By on June 11, 2019

The end of the Seventies was a time of quiet reflection. A time where Americans pondered things like fuel prices, polyester suits, and what a large sedan should be. As the reality of automotive downsizing moved ever closer to realization, one or two of the large sedan dinosaurs had a last hurrah. Today’s Rare Ride is one such example.

It’s a 1979 Lincoln Town car; more specifically the extra-luxurious Williamsburg Edition.

The dawn of the Seventies was a much more hopeful time for the large car market in the United States. Ford was riding high on the success of its long and low fourth-generation Continental, which entered production in 1961, and the Continental’s revamped fourth generation remained in production for nine years. The Blue Oval sought modernization and cost savings when the time came for a fifth edition.

The outgoing generation was expensive to produce thanks to a model cycle separate from Ford and Mercury products, as well as an extended unibody chassis borrowed from the Thunderbird. For 1970, the Continental Town Car moved to a more affordable body-on-frame chassis shared with the Mercury Marquis. Said sharing meant the Continental’s now-famous suicide doors were no longer an option.

Already imposing, the new Continental’s length increased around five inches in 1973 (to 229.9″) after the installation of mandatory 5 mile-per-hour bumpers. Ford held onto its large sedans while the competition downsized. The Town Car gained roughly three more inches in 1974 (232.6″), and rounded off its last three years of tenure at 233 inches in length. For 1977, it was the largest mass-produced automobile in the world. For 1979, Ford and Mercury debuted downsized offerings while Lincoln marketed the Continental as the last large sedan. Time for a party in Williamsburg.

Introduced in 1977, the Williamsburg Edition added different visuals and standard equipment over other Town Cars. Two-tone paint worked with a vinyl roof and luxurious pinstripes. Inside, top of the line leather seats were six-way adjustable, and everyone was cooled via power vent windows. The first Williamsburg showed its conservative roots by omitting opera windows and exterior coach lighting. The flash returned in ’78 and ’79, with windows and lights aplenty.

Alas, the Williamsburg party was over for 1980, as the introduction of the Mark VI took everything down a peg.

Today’s Rare Ride enjoys the additional rarity bonus of a location in Ye Olde England, where it was driven by someone who enjoyed fitting large cars into small spaces. It’s equipped with the smaller 6.6-liter 400 V8 and shows in stunning apricot over dark cordovan. With 7,200 miles on the odometer, a British person is asked to pay $31,800.

[Images: seller]

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71 Comments on “Rare Rides: A Gigantic 1979 Lincoln Continental Town Car Williamsburg Edition...”


  • avatar
    Russycle

    Nice find. This does have a certain decadent appeal. And power vent windows! Did any other car have those?

    “…, where it was driven by someone who enjoyed fitting large cars into small spaces.” Made me chuckle.

    • 0 avatar
      ravenuer

      Power vent windows were somewhat common on Caddys and their ilk back in the day.

      • 0 avatar
        Roberto Esponja

        And the power vent windows on this generation Lincoln weren’t even “real” vent windows, but just a smaller window that went down before the larger one. The “glorious” power vent windows were the ones that actually turned, such as the ones on higher priced Cadillacs up till 1968. I think some upper-level Chryslers and Imperials also had power vent windows.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I took my driver’s examination/test in an early ’70’s Town Car. Delivered only about 2 months earlier. Black with the deep burgundy interior (in velour). With the 460 cid engine which all true 70’s Lincolns should have. The instructor was in awe of its utter magnificence.

    The little ‘plaque’ over the glove compartment door was an option on ‘Designer Edition’ Lincolns of the era. It would have the name of the initial purchaser engraved on it and state that the vehicle was ‘specially made for’ that person.

    Not as impressed by the instrument panel on this version as it is lacking the large Cartier analogue clock which was a feature on most Lincolns and a major part of their advertising campaign. Lincoln’s of this era were so quiet inside that you could hear the tick/tock of the Cartier clock at highway speeds. This model is also lacking the quadraphonic 8-Track player of earlier models.

