By on June 27, 2019

TTAC commentator Blackcloud_9 writes:

I currently own a 2014 Kia Soul. I’m looking to use it as trade-in value for a new (or new to me) car. The Soul is an imminently practical car. Does most everything reasonably well, it’s very reliable but it definitely does not stir my “soul”. I’m usually a “keep it forever” guy but the time has come that I can finally afford to buy “my” car.  The question for you (and the B&B) is that the car has a couple of cosmetic issues and I’m wondering if it’s worth reconditioning a car for sale.

The only reason I would do this is to raise the trade-in value of the car.

  1. The windshield has a quarter-sized star/web crack in the lower right corner. I’ve had it filled and I know it won’t get any worse. However, the repair person did a poor job and the top resin fill fell out so the crack is very noticeable. The best estimate I’ve been quoted for a windshield replacement is ~ $235 (US).
  2. The front bumper had an unfortunate meet-and-greet with a garage doorframe and stucco wall. It is not dented but the plastic cladding has some pretty good gouges and there is a 1” wide x 3” long ellipse of removed paint. So, it’s not going to be a buff and wax job to get it looking good. I haven’t gotten an estimate for this repair but I’ve had front ends repaired before (other cars & teenaged children) so my best guess would be about $900.

I’m thinking the windshield might be a good investment but I’m not sure if I would get a good ROI on the bumper repair. The Soul has 77k miles and very mechanically/cosmetically sound otherwise.

Please note: I am NOT a wrench-it-yourself kind of guy. I admire anybody who can but I have a long history of self car repair frustrations.

Sajeev answers:

Here’s a rule for reconditioning a car (i.e. recon) for trade in purposes: if you can’t do it for free, don’t bother.

You won’t make the numbers work, relative to what dealers put into your trade for recon before resale. While your Soul sounds nice enough to never meet a dealer auction (i.e. they want to re-sell it on their lot), keep in mind:

  1. Dealerships negotiate vendor discounts: you’re not getting a volume discount on glass work, but they might. If the Dealership has a built-in body shop, with staff hungry for work? Fuggedaboutit!
  2. Dealers might require factory approved parts (they get at cost) for top dollar valuations, especially in the world of CPO vehicles. Not relevant here, but still…
  3. Your profit margins are razor thin when the pay day pertains to the world of bottom dollar trade-in valuations. Even dealers can take a bath on recon, is it worth your time/money when you aren’t selling something at retail/market value?
  4. Time Value of Money is real: you’re better off spending those hours driving for Lyft or Uber, or selling a perfectly-reconditioned vehicle on Craigslist. (Good luck with that, BTW)

There are valid reasons why people trade-in: tax perks and the ability to not give a rat’s ass about your current car.

If it stops, steers and starts, you can trade that hooptie in! Just do the free things (i.e. take out yo’ nasty stuff so the appraiser doesn’t hate their job) to maximize your valuation without wasting your precious time.

 

[Image: Boniface Hiers Kia]

Send your queries to [email protected]com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice.

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49 Comments on “Piston Slap: Recon for your Soulmate?...”


  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I would first head down to my local Carmax or AutoNation store and get a buy bid for the car. This will establish the baseline wholesale value of your car. You indicated that you are not a DIY repair sort, no problem. Surely you can spend 2 hours and for a wash and wax coupled with a reasonably extensive interior cleaning.

    You will get a better ROI from this than you will fixing a small star in the windshield IMHO. I would then try to sell the car on the open market as is for 2k – 3k more than the bid from Carmax/AN. At your price point, you will still do better this way than trade in for the offset in sales tax on the new car.

    FWIW, I have sold a ton of cars on CL and not had a problem yet. Sure, the scammers have tried but I find them entertaining in some strange way and generally EFF with them in my driveway for a bit before telling them to beat it. Makes no sense I know.

