By on July 8, 2019

When the new mid-engine, C8 Chevrolet Corvette finally debuts, it’ll be one of the most teased auto launches in history. While it seems like we’ve been talking about it forever, we still haven’t had a chance to take a look at the car without any camouflage. But since the internet exists, we don’t have to wait until the official unveiling later this month to check out unwrapped parts of the vehicle.

What you are seeing below (the break) is an Instagram post purporting to be the rear end of the new Corvette. It’s not the best quality of image, but we can see some key details that match up to the camouflaged version. We believe this to be an accurate picture. The exhausts, pushed all the way to the outside of the car, is one giveaway. The second is the rear spoiler that appears to curve down in the middle, following the lines of the decklid.

The rear taillights look a lot like the last-generation Camaro with hints of the current C7’s lights. It’s hard to tell from the photo if the black plastic rear vents are functional or if they’re just for show. That might vary depending on which engine is mounted amidships in the car.

General Motors hasn’t released specifics on the Vette but there is speculation that the base model will have a 6.2-liter V8 engine mated to a 7-speed DCT automatic. A manual transmission seems unlikely at this point, but anything is possible. Also expect Chevrolet to release higher-performance versions of the Corvette over time — versions like the Z06 and ZR1. A performance hybrid is also likely appear.

One thing for certain is that some Corvette fans aren’t going to appreciate the new look. Based on the uproar over the taillight change for the 7th-generation, you can already hear forum posters furiously typing about how this car isn’t a “real Corvette” and won’t sell. Still, it’s exciting to see this vehicle finally become reality. Hopefully we’ll have answers to most of your questions come the 18th of this month.

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54 Comments on “C8 Chevrolet Corvette Camo-less Rear End Leaked on Instagram...”


  • avatar

    Actually, given the anticipation and speculation for this since, oh, about 1970, this will be arguably the most “real” new Corvette since the ’63 split-window.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Real Corvette doesn’t mean much when you consider that the first one was a six cylinder, two speed automatic powered parade float on a chassis better suited to a truck. The question is whether or not it will meet the expectations of a sufficiently sized group of buyers. Time will tell, but I wouldn’t bet on it.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      It goes back to 1959:

      https://jalopnik.com/there-was-an-almost-forgotten-mid-engine-corvette-back-1825238888

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      True. This is the biggest thing since IRS, which came along with the C2 (1963).

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    you can already hear forum posters furiously typing about how this car isn’t a “real Corvette” and won’t sell…

    If it “doesn’t sell” I’d blame the 6 figure price tag as the point of entry. Part of the Corvette’s charm has been that it was a performance bargain compared to the 6 figure supercars.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      “it was a performance bargain compared to the 6 figure supercars.”

      Look at what the supercars cost now. Multiples of 6 figures. Even the Ford GT. If the 1000 hp hybrid version makes the cut, you can compare the Corvette against 7 figure hypercars.

      Maybe Cadillac could have a low-cost 4 cylinder variant that could be a Fiero replacement?

    • 0 avatar

      I’m afraid they will pull an NSX 2.0. Instead of an update and refresh they go so far that the result is an overpriced hot house flower…..so after a few great write ups, it mostly languishes….

  • avatar
    John R

    “One thing for certain is that some Corvette fans aren’t going to appreciate the new look. Based on the uproar over the taillight change for the 7th-generation, you can already hear forum posters furiously typing about how this car isn’t a ‘real Corvette’ and won’t sell.”

    Pffft. Whatevs. GM is going to sell every single one of these.

    • 0 avatar
      Matt51

      Maybe for 6 months until the novelty wears off.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      “GM is going to sell every single one of these.”

      At $100k (or more) a pop, how many of “these” will that be? What, 10,000 a year? Or 5,000? Less?

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I’d love to see what the yearly capacity for the Bowling Green Corvette plant is vs what the sales figures are. Whether GM “makes money” (which is all Mary B and the shareholders care about) will be closely tied to that figure.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          Why is everyone here so convinced that the base model will be $100K?

          It’s not as if the current Corvette shares a platform or many non-engine parts with other GM products. No economy of scale is being lost here, so what is inherently more expensive about a mid-engine design that requires doubling the base price?

          I’d be amazed if the opening price for a 1LT was anything above $64,999. I wouldn’t be surprised to see it at $59,999. By 2021 you’ll be able to buy a new one for $50K, just as you can now.

