By on November 7, 2018

Hyundai Kona EV

Much like with gasoline-powered vehicles, just how far you’ll travel in an electric car before your “tank” runs dry depends on driving style and the peculiarities of your chosen route.

A British publication has now put a range of electric vehicles, most available (or soon to be available) in the U.S., through their paces, reporting back on whether owners can expect to recoup every last mile promised by the manufacturers and the EPA. Your mileage may indeed vary.

EVs are more at home in the city, and not just because of the plethora of potential plug-in points. Range drops at highway speeds; there’s more aerodynamic drag and less regenerative braking to add juice back into the battery pack. However, day-to-day activities will surely mean spending at least some of your time on the freeway, or perhaps a lonely, rural two-lane.

To get an accurate return from each vehicle, What Car? created a mixed driving route along a 19.4-mile test track, simulating stoplight-to-stoplight driving, rural cruising, and freeway travel. A speed and route profiler was installed to give each test driver the same instructions. The cars then ran the course — twice for vehicles with a smaller battery capacity, three times for the big boys. Weather at the time was “mild,” which in the UK probably means damp and fairly chilly. Cabin temperature was set to room temperature (21C, or 70F); all headlights were illuminated.

Image: Volkswagen 2017 e-Golf VW

Skipping any vehicle not sold (or slated) for North American buyers, the tests revealed, not at all surprisingly, that the Smart Fortwo EQ Cabrio holds a rightful place at at the bottom of the range ladder. With an EPA-rated range of 58 miles, the Smart is truly a city car. That said, the little two-seater improved on its rating in the real-world tests, returning 59 miles before the lights went dark.

Moving up into vehicles with ranges that might take you miles from a Starbucks, two small, affordable hatchbacks returned the same driving distance. The Hyundai Ioniq Electric and Volkswagen e-Golf are rated at 124 and 125 miles, respectively, in the U.S., but the UK tests showed both models collapsing in exhaustion after 117 miles.

Another small German put some ground between itself and the e-Golf, as the BMW i3, upgraded for 2017 with a more energy dense battery, traversed 121 miles before entering the Stone Age. Its EPA rating? 114 miles.

Nissan’s Leaf, which boasts an EPA range of 151 miles, remains the longest-running EV on the market, with a second-generation model bowing for 2018. Put to the test, the Leaf returned 128 miles, a somewhat disappointing showing. Also disappointing was the base Tesla Model S, also known as the 75D. Rated for 259 miles of red, white, and blue range, the 75D left the Brits un-wowed with 204 miles of real-world prowess.

2019 Jaguar I-Pace

Much to the testers’ satisfaction, the Jaguar I-Pace SUV, rated for 234 miles in the U.S., slunk down the test route until it eventually tapped out — after 253 miles. Impressive abilities for this all-electric cat. The real stud, however, was not the sure-footed Brit. Rather, the best range of all vehicles tested came from the Hyundai Kona Electric, a vehicle rated for 258 miles of range. The Kona completed the test with 259 miles of real-world range.

You’ll notice that there’s a few vehicles missing in this test, at least from an American perspective. For one, the Tesla Model 3 didn’t get a turn on the track, nor did the long-ranged Model S and X in 100D guise. Same story for the Chevrolet Bolt, a popular EV rated for 238 miles in the United States. Past tests of the Bolt reveal the ability to maximize that range figure under certain driving conditions, so it would have been nice to see one put to the test.

Regardless, the publication’s testing gives would-be owners a sense of what they might expect should they sign the note on a new electric vehicle.

[Images: Hyundai, Jaguar Land Rover, Nissan]

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59 Comments on “Range Anxiety: Real-world Testing Shows EV Winners and Losers...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    300 or bust.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I really think that’s going to be a sweet spot.

      My Highlander gets about 320 on a tank before I have to stop and fill up. Honestly I’m a little irritated that it isn’t farther.

      The crop of EVs that hit an honest 300 and beyond become a much better proposition for those of us who don’t fly for every long trip.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Why? An EV with 300 miles of range will be just as much of a PITA to charge in the middle of nowhere as one with 250 miles of range.

