By on February 25, 2019

2020 Kia Soul

I had just returned from driving the 2020 Kia Soul in San Diego (review forthcoming later today) when Kia fulfilled a promise made to the media via a note in my inbox.

The pricing info that wasn’t ready for our drive event was now live.

While most of the pricing is in line with what one expects of a boxy compact commuter, if you fancy the GT Turbo, be prepared to pony up.

A stick-shift Soul LX will set you back $17,490, and an LX automatic will run you $18,990. An S goes for $20,290, as does a GT-Line with the 2.0-liter four-cylinder. An X-Line rings the register at $21,490, and an EX $22,690. Spring for the GT-Line with the 1.6-liter turbo four (review spoiler: That trim is better than the X-Line), though, and you’ll pay a premium. That car stickers at $27,490. All trims are saddled with a $995 destination fee.

Available content across the board includes Android Auto, Apple CarPlay, a 10.25-inch infotainment screen, two-device Bluetooth connection, eight-inch head-up display, sunroof, dual-zone climate control, heated seats, heated steering wheel, push-button start, satellite radio, tilt and telescope steering wheel, USB, and 640-watt premium audio system with amplifier and 10 speakers.

Available driver-aid tech includes forward-collision avoidance, lane-keep assist, lane-change assist, driver-attention warning, blind-spot collision warning, rear-cross collision warning, smart cruise control, and high-beam assist.

That GT turbo price premium is hefty, but perhaps worth it. Otherwise, the Soul appears to be a pretty decent value buy. It does cost a bit more than a Nissan Kicks, but all trims save the GT Turbo undercut the Fiat 500L and 500X. The regular 500 is cheaper, though.

We’ll have the full skinny on the Soul later today.

[Image © 2019 Tim Healey/TTAC]

 

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74 Comments on “2020 Kia Soul Pricing Announced: That Turbo Will Cost You...”


  • avatar
    jatz

    Christ on a bike, this is a GRANDMA car and successfully so. Grandmas are legion and they love Souls.

    Leave things well enough alone.

  • avatar
    NoID

    That face…

    Kia Soul is so done with your crap.

  • avatar
    syncro87

    Love the look of the new Soul. I’ve been looking for a replacement for my Scion xB. The xB is a super versatile car, and stone cold reliable, but the fuel economy sucks, and both transmissions options are highly flawed in the xB2. So when you’re looking for a more up to date xB stand in, the new Soul is one of my finalists.

    I’m disappointed that you can’t get a stick shift with the turbo, and I don’t trust H/K’s DCT durability, so the turbo version sadly gets crossed off the old shopping list. Not to mention I can’t envision myself paying nearly 30 grand, or even 25, for a Soul.

    That leaves me with a CVT option that doesn’t really excite…or the base manual. Ah, the LX manual. Yep, I think that’s the one variant that might have my interest. Cheap, probably the most fun non turbo to drive, and you can probably beat posted MPG numbers.

    You’ll probably be able to buy a base manual Soul for 15 or 16 grand. At that price level, the value equation in my head seems a lot better than 25k or so.

    Anyway, not that anyone will probably read this, but if you astute TTAC-ers have a better idea for my xB’s replacement, chime in.

    • 0 avatar
      saturnotaku

      Honda HR-V or Fit? They dropped the manual from the former for 2019, but it’s still available on the latter in every trim level but the top-line EX-L.

      • 0 avatar
        syncro87

        Fit isn’t a bad idea, but the gearing on the manual version is way too short for my taste. A real shame, because if 6th gear allowed you to drop about 500 rpm more than it does now at 70 or 75 mph, it would be decent. The CVT version I drove with that tiny engine, eh, not impressed. That being said, if Honda dropped the 1.5T into the Fit, I’d deal with the CVT. I test drove a manual Fit, and at Midwest USA flatland highway speeds (75-80+), the thing is just screaming. I think that would get old after a while.

        The HR-V is a good idea as well. A slug, though. My xB feels like a V6 compared to the HR-V. The HR is liveable with a stick, but those are gone now, and finding a used one is like finding a Leprechaun in my area. The HR-V sorely, sorely needs the 1.5 turbo engine from the Civic.

        Anyway, I appreciate the time you took to reply, and yeah, I might take another look at your suggestions.

        I thought maybe Impreza wagon, but man, they are under powered. I test drove a Crosstrek and it was pretty laughable taking an on ramp to the highway. I felt like I was driving my old Vanagon Westfalia to some degree.

        • 0 avatar
          saturnotaku

          Is a Fiesta ST too small and/or expensive? Maybe a VW Golf?