    You will not recoup your expense to repair the vehicle damage as whoever you trade to can fix it cheaper (volume purchasing) than you will most likely be able to.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I agree with Sajeev, when you trade your Soul in the dealer is going to look at your Carfax report and give you value based on that. The last car I traded wasn’t even looked at by the dealer who just printed the Carfax, asked me about a couple of items and gave me a fair trade without once looking at it until the deal was done and I gave him the keys

  • avatar
    ajla

    YMMV, but when I traded in my last car the dealer looked it over for literally 2 minutes and that was it. They didn’t even open the hood or trunk.
    Now maybe this means ol’ ajla was taken for a ride and left thousands on the table, but the offer I got was in the range I expected.
    So my advice would be run it through a car wash, vacuum it out, and that’s it.

    • 0 avatar
      FerrariLaFerrariFace

      The experiences I’ve had with dealers on trade-in inspections pretty much run the gamut. It all depends on the dealer you’re working with and how they handle trades. I’ve had some that do no or virtually no inspection at all. In those cases I either got a low-ball trade number or a big markup on the vehicle to be purchased. In other cases they took the car into the shop and ‘claimed’* to do a thorough inspection. Those times the numbers being tossed around were closer to reality, but either way the dealer has their contingencies baked into the numbers. They aren’t stupid and they know the game they are playing better than us.

      *Claimed = dealers are liars (so are buyers). Sometimes those inspections come back legit. I’ve had other times where I know for a fact the dealer invented problems with my trade in so they could justify a lower offer. It’s usually not worth the effort to call them out on the lie, either. Just factor that in and adjust the price on the purchased car accordingly. Or walk away. There’s always another car, another dealer, and another deal.

      • 0 avatar
        Robotdawn

        Ferrari, see, I’ve had the exact opposite experience. Like alja’s experience most of the time dealers barely look at my trade, and give me a number. I know what the number should be from research ahead of time, or at least a range, if it falls in the range we are good. If it doesn’t, next dealer.

        The dealers who want to look at your car, or talk about things are almost universally going to low-ball me. I know the minute they ask me to look at the car with them they are going to piss me off.

        With internet car pricing and a decent credit score, your trade is about the only place they can still get extra profit from you.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The last time I did a trade in I didn’t even bring it when I did the purchase. I got them within $250 of what I wanted going in and was honest that there was some damage to the front bumper. Brought in in the next day and they spent all of 30 seconds verifying that it was there and drove in took the keys and title and said thanks.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    I was flat-out told that repairing the windshield of the last car I sold would not affect the buyer’s valuation, so I saved myself the deductible and the hassle.

  • avatar
    TheDutchGun

    I recently traded a 15 F150 straight up for a 17 Focus ST. I knew what I could get selling privately and that I would have to put $1,500+ into the truck to get it.

    Dealer offered me enough on trade to make the numbers work and I had to do none of the sale prep on the truck. Win/win.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Yeah, this is how to do it. Add in a trip to Carmax for a minimum amount, check ebay for prices people are paying for your ride and you’re good to go.

  • avatar
    gtem

    I agree with a quick run through a car wash, vacuum interior/quick wipe down, buy a $12 touch up paint at autozone and cover up that paint scrape as best as possible. Windshield… probably not worth it unless you’re doing a private sale. I’ve gotten excellent fast work at a place in the hood here, $150 on an old Ranger of mine, good quality glass, replaced in an hour and a half.

  • avatar
    Firestorm 500

    I agree with gtem. Unless the crack is along the driver’s field of vision, don’t worry about it. With 77K miles, your car is a wholesale piece destined for the auction. It has high miles for the age of the car. Run it down to 1/4 tank, go through the car wash, vacuum, clean the glass, and go get your newer vehicle.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    General rule, you should never trade something clean you can retail. You only trade junk because you’re going to get f***ed on trade regardless. However, this becomes difficult for newer cars because most proles can’t come up with >10K so there is a window where something is still too expensive that the only person who can take it off your hands is the dealer. So back to the earlier point an in agreement with Sajeev, trade it-as is because you spending money to fix it is not going to equate you “making” more money on trade. If you were retailing it yourself people like me would beat you up for the cracked windshield etc, but its the same time-money proposition: you spending $300+ for the windshield does not make it worth $300 more, you don’t get the money back.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I agree 28 days, selling a clean new-ish (in a relative sense) privately is a non-trivial matter, but still worth the effort IMO. I sold my 2012 Civic LX back in 2016 for $11k cash with 53k miles, best trade in offers were in the $8k range at the time. Took about a month with low levels of interest (it was a stick shift) but ultimately I sold it to some nice people for my full asking price.