      Even with 500-600 miles of range EVs are nowhere near being able to replace ICE cars. So the real questions for purchase are can you charge at night, and can you charge enough to cover your daily drive comfortably? For the average American driving 40 or so miles a day, living in a single family detatched home, the answer is yes.

      Range anxiety is BS for 90% of people on the road.

      • 0 avatar
        Nurburgringer

        @sportyaccordy

        Spot on. I’ve been leasing a 2018 i3 (HUGE incentives bring the total cost down to leasing a ~$30k MSRP car, instead of it’s $54k MSRP) for 3 months and it’s 120mile range is way more than I need for my 45 mile daily commute. Charge up every other night at home, take the T&C minivan if we have to visit inlaws 90 miles away. Very much looking forward to the next-gen Kia Soul or Niro EV as a replacement for our other ICE.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          I don’t think I’m ready to purge the ICE from the fleet completely, but I could definitely do one for my ~400 mile a week commute, with a hybrid or PHEV serving as the family hauler. I hate long stops on road trips, so the idea of sitting around for half an hour or more to charge is awful for me. But for the day to day, never having to go to the gas station is just as appealing. So UCE for long distance + EV for short distance is a solid combo.

          I’m just not thrilled about any of the current EV offerings. I like a traditional sedan or fastback, but can’t afford + don’t want to deal with Tesla’s shenanigans.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        Yes! What matters more is the how long it takes to recharge vs. available electrical circuit at your destination. 120V 15A outlets and suitable extension cords are very common, but the charging time may be intolerably long. Not that rare for a house to have a utility room near the garage with a 240V 30A electric dryer outlet so that level might be available temporarily at a relative’s house. The next step up would 240V 50A like an RV hookup which probably isn’t available unless someone paid to have it installed.

    • 0 avatar
      TimK

      For EVs a honest range of 300 miles is a necessity in many western states. Only a fool drives through northern New Mexico with less than half a tank of gas.

    • 0 avatar
      ACCvsBig10

      300 pshh, let me know when they can do 400miles at 80mph

  • avatar
    Johnster

    I’d really like to see some range information with regards to various weather extremes. How much does the range drop when the outside temperature is below zero degrees fahrenheit? How do high temperatures above 100 degrees effect range? These kinds of things only increase range anxiety.

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      The cold weather does affect the range greatly. I had a coworker who owned a 2013 Volt. When it was cold with a full battery he could not get more than 40 miles per gallon and it was very cool inside since the heater wasnt able to heat the car properly at 12F ambient temperature. Much better suited for warmer weather.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “When it was cold with a full battery he could not get more than 40 miles per gallon and it was very cool inside since the heater wasnt able to heat the car properly at 12F ambient temperature. Much better suited for warmer weather.”

        My 2013 Volt is toasty warm inside even in -10F weather. Anything under 15F the engine turns on and it heats the cabin(using the heat from the engine) just like any other ICE vehicle. Even in those cold temps looking at both the electrical and gas consumption it is still way more efficient than an ICE vehicle. I never saw anything under 70MPG all last winter(I live in MN) but that includes the electricity, so not a true 70 MPG. Still quite good though even figuring in what the electricity cost me..

        • 0 avatar
          Carrera

          It was my mistake…not 40 mpg….he would get only 40 miles total with a full battery. Temperature was in the teens…and he would charge the battery overnight at home in the garage. I think he would turn the heater off himself because it would use way too much power from the battery. He would also complain that it was terrible in snow. When it came time to go home, batteries were depleted and he would drive on generator/engine. I really flirted with the idea getting one myself when I came back home to Florida. I drive 52 miles each way to work so in theory, even with AC on full blast which is required here, I would be able to make it to work. Unfortunately, since I am not able to plug it in anywhere at work, I abandoned the idea. I like the first generation Volt, not so much the current one.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            No doubt the electric heat kills the battery range, I think I got maybe 30 miles out of my battery today. In the summer running the AC has very little effect on battery range. I would agree with your comment that the Volt or any EV is much better suited in warmer weather.