          • 0 avatar
            syncro87

            Fiesta too tiny. One of the things I like about the xB is the big flat roof. Allows me to space out roof rack crossbars nice and wide, can haul canoe, kayak, wood, etc, up there easily. Have one child who is 9, so rear seat space isn’t the end all but matters.

            Golf Sportwagen is attractive (or just Golf), you are right on the money. But having owned a ton of VWs, well, VW. Having Hondas and Toyotas in the driveway in recent years is a refreshing change from Volkswagens…less shop visits and niggly problems. But yeah, Golf might be the best overall package.

            Whatever I get has to be able to drive from Kansas City to St Louis or so, 200 miles each way, from time to time, with 3 people in the car. You can do that in a Fiesta ST, but not ideal. My 2003 Mini Cooper was like that. Great city car, not so good car when you wanted to drive 8 hours to somewhere else. And when you live in Kansas City, you end up driving a long way to get somewhere else once in a while.

          • 0 avatar
            syncro87

            Fiesta too tiny. One of the things I like about the xB is the big flat roof. Allows me to space out roof rack crossbars nice and wide, can haul canoe, kayak, wood, etc, up there easily. Have one child who is 9, so rear seat space isn’t the end all but matters.

            Golf Sportwagen is attractive (or just Golf), you are right on the money. But having owned a ton of VWs, well, VW. Having Hondas and Toyotas in the driveway in recent years is a refreshing change from Volkswagens…less shop visits and niggly problems. But yeah, Golf might be the best overall package.

            Whatever I get has to be able to drive from Kansas City to St Louis or so, 200 miles each way, from time to time, with 3 people in the car. You can do that in a Fiesta ST, but not ideal. My 2003 Mini Cooper was like that. Great city car, not so good car when you wanted to drive 8 hours to somewhere else. And when you live in Kansas City, you end up driving a long way to get somewhere else once in a while.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            If highway refinement is your thing, and you like to drive, a Golf Sportwagen would be a terrific choice. It’d knock out that KC-STL road trip like a freakin’ champ. Plus, there’s the new warranty.

          • 0 avatar
            spookiness

            Golf & Sportwagen have been really calling me lately. Decent discounts, not as pricey as I’d thought. I’m slowly getting over my 20+ year aversion to VW (had the same issue with Ford and eventually go over it).

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            VW Golf SportWagen S with 4-motion, 6 speed manual, a few choice options, and when I build my own the MSRP is just a hair over $25K.

            That’s awfully close to the internet’s mythical unicorn wagon.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            If I were Syncro, I’d skip the AWD – it’s not really a must-have in KC.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      syncro87

      Being based off a Japanese work truck. The Scion xB could carry much heavier loads than the Kia Soul. If you carry heavy loads even occasionally, you will probably be better off looking at something designed primarily as a small work van. I believe the Ford Transit Connect; RAM Promaster City & Nissan NV200 are all also sold in passenger versions.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        “Being based off a Japanese work truck. The Scion xB could carry much heavier loads than the Kia Soul.”

        Huh? Since when is the Corolla (2nd gen platform) a “work truck?”

    • 0 avatar
      R Henry

      “I don’t trust H/K’s DCT durability, so the turbo version sadly gets crossed off the old shopping list.”

      With Kia’s 100k mile drivetrain warranty, I would jump in with both feet!

      • 0 avatar
        saturnotaku

        A front-drive Tucson in Value trim might work. That checks in at a shade under $25K. Not super powerful, but it has a surprising amount of passenger room and cargo space. You also avoid any potential DCT pitfalls, though recent examples I’ve driven have been much better behaved than the one in my ’17 Tucson Sport 1.6T.

    • 0 avatar
      formula m

      Get an LX 2wd Honda CRV and call it a day. Don’t waste your money on Kia Soul styling

    • 0 avatar
      Ol Shel

      Here’s the perfect car for you… and everyone:

      https://www.missoulavw.com/VehicleSearchResults?search=preowned&fuelType=Diesel&bodyColor=Brown

      • 0 avatar
        syncro87

        Shel,

        I’ve owned many VW diesels from 1981 to 2007 or so. They don’t make sense to me anymore with gas variants getting such good MPG, low sulfur diesel fuel pump wear concerns, and the complicated emissions gear like the regen stuff, etc. The last of the really good VW diesels were the 90 hp 1.9L cars of the early 00’s in my opinion. Too complicated now, and the payoff isn’t as great. I may have missed you just joking because that is the proverbial brown diesel wagon.