      • 0 avatar
        SSJeep

        I dont disagree but there is a factor of time spent vs. extra money reaped. If your time is valued at $50.00/hr and you spend 30-40 hours trying to sell your car, that savings gets eaten up something quick and it would be a LOT easier to trade the car in to the dealer. I fall in the latter camp – to me, its just not worth the hassle. I go to CarMax, get an offer, and ask the dealer to beat their offer if they want to close the deal.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I agree but instead of hours look at it as a percentage. Gtem got 30% more by waiting and selling it himself. So if you’re driving a $1,500 jalopy, yes $300 isn’t worth the hassle but $3K on an 11K car would be.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Yes, but at some point in your life you become very uncomfortable with strange tire-kickers coming to your house at all hours to look at your car, few are serious. So it cost me a few bucks, I only trade at a dealer these days

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “become very uncomfortable with strange tire-kickers coming to your house at all hours ”

            You guys need to learn how to sell cars privately the right way lol.

            I’d meet people in a church parking lot a few blocks from my house. “A few bucks?” We’re talking about several thousand, the same amount most here I’m assuming will spend quite some time and nerves negotiating with a dealer over.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I tried that, gtem, you get a lot of no shows, what a waste of time

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @lie2me

            Another variable is do you have something worth selling.

            Certain marques and models are easy sales in private party, most are not.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I’m worried that I have too pretty of a mouth to sell things over CL in Florida.
            Most of my lower value cars (like under $5K) I either sell to someone connected to my social circle or I just donate it. With higher value vehicles I’ve done trade-ins.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Not showing at your house increases number of no-shows? Not sure about that.

            I dunno what to tell you, be more selective with buyers maybe? Higher priced stuff seems to self-select and weed out the mouth breathers to begin with.

            I’m able to discern how serious a buyer is within the first few texts or facebook messages, nail down a time to show, and I’ve literally never been left hanging in the last 5 cars I’ve sold. At worst a few people let me know ahead of time they wouldn’t be able to make it.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I realize selling a car on your own is the best way to go, I’ve sold dozens that way, but as you begin to age out you become more aware of the possible dangers of dealing with unknowns. I’m really comfortable with the trade-in process, it’s easy, safe and no one comes back 2 weeks later complaining about something that broke on your old car

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            I curbsided cars for years. I don’t blame anyone for trading their car in. Complete roll of the dice and often a f*ckaround.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “I’m really comfortable with the trade-in process, it’s easy, safe and no one comes back 2 weeks later complaining about something that broke on your old car”

            Hey it’s your time and money so more power to you. For me it’s legitimately fun. I’ve never had any after-sale complaints even on some sketchier older cars with a few known age-related quirks. Sure I always have my CCW on me but never once has a buyer made me feel uncomfortable, in fact it’s been kind of uplifting for me to realize that most random people I meet are basically good.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I snapped some photos after washing the car and doing a quick spray/wipe wax, listed in about 5 minutes, fielded maybe a total of 5 emails, and only met one person (the buyer). Definitely worth 2 hours of my time to make $3k.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            I did the same recently. If you think Carmax is full of crap by offering 7k on a 10k vehicle, wash it, list it on CL and sell it within 30 days by listing it below others.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    I’m always amazed at how filthy trade ins are, then the Customer gripes at the low offer they got .

    Like everything else, the sizzle sells not the actual condition of your old hooptie, if you’re too lazy to clean it hospital clean, why should anyone give you more than scrap value ? .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Agree. Years ago when one of my brothers attempted to trade in his ‘Bandit’ Trans Am he brought it to the dealership with the interior looking like a cross between an ashtray, a trash bin and the inside of a purse.

      The exterior wasn’t much better.

      I met him there and had a conniption. The Sales Rep took one look and laughed at the car. Gave us a real low ball offer.

      So I made my brother take it to my house and supervised while he spent the rest of the day cleaning the inside and out, to my satisfaction.

