By on May 9, 2019

A class-action lawsuit filed against Ford Motor company in 2017 is close to bearing fruit for nearly two million current or former owners, but Ford could find itself on the hook for far more than the $35 million reached in an earlier settlement.

The automaker is awaiting the results of an appeal by nonprofit advocacy group Public Citizen, which felt the 1.9 million Ford Focus and Fiesta buyers whose lives were disrupted by wonky PowerShift transmissions would only end up getting shafted, once again.

As it waits for the U.S. Court of Appeals ruling, Ford claims the settlement was a fair one. The owners of 2012-2016 Focuses and 2011-2016 Fiestas beg to differ. Individual owners have already sued Ford and won big, compensating them for an unending nightmare of service trips and breakdowns.

In a message sent to the Detroit Free Press, the automaker said, “Ford is committed to providing our customers with top-quality vehicles. We continue to deny the allegations in this lawsuit, but rather than continuing with the litigation, Ford entered into a settlement agreement with lawyers representing these plaintiffs. That settlement is fair and appropriate and we look forward to final court approval.”

A ruling could come by December, the newspaper reports. If a panel of appellate judges decides in the litigants’ favor, Ford could be on the hook for a lot more than $35 million.

Michael Kirkpatrick of Public Citizen thinks Ford believes there’s a chance the earlier settlement will be tossed out.

“Given the way the oral argument went, Ford’s lawyers anticipate losing the appeal,” Kirkpatrick said of the April 8th hearing. “And they want to get out ahead of this. They have this huge liability they thought they had put to bed through a class-action settlement that was an exceptionally good deal for them.”

Ford’s troubles with its six-speed dual-clutch automatic are well documented. Numerous service bulletins, software reflashes, and lawsuits later, it still hasn’t put the trouble-plagued tranny in the past. The current class action involves 1.5 million current and 400,000 former owners. Owners who choose to go it alone in their quest to sue Ford in the state of California number some 1,200. Another group hitting Ford with a “mass action” lawsuit in Wayne County, Michigan numbers 12,300.

Calls for a recall or buyback program fell on deaf ears in Dearborn. Instead, many owners say they were left in the lurch, even after repeated repairs that didn’t solve the problem.

“This was a windfall release for Ford,” Kirkpatrick told Freep. “People would be giving up their claims of very high value. We know Ford has been settling cases for $75,000 right off the bat when people bring their own lawsuits under California consumer protection law.”

He added, “Once Ford is released, they’re no longer bound. This is about fairness. Ford is purchasing a release from liability at a very low price. Most ‘class’ members will get nothing, and the attorneys make big fees.”

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71 Comments on “Ford Transmission Lawsuit Powershifts Into Appeal Mode; How Much Green Will the Blue Oval Pay?...”


  • avatar
    gasser

    Another month, another financial/publicity disaster for Ford. How can a manufacturer, in today’s market, let such a horrible product out of the factory??
    After about 2 million of these transmissions have inconvenienced and enraged buyers, Ford still can’t figure out why their auto sales have evaporated.
    Have someone call me, I’ll explain it.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    In my recent Used Car Search From Hell (for Daughter No. 2), I avoided the 2012 and Focus and 2011 and Fiesta, because of this issue.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      2012 and up Focus and 2011 and up Fiesta, that is. :-|

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      Or…buy one with a manual trans. (which is my solution for all automotive ills) From what I understand, the rest of the vehicle is solid.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        I would, but Daughter No.2 wasn’t willing to learn to drive one. The first car for Daughter No. 1 was a 2010 Kia Forte Koup EX with 5-speed (she wanted a manual).She totaled it less than six months later, when she pulled out from a stop sign and the front end got raked across by an old Saturn.

        We found out later she’d been rolling stop signs, because she didn’t like starting off from a stop. She’s in a 2012 Forte Koup SX automatic. She can buy her own manual when she gets out of college.

        • 0 avatar
          R Henry

          I get it. I taught my son to drive a manual, and he has told me already a number of times that he is grateful for having developed that skill.

