By on December 13, 2018

2017 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT Blacktop Package - Image: FCA

The only minivans coming out of Detroit these days aren’t actually rolling out of Detroit, but a plant a stone’s throw from the Detroit River, on the Canadian side. Fiat Chrysler’s Windsor Assembly Plant, home to the Chrysler Pacifica and Dodge Grand Caravan, will go dark for two weeks starting on New Year’s Eve, presumably to manage inventories.

Short-lived shutdowns are commonplace at the plant, where workers assemble one of the newest and undoubtedly the oldest minivans on the market. The latter vehicle, while likely not having much of a future, certainly has a fan base. It’s not giving up on the model, and sales figures show it.

Unifor Local 444, which represents the Windsor workers, announced the shutdown in a tweet Wednesday. The plant comes online again on January 14th. Neither FCA or the union has stated the specific reason for the idle period, though it’s happened twice in the past year.

Your author likes to joke that the Grand Caravan is the one thing in this world that’s immune to inflation. Certainly, its low base price compared to other minivans makes it an appealing buy for those looking for basic, but competent, family transportation. Fleet buyers clearly feel the same way.

Compared to the more modern, technologically advanced Pacifica, the Grand Caravan’s a dinosaur, but it’s proved its usefulness to FCA. So much so, the automaker saw fit to spare its life in 2017 — for an unknown amount of time. It was initially thought that 2019 might be the famous nameplate’s final year. Or, maybe 2020 will bring about the model’s death.

2017 Dodge Grand Caravan

According to figures from the Automotive News Data Center, FCA ended November with a 29-day supply of Caravans and 91-day supply of Pacificas in the United States. That’s well below an optimum supply for the former model, well above for the latter. Canadian figures aren’t available.

In terms of sales, the Grand Caravan eclipses all other Dodge models, with 142,223 sold in the U.S. over the first 11 months of 2018. November sales rose 19 percent, year over year, and volume through the end of last month represents a 20 percent increase over the same period a year prior. If buyers give the model a healthy December, 2018’s sales tally might be the model’s best since before the recession.

In Canada, however, year-to-date sales have fallen 30 percent. While still popular, sales are significantly below the six-year period that came before (when the annual tally seesawed between 51,000 and 46,000 units with odd predictability). The Pacifica, on the other hand, is up both in the U.S. and Canada. Sales rose 2.1 percent, year to date, south of the border and 4.5 percent north of it.

Compared to the Grand Caravan, foreign rivals fared worse in 2018. Toyota’s Sienna saw volume fall 21.1 percent through the end of November, while the Kia Sedona fell 25.3 percent. The Honda Odyssey saw its sales rise 6 percent in 2018, though its volume, like that of the others, still pales next to that of the old Dodge.

The Grand Caravan also outsells its Pacifica factory mate, a vehicle that was meant to replace it. That’s still likely to happen, but, when it does, the Grand Caravan will at least be able to boast of going out on top.

[Images: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

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58 Comments on “As Plant Preps for Downtime, America’s Grand Caravan Love Appears Unshakeable...”


  • avatar
    Matt51

    Value for the money. I bought a new 2015 Grand Caravan, and have been extremely happy with it for 3.5 years now.

    • 0 avatar
      DweezilSFV

      ‘Value for money’. What a concept, eh ?

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Value for the money. That’s it, exactly! I am always amazed at how many old people I see at rest stops or Holiday Inn Express lodgings who have chosen this vehicle as their primary long-distance traveler.

      One year some old codger who was also visiting the MLB Spring Training games in Phx told me over breakfast, “Value for the money!” when we were talking about cars and traveling long distances comfortably.

      And when we all left after all the training games had ended, I could not believe all the stuff he and his wife packed into this minivan.

      It may be an old platform but it is still a great platform. Maybe not fashionable, but a great value.

