By on January 14, 2019

2020 Toyota Supra

The teaser parade is over, and the 2020 Toyota Supra is now fully visible to the world.

Toyota’s fifth-generation Supra follows the FT-1 Concept, as we all knew, and was developed by Toyota’s GAZOO Racing.

Contained within the two-seat sports car is a 335-horsepower (365 lb-ft of torque) 3.0-liter turbocharged inline-six cylinder engine, an eight-speed automatic transmission with paddle shifters, an adaptive suspension, and an active differential that distributes torque between the rear wheels as needed.

Toyota may have teased the Supra to death, to the point that many NAIAS attendees were “meh” about it, but either I have a higher tolerance for annoying teasers or I just like the car more than most. It looks good up close — the lines flow better than in pictures and the proportions look less out of whack.

I spoke to a Toyota PR person about the target competition, and that would be the Porsche Cayman. Other names tossed about include the BMW M2. He confirmed that the Supra’s footprint is similar to that of the FT86, but he pointed out that the buyer is different — fairly obvious, given the $50K starting price point.

2020 Toyota Supra

Nineteen-inch wheels front and rear are shod with Michelin Pilot Super Sport tires and outfitted with 13.7-inch Brembo brakes with four-piston calipers. The Supra has a rear multi-link suspension.

Here’s a few performance specs for perusal: A 0-60 time of 4.1 seconds and an electronically limited top speed of 155.

I don’t know if the Supra can really steal Cayman buyers away from Porsche, but I don’t think it will be a flop. As per usual, I am bummed at the lack of a manual transmission, but the Supra otherwise looks pretty good on paper. And not so bad in person.

2020 Toyota Supra

Even the $50K price is reasonable, though it will get pricier with options.

Teased to death or not, color me as more than meh. Toyota has something good here. Maybe not special in the way the Supra once was, but very, very good.

[Images @ 2019 Tim Healey/TTAC]

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109 Comments on “2020 Toyota Supra – Revealed for Real...”


  • avatar

    I’ve got two main. No. Three main complaints.

    -Automatic only

    -The engine is a BMW one, and not powerful enough (especially when compared to the last Supra)

    -It does not look like a Supra and is not large enough, because it has Z4 proportions. Clearly BMW dictated that part.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      Tell us how you really feel, Corey.

    • 0 avatar
      mgbjack

      What a loser this thing will be for both parties.

    • 0 avatar
      Null Set

      I find your third criticism to be both irrelevant and ahistorical. The Supra has undergone many, many radical changes in styling over its lifetime. Its styling has never been “iconic” in the way that, say, and 911’s is. Which is a good thing, since it’s never become a straitjacket for the model, the way it has for Porsche. So to say “it doesn’t look like a Supra” is kind of meaningless. The only question should be: Do you like its new styling? It’s a little operatic for my taste, but then, why not? You buy this kind of car to be noticed. If you want to be anonymous, ugly and “iconic”, buy a current Mustang.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      I actually think it has a decent amount of 4th gen Supra styling, but it looks awkward from most angles. Sort of like a poorly executed facelift. I agree with your other two points. I’m not a badge whore, but who wants the reliability of a BMW with the badge prestige of a Toyota.

    • 0 avatar
      Tele Vision

      I think that it’s exactly what it should be. It’s perfect. I love the proportions. A straight-six is a smooth thing of beauty and, with RWD and a near Panoz GTS-located cockpit, this should have near 50/50 weight balance. Bang on. Oh, and a turbo just makes it better, if you’re into that. I have no doubt that code is currently being furiously written to ‘chip’ this car even as I type, though.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      Flop^2.

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      #4, it is another car with a tablet stuck on after the fact. If they are trying to compete, at least look as nice as the competition. It probably pipes engine noise into the cabin also.

      I would take a Cayman or used Viper over this, or even a Corvette.

  • avatar
    George B

    Toyota styling with BMW reliability?