    I much prefer the available plush velour interior. Particularly when in the deep burgundy (cordovan). It is to my mind much more ‘brougham’ than leather.

    And of course, hide-away headlights are always a sign of grace and style. The same goes for large distinctive hood ornaments.Too bad that they did not purchase the after market ‘continental kit’.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Too bad it’s not a Williamsburg Edition photographed in Williamsburg.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Lincoln didn’t get much grander then this. It’s hard to believe there was a time when you could walk into a dealer’s showroom and come out with this for about $10K. Times have definitely changed

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      10k in 1979 is about 37k adjusted for inflation. This buys you an “MKC” Select in the current Lincoln portfolio. It’s not Brougham-y that’s for certain and certainly nowhere near as stately. Luxury? Near luxury?

      Navigator starts at 73k, so yeah, you aren’t buying top level luxury for what this car would have been new anymore.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        This was probably more like $14K to $17K in 1979. That’s about $58K today.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          My ’76 Stingray was approximately $10,600 new, if my memory is correct.

          I believe that the designer edition Mark IV’s of the same year were over $16,000.

          If I remember correctly part of the Lincoln cachet of that era was its inflated cost. Overcharging was a sign of affluent clients.

          Again that is just from memory, I have not checked. And remember what lifestyles were like in 1976, so my recollection might be clouded.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Update according to Curbside Classic in 1975 the ‘basic’ Mark IV was approximately $11,100 USD (they calculated that to be around $48,000) in 2012 dollars). As the 1970s suffered from extreme inflation, the price would have increased for 1976. The Designer Series added to the price. And since I am located in Canada the price would be considerably higher based on the exchange rate and our generally higher car prices due to the smaller size of our market.

          • 0 avatar

            “Overcharging was a sign of affluent clients.”

            As if the same is not true today.

        • 0 avatar
          Fordson

          Correct – I worked as a lot boy at an L-M dealer from ’77 to ’80…part of my job was checking these cars in as they came off of the carrier. These generally stickered at $13,500 to around $15,000.

          I got an “attaboy” from L-M corporate for noticing that cars with the available limited-slip rear were shipping with space-saver spares of sufficiently smaller diameter that they would screw up the diff.

          My boss gave me $250 bonus and the factory rep took us out to lunch…

        • 0 avatar
          dukeisduke

          A friend in high school drove his parents’ then-new ’77 Coupe de Ville to school for a couple of days. It still had the windows sticker on it, and the MSRP was $10k and change. So this should be considerably more.

          The NADA guide says the base price for the standard ’79 Continental was $12,093.

        • 0 avatar
          gearhead77

          OK, so it’s 58-62k for inflation. You’re still not touching the modern equivalent of this car, the Navigator, for that money. And since this is a special edition, you’ll have to equate that to “Black Label” today in Lincoln-speak, you’re at 100k.

          Honestly? I’d rather buy this for 30k and let someone swap a modern motor and driveline into it for that money and still have cash leftover before I’d get a Navigator. Now that’s exclusive. If only….

    • 0 avatar
      MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

      “It’s hard to believe there was a time when you could walk into a dealer’s showroom and come out with this for about $10K. Times have definitely changed”

      More like what you get per dollar has changed, and really that’s to be expected. I like the Breakfast Jack at JitB, and I think it should still be 99 cents like it was for years, but now it’s 1.79. When I was a kid Hersheys and Reeses were 3 for a buck. I saw ONE bar at 1.99 someplace recently. In the 60s my parents custom built a very nice house (sister still lives in it) for like 40 Grand. So yeah, 10 Grand seems cheap, but it was a lofty sum at the time, just like seeing Navigators top 100 Grand now is rather sobering.

  • avatar
    redapple

    Triactor Winner?

    Peak American IRON
    Peak Luxury
    Peak Lincoln

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Wish I could read the dealer emblem on the back. I’m thinking it’s probably a Denver dealer, since it was from a farm (a ranch?) in Colorado.