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            I’ve heard rumors of a $85k starting price. We’ll see what’s true once it’s available for sale.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      “GM is going to sell every single one of these.”

      I’ve never understood that phrase, was in the industry for 45 years and never saw new cars being scrapped. They always sold at some price.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      The (presumably) fake vents under the tail light are far more disturbing to me.

  • avatar
    Matt51

    GM is killing off its final remnants, Silverado and Corvette. You can’t fix stupid, I mean Mary Barra.

  • avatar
    webebob

    It is not the look, it is the motor hidden away, in a Chevy no less. The identical badge-engineed Buick Skyhawk, Chevy Monza, Pontiac Sunbird, and Olds Starfire of the ’75-’80 model years were equipped with a 3.8 liter V-6 that was very large for the size of the engine compartment on these small cars. The result was that, in order to change the spark plugs on the right bank of the engine, you had to disconnect the motor mounts, attach a chain hoist, and lift the engine at least a few inches in order to be able to access those plugs.

    After finding out how much extra a tune-up actually cost on these cars, a lot of owners opted to skip spark plug replacement–in an era when plugs needed to be changed every 12k-15k miles.

    For the current Corvette Chevy issued a 10 yr. secret warranty #17469 to 2014-2017 C7 owners to cover gas tank fuel senders that leak fumes or fuel, or both. But Chevrolet won’t fix the sender unless the owner reports fumes, or his house blows up when the tank leaks and no one is at home to smell the fumes. Why? The TSB advises the dealer it takes over 12 hours labor to perform the repair. And this is on a car with easy access to the engine! Having to drop the engine every time you need to change a fanbelt, sparkplug, perform maintenance or gasp, the Distributed Fuel Management system with 16 DFM lifters that fail, is going to be a financial nightmare to the owner when the warranty runs out. I once spent $300 in labor to replace one $30 hydraulic strut on a Porsche 993 frunk. Porsche mechanics put their kids through school every time a 911 engine drops; and i have no plans to repeat the short lived past mistakes of the 914, the X1/9, the Fiero, or the MR2. But since M.Barra’s first GM job out of college in 1985 was an engineer at a Pontiac Fiero factory; the hypothesis that some people never learn from their mistakes is proved.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      …For the current Corvette Chevy issued a 10 yr. secret warranty #17469 to 2014-2017 C7 owners to cover gas tank fuel senders that leak fumes or fuel, or both. But Chevrolet won’t fix the sender unless the owner reports fumes, or his house blows up when the tank leaks and no one is at home to smell the fumes. Why? The TSB advises the dealer it takes over 12 hours labor to perform the repair…

      Why is simple. First, this is not a “secret” anything. I received a notice in the mail regarding the “extended” warranty. But the reason is both the cost of the job and the way Corvettes are used. GM knows that many of the sportscars live pampered lives. All of those pampered cars (mine included) will likely make it past the 10 year timeframe before the sender lock ring fails. I’d be willing to bet that at least half of the production will exceed that time before any failure occurs. 12 hours times 50,000 cars is a lot of money. For those who use their Corvette as a daily and experience the failure, they will get the repair. So owners like myself are likely looking at a German-sized repair bill 8 or 10 years from now.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        So they’re taking advantage of your low use case to get away with selling you a car with an expensive defect that they won’t have to pay for fixing. I love it that you’re defending their position, which I think it is called the donkey punch. You’re a good GM customer.

  • avatar
    ajla

    If this really does start at $100K, I think it is a hard sell over Porsche’s offerings.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      If GM is foolish enough to price the base model at $100K they deserve to go out of business.

      As I said above, I can’t imagine this starting with anything higher than a 6.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    I’d have to see the car completely to get the entire context but from what I can see via the attached photo it looks very ersatz.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    Chevy dealers are going be doing MAP on the C8!

  • avatar
    MeJ

    Been holding off on an opinion on the styling but now I see the car looks very similar to the various renders out there. Too bad. I was hoping it would be better.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    If they can make this as fast around a track as the previous gen then hats off to GM…a real mid-engine Corvette…

    You tradition clutching teddy-bears and shove it.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Not a fan of the square exhaust pipes pushed so far to the edges. I’ve only had my C7 for a year so I’m not in the market for a C8… yet or maybe ever. One of the great things about the C7 is the hatch storage space. Also the access to all the greasy bits. My brother has a Boxster and I considered a Cayman but you can’t even see the engine much less work on it.

  • avatar
    Garrett

    I wonder how much HP the 2.0 turbo four will generate.

