By on December 27, 2018

2018 Volkswagen Golf S

2018 Volkswagen Golf S

1.8-liter turbocharged four-cylinder (170 horsepower @ 4,500 rpm; 199 lb-ft @ 1,600 rpm)

Five-speed manual, front-wheel drive

25 city / 34 highway / 29 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

9.3 city, 6.9 highway, 8.2 combined. (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $20,910 (U.S) / $22,295 (Canada)

As Tested: $21,805 (U.S.) / $24,080 (Canada)

Prices include $895 destination charge in the United States and $1,785 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

Commuting sucks.

It’s especially bad at speeds below “parking lot.” Foot off brake, crawl, foot on brake, repeat. It’s even worse when you’re piloting a stick – shift to first, release clutch pedal, roll, brake, clutch in, shift to neutral. And repeat.

Not all commuting is that slow, of course. There’s also the block-to-block drag race. First to the next stop sign or stoplight wins. If you’re lucky, you’ll hit 30 mph and get to third gear before doing it all over again.

If you’re gonna spend a lot of your time behind the wheel, working up to a measly 30 mph and hitting third gear right before you hit the brakes, there’s worse cars to do it in the than the 2018 Volkswagen Golf S.

As the value trim in the great Golf line – remember, this is the car upon which the vaunted GTI and hallowed Golf R stand – the S trim is one of those vehicles that used to roam the streets en masse during my childhood but has now mostly died off. I speak, of course, of the compact stick-shift sport hatch that offers few frills, a no-bullshit driving experience, plenty of grins, and little in the way of cash outlay.

If you don’t know from memory what engine motivates this level of Golf, it’s a 1.8-liter turbocharged four-cylinder making 170 horsepower and 199 lb-ft of torque. It drives the front wheels, and the manual transmission that comes standard on this car is of the five-speed variety.

2018 Volkswagen Golf S

It’s a quick little thing, and the gearbox is a joy to row. It doesn’t hurt that you don’t have to the rev the hell out of it to get to peak torque or even horsepower. Turning the car is also fun – handling is fairly sharp, even when riding on 15-inch wheels. True, it’s no GTI, but if you can’t swing anything much over $20K, you’re going to have a fun little car that makes getting from point A to point B much less monotonous. Even the slightly stiff ride isn’t too much of a penalty to pay.

Where you do suffer, of course, is on the content side. That, and in the sound arena – the S isn’t quiet. And that is the downside here – cheap commuting is fine, but you’re gonna give up some goods. Worse, there’s only one other trim level available on the regular Golf, and it (the SE) will only cost you about $3K more. So if you want a larger infotainment screen, a panoramic sunroof, 16-inch wheels, navigation, and blind-spot monitoring (among other goodies), you’ll have to pony up. But you can still get Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, satellite radio, USB, and Bluetooth at the bargain basement price.

2018 Volkswagen Golf S

Power windows with one-touch up/down, partial power front seats, rearview camera, A/C, cruise control, and leather shift knob and e-brake wrapping is also standard.

Both Golf trims were refreshed for 2018, and 2019 brings a new engine. Meaning if you’re a fan of the 1.8, you should grab it before it’s gone.

[Get new and used Volkswagen Golf pricing here!]

It’s cliché at this point for auto journos to write about their love for the GTI and Golf R, as they really are that good. Even their value counterpart is a worthwhile drive, and it won’t break the bank.

2018 Volkswagen Golf S

Sure, it’s a little flawed. It’s noisy, it’s stripped in terms of content and it doesn’t take much more dough to get a lot more, and the typical all-black VW interior appears particularly plain and utilitarian in base form.

But it’s a blast to drive, and it gives the grins without grabbing a big hunk of wallet. That’s a recipe for making the commute fun again.

[Images © 2018 Tim Healey/TTAC]

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77 Comments on “2018 Volkswagen Golf S Review – Make Commuting Fun Again...”


