By on June 19, 2019

In September of last year, the Michigan State Police conducted their 2019 Model Year Police Vehicle Evaluations. The purpose of these tests is to provide objective performance data to the individual agencies who are making purchasing decisions for their divisions.

For the automakers, it’s an all-out race for pride in being the superior bad-guy chaser. Ford hands off the title from their own 2018 3.5-liter EcoBoost Police Interceptor AWD (Taurus) sedan to their 2019 Police Interceptor Utility 3.0L EcoBoost AWD Explorer SUV.

It’s a first that an SUV has been fastest in the Police Vehicle Evaluations, but it reflects the change in market preference for SUVs over sedans. Part of the justification was – and is, for many agencies – that high-speed pursuit is unnecessary with the tracking capability that is in use today. For those that need it, Ford has taken their new rear-wheel-drive-based Explorer and provided a package that tops the performance charts while providing all the flexibility of an SUV package.

The Police Interceptor Utility 3.0L EcoBoost AWD Explorer SUV puts out 400 horsepower  and 415 lb-ft of torque from its twin-turbo V6. Transferred through a 10-speed automatic transmission and to all four wheels, the Explorer was over a second faster to 100 mph than the V8-powered Chargers, taking 13.59 seconds. Not that it’s practically usable in the real world, but top speed just edged the Chargers by 1 mph, hitting 150 mph.

In dynamics testing at Grattan Raceway, the EcoBoost Explorer averaged 1:36.47, beating out the Dodge Charger 5.7L AWD by 0.63 seconds. Dodge also brought Pursuit Durangos to the party, which lapped in an average of 1:42.70 in 5.7L trim. Ford’s additional two Explorer models were both handily faster around the road course, though. The 3.3L naturally-aspirated V6 Explorer posted a 1:39.96 average, while the Hybrid model did even better, with a 1:39.73.

Complete test results are available from the State of Michigan HERE.

It should be noted that this performance doesn’t come cheap, though. The 3.3-liter V6 model starts at $37,500, the hybrid at $41,000, and $42,000 for the 3.0L turbo, though fleet prices may vary. Pricing for the Charger ranges from $32,325 for the V6 RWD to $36,750 for the V8 AWD, while the Chevrolet Tahoe PPV 5.3-liter RWD stars at $42,765.

Now, as a bit of background, I have some first-hand knowledge of this process. I was formerly a Vehicle Dynamics Performance Engineer at FCA and worked on evaluation and development of pursuit models. What makes a pursuit model so is really based on the manufacturer’s definition. There are a myriad of pursuit-specific durability, functionality, and load-carrying requirements. But, from the 2019 MY MSP Police Evaluation Test Book, they state,

The manufacturers provide upcoming model year vehicles to both the MSP and Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department to be tested for suitability in their respective operations. Historically, successful results at both test sites have validated the manufacturers’ engineering efforts in building a car capable of handling the stress associated with police pursuits. Neither the MSP, nor the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, has the authority or credentials to award the term pursuit rated to any vehicle.

The MSP has performance criteria attached to its purchasing specifications. The criteria has historically been that a vehicle must accelerate from 0 – 60 mph in 9.0 seconds, 0 – 80 mph in 14.9 seconds, and 0 – 100 mph in 24.6 seconds. The vehicle must reach 110 mph in 4,838 feet and 120 mph in 8,985 feet. The vehicle must maintain an average deceleration rate of 25.79 ft./sec2 while performing twenty 60 – 0 mph threshold braking stops. The vehicle must also successfully complete all 32 laps of the Grattan Raceway dynamics testing without major component failure. Meeting these criteria does not certify a vehicle as being pursuit rated, rather it justifies a vehicle is capable of performing the job function the MSP requires in a police vehicle.”

The objective acceleration, braking, and top speed tests are conducted at FCA’s Chelsea Proving Grounds in Michigan, where I used to work, while the dynamics testing is conducted at Grattan Raceway in Belding, MI. The L.A. County Sheriff’s Department conducts a similar test on an infield road course at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, CA. I’ve been a part of multiple evaluations at both locations and can attest to the unique set of challenges that each test brings.

The highlight of the evaluations are certainly the dynamics testing. Each manufacturer spends considerable effort preparing their vehicles to survive the rigors of the 32-lap racetrack evaluation. Each vehicle is driven for eight laps by four separate drivers, with only 5 minutes of pause between evaluations. The five fastest laps for each driver are combined and averaged to provide a final score.