          My younger daughter had told me she is willing to learn driving a manual…but wants an automatic to drive.

          –I hope daughter No 1 was not injured! …every parents nightmare to get the phone call a child has been in a wreck!

        • 0 avatar
          SirRaoulDuke

          My daughter would not have received her first car if she did not want a manual, as I handed down to her my Mazda3 hatch. Fortunately, I also handed down the back-road haul-a$$ gene; she was very excited that the Mazda would be hers.

      • 0 avatar
        65corvair

        I had a manual transmission Fiesta. It was the car from hell. Even the manual transmission had work done on it. The paper work said “overhaul”. The cars was full of electrical gremlins and fragile suspension and drive train parts.

        We have since bought three news cars, could have all been Fords. All three are Hondas. Never will I buy a Ford again because of the Fiesta. If it isn’t a pick up Ford doesn’t care.

        • 0 avatar
          R Henry

          Ouch!

          I similarly divorced GM…in 2000…at the end of a horrendous lease experience on a 1997 Astro van. I have purchased only Asian cars since, and every single one has been excellent.

        • 0 avatar
          13kRPM

          The cam phaser issues that turned there truck engines in disposable chunks of iron for several years in the mid 2000s would argue that even when it comes to pickups, they really don’t care that much about quality. Frankly I wouldn’t take a F150 of that era as gift.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    This should be a red flag for anyone looking to buy a car…..not only will Ford not issue a recall for poorly designed and malfunctioning equipment but they will ruthlessly defend their mistakes in court…

    Repeated repairs with no adequate solution……thats not standing behind your product…

    The original settlement only offered payments in the $100-$2000 range for people who had multiple transmission replacements or those visited the dealer a ridiculous amount of times for the same issue…which basically means only those who tolerated and rebutted an obscene amount of stalling and false appeasement from the dealership would get any sort of satisfaction. That judgment was an extraordinary win for Ford considering the scope of the problem..

    Also keep in mind that the Powershift transmission was an option upgrade….

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “but they will ruthlessly defend their mistakes in court…”

      um… who doesn’t defend themselves in court?

      • 0 avatar
        tylanner

        “um… who doesn’t defend themselves in court?”

        You are not making a point with that statement….when you have choices in the marketplace why would you choose an automaker that you know will ruthlessly defend poorly designed and malfunctioning equipment?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    While we’re ragging on Ford, I’ll add an unrelated story. I saw the Ranger for the first time on the road last night – one pulled up next to me at a stoplight, and I got a good eyeful of the front fender. The panel gap between the hood and fender was just awful. I figured it might have been a one-off issue for that one vehicle, but no…

    https://www.cstatic-images.com/supersized/in/v1/431765/1FTER4FH6KLA34672/39e75ac7eff595ca0c2da52674e377f4.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      The Ranger is not good. They shouldn’t have brought it here in such condition. The only reason to buy one is if you MUST have a truck fit in your garage with a blue oval on it. TBH, I would rather build a new garage for $40K than buy a $40K Ranger.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        And the Ranger is the second piece of dreck they’ve dropped on us in less than a year.

        On the other hand, I saw the new Explorer and Aviator at the car show, and both look very, very cool.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          If you guys buy based on panel gaps, softness of interior panels and whatnot, you get what you deserve. Or do you just need an excuse to buy a VW, which you should never do (except with few exceptions)

          Anyone buying a car with a notoriously bad engine or transmission also get what they deserve. The same applies to those that have to be the first on their block to own an unproved, all-new (from the ground up) model.

          The Ranger hood gap doesn’t seem to be a quality issue. All the other lines square-up at the headlight and fender perfect. It’s not a normal side-by-side panel fit. Anyhow, it’s a truck for frick’s sake. It no doubt has a rock-hard plastic interior too. So you should never buy a (real) pickup.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Some day maybe Ford will start suing their customers in times of economic hardship. And the repeat ones will forgive them for it.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Funny, I’ve never seen a F-150 with funky panel gaps.