    And yeah, it really should have the 460, not the 400.

    • 0 avatar
      TCowner

      Unfortunately they killed the 460 after the 1978 model year-you won’t find a ’79 with it. The 400 became optional in ’77 I believe (for 1 mpg better?) in place of the big block 460, so you really don’t want to get stuck with one of those. My grandfather owned these during the 70s and into the 80s, and then bit the bullet and started buying the 80s versions. Nothing rides like these, and the torque on that 460 is very much like a locomotive.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I’m not usually a fan of these cars, but I dig this one. The color scheme is certainly unusual but very fitting and it’s immaculate. I rarely saw these cars in this condition, by the time I was of age to notice them, they were already dinosaurs and on their 2nd or 3rd less caring owner. Very fitting way to end the decade of decadence if you were rolling one of these.

    I don’t know who’s paying 31k for this. A Ford collector who has a ton of space to show it along with the rest of the collection? This is a museum piece more than anything. Rare condition, rare miles and rare edition.

    • 0 avatar
      WallMeerkat

      They’re extremely rare in the UK. Parts availability and mechanics who are familiar with them would be an issue.

      However I could see it almost paying for itself, being used for weddings (yes! In the UK this is seen as Americana glamour!), maybe as a car-casting car for any US based movies filmed in the UK (you’d be surprised how many, UK streets given makeovers with US cars to look American!)

  • avatar
    Ryannosaurus

    Modern day equivalent: 2wd F-150 Limited crew cab, with the 5 foot bed is 232 inches long. Slap a bed cover on it and you are good to go! Who says the American full size sedan is dead.

  • avatar
    Oldschool

    I own a 78 Lincoln Continental, White with a baby blue interior. I freakin love the thing to death! It’s the smoothest riding, most isolating, most comfortable car I have ever owned, and I’ve owned a few old Cadillacs, not including a 61 Lincoln Continental.

    70’s Lincoln’s rode better than Caddy’s, they were definitely a lot more cushy and softer riding. The bodies feel very solid and tight with zero rattles or any kind of vibrations.

    I also own a 87 Caddy Brougham and it no where near rides as nice as my Lincoln. The Brougham rides stiff in comparison, but it still rides nice just not as smooth.

    Although Lincoln cheapened the dash from 78-79, the overall build quality is a actually pretty good. I can’t imagine all the steel and materials that went into building each one of these Lincoln’s as there’s so much real estate that they take up.

    The 77-79 Lincoln’s are by far my favorite Lincoln’s ever. Sure the 60’s Continentals are awesome in there own right, but they aren’t as imposing or boss like when compared to the these Lincoln’s. Plus the unibody construction has a lot of rust issues and they don’t ride as smooth over very rough pavement.

    Everybody sleeps on these cars, but I’m the very near future these cars will be looked as being a RR alternative for collectors. They are ultra quiet, buttery smooth, they look amazing and is what a true luxury car should be. A nice big rolling work of art cruising down the street that garners more looks and attention than any new Lexus, Benz or Beemer.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Yes, it is generally agreed/accepted that generation of Lincoln Town Car and Mark were superior to their Cadillac counterparts.

      I do agree that the instrument panel does look ‘cheaper’ than that of early/mid 70’s Lincolns and have mentioned for instance the lack of the large analogue Cartier clock.

      In just about every way they were still superior cars to anything Rolls-Royce made in the 70’s.

      And based on how ‘luxury’ was defined in the 1970’s, they were more ‘luxurious’ than the just about any/all Mercedes that were available in North America. During the 1970’s Audi and BMW did not really register on the North American ‘luxury’ scale. At that time they were viewed more as competition with Volvo.

      The Japanese did not export anything to North America in the 1970’s that was in any way comparable/competitive with these luxo barges.

      So yes, peak American iron/luxury/brougham. I just hope that the prices do not go through the roof before I can purchase a ‘concourse quality Pucci’.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        “Yes, it is generally agreed/accepted that generation of Lincoln Town Car and Mark were superior to their Cadillac counterparts.”