    • 0 avatar
      lost1

      I have been driving Caravans or Grand Caravans, a new one every 2 years or so with 80 to 100,000 miles on them for the last 30 years (company vehicles). They have all been good vehicles. The latest generation has been the best with no unscheduled repairs, only oil changes and tires. The brakes on the latest generation seem to last forever as I have not needed to replace the brakes on my last two vehicles.
      My personal vehicle is now a 2018 Chrysler Pacifica Touring L Plus which replaced a POS 2015 Ford Explorer. The Pacifica is fantastic , quiet, smooth, fast, and gets great MPG. My current company vehicle is a 2018 Grand Caravan with so far 40,000 miles this year, is not in the same league as the Pacifica but it is still fun to drive is very tight , no rattles or squeaks and gets 30 MPG on the highway. I would recommend either vehicle to anyone who needs the space . By the way I am someone who doesn’t care a bit about what other people think about what I drive.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      Owner of a 2016 G/C (in R/T trim, no less!) here. We love ours. It does everything we need it to do as far as hauling my daughter and her dog show gear around. With the middle seats folded flat, she can rest in the back bench with the dogs safe and secure between us and her. And if we fold both middle and rear seats down, it truly is cavernous. Are there more refined vehicles? Sure. But with heated seats (front AND middle row), heated steering wheel and such, it makes a very fine interstate cruiser, indeed.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Having a pair of larger dogs is what’s pushing us right to a minivan, despite just having our one first child on the way. Lately we’ve been taking the dogs on road trip’s in my wife’s Camry rather than the seemingly more logical 4Runner with it’s rear cargo space for critters. Dogs to demonstrably better in the smoother riding Camry, and it’s easier to keep an eye on them. I’m looking forward to a van where we can configure the seats any which way to achieve an optimal family+pet hauling setup.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’ve noticed that the rental fleets have been getting largely Caravan GT models FWIW, and I rarely see new SXTs anymore.

    If you need a family hauler, don’t care what the neighbors think, must have brand new, and want the price as low as possible (cause the kids are going to make a mess of the sucker anyway) – Grand Caravan is hard to beat.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      I’m assuming the neighbors don’t care which minivan is in your driveway…is there such a thing as a cool minivan? Personally, I like the GC’s looks, if I had to have a van I can’t think of anything that would get me looking at the competition, given the price. Sure, a Toyonda might be more reliable, but the money you save on a GC will probably pay for a couple of transmissions.

    • 0 avatar
      Mathias

      >> must have brand new

      Buying a used minivan is really hard. Many are dirty, nasty rats, the nice ones are expensive and often loaded with futzy gadgets.

      I bought a bottom feeder caravan and consider it to be a great value. I’m always looking and in the last two years, I’ve found ONE Sienna worth buying. A friend of mine owns it now.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @Russycle – if you own a minivan I assume you don’t care what anybody thinks anyway.

        If you don’t care then why buy something stupid expensive like a Toyota or a Honda?

        • 0 avatar
          Russycle

          @PrincipalDan: Exactly!

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          The offset crash tests certainly are a talking point for many, historic Caravan quality issues as well. Granted Odysseys have had a litany of non-trivial issues themselves, but the perception is still there. I think for people buying the higher end Ody/Sienna trims NEW, these are folks that have high incomes and $45k for a nice van doesn’t seem bad at all relative to the point of reference of a $45-50k Audi/Bimmer/Lexus or $60k European crossover. They just don’t see the point of buying a cheaper Caravan with a lesser perceived quality to save a bit of money. I think the Pacifica (and Pac hybrid) are improving this perception massively.

          I’m right in the middle of trying vans on for size and trying to hone in on the value sweet spot. I can’t help but consider Caravans for the value factor, I always used to be favorably predisposed to my Caravan GT rentals, but after sampling a Pacifica Touring-L, the Caravans now seem crude, cheap, creaky, clumsy, and have poor ergonomics. I also suspect that even years into production, FCA has not addressed the inherent weakness of the Caravan’s electrical system (not worth the investment at this point into the run), I’m inclined to think that the newer Pacifica is superior in this regard.

          • 0 avatar
            SPPPP

            “The Caravans now seem crude, cheap, creaky, clumsy, and have poor ergonomics.”

            Yep, all that is true. I have been driving a rental this week with fewer than 30k miles on it and it has thumps, bumps, and creaks from front and rear suspensions. And the radio is fussy and hard to use while driving, and the dimmer and day/night mode settings are not well designed. And the Eco mode makes the transmission act clumsy while not saving much gas.