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Gee, I just don’t know why, but I sure see a lot of Z4 here. ;)

  • avatar
    Sanman111

    I am the demographic for this car. Nice income, was just graduating HS when fast and the furious came out, and love the MKIV supra and tuner cars. This is a hard pass. It is nothing like previous Supras. Also, it is ugly. A Mustang GT is more Supra than this and cheaper. The Mustang GT is also where my money will likely be going.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I agree w/ Corey. The loss of manual turns off a lot of folks who would otherwise be inclined to look this way, the JDM purist Gen Xers and older. To them, the Supra name meant German performance and build quality with Toyota reliability and cost efficacy. Now it comes with German reliability and the same 8spd auto used in every FR configuration under the sun.
    It should also be a 2+2 for the school run and insurance reasons.
    I’m looking at it with not a lot of enthusiasm.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    God this thing is ugly as h*ll.

    Zero interest from me.

  • avatar
    Mackie

    Not a fan of the styling. And that rear end… it looks like it’s been sucking on a lemon.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I believe Toyota and BMW collaborated on this car. So it’s basically a less expensive Z4, which can’t be that bad.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      People who rent BMWs do it for the badge. People who buy Toyotas do it for the lasting quality. This has BMW engineering quality and a Toyota badge. There probably isn’t a price low enough for that combination to appeal to anyone.

  • avatar
    open country

    This suffers from the same complex as the new NSX – over teased and over delayed leading to lukewarm interest and widespread criticism on launch.

  • avatar
    Jon

    335HP and 365TQ does not really seem like enough when compared to other two door performance coupes. I know i am dreaming but a supercharged 3URFE would have been fun.

    • 0 avatar
      Fordson

      All the people talking about the 335/365 not being enough:

      This is German 335/365, not Japanese 335/365…which means it will be making those numbers at the drive wheels, not the flywheel.

      This engine does 0-60 in the very low 4s in a 4200-lb. BMW 5 Series sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        SD 328I

        That is incorrect, all hp figures are rated at the flywheel which is the industry standard.

        You can say BMW can sometimes be conservative with the hp ratings, but they do not rate them at the wheel, no one does.

        • 0 avatar
          Fordson

          “That is incorrect, all hp figures are rated at the fl”wheel which is the industry standard.”

          No sh*t, Sherlock. I said it will in actuality make those numbers at the drive wheels, not that Toyota claimed it would make them at the drive wheels or that it would have an official rating at the drive wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      statikboy

      With Regards to the 3URFE, Wikipedia has this to say:

      “For a time, Toyota offered an available bolt-on Toyota Racing Development Eaton’s Twin Vortices Series Roots-type supercharger kit for the Tundra and Sequoia bumps power up to 504 hp (376 kW) and 550 lb⋅ft (750 N⋅m) of torque. Offered by Toyota’s TRD, the supercharger kit could be installed by dealers and covered under warranty.”

      But would it fit?

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I wonder if BMW stipulated that Toyota couldn’t have the powertrain if they made a direct M2 competitor, which this could have been with a slight wheelbase stretch and a manual.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Hideous looks, hideous price.

    Sales will drop by 50% in 3 years, and it will be discontinued in 5. Total run: 15k vehicles.

    I’m disappointed Toyota would green-light this.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Internet has harped on many of the issues, but the biggest one is the price. For ~$55K, this, or

    -718 Cayman
    -GT350
    -Camaro 1LE
    -Corvette Stingray

    Or perhaps most damningly, a well equipped 340i 6MT?

    This is the problem with historic model revivals. You have no choice but to either knock it out of the park, or offer a value proposition that can’t be refused (preferably both). The wildest part is I’d say an MKIV Turbo 6MT for the same or even more money is the better deal. For this much money you might as well have the real thing.

    • 0 avatar
      trackratmk1

      You nailed it. A $55k toy car. Precious few will year round DD this due to the cramped cabin, lack of storage, and summer only tires. Which means it’s a second or third (maybe fourth) car for most owners. The original was a GT car, not a sports car/toy car which meant it was actually usable as your only car… at least when it was new.

      Those with the means to afford a $55k toy can probably stretch to afford a 75k toy, and there will be better $75k toys than this.

    • 0 avatar
      Fordson

      Car design has come a long way in 25 years…you drive this, then drive a MkIV Supra, and you’ll think you’re driving a Model A Ford.

      Go look at Car & Driver’s Lightning Lap series – a new Civic R laps Virginia International a half-second faster than a 2013 Boxster S or 2013 Audi RS5.