  • avatar
    theBrandler

    That’s really expensive for not having AWD and not being a performance oriented vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      That was my first impression. However, given that real world transaction prices for the turbo will probably be a few grand less than sticker after the lots fill up, it might be more reasonable. 25 grand for a loaded out Soul seems in the realm of reason to me. 28 or 29 does not.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      Not really. It seems to compare with well-equipped hatchbacks.

    • 0 avatar
      KevinC

      We have an ’18 Exclaim (Turbo). The starting point for pricing was basically at invoice, and we live in the middle lf nowhere and this was from a tiny dealer. If you take the 80-mile drive to Tucson, the big dealer up there has a billion Souls in stock and the pricing is ridiculously low, and that’s before any negotiation. So the real-world price should be well below list on these too, at least after the first few weeks of availability. I figure $3k below sticker should be fairly easily attainable based on our experience. At that price, the Turbo is a steal, it’s SO loaded. We love ours so far.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    The short spell I owned a low mileage 2008 xB, I got atrocious city mileage, like worse than my V6 Mustang.

    Not sure if it was the low power of the xB or what, but I was lucky to crack 15mpg with the 4-speeed auto. Made me wish I had gotten a truck instead.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      I have an xB now. 2015. The thing is a gas pig. I’m not doing as badly as you. Doing 50/50 city highway is netting around 22-23 right now. That still seems like garbage to me considering how small the xB is, and how I drive the thing conservatively to try to increase MPG.

      The 4 speed auto is the problem. Very inefficient. I had a manual xB2 before this, and I should have never traded it. 28-29 mpg overall easily. 26 on a bad day. The dead wood 4 speed automatic drops you 5 mpg from the get go.

      It is a real shame Toyota let the xB rot on the vine. It would have been very easy to upgrade the thing. Stick a 6 speed auto in there, and make the gearing of the manual about 15% taller in 5th gear. The 2.4L has enough torque to where it is silly to have the thing buzzing along 1000 rpm too high on the freeway (stick version).

      I think a big reason xB2 sales sucked is that the MPG was not competitive for a small econo car. Back when gas was 3/gal plus, nobody wanted a small car that got 23 or 24 mpg.

      • 0 avatar
        dividebytube

        Not sure why my mileage was so bad – probably my leadfoot and coming from a 2004 BMW 325i with a 5-speed manual. So the xB2 was a change. I bought the Scion for it’s ability to haul stuff, sort of a mini wagon. It did that job very well but the fun factor was a lot less.

        The xB did take a 55 mph hit on the passenger door – I was t-boned – and kept me alive. So I have no complaints in that regard!

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      15 seems … implausible, yeah.

      I can’t get less than 16 in my XC70, and it’s 4,400 pounds with a turbo-6, and I don’t exactly baby it.

  • avatar
    wooootles

    The luxury, infotainment and driver-aid tech on the loaded model would flat out embarrass entry-level German luxury sedans from 10 years ago. Crazy.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      “The luxury, infotainment and driver-aid tech ”

      For thems as wants all that crap.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “flat out embarrass entry-level German luxury sedans from 10 years ago.”

      But, the base 2009 3-series or C-Class (at least if you lived in the US) also gave you ~30 more horsepower from a more refined engine with smoother power delivery. And RWD for those who care about such things.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      I’ll take a new BMW E46 330i (say 2005-era) over a Soul. Straight-6 with fantastic driving dynamics.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Hope you do your own wrenching

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        It’s funny how time changes perspective. As a BMW enthusiast/fanatic back in the day, the E46 was a huge disappointment with slow, light, and numb steering. It also was the first BMW where the secondary controls had lost their direct mechanical feel of quality, the first BMW in a while with indifferent ergonomics(Chris Bangle called them ‘active ergonomics,’ meaning that they required attention and effort, sort of like how ‘social justice’ is really injustice), and the first 3-series where color-coordination was a talking point. The E46 was also the heaviest one yet to use the ball-joints-as-bushings front lower control arms introduced on the E30. They wore out at a reasonable rate on the E30, a bit quicker on the E36, and like wiper blades on the E46. The E46 may have been the last attractive looking 3 series, but the last good 3 series was already history.

  • avatar

    The price for the turbo is aligned with a new Mazda 3 hatch AWD.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      Yes. I think Mazda might have a tough time selling the new 3, though. I think the market for slightly expensive Mazdas with mediocre rear seat room, so-so power, and poor rearward visibility might be limited. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a Mazda fan. But I’m on the fence as to whether Mazda moving the 3 upmarket is going to work out for them in the USA.