            Yet despite that, it still hauls a ton of stuff for little money, has decent power, can take curves fairly well for its size (even if ungracefully), and just basically does the job.

            So I guess I respect it even if I don’t love it.

            The Mazda5 I bought a few years back is a total sports car in comparison to the Grand Caravan. I just wish it had a foot more wheelbase so each row could get 2 inches extra and 6 inches could go in the cargo area. It’s still not going to haul plywood like a Caravan, but it would be more usable the other 99% of the time.

          • 0 avatar
            dwford

            @gtem: I thought FCA was going to stop production of the Grand Caravan and reengineer it to update the safety systems. Did they give up on that idea?

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            dwford I googled around and found a TTAC article about idling the plant and using the time to change/add something with the side impact airbags. I think this was a separate issue from the offset impact test results. Honestly, I see the IIHS ever-shifting targets as diminishing returns at some point. I get that progress is good, but nor am I willing to simply declare that the Caravan is now a veritable death trap and anyone who buys one doesn’t care about their families.

      • 0 avatar
        forward_look

        I bought one that was traded in a year old, probably because the roof leaked. A little RTV on the seam and we drove 4 kids around for 6 years. Transmission only died once.

        If I needed one today, I could get to the soccer field and back on 33 miles of electric range in the Pacifica. That would be sweet.

  • avatar
    pdog_phatpat

    IF youre gonna buy a throw away car/whatever, why not stick with something thats been around, cheap and has a warranty? The only reason these continue to sell.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I had a GC rental. I believe it was a 2017 model. IT DID NOT HAVE BLUETOOTH!!!!! I understand rental spec… whatever. But that was insane to me.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Wow, that is muy lame. I just bought a new stereo for my ’08 xB (Bluetooth AND USB!!), 200 bucks with all the wiring and adapters. Looks the install will be pretty easy, we’ll see…

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Had to. I am almost certain the standard head unit has bluetooth if you want it or not.

      Now, it could have been nonfunctional….

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      sporty, that must be a rental thing. My parents have a basic (they’re basic folk) 2014 and it has a surprising number of features, including bluetooth (7″ infotainment, power things you didn’t know could be power, remote start, etc).

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      This seems to be an FCA issue with low trim levels. I looked at a 2018 Ram that didn’t have bluetooth. The salesman said that he couldn’t understand how, in this day and age any manufacturer could put a vehicle on the lot without it.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Wow, what a timely post. I have rented a GC GT frim Midway the last two weeks in a row. They both had the cold weather package, heated steering wheel and seats!

    The GC is my guilty pleasure. I like the seating position, the seats are quite comfortable, and they haul a$$ when you want them to. As for the post that they rented one without bluetooth, i call BS. I haven’t rented one without that feature in years. FCA pairing takes some getting used to, and takes a ridiculous amount of time listening to the options.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      This is where the value proposition on the GC begins to unravel. You can get Bluetooth, but it will set you back $600. Same with NAV (which is an ancient Garmin unit, BTW). Oh, and forget privacy glass, roll down rear door windows, and Stow ‘n Go seats on base models, too.

      As a strippo people hauler for someone on a budget, the GC is okay. But option one up to today’s norms, and the Pacifica becomes just as good a value. All FCA has to do is offer a strippo Dodge version of the Pacifica, and the GC is history.

      • 0 avatar
        Matt51

        No, comparably optioned there is about a $5k difference. My base GC came with stow and go seats.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        I think a fair point has been made regarding the variance in ordering for the GC that a few snuck through with no bluetooth.

        As for the value, Rudiger: since I am ‘that guy’, I would only by a GC used. For those in need of a family hauler, the ex-national rental car GC GT that is optioned with faux leather heated seats, heated steering wheel, sto n go, and nice alloy wheels that actually make the darn thing look reasonably sporty represents a spectacular value for a family on a budget. These are sub 20k, sub 40k mile units (mostly) that have been maintained quite well. Hard to go wrong IMHO.

      • 0 avatar
        Flipper35

        Dad has a pretty base model GC but his has those options, except BT which it has but is turned off and the dealer offered to turn it back on for him. Sure.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Anecdotally, FCA still allows for an unusually high number of a la carte optioning, so it’s plausible that (either deliberately or in error) a few Bluetoothless Caravans ended up out there. The company I work for had a batch of Wranglers delivered where I guess that option box wasn’t checked.