            Yes, this stuff does matter, truck or not.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            the F-150 hasn’t had a hood which wrapped over the shoulder line since 1979. The new Ranger does.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “If you guys buy based on panel gaps, softness of interior panels and whatnot, you get what you deserve. Or do you just need an excuse to buy a VW, which you should never do (except with few exceptions)”

            The “new” (but actually 7 year old) Ranger is a disaster. Car and Driver just did a test recently and the Ranger placed last. IN summary:

            “If you’re going to be late to the party, at least get it right.”

            They questioned Ford’s lie that the US version was “significantly re-engineered from the global truck” and also noted some glaring quality issues (which other publications have seen problems during the test drives…The Straight Pipes experienced a failure of Advanced trac, ABS, Terrain management, traction control, hill start assist, and pre collision assist). Car and Driver also noted that the Ranger is “woefully under-dampened”. The braking was the worst in the group at 193 feet from 70 and the pedal feel was genuinely frightening with INCHES of travel before anything happened.

            The only thing that Car and Driver praised was the powertrain. Otherwise the Ranger is a pile of garbage. And that’s before the criminal nature of Ford’s deceptive fuel economy numbers for the Ranger.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            OK, car or not, how does this stuff matter? Do bad panel gaps accurately predict a bad car?

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I think for most people, uneven or large panel gaps are a signal of sloppy construction. It would be like walking with a big marinara sauce stain on your shirt.

            Reliability-wise, it doesn’t mean the truck will for sure turn into a pumpkin at 36 months, but it could lead to future squeaks/rattles/wind noise and it might discourage a person from dropping $37K on one.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Let’s examine the panel gaps of the worst offending cars that quickly turn into rattle traps and fall apart. Dollars to Donuts they all have amazingly perfect panel gaps.

            Face it, most car buyers don’t know what to look for, or who to ask and are totally overwhelmed. So they focus on silly little things, or the first things they come across, like the feel of the interior plastics as “indicators” to help make a tough decision.

            Take Hyundai/Kia. They’ve made great, no amazing strides on the stuff that meets the eye, in recent years. Except they’re still the same crappy cars.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Different things matter to different people and there can be diverse ownership expectations.

            I don’t think it is “silly” to want a vehicle with tight panel gaps, pleasing aesthetics, & a soft-touch interior; and I don’t think it is “silly” to not care about body fitment, exterior styling, or hard plastics.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            I don’t care about the panel gaps. I care that a truck that isn’t geared towards a contractor, plumber, etc has such a terrible interior, doesn’t drive particularly well, has poor option groups, is overpriced, and late to the market.

            It just isn’t good enough. It won’t command the price premium of the Gladiator and Tacoma. It is a worse everyday vehicle than the Ridgeline. And the Colorado and Frontier beat it on price.

            There is no reason to buy the Ranger right now. That makes me sad because it should be the vehicle I buy.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            A minority of Rangers will still go to plumbers and contractors, so they need to be durable too, inside and out, and will get sharp bulky objects bouncing around the interior.

            Rushing things to market is what GM does. Except “overpriced” is subjective. If it’s truly overpriced, rebates will tell.

            If the other, more “affordable” midsize trucks are still a better deal, pound for pound, sales figures will tell.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            I don’t know what Ford’s ramp up for sales is, but the Colorado is outselling the Ranger 3 to 1 right now. I don’t expect that to continue though.

      • 0 avatar

        May be they consider America to be a 3rd world country? They are Focused as a Laser on China and only China. That’s where the action is.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      that gap is required due to the fact that the hood “waterfalls” over the top of the fender. otherwise you would have metal-to-metal contact and chipped paint any time you close the hood. see also 2006-2008 Ram, 2003-2007 Silverado. Same thing.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      There are a lot of Fords in my Z-plan eligible family. At a family function we were driving behind my cousin’s Escape that she had bought new, and I couldn’t take my eyes off the misaligned tail lamps, how the ones on the hatch didn’t match those on the body. All the other Escapes (common car in NE Ohio) were the same way. The one Kia in the mix had properly aligned lights. If Kia can do it, why can’t Ford? Probably because they don’t care.