            I thought mine did pretty good last winter. I drove on some pretty nasty winter roads and it did a lot better than I was expecting. Only a couple of times I left it parked and drove the Tahoe.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    This might be termed Fake News, because EV makers generally recommend keeping the battery charged between 30 and 80% for maximum battery life. Fully charging and fully discharging the battery dramatically reduces the useful life and capacity of batteries. Thus that 200 mile Tesla S75 range is in reality 160 miles at 80%, but should be recharged at 60 miles (30%), which yields an “everyday” range of 100 miles. Throw in some cold weather where the heater is used and that range could be cut another 30% (now down to 70 miles), and in 8 to 10 years the full-range of the battery might further be reduced by 20% (i.e. 80 miles total under ideal conditions, 55 miles in the cold). Don’t believe the EV hype and the headlines – using maximum range is only for magazine tests and emergency use if you want to preserve your battery.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I generally agree with your assessment here.

      A few comments:
      I’d argue for a ‘safe’ low end of 20%, but deeper cycling only makes things worse.
      The 8-10 year window isn’t today, so most people aren’t concerned with that. However, Tesla batteries consistently show the best aging compared with others.

      • 0 avatar
        stingray65

        How would the public react if Ford or Toyota announced that owners of their gasoline or diesel cars should never put more than 16 gallons of fuel in the 20 gallon tank, and be sure to refill before getting below 6 gallons? Or to suggest owners avoid turning on the heat in the winter otherwise the tank leaks up to 6 gallons, and to warn that with age (i.e. beyond warranty coverage) the 20 gallon tank may shrink down to 16 gallons? Or to announcement that for only a few thousand dollars extra the buyer can purchase a tank with an extra 3 gallons of capacity? Would such news bump up their share prices?

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “should never”

          That’s over-stating it. The 80%-30% rule is the guideline for maximum battery longevity, not a FIRM “you must do this only” mandate. When you need a deep-cycle you can do it, it’s just not optimal.

          ICE cars have similar guidelines printed in their owner’s manual. Kia says that I shouldn’t excessively use launch control and that driving in sport mode will hurt my fuel economy. My father’s Ram 3500 has a listing of turbo cool-down times when towing certain weights, and everything I’ve ever owned warns against higher RPM use after a cold start.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Using launch control is exactly the same as filling the tank with gas, since its required you want to use the car at all. Excellent analogy.

            Okay, so replace “should never” with “should rarely”, is that better? Still a load of crap nobody would accept when buying anything other than an EV.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Okay, so replace ‘should never’ with ‘should rarely’, is that better?”

            Yes, that’s better. “should not regularly” would probably be best though.

            And I stand behind my analogies. I can understand the “80-30” guideline being a dealbreaker for some people, but EVs did not invent “regular use” limitations on a vehicle.

            Maybe it would be helpful if the EPA provided both a “maximum range” and an “optimal range” for EV window stickers.

        • 0 avatar
          arach

          You mean like on the BMW i3 REX where they made the odd “1 gallon limit” rule even though the tank holds like 2.6 gallons or something like that? haha…

      • 0 avatar
        arach

        Do any of the companies take this into consideration?

        IE- I imagine a tesla has a 350 mile range, but they preserve 20% battery power to assure the batteries last forever, and don’t quite charge to 100, so they get around a 250 mile official range thats software limited.

        This is how hard drives work… one of the reasons enterprise SSDs are so reliable is because they overprovision… so they have say 600 GB in HD space, but they only make “500” GB available, assuring it never actually fills up, preserving the life of the drive.

        I know when Verizon was rolling out their fiber optic network, the bandwidth was huge, but they throttled it in the end-users house. This meant that people really did get the “max speed” all the time no matter what happened down stream.

        I would expect an EV company to overprovision their batteries as well, and I’m kind of surprised if they aren’t.