        I think generally is a bit strong in this context. ’77-’79 Cadillacs with 425 ci engines were everywhere the wealthy congregated that was even a little urban. They were critically acclaimed like no American car other than the 1980 X-cars and the first Taurus has been since, and plenty of monied American car fans welcomed their reduced dimensions. Had Lincoln stuck it out with 400 ci traditional full sized cars into the ’80s, perceptions might have changed. The first three years of downsized Cadillacs were a time of happy and plentiful customers though, or else Ford might have kept making big Lincolns.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          ‘That generation’ being the 4th generation Caddy’s. And you are very guilty of generalization. As for sales figures: 1973 sales of 216,243 DeVilles versus 1977 sales of 234,171 DeVilles. So not “everywhere’.

          Furthermore in 1977 we leased an Eldorado and then in 1979 a Fleetwood Brougham. Neither had the same ‘luxo barge’ feel or decadence of the Marks/Town Cars that preceded them. And we were not alone in feeling this. The front engine/rwd format of the Marks was superior to the FWD Eldorado. And the Town Car(s) certainly out broughamed the Cadillac.

          But tastes/styles did change. American cars downsized, and younger, wealthy North Americans turned to German cars.

          The ’77 Cadillac line-up featured downsized models and according to Wikipedia “the two-door Coupe de Ville started at $9,654 and four-door Sedan de Ville at $9,864″.

          Whereas according to Curbside Classic (and Wikipedia)”in 1975 the ‘basic’ Mark IV was $11,082 USD” The Designer Editions were considerably more.
          And since the 1970s suffered from high inflation, the Lincoln’s price would have increased each year.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            That generation’ being the 4th generation Caddy’s. Your are referring to the 5th generation. And if anything you are also guilty of generalization. For example compare the sales figures: 1973 sales of 216,243 DeVilles versus 1977 sales of 234,171 DeVilles. So not “everywhere’.

            As for as comparisons between the 2 marques, as the advertising went ‘ask a man who drives one’. From 1973 until the turn of this century My Old Man always had at least one Cadillac or Lincoln on a one year lease. And I also had my share. Plus access to those of other family members or in the company ‘pool’.

            In 1977 we leased an Eldorado and then in 1979 a Fleetwood Brougham. Neither had the same ‘luxo barge’ feel or decadence of the Marks/Town Cars that preceded them, or the one that was sandwiched in between. And we were not alone in feeling this. The front engine/rwd format of the Marks was superior to the FWD Eldorado. And the Town Car(s) certainly out broughamed the Cadillac.

            But tastes/styles did change. American cars downsized, and younger, wealthy North Americans turned to German cars. Even My Old Man turned to the ‘European inspired’ STS when it arrived and remained loyal to them for the remainder of his days. NStar and all.

            The ’77 Cadillac line-up featured downsized models and according to Wikipedia “the two-door Coupe de Ville started at $9,654 and four-door Sedan de Ville at $9,864″.

            Whereas according to Curbside Classic (and Wikipedia)”in 1975 the ‘basic’ Mark IV was $11,082 USD” The Designer Editions were considerably more. And since the 1970s suffered from high inflation, the Lincoln’s price would have increased each year.

            Sorry I could not locate reliable Town Car pricing for that period in the time I have available.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            The de Ville was Cadillac’s entry level model, and it usually sold with more than 20% of MSRP increase in options. The Eldo and Seville had higher prices, as did the Fleetwoods, 60s, 75s, limos and anything else you could buy at a Cadillac dealership. The car in the article is a 1979, which also would have corresponded with higher prices all around.

            You say you had a 1977 Eldorado, which would have combined a huge car with an engine reduced in size by 75 cubic inches relative to the previous model year. That’s on you. Your lack of enjoyment of your ’79 Cadillac is compared to an earlier Lincoln with a much larger engine with less emissions controls. The 1979 Lincoln had a smaller engine with the same emissions standards in a MUCH heavier car.