      The upcoming 3 for some reason strikes me as the MK4 VW Jetta of 20 years later. I sold those back in the day. Now, granted, we sold a butt load of Jettas in the early 2000’s. But I remember the objections we got that resulted in a lot of people heading down the street to other dealerships, too. Rear seat too small. Fairly pricey. Limited VW dealer network resulting in 20 or 30 miles for service appointments versus 5 or 10 to the Honda or Toyota dealer.

      I think some of the hurdles in selling 2002 Jettas might rear their ugly heads for Mazda with the new 3. People shopping cheaper Corollas and Civics (and ironically, Jettas nowadays) down the street. Those cars all having better use of interior space. Sure, the Mazda will have AWD, but the people that care about that all want Subarus anyhow. I can just picture the young couples with one kid deciding that the rear seat is just too cramped.

      I think the new 3 is cool, but I wonder how many people will actually plunk down cash for one or sign on the line that is dotted.

      • 0 avatar
        syncro87

        One thing I forgot to add is that the market has changed since 2000. A lot more people want SUVs versus sedans today. That might make a somewhat premium small sedan a tougher sell than a Jetta was back in the day. Back then it was seen as somewhat cool to have a small “premium” sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        But over in Europe, Mazda handily outsells Honda (as well as in Australia).

        For those drivers who want driving dynamics and are dash-strokers (among the Japanese brands) Mazda outdoes Honda.

  • avatar
    wooootles

    @ajla you should have also added “superior driving dynamics” to the stuff people don’t really care about.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    $27K would be an acceptable price for the “N” or true “GT” version but not the “GT Line”

    The Veloster N starts at $26,900 (with far more HP) and even an Elantra GT Sport is easy to keep right at $25K for MSRP (roughly same HP as the Soul GT-Line.)

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Twenty-seven seems like a lot for the turbo version, but there is a turbo version now that starts around $23,000, and it can be optioned up to $27,000 easily (tech packages, sunroofs, etc). I suspect the new one might come loaded up with everything.

    Having said that, though, I think this car always made more sense as a basic grocery-getter.

  • avatar
    NiceCar

    I good friend has a Soul. I’ve always appreciated it for it’s practicality and reasonable price. And the times I’ve driven it, I thought it was perfectly fine, if not “great.” Sure, it unexpectedly became a hit with the older crowd, but that’s actually sort of cool. 27k for a Soul seems crazy, but as long as there’s still great, more affordable options down the trim line, then so be it. Why shouldn’t Kia try to ring some cash out of a select group of people who want a performance Soul?

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I’d like to read a review of the ace of base M/t 2.0L. It’s tough to compare dollar for dollar on the KDM car vs. Honda/Toyota etc as actual transaction prices will be quite a bit lower for the Kia.
    The 27k loaded Soul Turbo will likely transact for 23- 24k

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I can’t be getting too old, being in my 30’s….

    But is it just me or are recent new car/redesigned car prices seeming astronomical to anyone else?

    $27,500 for a Kia Soul?!
    What was that new Mazda3 with a manual? $28,XXX right?!

    I kinda have an interest in the new Ford Ranger. I realize there are trim options, but most of the reviews I’m seeing on YouTube have trucks that are stickering for like $37,000! For a midsize truck, and an older design as well. The interior isn’t lighting the world on fire.

    Price out a 4Runner.

    Granted, I know there is MSRP and then there are rebates and negotiation, but all the recent cars I’ve had my eye on just seem insane in the pricing department to me. I’m starting to wonder if the car companies are pricing these things on the assumption people are going to take out 7+ year loans or something.

    Maybe most sedan prices seem ok…unpopular segment and deals to be had.

    But other than that, I can’t believe how often I’m left with sticker shock on pretty “standard” vehicles like the Ranger, Soul, Jeep Grand Cherokee, Toyota trucks, etc.

    And I know you can play the used car game as well, but take a look at what 2 year old, low mileage sedans are listed at. Huge savings.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    I have yet to read a review that had anything positive to say about the Honda Fit’s ride and handling. It’s one of the worst choices in it’s class. And sales numbers prove it out. In 2018 they sold 35,000 units in the U.S.

    Even the Sentra (that everybody knocks on here) sold 218,000 units in 2018.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    I have yet to read a review that had anything positive to say about the Honda Fit’s ride and handling. It’s one of the worst choices in it’s class. And sales numbers prove it out. In 2018 they sold 35,000 units in the U.S.

    Even the Sentra (that everybody knocks on here) sold 218,000 units in 2018.


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