      Let’s just say the end result was we got a lot more money for it. It was traded as partial payment for a brand new 3 cylinder Chevy Sprint.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      I’m amazed at the number of filthy used cars I’ve seen that are listed for sale at dealers where it appears the dealer hasn’t spent any time
      re-conditioning the car. And these are cars that are maybe 2-4 years old, so they’re not worn out piles of crap.

      It’s hard for me to comprehend the apparent laziness of dealers when every time I’ve sold a car privately, I clean it like it owes me money (because it does).

      Condition, mileage and price are how people buy cars, so you’d think the dealer would want them looking as presentable as possible to get the most money.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        A local Audi dealer was too lazy to clean up grease marks on the back seat, reset the service indicators and fix a broken backup camera of an SQ5 we drove. This was a cpo car, by the way.

        Never. Trust. Dealers. They don’t give a damn.

        • 0 avatar
          -Nate

          Sad but true ~

          I worked in dealers and was appalled at how little they actually cared about ever doing the right thing or even being honest on any level .

          -Nate

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I’m with gtem on this one. It seems the time to sell it privately would net the author a considerable amount of money vs. trading it in. This Kia I’d imagine would sell quickly to a student or Uber driver. Although I would spend a few hundred on the windshield. I sold an E36 with a cracked windshield and it was a big deal for a few potential buyers, I suppose they were worried it wouldn’t pass inspection (even though it wasn’t anywhere near sightlines).
    The only time I wouldn’t sell it myself if I was in a hurry for a new ride or wanted to save on the sales tax on the new ride.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Yep summer time is prime-time for parents shopping for their college-bound kids. A lightly used Soul with 77k would be a primo offering right now. A coworker spent something like $9k on a 2012 Soul with right around 100k for her son at the dealer a few months ago (yeah, don’t ask)…

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        For us, the month of MAY, graduation month, was when all the scurrying for a new car went on. And all the dealers knew it.

        They knew that we, and many others, would want to give the kids a graduation present to call their own for use during summer break, and the dealers had the upper hand during negotiations.

        In 2011, we bought our grand daughter a 2011 Elantra as a HS graduation present that she could use for the years she would be attending college.

        And after visiting several dealers we found one in Las Cruces, NM, who was totally to our liking. This dealer had the selling price painted on the windshield, and by golly, they stuck to it.

        No padding the MSRP, no ancillary charges, no dancing with the salesmanager, just plain old “the price you see is the price you pay”, plus tt&l, of course.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          “No padding the MSRP”

          I pray you didn’t pay MSRP for a Hyundai…

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            No, as I recall it was ~$17K when all the crying was done.

            I wrote about our experience over the four years that followed. Best little car ever for my grand daughter. No warranty calls!

            Never a problem. When she drove to college it was a 150 mile roundtrip per day, with three other girls riding along.

            Anyway, she graduated in 2015, sold her little Elantra to one of her girlfriends, got married in June and we gave her our 2012 Grand Cherokee and her dad’s 2012 SRT8.

            Both of those vehicles still in use as DDs in Surprise, AZ, (Luke AFB) today.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            The Palisade (which has just hit the lots) has been going for over MSRP for the higher trims (same story for the Telluride).

            While some buyers had no issue paying MSRP or a little higher (still a decent deal if need to have it now), there are looney dealerships asking for $6k to $10k more than MSRP.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Astonishing, Gtem. People wonder why I want to do drivebys on places like JD Byrider. That’s a 3K car tops, the market agrees with me.