      The power-to-weight numbers from the old Supra to the new one may look similar, but…

      • 0 avatar
        johnny_5.0

        I agree with your general sentiment, but performance won’t exactly be Earth shattering compared to a car that came out 25 years ago. Depending on who you were reading, it did 0-60 between 4.6 and 5.1 seconds, pulled up to 0.98G, trapped over 105 mph. Even the basic specs of a ~3500 pound, 320 hp/315 lb-ft, 6 speed manual twin turbo 2+2 coupe don’t sound all that out of place today.

        If the new car hits 60 in 4 flat with a fast 8 speed auto and launch control I wouldn’t be surprised, or that impressed. The old car was also very competitive for its time and was faster than lots of more expensive hardware. The new one is entering a world where automatic Mustangs and Camaros are under 4 seconds to 60 and trapping at 118mph bone stock, for at least $10k less. Performance for your Supra dollar is a bloodbath for the new car though. The old one was $40k in 1993 which is about $70k with inflation.

        But in the end the old car is mostly legendary as the shell that contained the 2JZ-GTE. There will be no MKVs making 800hp on stock internals at import drag wars. ~600hp won’t be a “normal” state of tune when you see them on the street. It really is a rebadged Z4, nothing to pause and gawk over, other than perhaps rarity on the road.

        • 0 avatar
          Noble713

          “There will be no MKVs making 800hp on stock internals at import drag wars. ~600hp won’t be a “normal” state of tune when you see them on the street.”

          Why would you think this? BMW guys are already making 600whp B58s with stock internals, and the engine hasn’t even been out very long. This company’s Stage III kit costs roughly the same as the ~550whp kit I have planned for my MkIV Supra:

          https://www.bimmerboost.com/content.php?9205-BigBoost-Turbo-is-first-to-crack-600-whp-with-the-B58-BMW-F22-M240i-dynos-613-rwhp-with-Stage-III-turbo-kit

  • avatar
    jatz

    As an 8 year-old I love it and not many of my peers can drive a stick these days.

    Plus, universal rejection by car sites often means cha-ching in the real world.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I can say this – looking at this for the first time, has not twitched a single muscle in my body

  • avatar
    trackratmk1

    No targa.
    No manual.
    No back seats.

    I’ll take the M2 at almost the same price point.

    • 0 avatar
      Noble713

      The American car market is so spoiled. The M2 starts just under $80k here in Japan. Don’t even get me started on imported American muscle car prices.

      The base and middle-model A90 Supras come with 190 and 258hp turbo-4s here -_-.
      https://toyotagazooracing.com/gr/supra/specs/

      I like almost everything about the car except the totally-not-driver-focused interior, the lack of a manual trans, and the slightly-heavy curb weight. I anticipate that a manual will come later (as well as a “track/tuner spec” model that’s kinda stripped of features but has the B58 engine + 6-speed manual). I wouldn’t mind ordering one in a few years, but there’s no way in Hell I’d part with my MkIV Supra to add this to my garage.

  • avatar
    JoDa

    What? You didn’t think it was going to look stupid?
    Looks like something out of the mind of a deranged 12 year old.
    The engine is nice.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    A less-attrative BMW Z4? I’ve never found the Z4 appealing and this Supra even less so.

    Paint me in Camp Corey.

  • avatar
    loner

    I’d like to see it in person before commenting on the styling. However, putting a BMW engine in it removes much of the reason for buying a Toyota in the first place.

  • avatar
    Vanillasludge

    I’ve been burned too many times by BMW build quality to feel any desire for this thing.

    The button labels literally fell off the contols on our 328i with 25k miles on it. The number of recalls done over the past year are comical and there are electronic gremlins the dealer can’t verify.

    Further Examples:
    The driveline has a vibration they can’t trace. The body collects leaves in the drains and water gets trapped in the fenders. The AM radio band simply ceased to exist. The rear window trim flew off somewhere and water collected in the gap above the trunk. The climate controls will randomly fail to work on cold days.

    Run away Toyota fans, this is a BMW.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      One of my neighbors has an E90 3-Series and an E85 Z4 coupe, and both spend a lot of time up on jackstands. I could see one of these in his driveway, up on jackstands, ten years from now.

  • avatar
    overdale

    I’m curious why this article doesn’t mention anything about the fact that it was co-developed with the BMW Z4, has many of the same components, uses the same platform, and is built alongside its BMW sister at the same factory in Austria. Is it because the PR people didn’t want to highlight that?