  • avatar
    whynot

    Surprised to see the 1.4L in the 2019 Golf (figured VW wouldn’t bother to pay to certify it with the Golf and whatnot until new on comes out) but not too much of a shock. The 1.8 is a ton of fun but is thirstier than most of its hatchback competitors (which were also down on power).

    My (2015) SE is fairly quiet for a non-luxury compact car, do S’s have less sound deafening?

    • 0 avatar
      d4rksabre

      I thought my ’15 S was perfectly acceptable in terms of noise. Unless something has changed I think people are maybe too critical of cars that make even a little noise.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        I remember the Mk VII Golf getting a ton of praise about how quiet it was when it first came out for 2015 MY. I’m not sure if people are getting to critical or if VW made some cuts in the sound deafening to save costs since then (very plausible with VW). I haven’t find newer compacts that I have driven to be any quieter than mine.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff Waingrow

          I have a 2017 GTI and my wife has a 2011 Golf (automatic, with 20,000 miles!). Her Golf is extremely quiet and rides beautifully. It’s really much more comfortable than the GTI, though the GTI’s still by far my favorite. You could go cross country in the Golf and be totally relaxed. Seats are perfect and site lines outstanding. And not one thing has ever gone wrong with it. Same for the GTI.

          • 0 avatar
            lon888

            2012 GTI owner checking in. Consider yourself fortunate with your VW experiences. I have 3 words for my car – trouble, trouble, trouble. One and done with VW.

    • 0 avatar
      EquipmentJunkie

      I agree about the surprise ’19 offering of the 1.4L. Perhaps VW figures that the reduced supply in the frugal compact hatch segment (Fiesta, Focus, & Cruze) will lift sales? Maybe there is a shift amongst those few who still buy small hatches demand more economy?

      My co-worker has a 1.4L in his ’18 Jetta and is really pleased with the economy.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        My ’17 Jetta (which my daughter has inherited for the remainder of its’ lease) has the 1.4 and a manual, and I can vouch for it – as long as you keep it in its’ power band (1500-4500 rpm), there’s plenty of fun to be had, and mpg is +/- 34 combined.

        The catch is that if you try to drive it for MPG, it’s zero fun – the engine slogs a lot under 1500 rpm, and there’s no point in pushing past 5000 rpm. I actually think the engine’s better suited for the automatic if you’re after fuel economy.

        • 0 avatar
          statikboy

          So wait, the 1.8 Turbo is the base engine but there is a 1.4 that is not? How is this right?

        • 0 avatar

          We have the same car, but my girl has given it back to us for the remainder of the lease, as she lives in a car unfriendly city. The 1.4 is a
          good motor, I see 30 plus mpg. The base tires suck-I had a set of 225/50 x 16 in the garage, (conti dws) and they transformed the car…the OE tires go back on when the lease is returned. Again, a few mats worth of soundproofing, and it would be a 30k car.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I’m not surprised at all. They now have the same base motor in the Golf and the Jetta, and it has notably better mileage ratings (though still oddly less than the Jetta) with not really that much effect on real-world performance. It’s just not that much slower. If you want to go faster, you can step up to the GTI, or the long-roof Golf which I believe still comes with the 1.8T.

    • 0 avatar

      Dead right on sound. My Mk6 TDi was bank vault quiet. My Mk6 Base Jetta could use a few mats of soundproofing.. Sound is one of the few ways they can differentiate the cheap car from the expensive one…now that everything has a/c, power windows, and bluetooth.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      That is an odd comment on a modern Golf. My GTI is really, really quiet. Even the old non-MQB Jetta is very quiet.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Did you get a chance to try the 1.4, Tim? I’ve heard good things about it.

    FYI: with a manual, this is a first-class sleeper. There is nothing this car doesn’t do well.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    did I miss part of this review? It seems to start in the middle? Seems to make sense to step up for a ton more options , or is the SE just letting you have the option of getting more options????

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Logged back in and got the first two words of the story makes more sense now, also since most folks will buy a slush box, what is the cost of that?

