By on September 3, 2019

1974 Lincoln Continental Mark IV in Denver junkyard, LH front view - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsBig, Detroit-made Malaise Era personal luxury coupes still keep showing up in the big self-service wrecking yards, more than 35 years after the last one rolled off the assembly line. Yes, the diminished-expectations Mark VI, the “What Oil Crisis?” Mark V, and the rococo Mark IV— examples of each of these will appear in your local U-Wrench yard from time to time.

Here’s a worn-out Mark IV from the year of Nixon’s resignation and Haile Selassie’s banishment from his throne in a lowly Beetle, now awaiting The Crusher in a Denver yard.

1974 Lincoln Continental Mark IV in Denver junkyard, front seats - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsIt’s dirty and rusty and doesn’t smell so good, but you can still make out vestiges of the swank this car once possessed. I’m sure some bitter tears will flow from Sajeev’s eyes when he sees these two-tone leather seats. This car appears to have the prestigious Gold Luxury Group option package, which included a moonroof with gold glass and gold shag carpeting.

1974 Lincoln Continental Mark IV in Denver junkyard, clock - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsI already have a genuine Cartier (not really made by Cartier) clock from a Mark IV, so I didn’t buy this one.

1974 Lincoln Continental Mark IV in Denver junkyard, 460 engine - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsEngine power levels dropped significantly starting in 1971 as federal emissions regulations kicked in, and this 460-cubic-inch (that’s 7.5 liters, for those of you who don’t use Freedom Volume Units) V8 produced a mere 220 horsepower. The respectable 355 lb-ft of torque sufficed to move the car’s 5,362 pounds well enough, though.

1974 Lincoln Continental Mark IV in Denver junkyard, rust - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsNot much Midwest-style wheel well rot here, but the vinyl roof (standard equipment on the ’74 Mark IV) trapped rain and snow and allowed some pretty nasty rust to take hold. This could have been fixed, but it wouldn’t have been worth the investment.

1974 Lincoln Continental Mark IV in Denver junkyard, shag carpet - ©2019 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsHere’s the exquisitely middle-1970s deep shag carpeting, which would have been just the thing to put a Mark IV owner in the mood to hear the biggest schmaltzy hits of 1974. I’d like to think that the original owner of this car preferred the better music of that year, but we’ll never know.


If you were buying a luxury car for resale value in 1974, the Mark IV was your best choice.


The ’74 Town Car looked pretty plush, too.

If you like these junkyard posts, links to more than 1,700 of them may be found at The Junkyard Home of the Murilee Martin Lifestyle Brand™.

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81 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1974 Lincoln Continental Mark IV...”


  • avatar
    dividebytube

    “My name’s Frank Cannon, I’m a private investigator.”

    I’m still amazed that 5000 pound luxury coupes were “a thing”. Even the Ford LTD, as driven by Barnaby Jones, was an odd package as a coupe.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    No 8-track tape player??
    First owner cheaped out!!

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    It’s amazing how little power those giant V8s put out after the regulations kicked in, but I guess these weren’t meant to go fast anyway. Just a big luxurious living room on wheels. Great cross-country car :)

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Americans talk horsepower but drive torque.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Whatever that really means

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          It means that you can market anything to people who can’t understand what a multi-ratio transmission does.

          220 net horsepower is probably in the neighborhood of 300 gross horsepower. Pre-emissions control Detroit luxury cars typically had around 350 gross horsepower, so it wasn’t the massive reduction from 1970 that it might seem like at first glance. Unfortunately, the 5-mph impact bumper regulations introduced in the same era added a few hundred pounds to the cars just as they lost power from low compression unleaded-fuel engines and emissions controls. 4,500 lbs/260 net hp v. 5,000 lbs/220 net hp meant power to weight ratios that were 30% worse than a couple years earlier.

        • 0 avatar
          Steve S.

          Here is a primer about torque, as it relates to engines.

          https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a15347872/horsepower-vs-torque-whats-the-difference/

  • avatar
    ravenuer

    My, how the mighty have fallen……

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    First video (0:20-0:28):

    – Either that model doesn’t know how to drive, or there is way too much play in the steering.