      BTW, I saw this from the front seat of a Cruze. The driver would normally have bought a Focus, but these transmissions made it a non-option.

      • 0 avatar
        onyxtape

        I interviewed for a management track position in Dearborn right before the Great Recession (good thing I didn’t relocate for that job). We got a factory tour afterward. They were putting on bumpers on Explorers (or some similar vehicle), and was told that there was a +/- 5% variance in bumper length that was deemed acceptable.

        I don’t know much about auto production, but that sounds terrible.

    • 0 avatar
      Guitar man

      The current F-150 uses exactly the same alligator hood design as the Ranger. They have to have them now to comply with crash standards.

      There is no panel gap there, the lines are exactly parallel and the hood is in line with the cab.

  • avatar
    Rigaudon

    I have a 2014 Ford Focus with the Powershift that belonged to my late father in law. Anyone want it for $6,000? 31,000 miles. I’ve been driving it lately and reminded that avoiding Ford all these years since my first ’66 Ford Falcon was a wise move. It’s now scheduled for a clutch pack replacement but they are on backorder due to demand. At least the dealer was friendly and had comfortable chairs.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    This is one those scenarios which will likely be discussed in Business Ethics classes for generations.

    Ford, in a weak financial position after the 2007-8 recession, faced an existential challenge.

    1) Recall all Foci worldwide…when no permanent solution for the problem existed—which therefore essentially becomes a buyback of an extremely high volume market segment leader.

    2) Tapdance around the issue, paying dealers to band-aid the problems until the rest of the car wears out.

    That Ford chose option 2 doesn’t surprise me. Auto manufacturers do this routinely–to survive.

    Can anybody remember a time when a major manufacturer behaved differently? It is a matter of self-preservation. It could be argued that Ford could not afford to do the right thing. Of course, it can also be argued that Ford can’t afford to NOT do the right thing either.

    The VW Dieselgate issue doesn’t directly compare, because Western Governments got involved regarding emissions issues, NOT quality issues.

    Again, when has an OEM behaved differently in similar circumstances?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Again, when has an OEM behaved differently in similar circumstances?”

      I don’t know. Even FCA managed to drop their DCT and Duologic/select transmissions once it was obvious they sucked.
      Would it really have been impossible to replace the Powershift with a conventional auto on new builds after, say, 2013? By then it was obvious that the dry clutch DCT wasn’t ready for primetime.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I would think it wouldn’t have been difficult for Ford to find a 6 speed auto (planetary) in the parts bin somewhere.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          6F35 costs more. They put it on only one version of the Focus, the 1.0T.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @Adam – but this boondoggle is better somehow than a slightly increased per unit cost?

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Yea, by you time you add up development costs for the Powershift (might as well just tossed that money into a bonfire), warranty costs, legal costs, and loss of consumer goodwill; just using an off-the-shelf conventional unit likely looks much better.

            There were a lot of garbage DCTs and SMGs introduced around this time, but Ford and Smart are the only one that stubbornly stuck with them until everything was razed to the ground.

        • 0 avatar
          Guitar man

          – I would think it wouldn’t have been difficult for Ford to find a 6 speed auto (planetary) in the parts bin somewhere.

          The ECU is designed to work with the transmission. They can’t just drop in any old gearbox.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        What’s odd is that Ford chose the option of extending the transmission warranty for 7 years instead.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “Ford, in a weak financial position after the 2007-8 recession, faced an existential challenge.

      1) Recall all Foci worldwide…when no permanent solution for the problem existed—which therefore essentially becomes a buyback of an extremely high volume market segment leader.

      2) Tapdance around the issue, paying dealers to band-aid the problems until the rest of the car wears out.”

      Wait what?

      The 2008-2011 Focus was by far the most reliable generation of Focus ever sold.