  • avatar
    GS 455

    As I get older automotive styling becomes less of a priority for me but the 2020 Supra looks like it fell from the ugly tree and hit every branch on the way down.

  • avatar
    SlowMyke

    It’s kinda funny seeing people complain about the styling of this thing… I mean what was the last truly attractive Toyota vehicle made? The last supra? Ever since Toyota decided they were done with understated/dull design, it’s been nothing but a crapshoot full of bizarre creases/vents, bulging lights, and larger and larger predator-face grills. There was no chance this thing was going to be universally considered attractive.

    As per the perceived performance/value, it seems to be about on par with what the original was out of the box. Plus, there was a standard and turbo model, so who’s to say what’s coming? I mean, if the brz/86 are any indication, than i guess nothing more is coming. But i thought the whole appeal was what people did to the car afterwards.

    I was never a Toyota guy, though, so i may be missing something. I get the lack of a manual, that’s obvious. But manuals are dying anyway. I hardly expect Toyota to be the last bastion of driver involvement when brands like BMW keep flirting with killing the manual, too. The price- I mean you can get $50-$60k mustangs and camaros now. Inflation and price creep happen. I don’t like it, either, but everyone is trying for higher transaction prices these days.

    I think everyone is just sick of the never-ending hype/teaser trains that brands keep doing. If you’re going to do that, you’ve got to do something like FCA did with the hellcats and make it ridiculous. You can’t tease the crap out of a car based solely on the name and just give people a car that is probably pretty solid, but not crazy in some way. Perhaps brands will start to see this and chill out a bit. Maybe multiple years is too long a timeframe to keep everyone’s interest without shooting yourself in the foot by the time you put the car in showrooms?

    In any event, given the environment this thing is launching into, i don’t see it really doing more than just ok without Toyota really giving customers more. But their customers are still waiting on a turbo 86, so i think that model will be a pretty good example of what we’re getting here. Which is sad, because I’d like to see other brands keep trying things like this, rather than Ford’s strategy of replacing all their sports cars with “sports” crossovers.

    • 0 avatar
      MLS

      Has there ever been a truly attractive Toyota vehicle? I can appreciate the ’92 Camry’s clean styling and build quality just as much as the next guy, but the car was not exactly exciting. And from my vantage point, it’s been all downhill from there.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        If we count Lexus, the original SC300/400 were better looking that the Supra.

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        Yes, I agree that Toyota cars are generally boring design and not at all good looking. But I can remember one that I really liked the styling. Remember the old Celica Supra? Before they separated them? They made a version that looked really good back in the 80s. It had wide fender flares and nice concave factory wheels with wide tires. That might be the only truly good looking Toyota ever made.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Definitely been attractive Toyota vehicles.

        W20 MR2
        XV10 Camry
        A60 Celica – 83 to 85

        Just 3 right off the top of my head.

        • 0 avatar
          SlowMyke

          I like a few of Toyota’s designs, but none are modern. The 2000gt and the original Celica and Corolla all look good to me. The old sc400 looked pretty good, too.

          But i can’t think of anything since the supra first disappeared that isn’t extremely plain or just plain ugly. The 86 looks ok in overall shape, but the front facia isn’t great. It’s probably the best looking Toyota currently, though.

      • 0 avatar
        Noble713

        “Has there ever been a truly attractive Toyota vehicle?”

        JZX100 Toyota Chaser Tourer-V
        https://static1.squarespace.com/static/52d46dd9e4b0f63bcb07fa01/t/539e50a2e4b0fc2344624cef/1402884262724/

        https://i.pinimg.com/originals/b7/14/c1/b714c1480403f0eea6c4876de7d44ff6.jpg

        and the GRS200 Toyota Crown
        https://www.cardealpage.com/ogimage/1648748/01.jpg

  • avatar
    cammark

    I remember when the 86 came out I generally liked the overall proportions and lines but the front and rear fascias were off-putting. the mid-model release improved the situation.

    I see the same thing with this. when I focus on what’s above and between the bumper cover/fascias it’s clean and genuinely sporty. if it makes it to the mid-model refresh there’s a chance for it to actually look good.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    It’s great to see Toyota finally updating the 370Z. It’s been 10 years already! Maybe it would have been quicker to just rebadge the RC350, and then at least you’d have a Toyota instead of a BMW.