Before you think that these are beginner HPDE-style laps, believe me, they are not. The MSP and LACSD have a skilled set of drivers on hand. The lap times posted for all drivers were within 2-4 seconds of what this FIA Silver-rated driver could do. And that is without the benefit of having the intimate familiarity of how to get the most out of each particular car.

The evaluations are run with the cars in their default modes of electronic stability control on and the transmission in drive. No ESC deactivation or manual shifting is allowed, even if it’s available on the car. Therefore, a significant part of the racetrack performance comes down to calibration of the transmission and ESC.

If you’ve ever forgotten to deactivate a default ESC mode when on track or autocross, you know how restricting they can be. The baseline ESC calibrations end up being more like what you’d find in a sport mode of a performance street car. Based on the way one is driving, such as extended wide-open throttle, most of the vehicles will automatically convert to an aggressive powertrain strategy. They would maintain the lowest gear possible for maximum acceleration coming out of a corner, until extended coasting was detected. With 10 gear ratios to choose from, the Fords are likely realizing a significant performance benefit over the five-speeds that are carrying on in the Chargers.

While the going and turning is a big part of putting together a good lap time, one of the most difficult aspects to manage is braking performance. Thirty-two near-consecutive hot laps, with no mercy being offered to the brakes, takes significant engineering development to withstand. Pad materials are a science of their own. But, since there are so many systems competing for space and thermal expulsion, force-fed cooling is typically not an option. Air may be routed into the inner wheel well, but massive brakes are fitted to simply act as a heat sink to keep the fluid from boiling.

Lastly, it should be kept in mind that all the forces acting on these police package vehicles are being done so through all-season tires. They must survive the 32-lap flogging without chunking or delaminating, which is a tall order for these heavy vehicles that are not optimally set up for racetrack duty. The fact that so many are turning sub-1:40 lap times at Grattan Raceway should make you think twice before you try to outrun one. Speed and radios aside, chances are good that they’ll survive typical road hazards that would disable most quicker vehicles.

Now, if only FCA will bring their Redeye-powered Durango SRT Pursuit “Speed Trap” Concept to the 2020 Model Year Trials, the crown for fastest police package SUV just might change hands.

[Images: Ford, Michigan State Police, FCA]

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91 Comments on “The Fastest Cop Car is Not a Car...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Explorers make great cop cars and are all they use in the towns around me. I just worry that they may have an effect on “civilian” purchases much like the Crown Vics. Who wants to drive a cop car? Well, there’s that one weird guy who looks like Barney Fife

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      Crown Vics certainly have their third life among the bearded hipster types in SoCal. These guys seem to love sticking there sleeve-tattooed elbows in the eyeballs of everyone who does a double take in their rear view mirror….

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Didn’t Jack Baruth do an article on guys who got off on driving ex-cop cars? There was a term for it, and I don’t recall what it was.

      For a while, my younger brother had a ex-cop Crown Vic. He wasn’t *that* guy Baruth was talking about, but he was a “blue lives matter” booster, so I bet on some level, he was geeking out.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        We used to say they were, ahem, deficient in certain attributes

      • 0 avatar

        In the ham radio world, folks who think they are part of EMS or the PD are called “Whackers”. They have the vest, the radio, and the more extreme wear almost-uniforms…and yes, they drive the crown vic or equivalent. They have more antennas and radios though than actual cops.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Yep, “whackers” was the term Baruth used. Thanks, speedlaw.

          My brother didn’t have his Crown Vic all that long, and he didn’t “dress it up” with antennas or fake-cop stuff – it was just a plain old retired cruiser. He didn’t keep it very long, as I recall, but I’m sure it geeked him out a little tooling around in it.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      To be fair, just about *all* the Crown Vic was good for was police/civic duty; that’s how antiquated and compromised it was. However, the Explorer makes a handsome and (in nicer trims) upscale personal vehicle, which is appealing. So I don’t see it taking a hit just because it might become the de facto police interceptor or pursuit vehicle of choice.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      I wish it had a negative effect on civilian purchases. Cop cars should be very distinct from civilian versions. Explorers are too difficult to tell apart. Especially since the blackout packages are very popular. Slim LED lightbars that look like roof racks are even worse. Give me black and white crown vics with huge red and blue light bars.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    “Fix the cigarette lighter.”