  • avatar
    DougD

    Still enjoying my 2013 SE with 5-speed manual. This whole debacle may be of benefit to me because like CVT equipped cars these powershift Focii will land in the U-pull yards early, ensuring a good supply of parts for mine.

    Very bad for auto Focus owners though, having to pony up large dollars for a questionable transmission on a vehicle that’s not worth much. As a Dodge Caravan owner I can sympathize..

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      That is a good point that I hadn’t considered about the early demise of these cars. As a 5M Fiesta owner I’ll be keeping my eye out.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Or you know if you had a Focus ST or RS there will at least be body parts available in the wrecking yards.

        I noticed the local Ford dealer has a new 2018 Fiesta ST still on the lot and a NEW 2017 Mustang Ecoboost Performance Pack still on the lot. I think the automatic transmission is lot-poison for that car.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    So here’s the thing… the earliest reviews of this car complained about the transmission… people bought these anyhow. Then empirical and anecdotal evidence of the lousiness of this transmission piled up… and people kept buying them. So maybe I can feel sorry for the earliest buyers, but after that, my sympathy for people who bought these cars AFTER the word had been spread is severely limited.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    A 15 Focus rental with the DCT and 22k miles on it is unquestionably the worst drivetrain I’ve ever experienced.

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      I rented a 2014 Focus at Columbus Ohio airport. Backing out of the parking spot I sense something was very different about the car. Too bad it has turned out so badly.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I had the same experience a few weeks ago with a Focus in California. What a mess. The car only had 36K miles. I feel bad for the friend I couldn’t talk out of a new Focus last year. She said she had a good relationship with the dealer. Guess, I’ll see how she feels in a few thousand more miles.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    Nothing to say that hasn’t already been said. Ford could have easily swapped in an existing “proven” 4 or 5 speed slushbox early in the debacle. The average driver would not have known or cared. I tried hard to like the 12+ Foci because I like hatchbacks, but the trans was a non-starter for me. Otherwise the car is fun to drive, and if you can find a manual and want one, its very good and very affordable. I have the butt ugly heavily facelifted 08-11 model. There is something to be said about a decade-old platform. Too many front end noises, but otherwise it is holding up very nicely and is surprisingly comfortable despite hard plastic galore. It’s 9 years old and still solid and looks decent. I have had a bad case of new car fever, but this thing has no market value, so I’m just going to hold onto it for a while longer. I’ve been saying to many people that its the best mediocre used car I’ve owned, and I’ve owned a few.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    This PowerShift issuse is a perfect example of Big Al’s business model of “profits now, recalls/lawsuits later”. He cut quality so much which resulted in short term cash gains but resulted in some big long term losses. I’m astounded that Ford is settling cases for $75K with no hesitation. These cars were worth a quarter of that brand new. Ford has a massive problem on their hands. They just cannot do anything right. I thought it was bad when Big Al was running it (into the ground) but this Hackett guy has said “hold my beer” and is attempting to out due him. The Ranger and F-150 fuel economy scandal, profound quality issues, the ever present threat of your Ford starting on fire, recalling vehicles that have already been recalled to fix them again but properly this time, etc, etc.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I drove a 2012 Focus sedan on business several times with the herky jerky transmission. There is more wrong with the Focus than the transmission. Cannot see out the windows and uncomfortable seats made out of recycled pop bottles. A much better choice would be a Kia Rio or a Hyundai Accent.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Man, for all the Powershift hate… I had a Focus rental a few years ago and didn’t mind it. Took us all around Oregon without issue. I wouldn’t buy one though. They should have went for a conventional 7 or 8 speed.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    This does not surprise me. When I graduated from UM with several engineering degrees, I shortly worked at Ford and GM. At Ford, my boss, as well as many around me did not have a 4 year engineering degree. Yet, they held engineering titles. Some engineers had second rate degrees from the lower rung schools. Some of them seemed to have an ax to grind with people that held engineering degrees from better schools. Some of them were rumored as not being able to make it through a 4 year engineering program. We had others with H1Bs that were terrible. And, if you were a minority or female with a 2 year associates, your career was golden while the white male with 6 years of college was doomed by diversity. And, the raises were a joke. I sent resumes out and was able to get a massive raise by leaving the metro Detroit area. Best move for me. I still keep in touch with some of them, and many of those same players are still there. Frankly, until Ford fixes that problem where the smartest is not rising to the top, their problems will persist. The raises and promotions were driven by diversity instead of educated talent. On the east and west coast, the best rises and I landed up doing very very well.