    Still, at the price they’re asking, I’d rather have his-and-her 86’s. Both manual.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      This. I’d have rather seen them spend the money on a proper inline 6, drop it in the RC350, and give them a different front and rear facia.

      I still say 86 + a 6 cylinder turbo and a nice interior would be better and more true to the name (the mk II was still a Celica under there).

      • 0 avatar
        Noble713

        “This. I’d have rather seen them spend the money on a proper inline 6”

        What’s the cost to develop a clean-slate engine design these days? Maybe half a billion USD? They would have to roll a new engine out across their entire product line to amortize such an expense. I’m totally in favor of that, but don’t see conservative Toyota making such a leap. The B58 is a pretty damn stout engine so far, and Toyota took it and engineered certain replacement components that they weren’t entirely satisfied with (I think the oil pump is in this category…).

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    “Ok, let’s finally do it and build a new Supra, but let’s partner with BMW because they build some good-handling stuff. Right, now for an engine, hey let’s let those guys with the plastic cooling-systems do the engine too, that just leaves the body, interior and suspension tuning for us: easy-peazy this thing will be out the door in no time!”

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    This reminds me of a car from the late seventies that was a kind of one off deal. Growing up a woman down the street from us had one; avant or bricklin or something along those lines. I want to say it was a fiber glass car with the rear swooshing up like we have here on the Supra. Anyway, hopefully someone on here can blow the cob webs off for me.

    I agree with everyone here. For 55k one can acquire a lot more performance for less dough. This thing needed an M drivetrain in it cause a stir, seriously you can a C7 for the same dough knocking on the door of 500HP out of the box. I know that it is not all about HP, but 335 is minivan territory.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      This reminds me of a car from the late seventies that was a kind of one off deal. Growing up a woman down the street from us had one; avant or bricklin or something along those lines. I want to say it was a fiber glass car with the rear swooshing up like we have here on the Supra. Anyway, hopefully someone on here can blow the cob webs off for me.

      I agree with everyone here. For 55k one can acquire a lot more performance for less dough. This thing needed an M drivetrain in it cause a stir, seriously you can a C7 for the same dough knocking on the door of 500HP out of the box. I know that it is not all about HP, but 335 is minivan territory.

      **Found it** Opel GT, the back end of the Supra is an Opel…

  • avatar
    Ion

    Why does the center console wrap around the passenger? Is that bar really going to make it into production for LH drive models.

  • avatar
    NG5

    If it had a manual, it might be the parts-bin BMW I would actually want. Not too heavy, too powerful, or too big. Without a manual I’m not really inspired to try to support this venture with new car money, even if I could. Looks like Mazda is going to get my small manual transmission car money when it comes time for me to buy again.

  • avatar
    Crashdaddy430

    I was hoping for a little less FT-1 in the front end. Santa didn’t deliver.

  • avatar
    Spike_in_Brisbane

    I am old enough to remember the original Supra and it does not enter my consciousness until it was old enough to be a used car. Then the tuner kids got stuck into it and it became legendary. I have no idea who bought them new!

  • avatar
    Pete Zaitcev

    I’m very interested. After all, I passed upon the GT86 because my head pressed badly against the ceiling, which has a noticeable protrusion. If this car does not discriminate against taller drivers, it’s a contender, even with the BMW reliability. I’m not going to drive a convertible, so plain Z4 is out of the consideration. But this may work.

    BTW, I looked at the 2-series 2-door. Nice car, but it’s pretty big. What I really would like is something like GT86 with a different roof. I looked at Mustang several times, and ugh, what a boat. I cannot understand how people deal with it. I’m afraid that this new “Supra” may be getting close to it in size.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I see same trajectory as the FT-86 – solid sales for 12 to 18 months and then it crashes to earth after the hardcore fans have been satiated.