  • avatar
    bufguy

    The manual transmission has a peak torque of 184 vs 199 for the automatic…

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Not bad. Is the 1.8T (or the coming 1.4T) one of those motors that responds well to tunes? This would be a fun sleeper for sure and seems to check all the option boxes I care about.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Both the 1.8 and 1.4 can be tuned, but I don’t know how I’d feel about potentially voiding the warranty on a VW.

      You’d probably better off just popping for a GTI.

    • 0 avatar
      EquipmentJunkie

      I popped for the ’18 GTI and it’s a hoot…plus it still can deliver excellent economy. I don’t believe I’ve seen real world pen & paper numbers less than 32 mpg. I routinely see the on-screen trip odometer indicate better than 40 mpg on my jaunts.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    VW’s specs for the new 1.4 engine say it’s got a toothed belt cam drive. I thought those had died a well-deserved death long ago. The 1.8/2.0 VW engines use chain drive.

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    I guess VWoA wants to make the non-GTI Golf variants even more irrelevant by putting in the Jetta’s 1.4L.

    Das Idiots.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Nobody buying a base Golf will care. They will care about the 3-4mpg extra. If you want to go fast, buy a GTI.

      I wish I could buy a GTI with the 1.4T. I don’t use the performance, but I like the seats and suspension a lot. Like the old Golf “GT” in the MKII and MKIII days.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Don’t know why we’re seeing a review of the old 2018 model when the 2019 with the 1.4 and 6 speed is obviously of more interest to readers. I guess authors here were too busy reporting on the new colours available on subcompact kias.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      deanst, was thinking pretty much this. Anyone interested in a Golf at this point is hungry for info on the new powertrain options. The 1.8t / 5 speed / 6 speed auto stuff is old news and inventory will soon be gone from the lots.

  • avatar
    tallguy130

    If the VW dealer experience wasn’t so similar to fighting off sexual assault I would likely be in one of these or a GTI now.

    (And yes I realize how this sounds like ever VW comment ever. Anyone want to throw in the obligatory build quality comment? Step up to the plate!)

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      “If the VW dealer experience wasn’t so similar to fighting off sexual assault”

      Speak for yourself. My dealer experience last year–starting with randomly walking in the door just to see if the 2018 models were out yet, and ending up 3 weeks later with a 2017 GTI–was beyond superb. My first VW–a big and deserved middle finger to American Honda.

      Maybe it’s just you. (Or maybe not; I did deal with two other dealerships, one of them to get Costco pricing, and it was just like you’d expect the dealership experience to be.)

      And as for build quality–well, 21K on it and nothing more than two oil changes.

      I’m jonesing to step up now. S3? Or wait for Mk8 R? Or maybe SQ3…since the Q3 really is just a GTI-sized vehicle…

      • 0 avatar
        tallguy130

        I see how it is. Blame the victim. I was asking for it walking into the dealership like that, teasing them with talk of buying a car. ;)

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          hehehe Well, you’re the one who declared it “the VW dealer experience” as a blanket statement.

          From the two other ones I visited, I get it–but it’s not the VW dealer experience. It’s…the dealer experience. Period.

          Truth be told, when I walked in I didn’t need a car. When I bought the GTI, I didn’t need a car. Had my experience been nothing more than what the other two dealers offered, I wouldn’t have bought a car.

          Dealerships are hanging onto their model so tightly, not realizing that people buy cars DESPITE the dealer, not because. Imagine if people instead enjoyed the buying process.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Mazel tov to you, jalop…my experience with VW dealers is the opposite.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        No complaints about my experience either. Nor with the more local dealer where I have my GTI serviced (they didn’t have any manuals at the time).

        It’s almost like car dealers are all independent businesses or something, and if you don’t like one you can just go to a different one.

        Zero issues with my ’17, it will be two years old in two weeks. Been back for two annual oil changes with not a single squawk. The oil changes are even cheap. $80 for VW synthetic and a tire rotation. $60 for just the oil change. At that price I can’t be bothered to DIY, and no silly upsells attempted by the service writers. You don’t even need an appointment, just roll over and done in 30 minutes.