  • avatar
    MrIcky

    I’ve read a few complaints about the inaccessability of engine parts in the c8. I just don’t think that’s a realistic complaint anymore. The TTAC crew may be unusual, but I just don’t see many of the corvette owners I’ve met doing much work on their car.

    I’m going to make an assumption that the sparkplugs are probably 100k plugs- if they can put in good enough equipment like belts, etc. up front then you’ll probably have one pretty expensive scheduled service every 80k miles or 10 years, whichever comes first, and practically nothing but fluid changes in between. Now unscheduled services are something else, but lets just give them the benefit of the doubt on this- I don’t think it’s that big of a deal.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      This is a good post. The majority of owners won’t do anything more difficult than fluids, and the nature of a V8 design will make most things more accessible than a Porsche flat engine.

      The one thing I would be concerned about as a potential owner is the ease of installing aftermarket heads, cam, exhaust, etc. With that said, I don’t know how many owners even do this type of work anymore vs. having it done at a speed shop which should be equipped to handle whatever.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      Based on the available pictures it doesn’t look likely, but why not have the whole back of the body flip up like a Ford GT?. Integrate it into one assembly.

    • 0 avatar
      Tele Vision

      You just reminded me of an evening many years ago: my buddy pulled up next to my ’84 944 in his Mom’s new Audi S4, the one with the 5-valve heads and variable intake timing and twin turbos. It was an automatic, unfortunately, but still a very cool car. I stood at the front of the car and asked my friend to pop the hood, as I wanted to see how Audi had packaged all of this into this wee car. He grabbed the hood release; there was a noise – then the front grill fell down. No engine access. One could add washer fluid and check the oils and maybe change a headlight bulb but that was it. Bolted hood on that thing. Too bad.

  • avatar
    EX35

    Here’s to hoping GM puts C7s on firesale to make way for the C8.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I wonder when we’ll see the first picture of a mid-engine C8 wrapped around a telephone pole, driven by someone with more money than ability.

  • avatar
    mjg82

    It’s not a good sign that the taillights look like a sportier version of the Cruze sedan

    • 0 avatar
      James2

      Just a warning. This thing will have been designed by the same people who designed the new Silverado/HD, the Camaro refresh (which has been hurriedly refreshed itself), and various othr monstrosties.

      It might make the new Supra look like Miss Japan by comparison.

  • avatar
    The_Guru

    LOL wtf is this? Some squashed Honda Civic? Oh GM, just when I thought you couldnt go any lower(new trucks), here comes the new Vette to shatter that notion. Yikes.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Ching Chong, Guangzhou Motors (GM) Bring It On!

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Hideous Cruze-inspired rear end and automatic-only; the C8 is dead.

  • avatar
    Matt51

    GM is replacing their best car ever. Why?

  • avatar
    cprescott

    I’ll soon be crossing over the 60 year mark of life so my perspective of what a Corvette is and is not is pretty firmly entrenched. While the Corvette was never really affordable to the masses, it at least was close enough that people could aspire to own one and you had a solid vehicle that had its crude points but was clearly a Corvette viewed from significant distance.

    It is here where I have loathed the disaster that I call the “Shamvette” which is the C7 because it looks derivative of other automakers’ work and somehow has the audacity to claim enough Corvette hints and styling cues to be passed off as one. I find the C7 to be unremarkable and rather unattractive. The putridity of the rear end design on the C7 makes a mockery of the car. I know why it has those vents in the tail lights, but it seems someone forgot that styling is still important and executing the functionality like a five year old does not add a premium aroma to what we ended up seeing.

    The mid-engined Corvette has long been a pipe dream – the nirvana of the plastic car – yet somehow in the pursuit in the 1970’s, there was at least an attempt at styling and trying to include Corvette heritage in this. Right now I see a squashed Pontiac G6 coupe that had awful proportions – and there seems precious little styling acumen at least from the rear – so much going on there that this cannot be a limited example of what they have done to the rest of the car.

    Clearly now GM needs to build a Corvette to put back into the original market slot something that fulfills the legacy of Corvette without trying to be a Ferrari with tacky addons.

  • avatar

    Looks like GM applied its generic idea of what a rear-engine sports car should look like. Not good. Who’s doing the automotive styling anyway at GM? Look at what French PSA (Peugeot) did to formerly GM-owned Opel. A quick financial turnaround after Opel having hemorrhaged billions for decades, plus a spice up of the design.


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