        • 0 avatar
          hondah35

          The Coupe deVille with the 425 had better styling and was just a better automobile IMO.

          My grandpa had one which was mint green with a white vinyl top and green leather/interior. As was popular in the day, he had plush sheepskin seat covers custom made.

          A few times a year, my mom, dad, brother and I would climb into the passenger seats as he drove us up to Sedona with Marty Robbins playing on the 8-track player. Good times.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    This is possibly peak American luxury, (or close – Imperial? 60s Caddy?), it’s all been down hill from here. Today manufacturers are giving us midsize cars with 3L engines and passing them off as “luxury” it would be hilarious if it weren’t so sad.

    • 0 avatar
      Oldschool

      Right? Seriously, automakers have tricked and brainwashed the public into believing that it’s ok to have a ratty 4 cylinder engine in a luxury ride. They think that they can turbo charge there way out of everything. It’s so stupid. Nothing compares to a V8, especially when the miles go up, the engines are still very smooth unlike most 4 bangers that start to make more noise and vibrate over time.

      My Dad owns a 2012 S-Class Benz which is a very nice car, but my Lincoln still rides way better than his car, and has more comfortable seats. But gawd damn that twin turbo V8 in his Benz hauls major ass! And it’s extremely quiet and smooth. No V6 or 4 banger turbo could ever compare.

      Last of the true full size Caddy’s and Lincoln’s did die in the 70’s, possibly the 80’s with the end of the traditionally styled Broughams and Town Cars.

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        The proper luxury drivetrain for today is an electric one. The smoothness, quiet, and torque delivery can’t be beat.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          While it is certainly a luxury to be able to spend two-thirds to ninety-percent of the cost of a real car for something of limited capability and questionable value, there is nothing luxurious about planning your life around limited range and time intensive refueling. Luxury EVs are like companions who can do parlor tricks and can’t stop doing parlor tricks.

    • 0 avatar
      Mike Beranek

      Yes, this is the last of the true mastodons, GM downsized their bigs after 1976 and Chrysler killed theirs after 1978. GM’s downsized platform lasted until the mid-90’s, and Ford’s until 2011 as a police car. Chrysler had no money and slapped a new body on their old mid-size platform and only produced it for a couple of years.
      This car being a ’79 makes it the very end of the line. GM and Ford made FWD facsimiles of this formula through the early 2000’s- think LeSabre, Lucerne, Continental, etc. Those were modern cars with design features that mimicked- and in most cases did better- than the old barges that inspired them. But now, this automotive style has gone away completely. You can’t get a column shift/bench seat in a car anymore.

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        +1, a fair comment, Mike. We may eventually see some nostalgic love for the FWDers, as we do for these RWDers. I have a 6’5″ friend who travels a lot for work. He loved the Lucerne as a rental car and was sad to see it retired. It retained many of the virtues of a ’70s full-sizer while eliminating some of the vices.

        I think the Lucerne and the contemporaneous Lexus ES were the last two sedans available with a bench seat and column shift.

        • 0 avatar

          No column shift ever in the ES. The Avalon had one early on with bench, was gone by 99.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            Absolutely correct, Corey. I was thinking Avalon but typed ES.

            I think the Avalon dropped its bench option right around the time the Lucerne was retired (’11 model year). I recall perusing a message board thread in which cane and walker users were complaining that they lost their two sedan options.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            Gack, edit window timed out….

            2nd-gen Avalons had an available bench; 3rd-gens did not. So theoretically you could get an Avalon with a bench up through ’04.

          • 0 avatar

            I wonder if the bench was confined to base XL trim. Can’t imagine them doing a leather bench.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    My garage is 218 inches from the wall to the door. None of these would fit.

    • 0 avatar
      MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

      18 feet?!!? You got ripped off because a bare minimum depth for a garage is 20′, and I personally would not accept anything less than 24′.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Maybe his house is a hundred years old or it was built in a confined space.