        • 0 avatar
          Robbie

          I have driven VWs for 12 years now. Tried the 3 dealers in town. I love my GTI, but if you have a rattle, you better look up the service bulletin number and explain in detail what they are supposed to do, otherwise they will tell you you’re crazy and nobody has ever had this complaint.

          The independent VW place in town has a guy who enjoys saying things like, “Yes; they make it easy for us to compete”.

          Funniest moment was when I overheard a VW technician tell a 50-or-so old lady with a car that didn’t start well to “try a higher octane fuel”.

    • 0 avatar
      lon888

      Know what you mean. The first VW dealer I went to was a total prick. The second dealer (who I bought the car from) was just a little more reserved. The real fun starts when your 3/36 warranty runs out and you have to start paying for some $$$$ repairs. It’s best to learn to do everything yourself.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    Friend has a 2015 GTI (made in Mexico), I have a 2015 Golf R (made in Germany). Build quality is very good in both cases.

    Stepped up — next!

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I think I’ve experienced a 1.4T Jetta at some point in the last year or two.

    I actually thought it was a fine motor. Plenty peppy and torquey around town. Yeah, full acceleration rips aren’t much fun but for everyday driving it seems to be excellent. Pulled down high MPG as well.

    This might be the first time I’ve read that a modern Golf is “noisy”. That surprises me a bit.

    However, for me I’d think I’d probably rather have the Sportwagen, and one trim of that is available in a stick and 4Motion I believe. And it too is CHEAP.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    I really want a hatchback again, and though I’ve always liked Golf’s, the VW continues to make me nervous. I like the car though, the squareness, apparently good fit and finish, dash design. Everything just seems to the point and no-nonsense, which appeals to me greatly.

  • avatar
    Add Lightness

    I usually commute on my bicycle so the day to day slog in stop and go is a bit foreign to me but when I do drive with 3 pedals, it is fun trying to use the auto-idle valve as cruise control.
    BTW, one of the advantages of getting old is that all the noise concerns become less significant.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    What a drab-looking car.

    If my commute is comprised of 0-30 sprints, I’d much rather go electric.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      Drab is a good word. I thought the photo was of a twenty year old car. I was surprised that it was brand new. The styling hasn’t really progressed.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Drab is not a bug, it’s a feature. I prefer my cars not look like crazy anime characters that have been attacked by a hatchet-wielding madman. The Golf is simple, classic, and for a modern car you can actually see out of it.

        It’s the perfect Swiss Army Knife do it all cheap car.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      EVs shine in traffic conditions. My commute averages 19 mph, and being in EV mode is the only way to do it.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        The best commute is rolling over in bed and turning your laptop on. I haven’t had a daily commute in a 13 years, and you couldn’t pay me enough to do it again. Especially anywhere with real traffic. What a waste of time.

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          You couldn’t have said it better. Work is what you do and get done, not where you go.

          Me, I’m in the field. I don’t really have a commute. Either that, or my commute is every stinking bit of traffic in town. And out of town.

  • avatar
    JuniperBug

    Count me among those who find the Mk7 Golf’s highway ride to be quite serene, especially for its class. My 2015 Mazda 3 is considerably worse when it comes to road noise and ride comfort.

    It’s the turbo lag in the 1.8 that I couldn’t come to grips with in around-town driving. I don’t know what I was doing that reviewers aren’t, that I seem to be the only one who has a problem with this, but even with ample clutch slipping I couldn’t get off the line without bogging the thing. For reference, I used to ride a motorcycle in rush hour traffic which was geared to do 60 MPH in first gear and had its power peak at 11,000 RPM.

    Once underway the Golf was fine, but trying to judge gaps when trying to enter an intersection from a stop was dicey to me. You’d get nothing, nothing, then suddenly be chirping the tires once the turbo spooled up. I have no such problems in the lower power, naturally aspirated 2.0L Mazda 3.

