GM Finds a New Boss for Maven

Steph Willems
by Steph Willems
gm finds a new boss for maven

Rather than look outside the company for some Silicon Valley-reared go-getter, General Motors sourced its new Maven boss from within. The automaker’s mobility brand was left leaderless following the unexpected January departure of Julia Steyn, who led the brand since its 2016 inception.

Into Steyn’s shoes steps Sigal Cordeiro, a 19-year GM veteran who most recently served as executive director of global product marketing for the automaker’s overseas GEM platform — a vehicle architecture intended to help GM grow its presence in emerging markets. Cordeiro now must guide Maven through its growing pains, ultimately taking it … somewhere.

Steyn had big ideas for Maven, which started out in January 2016 as a carsharing service offering short-term rentals from a GM-owned fleet. The brand then branched out with Maven Gig, a rental service providing vehicles to rideshare and delivery drivers. Last year came a new initiative: peer-to-peer carsharing.

Essentially, private owners and lessees of 2015 or newer GM vehicles can rent out their car to others via a mobile app, earning themselves (and GM) money in the process. The service is now in the process of expanding to 10 American cities. Shortly before her departure, Steyn spoke of adding non-GM vehicles to the service.

While GM created Maven in a bid to open up new revenue streams in a cooling new vehicle market, the mobility realm is still young and teething. Cordeiro’s new role at GM, which began effective February 15th, is to ensure the brand’s profitability — not a simple goal, given the number of competing mobility upstarts.

[Source: Automotive News] [Image: Maven]

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  • Trucky McTruckface Trucky McTruckface on Feb 22, 2019

    "Essentially, private owners and lessees of 2015 or newer GM vehicles can rent out their car to others via a mobile app, earning themselves (and GM) money in the process" Because your GM car didn't already feel enough like a rental, now you can literally rent it to strangers! Just what everyone's always wanted! "Shortly before her departure, Steyn spoke of adding non-GM vehicles to the service" What a shock that she "departed" after suggesting that! "Into Steyn’s shoes steps Sigal Cordeiro, a 19-year GM veteran" GM lifer replaces failed executive, another shock!

  • BklynPete BklynPete on Feb 23, 2019

    "General Motors. The faces change, but the excuses remain the same."

  • Jeff S In the EV market Tesla is not a niche player it is the major player. According to the latest data of the California-based vehicle valuation and automotive research company  Kelley Blue Book, Tesla has the lion’s share with 75 percent market share in  the electric vehicle market in the first three months of 2022.Tesla has dominated the electric vehicle market for years in the United States. The electric vehicles manufactured by Tesla accounted for 79 percent of the new electric vehicles registered in the United States in 2020 and 69,95 percent in 2021. The decrease in the market share in 2021 might be explained by backlogs and the global chip shortage, but the company is ramping up its sales and has already increased its market share to 75 percent in the first quarter of the year. According to Kelley Blue Book, the top 10 EVs sold in the US in the first quarter of 2022 are;[list=1][*]Tesla Model Y[/*][*]Tesla Model 3[/*][*]Ford Mustang Mach-E[/*][*]Tesla Model X[/*][*]Hyundai Ioniq 5[/*][*]Kia EV6[/*][*]Tesla Model S[/*][*]Nissan Leaf[/*][*]Kia Niro[/*][*]Audi e-Tron[/*][/list=1]Tesla has delivered 310,048 vehicles in the first quarter of 2022, another first-quarter record. The success of Tesla is proven once again as the company has three electric cars in the top 10 most selling electric vehicles in the United States, while no other manufacturer has even two different models on the list.Tesla leads all others, selling slightly over 936,000 units in 2021. This gave the company a market share of nearly 14%.Mar 30, 2022https://interestingengineering.com/transportation/tesla-ev-market-75-percent-market-share
  • Jeff S I did not know Plymouth had a full size van prior to the mini vans. I did know about the Plymouth pickups and the Trail Duster.
  • Arthur Dailey When I grew tired of the T-Bird trying to kill me by refusing to start at the most inconvenient times/places, I replaced it with a '79 fullsized Dodge (Sportsman) van. Similar to this but with a different grille and rectangular headlights. The 4 'captains' chairs in my van were pretty much identical to the ones in this van. Mine certainly was not as nicely finished inside. And it was a handful to drive in snow/ice. One thing that strikes me about this van is that although a conversion it does not seem to have the requisite dark tint on the windows.
  • Jeff S I am not a fan of Tesla and they were niche vehicles but it seems that they have become more common. I doubt if I get an EV that it would be a Tesla. The electrical grid will have to be expanded because people over the long run are not going to accept the excuse of the grid can't handle people charging their EVs.
  • AMcA The '70 Continentals and Town Cars may have been cousins to the standard body Fords and Mercurys, they didn't have to be disguised, because they had unique, unbelievably huge bodies of their own. Looking at the new 1970 interior, I'd say it was also a cost savings in sewing the seat. Button tufted panels like the 1969 interior had require a lot of sewing and tufting work. The 1970 interior is mostly surface sewing on a single sheet of upholstery instead of laboriously assembled smaller pieces. FINALLY: do I remember correctly that the shag carpet shown under these cars was a Photoshop? They didn't really go so peak '70s as to photograph cars on shag carpets, did they?
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