    – The visible exhaust cloud is a nice touch.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      recirculating-ball steering boxes got loose and sloppy after about 6 microseconds of use.

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        BMW, for one, used to offer some recirculating ball set-ups that offered good feel and relatively quick response. (I haven’t driven the contemporary recirculating ball Mercedes.)

        You’re not wrong, but I think what ToolGuy is seeing also is the result of a design criterion that a 95-pound, 95-year-old widow be able to turn the Mark IV’s steering wheel with the absolute minimum of strain on her muscles and bones.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          I used to be friends with a multi-time president of the BMW CCA. He claimed that he only liked BMWs with recirculating ball power steering.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            Interesting. FWIW, I preferred the steering in my family’s E28 (recirculating ball) to that in a friend’s E90 and F30 (rack & pinion). The latter two were both xDrive; maybe the RWDers are a little better. A fairly narrow frame of reference, I admit, but I remember feeling let down by the newer cars.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Yes the Mark IV is the epitome of one finger on the wheel steering.

    • 0 avatar
      CaddyDaddy

      “The visible exhaust cloud is a nice touch.” Accelerator Pump stroke setting to aggressive and prob. made worse by the awful Altitude Compensating Carburetor.

      460s get a bad wrap because they were implemented during the darkest of the smog years. By the mid 90’s, 460s were formidable big blocks that made more HP and torque, albeit diminished fuel economy, than their 7.3L oil burning forced air alternatives.

      Super Shuttle in their E-Series vans had no problem getting over 500,000 miles out of their fleet before rebuilds.

      There is a reason you never saw GM vans in a super shuttle fleet.

      • 0 avatar
        Steve S.

        Ford engines had their camshaft timing retarded about 6 degrees in the ’70s. Replacing the timing set with one from a pre-emissions 429 is worth about 30 horsepower on this engine.

  • avatar
    Blackcloud_9

    Given the sheer length of the hood, I’m always surprised how crowded the engine bay looks.

  • avatar
    RedRocket

    The ’74 Maverick/Comet Luxury Decor Option model had the exact same shag carpet. They had the same rust too, and a lot sooner. 1970s Fords were really pretty awful in that respect.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      IIRC that’s when they tried using s**t recycled steel. we had a ’73 Cougar in the family; it was bought brand new and yet by ’77 it had perforations and structural rust.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Ford lost a class action ‘rusty Ford’ lawsuit, which is probably the main reason why you see so few 1970’s era ‘common’ Fords around.

        But I am not sure that Lincolns were impacted the same way.

      • 0 avatar
        1500cc

        I’m fairly certain that all automobiles are still produced using partially recycled steel. Overall something like 2/3s of new steel coming out of mills is sourced from recycled materials. It’s in the car manufacturing processes (e.g. coatings) where the improvements in corrosion resistance have been made since the 70s.

      • 0 avatar
        Steve S.

        That’s pretty typical of all cars of the era 1950s-1980s.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    IIRC ’71 was when they started phasing in SAE net (“real world”) horsepower ratings. That’s when we started seeing how grossly inflated the previous SAE gross hp ratings were; per Chrysler’s own literature the “425 horsepower” 426 Hemi only put out 350 as installed in the vehicle. no wonder that it was fairly well known the (330 net hp) 440 6-bbl could walk a Hemi on the drag strip.

    ’72 was when the new emissions limits went into effect. GM started dropping compression on their engines in ’71 due to a corporate mandate to run on lower octane (lower lead) fuel.

    • 0 avatar
      -Nate

      Don’t forget that most manufacturers also retarded the cam timing by 3 degrees, this cleaned up the emissions at great loss of power and fuel economy .

      One of the easiest ways to wake up your malaise era boat was to replace the cam shaft with the pre 1969 version .

      All they did was move the woodruff key’s slot 3 degrees and bingo ~ reduced emissions .

      Some brands did it by altering the slot in the cam chain sprocket .