        • 0 avatar
          Featherston

          Before they started getting bigger, garages actually got much smaller. What caused the change was the introduction of the electric starter. My great-grandparents and grandparents lived in a two-flat with a detached garage. It was built in 1910, two years before Cadillac introduced its electric starter. The garage was designed so that you had ample room to walk to the front of the car and crank start it. My grandparents’ ’59 Cadillac fit in it with plenty of room to spare. (There also was a gas tank buried in the backyard and service station-style gas pump in the garage.)

          My parents’ house was built about half a decade later, and the garage was very small. The largest cars that would fit in it were on the scale of an ’85-’91 GM H-body, and parking something like that took some practice. I still remember intentionally giving the driver’s side mirror about 3″ of clearance so you’d have about 5″ on the passenger side and then pulling forward until the windshield contacted a tennis ball my father had suspended from the garage door opener motor. That let you know you’d cleared the path of the door and were almost touching the back wall.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I remember my grandfather had a mid 50s Cadillac that didn’t fit in his small Chicago garage. He had to leave the garage door open and about a foot of fins stuck out into the alley. A very funny sight at the time

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        A funny sight and not an entirely uncommon one. In the mid-’80s, family friends bought a ’65-’70 Calais or De Ville as a second car. The original owner was a little old lady who only could park it as your grandfather did his. The car was in great cosmetic shape except for its hind 10″ or so, which were very weathered. Sadly, it then became an outdoor car and the primary ride of their 16-year-old son. It aged *very* rapidly over the ensuing three years.

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    I LOVE IT.

    As a kid I thought these were so sweet, I always wanted one. As it turned out, I did own a couple Town Cars, 80s and 90s flavors, and several 2-door Lincolns of the Mk VII and VIII LSC variety.

    I also dated a girl back in the 90s who had inherited pretty much this exact car, colors and everything, she was a cute lil blonde and pretty hilarious driving that barge. But I loved it.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    This car was the end of many eras. My grandfather had a ’79 like this when I was young and I thought it was fantastic. He got the Lincoln after driving a Mercury Bobcat bought during the fuel crisis. Once he retired, he decided that the fuel savings wasn’t worth the pain of enduring 1970’s compact cars.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    We almost had this vehicle when I was a pre teen. My older brother had totaled our 78 Delta 88 and my dad wanted another full size sedan to replace it, for safety. This was in 1989. On a teacher’s budget a Volvo was out of the question but a fairly clean 2 tone blue /dk blue over blue velour showed up in our driveway. My mom nixed it when she drove it around the block. She’s only 5 feet tall and could barely see the end of the hood.Ultimately we ended up getting a fairly high mile 87 Le Sabre (maroon with white landau top)which was served us well for the next decade or so.

  • avatar
    Mike-NB2

    I loved and still love these cars. I saw one in the flesh for the first time in decades a month or so ago at a grocery store. I’m familiar with these as they were relatively common in my youth but I had forgotten just how HUGE they are. It stretched into a second parking spot. The best part was the owner, a guy in his 70s or older, was just getting out of the car. I stopped to compliment him on the car and talk about it. As a car guy I know it’s always great when someone compliments you on your wheels (and knows some of the history of the vehicle) and I doubt that many people under 50 would see this for the great car it is. He was pretty happy to talk about his Continental. (I didn’t bother pointing out my ’17 MKZ as it would fit in the Continental’s trunk.)

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    ‘That generation’ being the 4th generation Caddy’s. Your are referring to the 5th generation. And if anything you are also guilty of generalization. For example compare the sales figures: 1973 sales of 216,243 DeVilles versus 1977 sales of 234,171 DeVilles. So not “everywhere’.

    Furthermore in 1977 we leased an Eldorado and then in 1979 a Fleetwood Brougham. Neither had the same ‘luxo barge’ feel or decadence of the Marks/Town Cars that preceded them, or the one that was sandwiched in between. And we were not alone in feeling this. The front engine/rwd format of the Marks was superior to the FWD Eldorado. And the Town Car(s) certainly out broughamed the Cadillac.

