By on September 27, 2019

best wheel chocks

From time to time, TTAC will highlight automotive products we think may be of interest to our community. Plus, posts like this help to keep the lights on around here. Learn more about how this works.


The signature characteristic of any gearhead worth their 5W30 is their ability to wrench on a vehicle or hitch up a trailer. Either of these activities generally necessitates the chocking of one or more wheel, lest the whole thing get out of control faster than a Vegas after-party.

As you’ll learn, there are more to wheel chocks than simple wedges of rubber or plastic that go jammed between a tire’s tread and terra firma. While this type of accessory isn’t generally thought of until it is needed, the level of innovation and array of products suggest that there are plenty of designers and engineers giving wheel chocks plenty of thought indeed, even if they don’t rank too high on our personal top 40.

(Editor’s note: As noted above, this post is meant to both help you be an informed shopper for automotive products but also to pay for our ‘90s sedan shopping habits operating expenses. Some of you don’t find these posts fun, but they help pay for Junkyard Finds, Rare Rides, Piston Slaps, and whatever else. Thanks for reading.)


1. Editor’s Choice: Jade Active Premium Rubber Wheel Chocks

jade active premium rubber wheel chocks

Your author freely admits he was the type of kid who needed to have his mittens tied to his jacket lest they wind up in the dark recesses of school’s Lost & Found. This may have infuriated his parents but has taught him as an adult to keep track of his things. It’s also one of the reasons I chose these chocks as my pick for this post.

Made from durable and robust rubber that should be far stronger than plastic chocks, they are tethered together with a stout length of rope. Slip, weather, and oil resistant, these chocks are built to put up with heavy usage. Their 4.2 lb weight means they are more likely to stay in place than lighter units and measure about 8 inches long by 4 inches high.

Pros: Durable, heavy, and tethered

Cons: Cheaper options exist

Shop Now


2. AFA Tooling Heavyweight Wheel Chock

afa tooling nylon reinforced wheel chocks

Here’s a set of four wheel chocks made of reinforced nylon that’s ribbed for her pleasure to provide extra grip. Double reinforced eyebolts allow them to be staked into surfaces such as dirt and gravel roads in a bid to make doubly sure your car or RV isn’t going anywhere. Or, y’know, you could use the eyelets and a bit of rope to tie the things together.

At 5 Inches wide, 8 Inches long, and 4 Inches high, these wheel chocks provides a strong force that – according to the seller – “beats gravity” and stops potential dangerous rolling accidents. Hey, betcha didn’t think you’d be able to defy the laws of physics for just forty bucks, did you?

Pros: Those eyelets, sold in sets of four

Cons: Not solid rubber

Shop Now


3. X-Chock Wheel Stabilizer – Pair

x-chock wheel stabilizer

Here’s an interesting solution, proving that bright minds inhabit every single part of the automotive spectrum. Instead of jamming a rubber or plastic triangle wedge between your tires and the ground, use this x-wing of a device to apply opposing forces to tandem tire applications. Science!

The seller asserts this design is better because it works with the tires’ natural movement instead of against them. Sold in pairs, they weigh 5 pounds each and have a rust inhibitive coating applied from the factory. A plated ratchet wrench is included so you can deploy these things without having to bring along your entire toolbox.

Pros: Innovative design, makes the laws of physics work for you

Cons: Will be tough to remove if rust appears

Shop Now


4. Elasco Aviation Industrial Wheel Chock

elasco wide wheel chock

Anyone who’s been on a plane has seen these things on the ground, generally flung around by harried ground crew while corralling an Airbus A220. It is entertaining that these things are available for purchase by the general public. Hey – if they’re trusted to hold a Boeing in place, they’ll surely anchor your Super Duty.

Abrasion-resistant polyurethane construction is designed for longevity and durability. This is a fair assertion, as that type of stuff can withstand chemicals and will not rot or deteriorate outdoors like rubber or plastic. Three widths are available, up to a massive 45 inches, and these suckers also glow in the dark.

Pros: Weight provides plenty of security, enormous size, fantasies of plane ownership

Cons: Bucks deluxe

Shop Now


5. Esco Pro Series Wheel Chock

esco safety yellow pro series wheel chock

Ever wonder how they keep those enormous pieces of mining equipment from rolling away and crashing into a tour bus full of disabled schoolchildren? Sticking with the silly and extreme, we present this safety chock for construction gear. It has an 800,000 lb maximum weight capacity, or about the same payload as your author’s lunchbox.

Despite this level of stout, the seller alleges the whole thing only weighs 41 pounds, meaning burly workers can grab onto its handle and fling it in the bed of a service truck on their way to a call. It is said that this chock can work with tires up to 165 inches, a size just smaller than the wheels offered on the new SilverRam-150 Argon Diamond Uranium pickup truck planned for 2020.