      -Nate

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Yeah not hard to uncork lost HP and torque.

        I would have loved to get my hands on a clean mid 70s sedan with a big block and work those little tricks on it plus a TBI. Stick new modern catalytic converters on it and it would likely be almost as emissions clean as factory.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        Depending on the construction of the cam sprocket, you could just make your own slot elsewhere on the sprocket, advanced to the “old” timing, and figure out how to index it. If the sprocket has an even number of teeth then make the new slot not quite 180 degrees out and maybe make an index mark exactly 180° from the original one… not much math required. Just make sure your new slot is advancing the timing, not retarding it further.

        The above advice is for off-road use only in the state of California.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          A cam sprocket will always have an even number of teeth. It must have twice as many as the crank has since it needs to spin at exactly 1/2 of crank speed. So either odd or even on the crank x2 will be an even number.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            Right you are, sir!

            I think I originally typed that as “about 30 or 40 teeth,” then I changed it before I posted it. Looks like I should have edited it one more time.

            Ideally, the number of teeth on the crank sprocket is a prime number, and the number of teeth on the chain is an odd number that is also not a multiple of the number of teeth on the crank sprocket. This spreads the wear evenly between all teeth and chain links. (Or timing belt teeth, as the case may be.)

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            Or, just get an offset “shuffle” woodruff key .

            I don’t trust them but many older Hot Roddrs use them to dial in the cam Just So .

            -Nate

        • 0 avatar
          Steve S.

          Easier to just get a new timing set for a pre-emissions version of the particular engine. Usually they need a new one anyway because of chain stretch.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        (editing window closed)

        Small changes in valve timing also affect fuel economy and ping. Advancing the cam a few degrees opens the exhaust valves a bit sooner BBDC and wastes some of the energy because it effectively shortens the power stroke (makes your mileage worse). It also closes the intake valves a bit sooner ABDC, which at off-idle rpms tends to keep more of the intake charge in the cylinder (it would otherwise puff a bit of it back into the intake manifold). That effectively raises the compression, again only at low, off-idle rpm, but this can reduce the detonation margin and make the engine ping more easily when you’re lugging it.

        Just some neat to know stuff about tinkering with old engines.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Noooooooooooooo! Forget CAFE, emission and safety standards, I would support however legislates that all Mark IV’s must be preserved.

    Just 2 weeks ago, I while driving two engineering students to a seminar, I spotted a Mark IV, this very colour tucked into a body shop, I wheeled into the parking lot to let them look at the type of vehicle they had never and may never experience. Both students were quite frankly in awe of the ‘rococo’ luxury that it still exuded. The long hood, the chrome, the thick carpeting. If someone were to electrify/hybridize these vehicles, I think that they would have a line-up of customers.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I really do think that there is a market out there for battery-electric restomods. Old powertrains tend to be stinky (as we see here) and also fiddly to maintain. Put in an electric drivetrain and old cars would get easier to live with.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        EV West is here for you. Mostly they do Euro lightweights with removable tops because that’s obviously more fun, but in between the hilariously overpowered Porsche 914s and Fiat Spyders they do some less obvious EV conversions.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        EV West is here for you. Mostly they do Euro lightweights with removable tops because that’s obviously more fun, but in between the hilariously overpowered Porsche 914s and Fiat Spyders they do some less obvious EV conversions.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Is Billy Batts in that trunk?

    On an unrelated note, the cast iron reservoir for the brake master cylinder- I’d forgotten about those. They are a reminder just how careless the domestics used to be about weight before the fuel crisis

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Batts was in the trunk of a Grand Prix, but yeah…

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Cast iron for a brake reservoir seems like a high attention to detail to me. I wish we could go back to that high material quality of craftsmanship in the individual components making up cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      It wasn’t being careless about weight, it was being cheap if anything since an aluminum one would have cost more.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        I’m going to respectfully disagree with both of you, Scoutdude and Hummer, about the craftsmanship or low cost of a cast iron brake fluid reservoir. They could have made it out of stamped metal like a lot of valve gallery covers of the era (then again, a lot of those were also cast).