    • 0 avatar
      Giskard

      Ironic as you’re spreading your own “fake news” here. Yes, manufacturers generally don’t recommend discharging your battery to zero or keeping it topped off at 100% every day. However, you generally don’t have a need to do this every day either. Charging to 100% and running the battery to near zero for the occasional road trip is perfectly fine and will not do significant damage to modern electric car battery packs.

      Also, as the packs have evolved to be more robust, cheaper, and bigger this just isn’t that much of an issue anymore. Manufacturers have learned to build enough of a “buffer” in so that 0% doesn’t mean completely drained. Much like the “reserve” built into most ICE powered vehicles.

      Even my 5 year old i3 Rex does not have any restrictions on charging beyond stating that I shouldn’t leave the pack uncharged for more than a week or two at a time. I plug it in every night when I get home and it’s “full” in the morning, just like my cell phone. No real planning required.

      • 0 avatar
        stingray65

        Giskard – BMW made the REX version precisely because people don’t want to plan, as the gasoline engine can bail them out if they forget or don’t have time to plug in, or if an emergency requires an unexpected longer trip, etc. I like the i3 as a used buy because its a nice car that has terrible resale value generally, but I would never consider the battery only version because of the severe range limitations, which is why they are widely available for peanuts with virtually no mileage.

        • 0 avatar
          Giskard

          Correct – the relative cheapness of used i3s is why I recently bought mine instead of the much more expensive Model 3. That and I live in the middle of nowhere (northwest corner of MN) where even Tesla hasn’t built out charging infrastructure adequately yet. I never run out of electrons with normal commuting, but can go anywhere I want using the Rex when I have to venture further. It’s actually a really comfortable and fun car irregardless of the powertrain, too.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      Do ev drivers actually have enough control over the charging to force the battery to full charge or complete discharge? I don’t think so.

      My impression is that battery charge is limited to a range of that does not go near full charge or discharge. So for my hybrid, that means the available capacity is something like 23% of full capacity, between 40% and 63% of the entire battery capacity.

      The confusion may be from using the term “full charge” to mean the upper limit of the allowed charge range. So for my hybrid, a “full charge” is 63% f total battery capacity. I doubt you have the ability to discharge an ev battery to 0% charge, so the rated distance range applies to the allowed charge level range.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        @brandloyalty: Hybrids are designed to keep their batteries happy, so that’s why they never fully discharge or charge.

        You certainly can take a BEV battery to 0 or 100%; I’ve done it. OK – maybe not 0%, but perhaps 1-2% with ‘turtle mode’ in a 12 Leaf, and then it shuts off. There are a few anecdotal stories of batteries becoming unsalvageable if run down too low, but I don’t know if one incident is enough to do it.

        That vintage of Leaf recommended only 80% charge for daily use, with occasional 100% charges. I think now it’s just 100%. Tesla (even now) permits you to adjust the charge percentage.

        • 0 avatar
          brandloyalty

          @SCE to AUX

          Do you know if lithium batteries are more or less vulnerable to degradation from charging or discharging close to their limits than NiMH batteries? My hybrid uses NiMH cells, while I think ev’s use lithium.

          Certainly the NiMH batteries as they are managed are showing little or no degradation over 10 years of use. My 2009 hybrid is getting its best mileage ever, which despite not making sense, does suggest battery performance equal to new.

          And if ev drivers can approach or reach full charge or discharge, are they warned this can degrade the batteries?

          • 0 avatar
            SCE to AUX

            @brandloyalty:

            NIMH batteries are very rugged, but they’ve fallen out of favor due to their weight and lower energy density. I don’t think they suffer much from full charge or discharge. And they’ve excelled in hybrid use since Toyota began using them way back in ~1998/2000, especially since they live in the mid-range of charge capacity.

            However, modern hybrids are using lithium ion (like my 13 Optima Hybrid), and even the Prius uses lithium ion now.

            Yes, EV drivers are warned about excess charge or discharge, but the mfrs do not like to mention it.