  • avatar
    CarNutChris

    From a purely logical point of view, the Grand Caravan meets almost everybody’s Family/hauling needs at a reasonable price. Since a minivan is not going to be ‘cool’, you might as well get the GC. I see no reason to pay the Hondayota ‘tax’.

  • avatar
    Mike-NB2

    I rent a lot of cars in my work and I never complain when handed the keys to the ‘old’ Grand Caravan. I may think of myself as a ‘car guy’ but that may be exactly why I can appreciate something honest that hits its target so well. Is it a great vehicle? Nope. But it’s competent and seems well built.

    I know this may be grounds for people coming by with torches and pitchforks, but one thought I have every time I drive on of these is that probably 80-90% of people with trucks and SUVs would be better off with something like the GC.

  • avatar
    SpeedJebus

    I don’t understand the lack of popularity for the Kia Sedona.

    (IMO) As far as vans go, it’s one of the better looking on the road.

    Space is great, powertrain is excellent, standard equipment is great, interior quality is great, and warranty is excellent. I’ll admit bias, as I bought a 2017 brand new in fall 2016.

    2+ years later: 0 problems, 24k miles. Better highway mileage than my Speed3. Still tight as a drum (no rattles / creaks), and everything works as it should.

    To get anywhere near the same level of equipment in a Toyota / Honda, it’d have been at least $5k more, and the interest rates were (are) astronomical of the Siennas / Odysseys.

    Caravan is soooo not an option after my Jeep debacle… as much as I’d like to support my local economy,

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      “2+ years later: 0 problems, 24k miles.”

      Never understood this. My car hit 88K before it needed it’s first repair. If it needed something at 24K, I’d be upset. Never had a car that needed work that early.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I think the lack of a removable second row and the high console with console shifter are the biggest demerits to the current Sedona. That and the needlessly heavy/trucky styling (that’s more of a personal quibble). They nailed a perfect “goldilocks” with the 2nd gen, gen 3 is a regression in most utilitarian and aesthetic metrics IMO. I will say, it seems like the Sedona is perhaps the highest quality minivan on the market right now, in terms of overall fit/finish and reliability.

      • 0 avatar
        rudiger

        Yeah, I’m sure the Sedona’s funky second row seats put off a lot of potential buyers. They can’t be removed (at least not without a set of tools), nor do they fold into the floor.

        Instead, they fold ‘forward’ against the backs of the front seats, sucking up a bunch of otherwise usable space. Kia marketing tries to claim this as a feature which provides better access to the third row than either fold-into-floor or removable seats. Between the three choices, I have no doubt that most would choose one of the latter two.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      I personally thought that about the Nissan Quest whenever it was that the most recent iteration was introduced. It was quirky, narrow, had the worst cargo management of the popular minivan…. but, I think it had the most pleasant interior and perhaps was the most pleasant to drive. Maybe not as sporty as the sliding-door sports car known as the Odyssey around here, but a nice cabin to hang out in. I would have thought it could garner more sales than it did.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        I’ve never been in one, but my understanding is that the Nissan trades traditional US minivan max-cargo carrying capacity for an uber-cushy and high quality interior taken right from the Japanese domestic market. Not enough to tempt me, the CVT alone in a vehicle as powerful and and heavy as that is enough to keep me away.

  • avatar
    Matt51

    My base 2015 GC came with stow and go seats. Maybe the base Pacifica doesn’t?

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      The basic GC does not come standard with Stow n’Go seats. The option code for the second row bench seat is CYY. The code for the optional second row Stow n’Go seats is CYC. The price of the option per the FCA website is currently $1,195.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Grand Caravans are also my ‘guilty pleasure’ (plagiarizing another poster). In The GTA they are generally among the very most expensive vehicles to rent. .

    After a long weekend driving one, my son has also come to appreciate them.

    Great driving position, superior visibility, relatively good highway cruiser, able to serve as a camper/tent in a pinch, and able to move a dorm rooms worth of stuff.