    But tastes/styles did change. American cars downsized, and younger, wealthy North Americans turned to German cars. Even My Old Man turned to the ‘European inspired’ STS when it arrived and remained loyal to them for the remainder of his days. NStar and all.

    The ’77 Cadillac line-up featured downsized models and according to Wikipedia “the two-door Coupe de Ville started at $9,654 and four-door Sedan de Ville at $9,864″.

    Whereas according to Curbside Classic (and Wikipedia)”in 1975 the ‘basic’ Mark IV was $11,082 USD” The Designer Editions were considerably more. And since the 1970s suffered from high inflation, the Lincoln’s price would have increased each year.

    Sorry I could not locate reliable Town Car pricing for that period in the time I have available.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Honestly, I’ve never been a huge fan of the 70s air craft carrier luxury cars. I like the “authenticity” of this in 2019, but there is 0% chance I would have been interested in buying one in ’79.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    Huggy Bear!

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c7/d6/ae/c7d6aef8385602128c0f0c865d37cf90.jpg

    actually, that’s Snoop Dogg’s personal ride, that he used in the movie…

  • avatar
    RHD

    At 7200 miles on the odometer in 40 years, this car has averaged just under half a mile per day since new.
    At this rate, it will roll over 99,999.9 miles in the year 2534.

  • avatar
    Matt Foley

    I would like to see a comparison test of a 1979 Town Car, a 1999 Town Car, and a 2019 Navigator. Not at all kidding.

    • 0 avatar
      newenthusiast

      That would be hilarious

      But wouldn’t the Navigator would win just about every test?

      Unless the test is “how much uh ‘product’ you can hide in it” or “how many former enemies you can conceal in the truck/cargo area”

      Then the Town Cars win

      :)

  • avatar
    bkrell

    My parents and grandparents lamented the smaller size of the 1980s cars they were forced to purchase. I never understood. I liked the more angular looks and the better tech, if you can call it that, of the 80’s models. But I’ve definitely gained a huge appreciation of the 70’s Lincolns over the years, especially after realizing in hindsight what crap our 80’s cars were. But even the 90-97 Town Car has grown on me.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Williamsburg edition? I was expecting at least a trunkful of PBR with beard oil and moustache wax in the glove box.

  • avatar
    JREwing

    It’s remarkable how much of the interior elements showed up on the ’79 and later LTD (later LTD Crown Victoria) and such. Same vents. Same heater controls. Similar radio openings. Same mirror controls. Same shift levers, and so on.

    The following year brought a 302 V8 with throttle-body fuel injection, the 4-speed AOD automatic, and a lot less weight. This car, eventually rebranded the Town Car in 1982, had a ton of success, even if it “only” had a 117″ wheelbase and total length of “only” 219″.

  • avatar
    86er

    I own a ’79 Town Car, and these truly are the ‘last hurrah’ of uncompromised size and an emphasis on supreme comfort.

    Often, sitting in that vast cabin made more vast by the white divided headliner and seats, I feel like it harkens back to the glory days of the 1950s cars, when long, low, and wide was reaching its first evolutionary headwind.

  • avatar
    427Cobra

    my grandfather bought a Cartier Edition town car new in ’78… Jeez, I loved that car… crushed velour seats & all. In the early 80s, he traded for a Chrysler Fifth Avenue… which he absolutely HATED. In less than a year, he went back to a Grand Marquis, and remained with them for the next 20+ years. Both sets of grandparents drove the required Grand Marquis in South Florida. However, once I showed up with a ’98 Mark VIII LSC, my grandfather was not about to be up-staged. Two weeks later, he bought a Town Car.

    I have a nostalgic twinge for the 70-79 Town Cars, but my personal fave is the ’90-’97 Town Car…

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      I don’t have much love for these large cars, but I do like the 90-97 Town Cars. It’s the downsizing of the 80’s with tech coming into the 90’s. But they still rode supremely on that air suspension. We rented them often on vacation because we were a family of 5 and Dad didn’t like minivans.


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