Pros: Earth-stopping chocking power, great party piece

Cons: Costs more than my last three derby cars combined

Shop Now


6. Camco Yellow RV Wheel Stop with Lock

camco wheel stop large with lock

Back in the real world, it seems the makers of those metal x-wings above aren’t the only ones using gravity to their advantage. These large wheel stops also go wedged between tandem wheels, preventing movement while parked or during re-hitching. This example includes a padlock for a measure of security but, really, if someone wants to defeat them they could do so with a well-placed sledgehammer strike.

Still, it’s an innovative solution to a common problem. Its design incorporates an easy grip handle so users aren’t fumbling the units because you just know it’ll be raining and dark when it comes time to deploy these or any other wheel chocks. Lightweight and compact, these things are easily tossed in a glovebox or in underseat storage.

Pros: Easy to store, uses the magic of opposing force

Cons: Lock is more of a deterrent than theft-prevention

Shop Now


7. BAIJIAWEI Heavy Duty Solid Rubber Wheel Chock

baijiawei heavy duty large solid rubber wheel chock

Made of 100% recycled rubber, these chocks are definitely not of the cheap plastic variety found on the shelves of some major retailers. Their dimensions of 10”x 6”x 7.3” mean they’re a great size for arresting the movement of a vehicle or trailer while it is parked in a driveway or parking lot.

Their black and yellow high-vis styling choice amuses your author as it reminds him of a bumble bee (I’m actually 9 years old, not 39, folks). Robust grippers mean you can be sure the non-slip rubber traction pad on the bottom side will keep the chock in place. Handles are baked in to the anterior side as well.

Pros: Non-slip bottom surface, made of solid rubber

Cons: Weird color pattern

Shop Now


8. Camco Basic Wheel Chock

camco wheel chock

You know the cheap plastic chocks I was making fun of just one selection ago? Yeah, these are the ones. Look, I get that there may be an occasion when a quick fix is need but these things definitely aren’t made for long term use. Priced less than a burger and fries, these hard plastic chocks are at least sold in pairs.

It’s important to note that the seller says these items are designed to work with tires up to 26 inches in diameter, which excludes almost everything bigger than a 15-inch wheel. A tire measuring just 205/65R15, for example, has a total diameter of 25.5 inches. Still, most utility trailers have very small tires and that is the market to which this product is targeted.

Pros: Cheap, lightweight

Cons: Only good for small applications

Shop Now


[Images provided by the manufacturer.]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

8 Comments on “(Don’t) Let ‘em Roll: Best Wheel Chocks...”


  • avatar
    JMII

    I use a brick plus a random wedge of wood for my boat trailer.

    I used another humble brick at the track too… but everyone laughed at me for using random building materials to hold back a $75K car. So now I have something similar to item #2. Mine don’t have the eyelets. They do have one small drawback – they smell terrible due to the rubber used.

  • avatar
    gtem

    Desperate times…

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    It helps having worked at an airport.

    I swear those big rubber chocks just followed me home one day.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    This is one of those things you buy at Harbor Freight, particularly when you have a coupon or they are on sale. It’s just a chunk of rubber so pretty hard to mess up, or fail.

  • avatar
    Deontologist

    So will TTAC accept liability when one of your cheap Chinese recommendations with bribed Amazon reviews fails?

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    It’s a wheel chock…if you are the sort that has to read reviews prior to this purchase, please, I beg you, don’t ever wrench on anything.

  • avatar
    Jeff Semenak

    The last time I could have used a wheel chock was in 1983. I was replacing the Clutch in my 1976 Pontiac Sunbird. Yes, the early version of the Holy 3800 Buick V-6. I had the front of the car on ramps but, the car wasn’t high enough to drop the Transmission. No problem, a few blocks under the front tires on top of the ramps! Problem, disconnecting the driveshaft would not keep the rear tires held. E-brake cables rusted thoroughly by Michigan road salt. Problem solved, a come-along attached to the front bumper and an upright beam for the pole barn I was working in. 3 Stooges Auto Repair but, it worked to fix the clutch.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Jeff Semenak: The last time I could have used a wheel chock was in 1983. I was replacing the Clutch in my 1976...
  • thejohnnycanuck: We just bought a manual hatch for the missus in that cool Smoked Paprika colour with the 18 inch...
  • Prado: There are things I don’t like about the current generation but overall I still consider it a good car....
  • Prado: Don’t dismiss the new Corolla with the 2.0 and 6 speed manual without at least a test drive. It is quite...
  • stevelovescars: This sounds like a good gimmick, but not a safe one given the average reliability of consumer...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States