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Can we finally admit the FCA LX platform has run its course, is outdated, and is in desperate need of a replacement?

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      Yes, the LX platform is old. This enables FCA to produce perfectly servicable rear drive full sized sedans (and coupes (Challenger)) for A LOT less money than their German competitors. Development costs were amortized years ago.

      Yes, FCA could dump a RAM longbed’s load of cash into a new large rwd platform, and sell a few dozen in this SUV crazed market. What is the point? I can’t envision how a 300C on a new platform will be a hot seller. Where you see “outdated” I see “Profitable.”

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        You’re absolutely right, but I wonder why they don’t at least update the interior. I took a look at a 300 but that dash was just a no-sale for me. Shame, because like you say, there isn’t much wrong with this car otherwise.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      That class of car is completely stone-cold dead. Replacing it with something new would just be lighting precious money on fire. FCA should just keep building the LX cars until they are no longer profitable and then exit that segment.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      Careful what you ask for, replaced by what? New sedans suck so much that even non car people have figured it out and given up on them. A new LX for 2020 would be 2000cc of forgettable buzz with A pillars that hit you in the head on the way in and out. Just like everything else. No thanks.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Call it old but it’s became one of the best cars money can buy. I’d much rather be driving a base no options Charger than any Nissan/Toyota/Ford/GM/Honda car on the market no matter how well they were optioned up.

      It desperately does NOT need to be replaced. Updated sure, replaced, hell no.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        ^^This

        It’s not that expensive to design new bodies on the same old platform. Car companies did it every year in the 50s and 60s

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          That was before modern crash standards, airbags, pedestrian safety, and other things.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Other than the small overlap test all of the Chargers safety ratings are Good, pedestrian safety is a bs measurement that should be rightly ignored, I don’t see an exact number of airbags in my quick search but I did see a list of airbag types in the car which add up to be 8, which is more than reasonable for a modern car.

            The Charger seems thoroughly modern to anyone unaware that it has been soldering around for 15+ years. The ride is good, the power is better than most competitors, the MPG is phenomenal; unless you need over 30+ MPG then it’s the best car on the market today for the money. GM doesn’t even make a car in any of its 4 divisions that would be a better value or overall car.

          • 0 avatar
            86er

            But are they reliable?

            That’s the common knock on Chryslers since, oh, as long as I can remember.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            According to the JD power survey, which granted is a useless measurement imo, Dodge as a whole scored pretty high.

      • 0 avatar
        Fordson

        OK with me – give Hummer the no-options Charger; I’ll take that new GT350R over there…

  • avatar
    R Henry

    Are you sure the Chargers are running 5 speeds? I thought ALL LX platorm cars run the ZF licensed 8-speeds.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Doesn’t matter how fast the cop is – you can’t outrun a radio.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      You can’t outrun a Motorola, but if you have the jump then you can take the first exit and with a little luck you can blend in.

    • 0 avatar
      lstanley

      And with a criteria that the police vehicle must accelerate from 0 – 60 mph in 9.0 seconds, you damn well need that radio.

      “Officer in pursuit of 2005 Subaru B9 Tribeca. Suspect is getting away, I can’t keep up.”

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    I guess I am a traditionalist – to me the Crown Vic just looks the part of “cop car.” However the other day I saw a police explorer splitting a couple lanes of stopped traffic; if that had been a crown vic or similar sedan, it would have been lost in a canyon of suvs. I have to think driving a charger or some sedan now would hamper visibility.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      I thought the Dodge Diplomat looks the part of a cop car… heck, the Polara looks the part to me.

      The Crown Vic looks the part mostly because we’re so used to seeing them. Well, that and the dog dish hubcaps are just the right touch…

  • avatar
    brn

    Didn’t Ford discontinue the PI Sedan for 2019? That’d be another reason it lost it’s crown.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    What the article fails to accurately mention is pricing.

    Even at state bid pricing, the new Explorer is outrageeously overpriced and a massive price increase from the last model:

    A state patrol in the upper mid-west just left Ford for Dodge due to pricing. Here is the state bid pricing breaks down:

    V8, AWD Charger – $23,600
    NEW Explorer (N/A V6, AWD, NON HYBRID) – $33,700

    2019 Explorer N/A V6, AWD – $28,500

    Ford is on crack and the new Explorer is garbage.