            They don’t like to mention that best battery treatment means you’ve limited the range of their car, and they never quantify how environmental conditions will affect it. That leaves it up to consumer geeks to publish tables that predict this behavior for you.

            At the local auto show a few years ago, a private mail carrier was talking to the booth babe about how he figured the Nissan Leaf would work for his 80-mile daily rounds. I interjected that this was absolutely not true, since ambient temperature, climate control, speed, and battery degradation would each chop a percentage off the maximum range the car claimed to have. The booth babe looked most displeased, but I truly believe Nissan would have happily sold him a car that would not work for him.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      @stingray: “EV makers generally recommend keeping the battery charged between 30 and 80% for maximum battery life. Fully charging and fully discharging the battery dramatically reduces the useful life and capacity of batteries.”

      Total BS. Nissan says it’s okay to charge to 100% – although I agree with the 30% low end number. Neither Nissan’s or Tesla’s seem to have issues with charging to 100%. Nissan, I know from personal experience. For Tesla, see Tesloops experience:

      https://www.tesloop.com/blog/2017/8/30/tesla-model-s-hits-300k-miles-with-less-than-11k-maintenance-costs

      Real world experience. Not fake propaganda.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “Thus that 200 mile Tesla S75 range is in reality 160 miles at 80%, but should be recharged at 60 miles (30%), which yields an “everyday” range of 100 miles. ”

      No, that’s already figured in. My 2013 Volt has enough battery to push it almost a 100 miles on a good day, but is rated @ 40 miles. With just under 70K on it I get 45 miles of range out of it all the time as long as the temp is above 45F.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      An EV does not charge to true 100%, nor does it discharge to true 0%. The buffers at both end are built in; you cannot access that capacity. So concern about battery life based on full cycling is a bit of a red herring.

      Most manufacturers tell you to just charge to 100%. You’re right that normal people won’t drive til the battery runs out; who would want to be stranded?

      byw, That Nissan Leaf result is really disappointing–way out of line compared to the rating, while the others are reasonably close.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I’m surprised at the Tesla and the I-Pace, which I would expect to behave oppositely. Other ‘real-world’ testing has not been kind to the I-Pace.

    To me, anything within 10% of the EPA claim is excellent, so I’d be OK with the Ioniq and e-Golf.

    • 0 avatar
      stingray65

      The Brits always praise British car brands to high heaven – even when they are owned by the Indians. Over 20+ years I’ve never seen a negative review of a Jaguar or Land Rover product in a British motoring magazine.

      • 0 avatar

        “The Brits always praise British car brands to high heaven”

        Why shouldn’t they? British cars are highly desirable worldwide, super luxury brands. And add to this national pride something that Americans are not used to. Even American icon Ford starved its own luxury brands to death just to acquire and nurture British “jewels in the crown” before handing them over to another former colony to take care.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        So your suggesting they outright lied about the Jaguar? Being “kind” in a review is a bit different than saying “the car will do 150 mph and get 50 mpg doing it for 400k miles with one oil change”.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          You’re getting painfully close to how the E-type achieved its performance claims. Car and Driver once observed that the engine speed required to reach the reported 150 mph top speed was about 25% higher than maximum. On the positive side, it was finally as fast as the Brits had claimed the XK120 had been a dozen years earlier.

  • avatar
    raynla

    Range anxiety is like most other anxieties…It’s all in your head.
    Most people don’t drive over 100 miles a day anyway.
    And when you count home charging access there are many, many more charging stations than gas stations already and at a substantial discount even.
    I know, I know, what about the cross country road trip that less than 1% of the population can say they have ever done, or will ever do in their lifetime?
    By now you’ve all probably have heard about Tesla’s Supercharger network. It works as advertised (or maybe not since Tesla doesn’t advertise) lol!
    It’s a change in mindset, but there is probably an EV for sale right now that will work for most consumers.