    335 HP, 3200 pounds, RWD, $50,000 with a Lazy T logo. Or….

    460 HP, 3700 pounds, RWD, $40,000 – Ford Mustang GT Fastback Premium (available manual)

    455 HP, 3350 pounds, RWD, $56,000 – C7 Corvette (available manual)

    332 HP, 3350 pounds, RWD, $30,000 – Nissan 370Z (admittedly Malthusian, available manual)

    300 HP, 2950 pounds, RWD, $56,000 – Porsche 718 Cayman base manual

    485 HP, 4250 pounds, RWD, $46,500 – Dodge Challenger R/T Scat Pack Wide Body (admittedly almost certainly not cross shopped, comes with a manual)

    355 HP, 4025 pounds, AWD, $52,500 – Audi S5 Sportback

    380 HP, 3725 pounds, RWD, $53,000 – Jaguar XE S

    $50,000 bones TO START, with added dealer kick in the rocks because, hey, Supra? The fanboys will of course line up and then this is pure flop.

    • 0 avatar

      Amongst my competitors I put the F-Type, and the regular S5. If you like, can also throw in the Q60 Red Sport.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I don’t think slowness is going to be a problem here like it is with the 86. This same engine in a 2-series does pretty well. Knock it down to 3200lbs and it should be nipping at the Corvette.

      caranddriver.com/reviews/2017-bmw-m240i-coupe-automatic-tested-review

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Man, makes the 370 look like a bargain.

    • 0 avatar
      Noble713

      Just for some perspective, here’s the same cars is Japanese market price equivalents:

      Mustang GT: $55,000 <—too heavy for aggressive driving on narrow Japanese roads IMO
      C7 Corvette: $100,000
      Challenger R/T Scat Pack: $50,000 <—a gigantic boat that barely FITS on Japanese roads

      Now keep in mind that these cars above will also cost you $1000+ every year in road taxes due to their large-displacement engines.

      718 Cayman: $60,000
      Audi S5: $80,000
      Jaguar XE S: $78,000
      Fairlady (370) Z: $35,000

      So pretty much the 718 Cayman and the 370Z are the only cars in the same price and performance envelope as the Supra in its home market, and the Nissan is an OLD platform on its way out.

      I really doubt Toyota designs a sports car with the price/performance ratio in the USDM market in mind at all.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      No manual = no sale. Glad I got a used ‘Vette and didn’t wait for this.

      Plus did you look at that interior? At least the 370Z has an excuse… its OLD.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    Duck tail, beaver tail, platypus tail, what a great caricature of a Viper trunklid spoiler! Or a Ferrari 250 GTO! Or a giant tongue taunting the competition languishing in its wake! That Akio knows his excitement all right! Double-bubble roof! Our intrepid crew are on the start line of the 1960 Mille Miglia! Up front, the predator prow squints angrily, daring errant swooping seagulls to a duel down the Appian way! The Japanese tuner mags will be a phantasmagoria of color pix. It is an exclamation point car! Totally artificial. A cartoon dream.

    Not that its sister the new Z4 is a paragon of styling virtue either, subject as it is to the excessive strakes of recent BMW outrageous navel-gazing “we’re completely lost please help us” styling. A short squat wide car looks like a crab no matter how disguised, ready to scuttle.

    Still, at least the Supra has BMW engines. Toyota’s recent D4S upgrade of the 3.5 V6 in the Camry from the previous port injection version added 33 mythical horsepower to total 301 and added a dose of DI noise, in that the car accelerated no faster than before despite weighing less, 14.4 in the quarter.

    But this was no time for marketing department imagined specs – real power was required. BMW power. The four will be the noisy but thrustful B48, a tuned-up 228hp MINI turbo four all the way to 248 hp and also shared with the 330i which runs a 14.0 quarter.

    The B58 six rated at 335 measly hp takes a 4872 lb X5 by the scruff of the neck for a 13.6 quarter. It’ll make the 1500 pound lighter Supra dance all right.

    Will anyone buy the ugly duckling Supra? Who knows, but if they do it’ll be 96 frame per second cartoon car excitement they get.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Is this Toyota phoning it in Pontiac Vibe style? Like GM said “we can’t do small cars so stick Pontiac badges on a Carolla” Toyota seems to be saying “we don’t do sport so just toss our badge on a bummer”

    Problem is, recently anyway, unless you go for the M cars, BMW doesn’t do it all that well anymore. And from a reliability perspective Toyota would have been miles ahead sourcing Mustangs, Camaros, or Challengers and slapping a “Supraesque” body on them.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Not to mention the 2 Coupes (RC and 86) that could have been enlisted for Supra duty (not sure if the LC could have been made to fit the desired price). The RC would be more towards the MK IV end of the spectrum while the 86 would have been more MKII throwback when the Supra was still Celica based. Understand why they went high end as the target buyer has memories of the MK IV car, but I just don’t see it with this car.