    • 0 avatar
      The_Guru

      LOL. So one place gets good pricing on an some old cars and suddenly the brand new Explorer is overpriced garbage. Because logic.

      EBFlex is on crack(lel) and the Charger is old garbage.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        What do you mean “some place gets good pricing on some old cars”?

        I am quoting state bid pricing for the state of Minnesota.

        And yes the Explorer is overpriced. Nothing about the new one justifies a $5,000 price increase. A price that will be paid for by taxpayers for agencies short sighted enough to buy the Explorer.

    • 0 avatar

      You are correct in that I only noted MSRP’s. I am aware that fleet pricing is much, much cheaper than the stated retail prices, but I was not able to readily get my hands on that info. Thanks for filling in.
      “It should be noted that this performance doesn’t come cheap, though. The 3.3-liter V6 model starts at $37,500, the hybrid at $41,000, and $42,000 for the 3.0L turbo, though fleet prices may vary. Pricing for the Charger ranges from $32,325 for the V6 RWD to $36,750 for the V8 AWD, while the Chevrolet Tahoe PPV 5.3-liter RWD stars at $42,765.”
      I don’t see how the pricing makes the new Explorer garbage, but it is worth noting the price difference. The Chargers are running on a much older platform with more basic running gear. The majority of their tooling has been paid off for years, allowing them to build and sell them for significantly less.
      If you have all of the police package fleet pricing, would you mind posting it, or emailing it to me at [email protected]?

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        The Explorer garbage comment is more based on their past history. Many, many issues with them in fleet applications.

        Yes the Charger is on an old platform but it works and works well. You can get all the modern tech inside, AWD, and V8 performance for CONSIDERABLY less than the others. Same for the Durango.

        As for the fleet pricing, I can tell you that it’s hidden pretty well and most states negotiate with the manufacturer. But I will dig and see what I can find for you. It may not be my state but for the most part, what an agency pays in one area of the country will be very similar in another.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          No states don’t negotiate with the mfg, and it can vary pretty significantly from area to area.

          In my state’s contract a 2019 Charger with the V8 and AWD will set you back $27,400. A 2020 Explorer with the base engine is $32,800, $36,102 if you want the Hybrid and if you want the fastest and quickest Police vehicle in the land that will set you back $36,841.

          But the fact is the Charger doesn’t really compete with the UI, the Tahoe is the more realistic competition and a 2020 will set you back $39,420 in the PPV 4wd form or $38,920 if you can get by with a SSV or $34,420 for a RWD PPV.

          Fact is initial purchase price is only part of the cost of operation equation. A friend of mine who is responsible for purchasing vehicles and equipment for a local city. He fell for Chrysler’s sales pitch for the Charger that thanks to its much lower price they would be cheaper overall than the Crown Vics they city used at the time. The next vehicles he purchased were Tahoes because the Chargers were expensive to keep on the road and while they were still more expensive than the Crown Vics they were cheaper than the Charger.

          When it comes time to surplus that Charger it will bring $5,000 if it is in good shape, while the last generation UIs will bring $10,000 or more.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “No states don’t negotiate with the manufacturers”

            One sentence later: “In my states contract…”

            My state does negotiate with the manufacturer. I didn’t say all states.

            And whoever does your negotiations needs to be fired. In a snow belt state that V8, AWD Charger is $23,600.

            And it is most certainly a competitor for the Explorer as it’s basically the only police vehicle Ford sells now. Nobody wants a POS Fusion or F-150 as a primary patrol vehicle in their fleet.

            The Charger is a fine car and likely much more reliable than the Fords. From trying to kill officers with CO to trying to induce crashes with faulty suspensions, to leaky AWD PTUs and clock spring and multi function switch issues, the Fords at my local PD have been garbage.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Yeah they don’t deal with the MFG they deal with a dealer, you know someone that can actually sell and deliver the vehicle.

            And no they don’t negotiate, a competitive bid process is what is required by state law and many other gov’t entities have similar rules.

            It is the Fleet dept manager at a given dealer that submits the bids. The winner for a specific model does sometimes change from year to year.

            For example one particular dealer group has stores with multiple mfgs, they won all the current Chevy and Subaru vehicles, but only a couple of the FCA vehicle contracts. In the past they did better on FCA with across the board wins in previous years.