        It’s only a small detail of the car, but it’s another case of that’s how they’d always done it and nobody gave it much thought or even noticed.

        I still have a fondness for cars built this way- they’re from a different time and that makes them special, their greatness and their flaws.

  • avatar
    subuclayton

    Agree it seems like a crime to make a giant pancake out of this car. Doesn’t somebody need a bumper or grill off a Mark 1Y Continental? He could buy this one and pay more for it than the guy who junked it received for the whole car.

    Cars like this will be lost forever unless the parts are available to restore them.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    Oversized underpowered motors, emissions controls that made cars balky warming up and some models even when warmed up, opera windows, vinyl roofs, rhinoceros chrome bumpers, exterior styling inspired by by castles, interiors decked out like plush bordellos.
    With some exceptions, the 70’s were truly a dark age for cars.

  • avatar
    Featherston

    Here’s an interesting Mark III, IV, and V episode of My Classic Car. I find it very surprising that Dennis Gage and Rick Schmidt seem to conclude that the IV actually is the best of the three, at least in terms of how it drives. Conventional wisdom would be late ’60s car > early ’70s car.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KdSziIIs6t8

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Having extensive ‘wheel time’ behind all 3 I strongly concur that the Mark IV was the best and the nicest looking.

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        “Ask the man who drove one.” :-)

        Your take makes sense given this insight from Ate Up with Motor: “The sheer size of the [Mark III] caused considerable strife with Lincoln-Mercury engineers, leading to an unsuccessful attempt by Lincoln-Mercury chief engineer Burt Andren to trim 4 inches (102 mm) from the car’s prodigious front overhang in the interests of better weight distribution. Ash steadfastly refused to alter the design and Bordinat went over Andren’s head to ensure the design would go forward unmolested.”

        I would imagine that the Mark IV was a more collaborative effort between styling and engineering, which allowed engineering to do more good on the ride/handling front.

        I have only the vaguest recollection of riding in back of a late relative’s Mark IV. He was a Whiz Kids era Ford exec, and a triple black example was his last car. Like them or not, his example had presence in spades – not an angry-looking car, but vaguely menacing in that color scheme.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I agree, the Mark IVs were the best

    • 0 avatar
      ToolGuy

      Featherston,

      Thank you for posting that video – gave me a lot to think about.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    I just saw one of these for sale yesterday, in Hartville, Ohio. Dark red, looked to be in pretty good condition. Didn’t stop to see the price though. On Rt. 43, just south of downtown.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Was it red or an absolutely gorgeous maroon, with a silver vinyl roof and silver ‘scooped’ wheel covers?

      If so it may be the most revered of all beasts, the Pucci edition.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        Maroon sounds right. I thought the top was white, but it could have been silver. I was kind of blinded by the chrome, and I didn’t notice the wheels.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        I think if that specimen here WOULD have been a Pucci Edition, Mr. Dailey here would move Heaven and Earth to acquire it, especially if the body was cleaner than this example. (Although that interior doesn’t look all bad, all things considered.)

        One thing I’ve wondered: the LTD dash was the same from 1973-1978, before the advent of the Panthers; the LTD coupe went to the multiple-window look in 1975 when the grille went large and the headlights on the top-trim Landaus were covered. Is the IP and dashboard of the Mark IV the same as the Mark V? It’d make sense, but I’ve never gotten a definitive answer on that.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Bought a lottery ticket tonight, so let’s see.

          You really have me wracking the old brain cells (or what is left of them) regarding the IP’s. And I don’t want to misinform.

          But I believe there was a redesign from the Mark III to the Mark IV but that the Mark V at least originally had a similar IP?

  • avatar
    CammerLens

    My father’s midlife-crisis car was a 1974 Mark IV Cartier Edition. Silver with maroon plush interior. My dad got it the day my parents’ divorce was final. He called it his “lead barge.” He went into the ownership experience a die-hard Ford loyalist, but emerged in 1985 or so a broken man. “Every system on that car failed at some point,” he said. “Every single one.” He replaced it with a Mazda RX-7. For a veteran of the Pacific War to make the transition to a Japanese-made car speaks to the psychological trauma inflicted by that troublesome Lincoln.