  • avatar
    theoldguard

    PowerShud-d-d-er transmission was a tragedy. Focus was great car apart from that transmission. I don’t see how that thing made it through testing, and why, after seeing it was irredeemable, Ford kept making it. I won’t say I wouldn’t buy another Ford, but my wife does.

  • avatar
    theoldguard

    After a few years, I gave Focus with PowerShud-d-d-er to my son in college. He said that when he let anyone else drive it, they thought they had broken it. Not good for a company that wants to build cars in the 21st century.

  • avatar
    RS

    Ford’s probably wishing they went with a CVT in the Focus/Fiesta. MPG’s may have been better too.

    Why are the 2017 and newer not covered?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Try driving that Power Shift Focus for a few years you might not like it. The car itself rode ok but the seats were terrible and the visibility was bad. There are much better compact cars out there for not much more or even less if you look at Kia and Hyundai. The Focus and the Fiesta could have been good cars and with a manual transmission they would be at least worth considering.

  • avatar
    TotalNonStopCars

    Yawn. Gm says hold my beer.

    https://www.classaction.org/gm-8-speed-transmission-defect-lawsuits

  • avatar
    conundrum

    If you want to see what a true engineering lemon is, visit a Fusion Sport forum for yuks and giggles. I ran away after a road test because of a driver’s seat made for people with extremely short thighs and butts that needed deep squeezing. Sure it had adjustments, just none that helped and adding four inches to the cushion length was beyond its remit. Thank goodness it was so obvious or I might now be one of those crying into my cups on the forums for other reasons.

    Like most others, I’ve driven a Focus Powershift rental. A decent car was trying to show through the abrupt clonks and learner driver shuddering clutch takeoffs, but if it had a true 160hp I’d be highly surprised. I expected it to fly, but no such luck.

    I tend to dismiss Fords as a bit half-*ssed. The F150 might be decent, but as a decidedly non-truck person, I could not be more uninterested.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Ford has been bad at automatic transmissions for at least half a century now. (In contrast, a M/T first-gen Escort I borrowed for a week in the mid 80’s had a butter-smooth clutch.)

    Seriously how can you be so bad at your ‘core’ business for so long?

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    F *cked
    O ver
    R eally
    D eeply

    Rolling dumpster fire vehicles, with possibly three exceptions out of their entire lineup, with what is one of the worst dealership networks and massive lack of consumer support by HQ, all reflected in resale values.

    Repeat Ford/Lincoln buyers are heavy into sadomasochism; each Ford/Lincoln vehicle should come with a large package of BDSM gear so that Ford/Lincoln dealerships can use restraints on vehicle owners and painfully penetrate them with all manner of injurious objects when they inevitably take their vehicles in for repairs a minimum 2 times per month.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      As someone that owns a Lincoln and a Ford, I don’t have these problems. However, I know my sample size is small.

      Still, I would not recommend most of Ford’s current products to other people. The exceptions are F-Series/Expedition/Navigator, Mustang, and Lincoln products not named MKC/Corsair. The Lincoln dealer experience is much better. If you actually have a problem, they will fix it and you will have a Lincoln loaner. CPO Lincolns are a much better value that new though.

    • 0 avatar
      Darwinian

      The real Truth About Cars.

      Just about given up on this site until this comment.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    FWIW, my company’s got a huge fleet consisting largely of PowerShift Foci. Maybe the fleet manager knows something I don’t and is hating life, but my sense of them, about five years in, is they’re just fine. The car itself drives great, and as long as you accept that the PowerShift transmission is a manual with a computer doing the clutchy parts for you, it’s fine too.


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