      • 0 avatar
        Oberkanone

        Sent you an email with fleet pricing for state of Indiana.

        Note that no GM vehicles are on the menu.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        I sent you a link to my state’s current vehicle contracts. You can see all the pricing including options, packages and upfitting, from LSVs to Police Vehicles to HD trucks.

  • avatar

    Why Tesla does not provide cop cars? Tesla Model S or X would easily outperform all those ancient ICE cop cars/SUVs.

    • 0 avatar

      Do you think they could do 32 consecutive laps without significant time drop off?
      Also, how expensive are those, again?

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “Why Tesla does not provide cop cars? Tesla Model S or X would easily outperform all those ancient ICE cop cars/SUVs.”

      Because Tesla vehicles are garbage and police departments cannot afford to be down vehicles for months on end because nobody can fix a Tesla in a timely manner.

      Oh and they crash into fire trucks and burst into flames.

      • 0 avatar
        namesakeone

        That, and the Model S starts at $75,000. I have no idea how much apiece a fleet would cost. https://www.google.com/search?q=tesla+model+s+price&rlz=1C1EJFA_enUS739US748&oq=Tesla+Model+S+price&aqs=chrome.0.0l6.5344j1j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        ebflex: “Because Tesla vehicles are garbage”

        Plenty of cases where Teslas in commercial service are fine in the 300,000 to 400,000-mile-range. Lutz says the fit and finish is world class now – at least on the Model 3. Also, I’m not a fan of the current battery packs on the S and X. Would like to know more about those fires.

        “because nobody can fix a Tesla in a timely manner.”

        True and false. It depends on where you are located. In New England, we now have an excellent independent dedicated Tesla shop, so around here, service is better. The shop has even come up with Model S door handle rebuilds that are better than factory. From what I understand, Teslas are somewhat easy to work on.

        “because nobody can fix a Tesla in a timely manner.”
        Only if the cops are sleeping and on autopilot which would never happen… er, uh okay, maybe you have a point.

        “That, and the Model S starts at $75,000”
        That’s the biggest factor against it.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          You are wrong on everything you stated.

          Check out The Fast Lane Car on YouTube. Tiny fender bender and their garbage Model 3 has been down for a very long time and likely longer.

          They also talk about a guy who had to wait an amazing length of time for a simple lug nut.

          The company is a joke. And their quality is abhorrent. Every panel is misaligned among other things.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        ebflex: “Because Tesla vehicles are garbage”

        Plenty of cases where Teslas in commercial service are fine in the 300,000 to 400,000-mile-range. Lutz says the fit and finish is world class now – at least on the Model 3. Also, I’m not a fan of the current battery packs on the S and X. Would like to know more about those fires.

        “because nobody can fix a Tesla in a timely manner.”

        True and false. It depends on where you are located. In New England, we now have an excellent independent dedicated Tesla shop, so around here, service is better. The shop has even come up with Model S door handle rebuilds that are better than factory. From what I understand, Teslas are somewhat easy to work on.

        “Oh and they crash into fire trucks and burst into flames.”
        Only if the cops are sleeping and on autopilot which would never happen… er, uh okay, maybe you have a point.

        “That, and the Model S starts at $75,000”
        That’s the biggest factor against it.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      Because it was too expensive and range anxiety?

      Seriously, of all places Police is not the place you put an expensive EV in. Maybe other fleets, but not police.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      Among other things, many patrol cars will go for weeks without being shut off. EVs aren’t there yet.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    Good to have someone with a clue writing for TTAC, Mr Magagnoli. And writing well. Hope you hang around awhile, or is it just a gig?

  • avatar
    tylanner

    The Ecoboost is a major triumph for Ford…an enviable amount of power.

  • avatar
    Nick

    Raises an interesting question. The drivers for this evaluation are a skilled bunch but I’d like to know how much training the average metropolitan police officer or highway patrol officer gets.