    If FCA would just spend another couple of hundred dollars on upgrading the electrical system or greatly increasing the warranty, and then slightly bump the price to offset this, I would be much more comfortable trying to convince my wife that another GC should be our next new vehicle acquisition.

  • avatar
    backtees

    Real world family test. Each year 6.5 hour drive for holidays. 3 years ago splurged and rented Suburban. Last year only Caravan available. This year the family (party of 6) said please get the minivan. As I am behind the wheel 100% of the time I can tell you the Caravan is a horse. 20+ mpg. Can scat. Solid at 75.- 80 mph. Comfy ergonomics. The bad….funky infotainment, no dvd, no tire pressure gauge – just warning, cheap interior.

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    My wife and I are recently retired and last year we brought home a new, loaded ’17 GT when they were doing the 25% off MSRP deal. It wasn’t our only reason for going with the GC but it was hard to argue with a $50K+ (Cdn) sticker dropping to the mid thirties right off the top.

    All I can say is we absolutely love it. We’ve always been van people and I feel sorry for those who don’t get it. As others have said it is a great road trip vehicle and the front perches and driving position are among the best I’ve ever experienced.

  • avatar
    JREwing

    I recently put about 1,000 miles on a rental Pacifica and came away a bit surprised at how nice a car it really is. The 3.6 is plenty of motor in either vehicle. I’m normally resistant to automatics, and heard a ton of horror stories about the 9-speed, but behind the 3.6 it made smart, smooth shifts. It was really hard to confuse it.

    The interior was luxury-sedan quiet. The stereo sounded really good and was as intuitive as any infotainment system out there. The ride and handling fall towards the luxurious side, but was well controlled. Chrysler did a solid job with this van.

    For the price, though, it’s hard to beat the Grand Caravan. It feels like the 10+ year old vehicle it is – the Pacifica is a quantum leap ahead in refinement, but it’s still a comfortable, smooth driving workhorse with solid fuel economy. I’d pick one any day over a small SUV.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Agreed on all points JRE. I don’t mean to come across too harsh on the GC in my above posts, but after driving a Pacifica for an 8 hour straight shot, I will never look at the older GC platform the same way again. My Pacifica Touring-L rental had 42k miles on it and the ZF9 transmission seemed well sorted, and the Pentastar is an absolute screamer. I was doing some impromptu roll-on acceleration tests leaving construction zones (55-80 mph) and the sound that thing makes is addictive. And I STILL managed to get 29 mpg. The interior quality and overall ergonomics left me very impressed. Add to that a well sorted suspension and the best styling in the segment (IMO). Believe me I’m no FCA/Mopar fanboy, but I loved the Pacifica.

      I’ve started looking at used ones locally, even a few Hybrids. The worrying thing is that close to half of the used 2017 Pacifica Hybrids are lemon law buybacks, not encouraging. I think I’ll stick to the regular non-hybrid ones.

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      Yeah I agree that both the GC and Pacifica are great vehicles, from two different perspectives. I honestly don’t know which I’d buy, but I’d probably buy either a pre-owned loaded GC or a hybrid Pacifica.

      Hell, the GC comes with adjustable pedals. Do the Hondayota vans?

  • avatar
    bryanska

    This is what trendier auto blogs fail to get (looking at you Jalopnik). They freak out and get all angry at people buying an old design.

    Loyalty COUNTS. For a lot. Passionate buyers are gold to any company. Repeat buyers are money in the bank. I’d bet real money that the GC and the LX platform have excellent repeat. These are real people, with real money, who are buying product. That’s how the PT Cruiser became a solid money maker.

    I’m glad that FCA doesn’t listen to the perpetually pissed-off Jalopnik staff and make BRZs. Half those Kinja commenters are the kind of people who wouldn’t sell steak to someone who would put sauce on it. That’s a great way to go bankrupt.

  • avatar
    volvoguyincanada

    There’s a surprising amount of love in the comments here for what really is an unsafe, handles like garbage, but wait it’s value-priced, family vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Just how unsafe is it though? Relative to the average 12 year old car on the road in the US or Canada, is it really unsafe?

      I don’t think they handle like “garbage” either. They don’t handle mid-corner bumps as well as their successor Pacifica by any means, but they hold the road perfectly securely and safely for the average driver going legal speeds on paved roads, notably better handling than just about any previous generation of minivan.