        MY12 Kia Soul “wagon” trim

        5/30/19 $1,700 204,529 – – 4G/A Silver Regular Southwest Dallas-Fort Worth
        6/13/19 $2,200 182,069 3.2 4G/A White Regular Southwest Dallas-Fort Worth
        5/30/19 $2,000 181,503 3.6 4G/6 White Regular West Coast Southern California
        6/20/19 $2,400 169,718 2.0 4G/A Silver Lease Midwest Chicago
        6/4/19 $2,900 153,142 2.9 4G/A Black Regular Southeast Atlanta
        6/4/19 $2,500 144,712 2.3 4G/A White Lease Southeast Georgia
        6/4/19 $3,000 143,286 3.5 4G/6 White Lease Southeast Orlando
        6/12/19 $2,800 140,582 – – 4G/A White Regular Southeast Daytona Beach
        6/26/19 $4,150 132,960 – – 4G/A White Regular West Coast Seattle
        5/28/19 $3,100 126,070 – – 4G/A White Regular Northeast Baltimore-Washington
        5/28/19 $2,100 120,974 2.3 4G/A Silver Lease Midwest Ohio
        6/5/19 $2,400 119,969 – – 4G/A Green Regular Southwest Dallas
        6/4/19 $3,500 119,173 – – 4G/A Black Regular Southeast Pensacola
        6/11/19 $3,000 115,751 – – 4G/A White Regular Southeast Fort Lauderdale
        6/25/19 $3,000 114,737 2.5 4G/A Silver Regular Northeast New England
        6/18/19 $2,500 108,243 2.9 4G/6 Silver Lease Northeast NY Metro Skyline
        6/25/19 $4,300 104,940 3.5 4G/A Green Lease Southwest Dallas
        6/26/19 $3,500 103,843 3.2 4G/6 White Regular Southeast Charlotte
        6/24/19 $4,900 98,875 2.9 4G/A White Lease Southeast North Carolina
        6/11/19 $3,300 98,619 1.3 4G/A White Lease Southwest Denver
        6/18/19 $3,800 97,740 2.5 4G/A Green Regular Southeast Central Florida
        6/18/19 $5,400 94,609 2.4 4G/A Silver Regular Southwest Houston
        5/28/19 $4,200 89,189 2.4 4G/A White Regular Southeast Orlando
        5/29/19 $4,400 89,124 2.6 4G/A Silver Lease Southwest San Antonio
        5/29/19 $4,000 87,270 – – 4G/A Silver Regular Southwest New Mexico

        I used to feel bad selling $1-1500 cars for $2999-3499, that dealer BURIED that guy at 9K.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          FWIW every single car in your list of examples is in quite poor condition judging by the ratings. I guess cheaper economy cars really get put through the ringer, especially by 100k miles.

          I guess is there even such a thing as a 100k mile wholesale Soul in the 4.0+ grade? The closest in your list is a 3.5 104k mile example bought at auction for $4,300.

          So no I don’t think a 100k mile Soul in generally good condition is going to be priced at $3k retail, but nor should anyone be buying one for $9k!! I think something like $6k would be “reasonable” for the average retail buyer, although I personally don’t really see it as a good deal.

          2 years ago I did a PPI on a like-new 36k mile 2010 Soul for a Chinese grad student, she got it from a private seller in our neighborhood for $8000 as I recall. Now that I consider reasonable.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree, the economy cars generally get beat on and its sometimes hard to find them in clean condition. I think in your example, 6 is still too high. Figure “generous” is true valuation + 25% @ $4-5 on average in your example, and thats you giving up 25% which I think is a lot on a percentage basis.

            In my last (and first new) automotive transaction, I knew the MY18 Corolla IM was pulling $15,8 on the block like under 3K miles. Dealer had a new MY18 (112 miles) which had been reduced to $18,3 with cash on the hood from Toyota. “Retail” in the area only had a handful of IMs, mostly MY17 ranging from 3-12K miles for $17 on the nose and up. So I could go to the block and buy one with 3K, but its going to run me $750 (250 buyer fee + 500 commission) plus a favor. So I’m at $16,550 for a *used* IM and I think what would it take for the new one at that point. I went to the dealer on Black Friday during their “sale” and simply said I want the new IM at $17 even plus tax (not out the door). Dealer did their bullsh!t and came back with we can’t do 17 will you do $17,5? We shook hands and it was done. That’s $1700 over aggregate wholesale, or a 9.71% premium, for a NEW car in the same model year. This is the type of deal used car buyers must pursue if they are to manage their recon and meet with success. Otherwise, it is easy to get buried.