    • 0 avatar
      stingray65

      Why are you on a car site if you have never taken a road trip? Not that you have to be a car enthusiast to take road trips, because I can’t say I know anyone who hasn’t taken a number of extended road trips. Grandparents for Christmas, ski/hiking trips to the mountains, summer vacation trips with the kids, Florida for Spring Break, Snow-birds heading south, out-of-state college kids heading to school, people afraid to fly – you don’t think most people haven’t had at least of few of these during any car ownership period? And believe it or not, many people don’t live next to a Tesla supercharger station, or want to plan their travel routes based on available charging locations. It may also blow your mind to know that some people are unable or unwilling to spend $50,000+ on a 200 mile range Tesla, no matter how nice they are to drive or how convenient the supercharger network is.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        stingray65, not every car is well suited to road trips and it’s not uncommon to rent a car for a long trip. Easy to imagine a car enthusiast really enjoying driving a Miata, but choosing something different to drive hundreds of miles on the interstate. I don’t see a problem with choosing an EV for a daily commute to work and using a different car for road trips.

      • 0 avatar
        raynla

        Key words “cross country”

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      You seriously think less than 1% of the population will ever drive over 300 miles in a day?

      While I don’t do it every weekend, the inability of a vehicle to take me on a “road trip” would be a major negative and I don’t think it’s just me and five other morons that feel this way. If EVs want to move beyond their niche and become the default propulsion method for people then it’s something manufacturers will have to address. Whether that answer is longer range, shorter charge times (and better infrastructure), or more PHEVs.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Most people, especially new car buyers, live in households with access to more than one vehicle. So when the need arises to go beyond what is practical with an EV there are other options.

        If you want or need one vehicle to do it all then obviously EVs are not for you. But the notion that EVs will never be more than niche if they don’t work for any and everybody is absurd. There are plenty of cars way more niche than something like a Kia Niro EV that have been in production for 50+ years.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “But the notion that EVs will never be more than niche if they don’t work for any and everybody is absurd.”

          “Niche” might be a bad term, but it sounds like you agree with me that any “ICE is dead soon” talk is incorrect.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            “ICE is dead” is a strawman in this discussion; I don’t think anyone here has said this. Don’t let your fear trick you into hearing things nobody is saying. EV will complement ICE, not replace it, for reasons that should be obvious.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “If EVs want to move beyond their niche and become the default propulsion method for people then it’s something manufacturers will have to address. Whether that answer is longer range, shorter charge times (and better infrastructure), or more PHEVs.”

        How many multi-car households are there in this country? For everyone of those an EV is pretty much a no-brainer. Don’t need shorter charge times, do not need charging infrastructure. The battery tech is there, just need the cost to come down which if your paying attention China will take care of that in a few years. My Volt has a piddly 40 miles of range and it hardly ever burns gas. Any EV with a 150 miles of Range would meet most peoples driving requirements 99.9999% of the time.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “Don’t need shorter charge times, do not need charging infrastructure.”

          I think you are wrong. Increasing range, decreasing charge times and increasing infrastructure is *literally* what nearly every vehicle manufacturers is working on when it comes to EVs. There is obviously consumer demand for these things. Simply meeting “minimum requirements” isn’t going to get people to break out their wallets.

          Plus your Volt is a PHEV, which I already brought up as a possible solution.

  • avatar
    raynla

    Range anxiety is like most other anxieties…It’s all in your head.
    Most people don’t drive over 100 miles a day anyway.
    And when you count home charging access there are many, many more charging stations than gas stations already and at a substantial discount even.
    I know, I know, what about the cross country road trip that less than 1% of the population can say they have ever done, or will ever do in their lifetime?
    By now you’ve all have probably heard about Tesla’s Supercharger network. It works as advertised (or maybe not since Tesla doesn’t advertise) lol!
    It’s a change in mindset, but there is probably an EV for sale right now that will work for most consumers.

