2020 Kia Soul Pricing Announced: That Turbo Will Cost You

Tim Healey
by Tim Healey

I had just returned from driving the 2020 Kia Soul in San Diego (review forthcoming later today) when Kia fulfilled a promise made to the media via a note in my inbox.

The pricing info that wasn’t ready for our drive event was now live.

While most of the pricing is in line with what one expects of a boxy compact commuter, if you fancy the GT Turbo, be prepared to pony up.

A stick-shift Soul LX will set you back $17,490, and an LX automatic will run you $18,990. An S goes for $20,290, as does a GT-Line with the 2.0-liter four-cylinder. An X-Line rings the register at $21,490, and an EX $22,690. Spring for the GT-Line with the 1.6-liter turbo four (review spoiler: That trim is better than the X-Line), though, and you’ll pay a premium. That car stickers at $27,490. All trims are saddled with a $995 destination fee.

Available content across the board includes Android Auto, Apple CarPlay, a 10.25-inch infotainment screen, two-device Bluetooth connection, eight-inch head-up display, sunroof, dual-zone climate control, heated seats, heated steering wheel, push-button start, satellite radio, tilt and telescope steering wheel, USB, and 640-watt premium audio system with amplifier and 10 speakers.

Available driver-aid tech includes forward-collision avoidance, lane-keep assist, lane-change assist, driver-attention warning, blind-spot collision warning, rear-cross collision warning, smart cruise control, and high-beam assist.

That GT turbo price premium is hefty, but perhaps worth it. Otherwise, the Soul appears to be a pretty decent value buy. It does cost a bit more than a Nissan Kicks, but all trims save the GT Turbo undercut the Fiat 500L and 500X. The regular 500 is cheaper, though.

We’ll have the full skinny on the Soul later today.

[Image © 2019 Tim Healey/TTAC]

Tim Healey
Tim Healey

Tim Healey grew up around the auto-parts business and has always had a love for cars — his parents joke his first word was “‘Vette”. Despite this, he wanted to pursue a career in sports writing but he ended up falling semi-accidentally into the automotive-journalism industry, first at Consumer Guide Automotive and later at Web2Carz.com. He also worked as an industry analyst at Mintel Group and freelanced for About.com, CarFax, Vehix.com, High Gear Media, Torque News, FutureCar.com, Cars.com, among others, and of course Vertical Scope sites such as AutoGuide.com, Off-Road.com, and HybridCars.com. He’s an urbanite and as such, doesn’t need a daily driver, but if he had one, it would be compact, sporty, and have a manual transmission.

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  • CKNSLS Sierra SLT CKNSLS Sierra SLT on Feb 25, 2019

    I have yet to read a review that had anything positive to say about the Honda Fit's ride and handling. It's one of the worst choices in it's class. And sales numbers prove it out. In 2018 they sold 35,000 units in the U.S. Even the Sentra (that everybody knocks on here) sold 218,000 units in 2018.

    • See 2 previous
    • Art Vandelay Art Vandelay on Feb 25, 2019

      @syncro87 I'd buy a fit so as you describe

  • CKNSLS Sierra SLT CKNSLS Sierra SLT on Feb 25, 2019

    I have yet to read a review that had anything positive to say about the Honda Fit's ride and handling. It's one of the worst choices in it's class. And sales numbers prove it out. In 2018 they sold 35,000 units in the U.S. Even the Sentra (that everybody knocks on here) sold 218,000 units in 2018.

  • Jonathan IMO the hatchback sedans like the Audi A5 Sportback, the Kia Stinger, and the already gone Buick Sportback are the answer to SUVs. The A5 and the AWD version of the Stinger being the better overall option IMO. I drive the A5, and love the depth and size of the trunk space as well as the low lift over. I've yet to find anything I need to carry that I can't, although I admit I don't carry things like drywall, building materials, etc. However, add in the fun to drive handling characteristics, there's almost no SUV that compares.
  • C-b65792653 I'm starting to wonder about Elon....again!!I see a parallel with Henry Ford who was the wealthiest industrialist at one time. Henry went off on a tangent with the peace ship for WWI, Ford TriMotor, invasive social engineering, etc. Once the economy went bad, the focus fell back to cars. Elon became one of the wealthiest industrialist in the 21st century. Then he went off with the space venture, boring holes in the ground venture, "X" (formerly Twitter), etc, etc, etc. Once Tesla hit a plateau and he realized his EVs were a commodity, he too is focused on his primary money making machine. Yet, I feel Elon is over reacting. Down sizing is the nature of the beast in the auto industry; you can't get around that. But hacking the Super Charger division is like cutting off your own leg. IIRC, GM and Ford were scheduled to sign on to the exclusive Tesla charging format. That would have doubled or tripled his charging opportunity. I wonder what those at the Renaissance Center and the Glass House are thinking now. As alluded to, there's blood in the water and other charging companies will fill the void. I believe other nations have standardized EV charging (EU & China). Elon had the chance to have his charging system as the default in North America. Now, he's dropped the ball. He's lost considerable influence on what the standardized format will eventually be. Tremendous opportunity lost. 🚗🚗🚗
  • Tassos I never used winter tires, and the last two decades I am driving almost only rear wheel drive cars, half of them in MI. I always bought all season tires for them, but the diff between touring and non touring flavors never came up. Does it make even the smallest bit of difference? (I will not read the lengthy article because I believe it does not).
  • Lou_BC ???
  • Lou_BC Mustang sedan? 4 doors? A quarterhorse?Ford nomenclature will become:F Series - Pickups Raptor - performance division Bronco - 4x4 SUV/CUVExplorer - police fleetsMustang- cars
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