            On the MY10, it probably wasn’t a bad product for her but she most likely overpaid by several thousand dollars. There is a premium to low miles but its not a 50-75% premium. Valuations nearly all have dropped off by year five of a car’s life because extended warranties have typically expired. So the MY14 or 15 Soul with 130K miles generally commands a higher valuation than the MY10 would with no miles.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “but she most likely overpaid by several thousand dollars.”

            My friend you live in the world of access to dealer auctions, I live in the world of regular Joes surrounded by overpriced (wonderful world of used car financing) newer used cars like that $9k Soul and flipped auction sh*ite from curbstoners on the low end. A single owner barely used 2010 Soul for $8k is a godsend for someone that just wants a reliable newer car for less than $10k.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Financing is a big variable, but assuming one can float some cash there is no reason one armed with the proper valuations, which I provide, cannot make a better buy. If you can’t get it for the right money don’t buy it in the first place. But I think you already know this friend :)

            “A single owner barely used 2010 Soul for $8k is a godsend for someone that just wants a reliable newer car for less than $10k.”

            I see your point, but I still don’t think its a good thing to get buried in a used car. I have seen it so many times and I argue it is the first step on the path to poverty (assuming one doesn’t already start in poverty which already may be the case). This also brings the “buy the payment” vs “buy the asset” scenario into my mind. The smart person knows NOT to buy the payment, that’s for the dumb money to do.

  • avatar
    naterator

    You might consider putting this on Turo for a few years, then selling.

    Depending on your location, you could make a few hundred dollars a month or more – more than enough to cover the increased payment from not having this on trade and put some extra money in your pocket.

    In a few years, when it hits 120k (or whatever the Turo mileage limit is), you could sell it on CL for not much less than you’d get on trade right now.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Just today sold a 2011 Explorer for my sister. I can tell you that spending the (numerous) hours I did detailing made a huge difference when it came time to show and sell. Of course, it helps that the vehicle was also properly maintained, but the buyer made it a point to comment (repeatedly) at the overall appearance of the Explorer we were selling versus numerous (newer and more expensive) ones found on dealer lots. Can’t say that my experience is an across the board answer and other’s results may vary. But I’ve seen it on numerous cars I’ve sold…getting it cleaned (and cleaned well) does appear to make a difference. Maybe not so much in a dealer trade, but in a private party sale, invest in the time to get it looking decent.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Yes, absolutely. I’ve been appalled at the condition of some even fairly new used cars on main dealer lots, you’d think they’d value their reputations and image a bit more than having dried coffee stains and other pretty easy to clean things taken care of.

      This is amplified on the cheaper older used side of things where buyers have looked at a number of very poorly presented private sale cars (both in the photos of competing ads, and even more so in person).

      I swear there’s a business model to be made for just seeking out poorly presented dirty cars, buying them cheap for a seller that’s gotten frustrated, cleaning them up and putting up a nice ad, and flipping.

  • avatar

    I used to sell my cars by publishing ads in local newspaper when I was young and relatively poor. The first time buyer was a cop and I sold him very problematic car with suspicious past (there was no Carfax back then) for the same amount of money I paid for it two years earlier. And the last time I sold my Toyota to local gangster – he totaled his Opel in some kind of chase and needed the car. He was impressed by my Toyota since it has well optioned. Later I learned that he totaled my Toyota also, life is always tough for gangsters and the as well as their cars – they do not live too long. Sooner or later bullet catches them.

    Last time I traded in my 12 y.o. car with 180K miles. It had malfunctioning ignition coils. I did not bother to fix it since I had to remove some engine parts like exhaust manifold. I told internet sales manager about problem and he told me that he does not care because the car will go straight to auction. I got a great deal on new car (since it sat for several months on dealership’s lot) but he also looked happy when I told him how much I want for the trade-in. Win-win situation.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      ^^This, a simple and clean unemotional transaction. I once had a guy come back at me 2 weeks after selling him a truck because he discovered some issues. He had a mechanic check out the truck before buying it. I was unaware of any problems with the truck. It was then I decided trade-in only from now on

  • avatar
    NeilM

    I know that dealers aren’t held in the highest esteem, but who knew you could actually sell your Soul to one?


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