    • 0 avatar
      Bill Wade

      I have an ’18 Sportwagen S manual. I too find the turbo lag slightly bothersome in town but overall I’m extremely pleased with the vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

        Problem is, you should have bought a turbo with an automatic – much better aligned powertrain.

        (and no I don’t hate sticks, I have 2 sportscars, an SUV, a V8 pony car and a fullsize 3/4-ton pickup that are all sticks)

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      I’m glad to see this comment, so I know its not just me! I like the car, but it can be a challenge, especially on hills, to launch smoothly. Maybe the hill hold is too aggressive or something. I know there’s mention on the forums of the CDV or clutch delay valve that makes the clutch a challenge sometimes. I’m used to it now, but initially, I couldn’t drive it smoothly. It’s also my first stick in 17 years!

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I looked at this when car shopping, it has nice power and handles well but it didn’t come home with me.

  • avatar
    squelchy451

    This is the first review where road noise was a complaint on the Golf. There’s a reason why this is almost a foot shorter than the Mazda 3 base hatch but weighs a 100 pounds less. The Mazda, for all its pretenses about being a premium brand, has yet to deliver a truly refined experience behind the wheel. As I often tell people when asked why I got rid of the Mazda 3–it was too uncomfortable to be that slow.

  • avatar
    KevinC

    Really odd timing to be reviewing an ’18 model when the ’19 will have a completely different motor and is already arriving at dealerships. But the 1.4T is no slouch and the fuel economy is better, so hardly a surprise that they are ditching the 1.8T in the Golf.

    Errata – no SiriusXM at this trim level. The smaller-screened infotainment system that VW now sticks in the S model (GTI too) lacks it. VW bean counters are notorious for little cost-cutting moves like this in the middle of a model run.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      They all have Carplay and Android Auto – if you want SiriusXM or similar, get it that way – “there’s an app for that”.

      I would assume that there are very few ’19s in the review fleet currently. They have barely made it to dealerships – I was in for my annual service last week and the local dealer has gotten a single 2019 Golf so far, and no GTIs. Agree on the 1.4T, it makes perfect sense to me to be the engine in the basic Golf.

  • avatar
    pdog_phatpat

    Hmmmmm. I’m just not sure. Perhaps if they added AWD and 10 inches of ground clearance, a giant grill and a sweet roof rack. Maybe then I’d buy it.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I rented a 1.8t Golf and 1.4t Jetta. The bigger engine felt so much more refined. It’s a shame they junked it. I’ll bet the GLI will have the 1.8t.

    Man I still reminisce over that 1.8t. The MK7 is like a baby S Class. So good

  • avatar
    threeer

    So I think I’m coming down to a choice between a Golf and Mazda3 as my next hatch. Has to be manual. I want something a little more grown up and not as boy-racer as the Honda Civic. I drove the Mazda3 right before I deployed and came away grinning from ear to ear. I tested the new Corolla hatch, and while it was nice, I just didn’t come away as smile-induced as I did the 3. So, when I get home in May it’ll be time to test drive a few more hatches to see who gets the price to replace the Cruze…

    • 0 avatar
      JuniperBug

      I was torn between those same two when I shopped for a 2015 this summer. My perception was that the Golf gets you more refinement, the 3 more fun.

      The Golf is more relaxed and composed on the highway, has better outward visibility, is more powerful, and has a more useful trunk.

      The 3 has quicker steering, better throttle response, and feels more like it wants to be thrown around. Dollar for dollar I also found it to have the nicer interior and more features. I like its shifter feel better, and not only because of the extra gear.

      I bought the 3 and enjoy it, but I kind of miss the Golf’s highway composure and better visibility. If I’d bought the Golf I’d probably be missing the 3’s point-and-shoot directness.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        Juniper, thanks for the feedback from somebody who has “been there, done that” for both the Golf and the 3. I’ve not yet tested the Golf (last one I drove was my 2000…and that one barely made it out of warranty before I sold it, though when it was right, I adored it). The 3 just made me feel good driving it. My commute isn’t that long when I’m home, and I need the hatch for the occasional trip to the vet with one of my three dogs. Looking forward to getting home in the spring and doing a back to back comparo of the two before deciding which way to go.