      There was a time back at the dawn of the 90s where Toyota said “We can do it better than the Germans” and they gave us those phenomenal early Lexus models. Now we get warmed over BMW’s? What Happened?

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Bean counters is what happened.

      • 0 avatar
        Noble713

        “There was a time back at the dawn of the 90s where Toyota said “We can do it better than the Germans” and they gave us those phenomenal early Lexus models. Now we get warmed over BMW’s? What Happened?”

        All those early-90’s Japanese guys are old as dirt now. Combine that with 20+ years of economic stagnation and the country has neither the willpower nor the disposable income to throw R&D money at frivolous halo projects like sports cars.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I like it more than most of the commenters. $50K seems okay and I think it will outkick its power rating. I’m also a lazy, monstrous automatic transmission person. I wish it was about 5 inches longer but whatever.

    My biggest problem is that there is obviously a lot of BMW in the recipe. I don’t hate BMW or anything (although I would have different expectations vs a Toyota), but I’m not sure if Toyota added enough special frosting to make this worthwhile over something already wearing the BMW badge.

  • avatar
    Boff

    You know what? I really like it…but these pictures are azztrocious. Go to youtube for some footage of a red one driving (really slowly) around a track. No clutch, no sale for me, sadly.

  • avatar
    KevinC

    Could it scream “look at me” any louder?

    Ugly Japanese styling meets German “reliability”. What could possibly go wrong?

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      “Could it scream ‘look at me’ any louder?”

      What else is it supposed to do?

      Civil society doesn’t allow many other ways for young males to act out. Enjoy it while it lasts.

  • avatar
    jkk6

    Looks like a two door Giulia to me.

    4.1 Seconds is not bad either. Cheap fun, let’s just hope Toyota honors their warranty as well as BMW does.

  • avatar
    DEVILLE88

    All this BS for a car that looks like a 90’s Nissan Z car. i am underwhelmed, as expected.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    Ouch!

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    Mazda Miata with a large pimple on a stretched out nose. I would take the BMW Z styling over this any day or even on a very dark night.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    A car without a market.

    A German price, with German grumpiness after warranty expiration, and a non-prestige Japanese badge and dealership experience. Pointless.

    Go native or go home,Toyota.

  • avatar
    gysubcomtest

    Hmm really need to see it in real life to judge the exterior styling.

  • avatar
    scott25

    Don’t really see any ugliness in the styling, it’s just mostly bland, especially the front end. I agree that it will be a flop after the first year. A Camaro SS 1LE will destroy it in every way on a track and a GT350 will have better value in the future, and both of them are manual-only.

    Also agree that German engineering completely ruins the point of Japanese sports cars in the first place. The reason the original NSX and MKIV Supra were so iconic is that they were liveable on a daily basis but drove like an exotic, even though they’d run forever.

    There are rumours that there will be a 2.0T version in the future, and that might have a manual option. Sell that for 40k and it’ll be much more successful since it’ll be able to sell on its name alone.

    Also, the 6 cylinder Supra is going to sell for the same price as a 4 cylinder Z4.

    • 0 avatar
      Noble713

      “Also agree that German engineering completely ruins the point of Japanese sports cars in the first place. The reason the original NSX and MKIV Supra were so iconic is that they were liveable on a daily basis but drove like an exotic, even though they’d run forever.”

      Yeah, can’t have any German engineering in my Japanese sports car. Hey where was that infamous bulletbroof V160 6-speed in the MkIV Supra designed and manufactured again? Oh, Getrag Gmbh of Germany… Huh…. Awkward….

  • avatar
    SunnyvaleCA

    Given that much of the mechanicals of this car are a BMW, where would you go for service? If you have engine problems (or even engine maintenance) would you go to a BMW shop? Would a Toyota have the tools and experience to handle any issues efficiently?

  • avatar
    Shawnski

    If I wanted a BMW, I would by the one that actually looks good.


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