    • 0 avatar

      My understanding is that these folks are essentially the trainers. I’d also be interested in learning more about the driver training programs that the average agency provides, as this is in line with my regular driver development work.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Officers are trained in pursuit driving for sure. I believe the highway patrol spends a good amount of time and resources on this. In past episodes of Mythbusters they would often work at such training facilities for car related myths that involved get-a-ways or other risky car maneuvers. Your average citizen has pretty much zero experience in these situations. Just watching LivePD you’ll see most chases end in a crash as a result. The officer has the superior vehicle and driving skills 90% of the time. Even when the criminal has the better vehicle they just can’t use it to its full potential on most roads due to traffic or weather. On a race track sure a Mustang is going to outrun an Explorer but going down mainstreet with potholes, curbs and puddles? Advantage cop.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        Some of the real chases are the people with the poor judgment to attempt a getaway usually have the driving skills to match their judgment.

        The corollary is that drivers who do have the driving skills to have a fighting chance don’t make bad life decisions to put themselves in that position.

        Traffic and road conditions are the great equalizer. You can see this in action if you’re ever competing with other cars to get ahead in traffic. The boy racers don’t usually get all that far ahead, or when they do then you can usually catch up with them by driving with smooth steering, gas, and brake inputs, driving with some patience, being able to read the traffic, pick a lane that is going to move better for the next couple minutes, drive smoothly, and be patient. Did I mention patience and smoothness? You’d think racing school coaches would emphasize those things- oh wait, they do!

        When I say boy racers I mean the ones who abruptly change lanes so that the car noticeably rocks on its suspension, the ones who constantly stab their brakes, the ones who don’t look much farther ahead than one or two cars in front of them. **Watch the getaway drivers on cop TV, the ones who crash usually drive like that.**

        The cops don’t always drive a lot better (adrenaline has a lot to do with that) but they only have to drive a little bit better. That’s fine. As long as the cop stays calm, is patient, and doesn’t crash, then he or she is going to win the chase.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I think the driver training is going to vary significantly from agency to agency. I know my State Patrol has a dedicated driver training facility that every officer attends. I know they will also rent the facility to other agencies, ie you bring your cars and instructors, or you can enroll your officers in their classes and use their cars. So yeah that small city with a small force and a tight budget may never do any driver training because they can’t afford it.

  • avatar
    Robbie

    An SUV…! I guess the hope is that any pursuit is straight line, and that nobody tries to outrun the cop car on a road with some turns in it?

  • avatar
    James2

    In HNL, I would guess 50-percent of the police cars are Tauri or Explorer –HPD bought a bunch in recent years, with the occasional Fusion Hybrid or Crown Vic still hanging around*– while 50-percent are subsidized, unmarked (except for the light bar) civilian cars, the Toyota 4Runner very popular among the cops.

    I’m guessing HPD has access to the MSP/LA test results, but that obviously didn’t resonate with the cops when buying their personal rides.

    *I’ve seen exactly one Toyota Camry and one Dodge Charger in HPD blue. Must have been an experiment.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Firestone&tireModel=Firehawk+GT+Pursuit&sidewall=Blackwall&partnum=455WR8FHGTP&tab=Sizes

    In case anyone wants those magic all season tires. $372.21 a piece from the Tire Rack. Taxpayers take note.

    • 0 avatar
      -Nate

      ? Are you aware that the municipal police departments get a large federal break in the cost of these and all police rated tires ? .

      They do ~ I used to buy tires for L.A.P.D. and tried to get some for me at the good guy price, no dice .

      The used tires we sell by the pallet, get *very* good money and are instantly re sold .

      -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I can only tell you about three of the four police departments in my hometown buying their tires from a place supplied by Virginia Wholesale Tire, which was one of my wholesale suppliers too. They were paying a price that would have been comparable to what Tire Rack is charging. I don’t know what they’re worth used, as they are only treadware 340 tires, which means anything over 34K miles is dangerous. I’m surprised LAPD accepts the liability of selling used tires, but maybe they sell them to someone who takes them to Mexico.

      None of these cop-spec tires would get stocked for sale to the public, as they are relatively short-lived for all-season performance tires and twice as expensive as premium tires that do almost everything much better. Maybe some police departments get a 50% discount, at which point they’re still paying too much. It suggests that at the very least they’re priced by Firestone to allow for a discount.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        The tires are sold as scrap .

        Interestingly, after three punctures they’re scrap and every tire must be no more than three years old so there are the occasional never used ones mixed in with the bald, slashed, sidewall punctured and so on tires too .

        I’ve forgotten the tire seller, it varies but all are normal wholesale / jobber tire sellers who bid on three year contracts .

        -Nate


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