    About the only component that never broke was the 460 Ford engine. I remember swapping the factory Thermo-Quad (or maybe it was some iteration of Autolite — I can’t recall for sure) for a spread-bore double-pumper Holley that I got at a swap meet for $20. It really woke the engine up, although correcting the baked-in 4º cam retard would have helped even more.

  • avatar
    STS_Endeavour

    My first car ride ever was in a ’74 Mark IV – being driven home from the hospital I was born at. Black on black, it looked great over the years – even when the name Lincoln was no longer popular. It would soldier on for the family until I used it in college. I replaced it with a shiny-new green ’93 Thunderbird and stored the mighty 4 in a barn on my dad’s ranch. My dad wound up giving it away to the Salvation Army.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I might be in the minority but I always liked these along with the other big Lincolns and Cadillacs of this era. Gas was cheaper and these were some very comfortable highway cruisers. True things are different today but it was nice while it lasted. I miss the choice in interior colors, carpet that was actually real carpet and not plasticky astro turf, real velour and cloth interiors and not ones made from recycled 2 liter pop bottles, and real V8 engines instead of turbo charged small displacement engines that are many times teamed with CVT transmissions. I realize this is the past but this car represents some of the things that I miss about the 70s but those times are gone for good.

  • avatar
    thx_zetec

    I like some of the old big iron (72 Electtra, Plymouth Fury) but these things were really pigs. Besides being huge, heavy, ugly, sucking gas unreliable, they didn’t even have that much interior room. About the most space inefficient ever.

    You should have shown the engine bay from a little farther away – you’d be able to see the 2.5 foot of added, useless front overhang.

    A Chevy caprice of same year better in every way.

    OK a few good things
    * no center screen infotainment
    * knob controls
    * does not have ultra-low profile tires
    * large trunk
    * Alloy wheels (the right alloy . . . iron + carbon!)

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      @ thx_zetec: I could not disagree more. I had a fully loaded 1975 Caprice Classic coupe and it was inferior to the Mark IV in every way imaginable, except perhaps back seat room and trunk space.

      And the Mark IV was a luxury PLC, so neither were a priority.

      My Old Man wouldn’t even drive the Caprice after taking it out for one spin when I brought it home. And the Chev was only 6 months old when I got it, with minimal miles.

      The Mark was also superior to the 1977 Caprice that was my mother’s that although a good car for the era was inferior to the Mark for all but ‘family’ duty.

      I also briefly had a 1975 Dodge Coronet and it wasn’t even in the same galaxy as the Mark.

      Nor was my 1977 Grand Prix SJ. The Mark IV was better in every single way.

      The Mark IV was also superior to the 1977 Eldorado, we had.
      The 1973 Sedan de Ville that was my girlfriend’s father’s car or the 1972 Chrysler Newport that my training partner drove. And I had extensive time in all of those vehicles.

      When it comes to the Brougham Era the Mark IV was the ‘Daddy’. I never experienced or found a vehicle of that era that was better at what it was supposed to be than the Mark IV.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I also miss bench seats with fold down armrests and spare tires which are not offered on many of today’s new vehicles as a weight reduction. These cars were not that unreliable unless you compare them to 2019. They required more frequent maintenance but much of it you could do yourself and you could actually afford to buy a new car instead of mortgaging your first born. Technology has improved most of our lives and has made vehicles last longer but then technology has made vehicles more complex. I am not saying that the past was better but there were somethings that were better in the past and somethings that are much better today. By standards of the 70’s this was a true luxury car much more luxurious than the BMW or Mercedes of that time and these were cars that one aspired to which is more than a lot of today’s so called luxury cars which are not a lot more premium than the loaded versions of the non luxury brands. Maybe most of us have moved on from the 70s but that doesn’t mean that we cannot enjoy a rare sighting of these vehicles and reading these Junkyard Finds.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      @JeffS: well said. People aspired to Lincolns and Cadillacs in the early and mid 1970’s.