        • 0 avatar
          JuniperBug

          You’re welcome.

          If you’re not doing much highway, I suspect you’ll lean towards the 3, but you’ll of course have to decide for yourself. Both cars are quite good and it mostly comes down to personal preference.

          For what it’s worth, I went into my test drives thinking that I wanted a Golf based on the reviews I’d read, but wound up preferring the Mazda. Like you, it made me feel better while driving it, despite the Golf being faster and more comfortable.

          My biggest gripe about the Mazda so far is that it collects far more rock chips on its soul red paint than I’d like.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      threeer, if it has to be a manual Golf, you might want to do your shopping sooner versus later – the 2019 has the 1.4 from the Jetta. The 1.4 is a fine engine – I own a ’17 Jetta with one – but a manual Golf with the 1.8 is a first class little sleeper. Get it while you still can.

  • avatar
    brodyboy

    For about 27,000 trouble-free miles we owned an automatic 2015 SE, Fender audio, Silk Blue. great color. not drab in the least. The buying and owning experience was first-rate. In the first couple of months of ownership, an odd vibration issue developed with the driveshafts, noted by many on message boards; dealer fixed with shafts off the Jetta parts list (different part #, swapped right in) without pushback of any kind, escalated problem to corporate right away. Fixed and done.

    The car was quiet (not Benz quiet, but good enough), fast and felt and drove in a class above its station; very comfy seats. Only gripe: mild turbo lag; weird ‘rubber-band’ feeling. But that’s just the way it is, we had never owned a turbo four before, just something to get used to.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I have had my Night Blue/Beige interior ’17 Golf Wolfsburg with a 5 speed for a bit over a year and only 9000 miles. I drove a GTI and wanted a GTI, but I didn’t want to pay for it. I call my Golf a “3/4 GTI”. The aftermarket is there if I want to do stuff to it, but probably not.

    The only equipment it lacks that I personally would like is auto climate control and HID or LED headlamps. Yes, the V-tex interior is not leather, but you’d never know since the leather in this class of car is barely that. I personally prefer leather (or leatherette) to cloth interiors.

    I use the 16 inch alloy wheels it came with as snow wheels and bought a set of inexpensive 17″ “R look” wheels with Michelin Pilots. It’s still not a GTI, but it’s a hell of a lot of fun. The 1.8 is strong enough and fairly flexible, but it is tuned for low-end power. I live with plenty of hills and the car encourages my leadfoot and I still average 28 mpg.

    My previous car was a leased ’16 Cruze LT. That car carried the same window sticker as my VW and did not have heated seats, a moonroof and still didn’t feel as solid as my VW, nor was it any fun to drive. Mine was just under 20k out the door.

    A shame the 1.4 will replace the 1.8, taking some character from the car. Maybe too many folks found the 1.8 enough and was stealing from GTI sales, who knows? Any way, this is my second VW and if they’d bring a minivan here, I’d certainly get one of those. Yes, the diesel scandal sucks and the coverup was bulls*t. But they aren’t the first company to lie about their products and cover it up. Doesn’t make it right, it just is.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    Old post, but I drove a MY 2016 automatic last night. Considering a 2019 (yes different engine and trans now) but Zipcar has these as rentals so I used it as an extended test drive. Hardly any engine noise, except on acceleration. Otherwise fairly quiet and drama-free. Soaked up road imperfections very well. Felt light, yet solid. A/C was ice cold. Impressive acceleration and I did get it up to 90 on the highway for a moment. Love the visibility and ergonomics. Two minor complaints. The steering feels quite light and overboosted for my taste. The suspension seemed to overwhelm the base 16″ tires. I made them squeel in corners without trying very hard. They appeared to be OEM ContiProContacts. Car had 36k miles on it. This car was fun, GTI must be a blast.

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