      Here’s what our esteemed race car driver J. Baruth said on the matter:
      “Even with the cheapo tires fitted to non-R/T Caravans, it’s possible to double most on-ramp speed limits and fast lane changes happen without too much roll or difficulty. I suspect that most of the driving dynamics are considerably less pleasant with seven passengers on board, but guess what? The same thing can be said of a Gallardo Superleggera.”
      https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/02/trackday-diaries-you-should-buy-a-minivan/

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      handles like garbage….?

      In all seriousness, what was your expectation for handling out of a GC or any other minivan for that matter? I find they handle fine for what they are, you know, a miniature bus.

      As for the safety issue, I have always been under the impression the vans are reasonably safe. Mostly because I have yet to read anything to advise me of the contrary. Perhaps the fine folks here at TTAC could research this and give us a posting.

  • avatar
    Tj21

    Not a corporate guy, just a regular guy building minivans. I want to say thank you for the responses about the Grand Caravan and Pacifica. It’s good to see that the vehicles I’m building everyday and putting passion into has effected so many people in a positive way. It might not be the most glorious occupation but I’m proud of it and proud of the fact that we have the opportunity to build a reliable, well built vehicle for families. Enjoy the holidays and thanks for making mine better as well.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Welcome!
      I appreciate you and your counterparts efforts, since I get a random selection of your work monthly it is nice to know they are screwed together by people who care.

      • 0 avatar
        Tj21

        Thanks man, I honestly do. I want us to succeed and continue to do so in the future. I’ve worked at other manufacturing facilities where you’re just a number. This one feels more like a second home. I’d be glad to build these for years to come.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    To be clear, I’m certain there are a good number of people who can live without Bluetooth, Stow ‘n Go second row seats, privacy glass, roll-down rear door windows, and a few other amenities. For those folks, a basic GC is still a terrific bargain. And more than a few dealers stock them like that, too, as ‘loss leaders’ that they advertise at a very low price to get people into the showrooms to try and get them into more profitable, more optioned vehicles. It’s an old game.

    And, for those who show up and ‘do’ want those niceties, well, adding them to a GC brings the price closer to the new Pacifica, which is also a much better minivan overall.

    The bottom line is you can get a cheap GC, but it might not have some stuff you otherwise thought would come as standard equipment. In fact, as to Bluetooth, all of the GC’s radios have a Bluetooth button so it ‘looks’ like they’re Bluetooth enabled, but some of them aren’t activated. It’s kind of a sleazy thing, but that’s just the way it is.

  • avatar
    jthorner

    The GC delivers a very useful package, good reliability, excellent flexibility and an amazingly low real-world price. We own a 2016 GC that was purchased brand new as a third vehicle to support our business and the occasional many passenger trip. It does exactly what we need it to do for about $10k less out-the-door than a similar Toyota or Honda would have cost.

    We are putting about 5,000 miles per year on it, often fully loaded, and so far haven’t purchased anything besides wiper blades and oil changes.

  • avatar
    mike978

    I have a 2008 Toyota Sienna and I’m currently on vacation in Arizona. I am renting a 2018 Grand Caravan GT. I think it is a really good minivan. I have looked at one year old used models from Hertz and Enterprise. You can get models with 20000 miles between 18 to $20,000. The GT spec is very good with leather, all round electric doors (including trunk), useful navigation, stow and go seats and sun shades. Next great sense for a typical family. Only negatives are that it is a bit louder and not as smooth riding as I’d expect

  • avatar
    PartyUpLive

    I bought a 2015 Grand Caravan and I like it a lot. I didn’t get the Pacifica because I never buy a new car in its first model year run.

    I also like the simpler design of the GC. My next preference for overall minivan exterior design is the Kia Sedona.

    I’ll admit the Stow N Go seats are a big reason why I went with the GC. Plus, it had a proven track record in 2015 as opposed to the new Pacifica which was brand new.

    My main issue with the GC is the interior but I have added a few things to jazz it up. But I also don’t like touch screens, especially touch screens that control too many of the more important controls of a car.

    Also I’m 6′ 9″ and driving the GC is very comfortable for me with a lot of room head and leg room.

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