      When an acquaintance of My Old Man showed up in a brand new 5 Series he was lambasted for driving something so small, and austere. He got rid of it after a few months. BMW’s were viewed more as Saab competitors not ‘luxury’ cars.

      Audi wasn’t even a consideration.

      Driving a Lincoln or Cadillac demonstrated that you had ‘made it’. They had ‘gravitas’. And large men of a certain age could fit into them comfortably, light up a big cigar and ‘waft’ down the road, in luxurious silence.

      You are also correct that nothing beats a 60/40 split front bench with thick tufted velour upholstery for seating comfort. I am too ‘wide’ to fit into ‘Recarro style’ seats.

      As to reliability, they were about as good as any vehicle available at the time, perhaps more so. I drove a Mark IV very hard, including a non-stop from Toronto to Florida with nary a problem.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        “Driving a Lincoln or Cadillac demonstrated that you had ‘made it’. They had ‘gravitas’. And large men of a certain age could fit into them comfortably, light up a big cigar and ‘waft’ down the road, in luxurious silence.”

        This made me laugh because there is so much truth in it. It’s both an aspirational picture of the era and a caricature of it at the same time.

        (Nowadays I wonder if picture of such opulence is a land yacht SUV that barely fits in the handicap spots at WalMart- the occupants climb down, waddle over to an electric scooter, and pour themselves into the the catbird seat.)

  • avatar
    427Cobra

    when I was a kid, my best friend’s dad got a new 1976 Buick Electra Park Avenue Limited. Gold… tan vinyl roof… tan interior… wire wheels… fender skirts. It was huge… pillar-less windows… deep-pile carpeting, & heavily-padded velour seats that you sank down into… I was SOOOOOO jealous. It was the shizzle.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    “(Nowadays I wonder if picture of such opulence is a land yacht SUV that barely fits in the handicap spots at WalMart- the occupants climb down, waddle over to an electric scooter, and pour themselves into the the catbird seat.)” JimC2

    True but may I add a large crew cab F series with a Power Stroke or a Ram Cummins diesel both with heated and cooled leather seats and every bell and whistle imagined.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Arthur Dailey–I remember my mother after raising 3 sons and having a late life baby girl deciding she had enough of station wagons and finally got a 72 metallic turquoise Sedan Deville with a white vinyl roof. She was so proud of that car and it drew plenty of attention. I never owned a Lincoln or a Cadillac but I do remember them well in their salad days and the attention that they drew. I always liked the Lincoln Marks and they represented the best in an American personal luxury cars. Today you can see a late model Cadillac or Lincoln sedan and it hardly draws any attention. That is not to say they are bad but they are far from being unique and the Lincoln could easily be mistaken for a Ford. Even most Mercedes and BMWs are not as unique as they once were. Blob like vehicles with a turbo 4, Billy Bass grills, tiny slits for headlights, and thick pillars are not that unique whether they wear a luxury badge or not and whether they are German, Japanese, South Korean, British, American, or Chinese.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    @JimC2 and JeffS: comments like yours are what keeps me coming back to TTAC. Regardless of personal beliefs/politics, there are some darn smart and/or entertaining postings.

    Agree 100% regarding how modern cars look so much alike. My wife a few months ago from the back quarter was unable to determine the difference between an F-Pace and a Rogue.

    There was a time when each manufacturer’s vehicles were distinct. The ventiports on Buicks, the ‘hawk nose’ on Pontiacs, the round tailights on Chevs, each had their own style.

    When a Mark IV was in coming at you, there was no other vehicle that you could mistake it for, or when it was ahead of you with its continental tire hump, even from the side with its long hood, half-vinyl roof, opera windows and coach lights.

    Perhaps the advent of electric or hybrid cars will allow designers to once again claim their place ahead of engineers and their enslavement to MPG figures, and create unique designs?


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