  • avatar
    arthurk45

    And lately the Tesla fans have been quetioning the driivng range of the I Pace (with a 90kWhr battery) versus its direct competitor, the Tesla Model X 75D (rated the most unreliable car on the planet) solely on the basis of the EPA driving range estimates, in which both cars are roughly equal. This test shows results much more plausible, in line with respective battery capacities. It may not prove that the differences are always going to be that large, but it eliminates the claim that the Model X will always get more out of its capacity than the I Pace gets out of its (miles per kWhr) It also demonstrates that every single drive from fully charged to empty is different and that any test can only provide data for a given driving cycle. IN thecase of the proclaimed significant “greater MPKwhr” for the Model X, calculations show that while the difference may seem large, electric fuel costs are not and the owner of the I Pace,even if he gets 20% less mileage, during a 10,000 mile year, he will only spend $60 more for his electricity, assuming he pays the national average of 12 cents per kWhr.

    • 0 avatar
      raynla

      Speaking of reliability…the Jaguar F-Pace rounded off the top 10 in the most unreliable category.
      Though one could almost argue that Jaguar is a “niche” brand due to their volume.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    The range doesn’t really bother me..as long as I could get 120-150 miles. What I want is 1-3 minutes charge time and charging stations at each gas pump. Then I am interested. At home, I could live with 4-5 hour charge time for overnight.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      A 4 mile/kWh car filling up its 150-mile range battery in 3 minutes would require nearly a 1 megawatt charger (750 kW). With today’s 400 Volt systems, you’re talking about 1875 Amps, which requires a cable you can’t carry. Even tomorrow’s 800 Volt systems would need to deliver 900+ Amps to provide a 3-minute charge of 150 miles, which is a Lot of Current.

      And you’d actually need more than this, because batteries charge on a curve rather than a straight line.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      If you can charge at home, why do you need to charge anywhere else?

  • avatar
    furryfeatures

    Do you know when and where “What Car?” tested these cars? The UK has had a very hot summer this year and autumn has also been somewhat above average. North Americans seem to believe that it’s always cold and wet here but it isn’t. Month by month, London and Vancouver have very similar temperatures but London has much LESS rain. That said, whenever I’ve gone to Vancouver in the summer, it’s had longer dry spells and when it rains, it rains more heavily. But my one winter visit was freezing cold and had more snow than I’ve seen in any other city, including New York. But I understand that that winter was freakishly cold for Vancouver and it (December 1996) was like December 2010 in London, something very unusual.

    If the road tests were done during September this year somewhere in southern England, the temperature was probably something between 18-25 degrees Celsius, with about a one fifth chance of rain and a two fifths chance of sunshine. The other two fifths would have been other weather types, such as heavily overcast, windy or showery. September and much of October had very pleasant weather this year. “Mild” probably meant exactly what it said and it was more likely to be dry than you might think.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    My wife and I divide our vehicles by load, not by travel distance. We own three: a Ford Focus which gets used most, an AWD Toyota Sienna when we have more than the Focus can hold and for winter driving, and an Infiniti G37S which is my toy. All three get used for trips from a few miles in town to far beyond the range of any BEV. Plug in hybrids would work for us. As far as I know, they are limited to sedans (i.e. Focus substitute), SUVs and crossovers. No vans or sports cars.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    My 2012 Camry Hybrid will travel up to 600 miles on a tank of gas. But, it can go as low as 500 miles on a tank in cool weather. Regardless, until I see the same level of range in an electric, I will keep the hybrid. Why would I pay a ton of money to trade into a vehicle that gets half the range.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Answer: If range is all you care about, then there is no reason to get an EV.

      My 13 Optima Hybrid can go 650+ miles on a tank of gas if driven carefully (40 mpg highway, 17 gallon tank). I once drove it across PA and back without refilling, with lots of range left over.

      But it has terrible driveability, is slow off the line, and still requires all the maintenance of an ICE. EVs of any brand offer smooth, quiet, snappy performance, without the constant maintenance of an ICE. Some people value the driving and ownership qualities of an EV more than just range between refilling.

  • avatar
    skloon

    I was thinking about this Tuesday- my usual commute of about 8km takes 15 minutes at rush hour, Tuesday it was 50 minutes due to trains, accidents and idiots- as it was -12c I wonder what that would have done to an electric cars range- most of the battery usage would be keeping me warm


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