By on October 1, 2018

This weekend, someone raised their bidder’s number at Barrett-Jackson in Las Vegas when the auctioneer asked for $58,000. It wasn’t on a Hemi ‘Cuda convertible. Nor was it on a tasty ’70 Chevelle SS. It was on the 1997 Acura Integra Type R you see above.

After buyer’s fees, the new owner shelled out $63,800 for what may very well be the lowest-mileage ITR in existence. Do you think collector’s tastes have shifted? Maybe permanently?

It wasn’t too long ago we were watching ’70s muscle trade for inflated six (and seven!) figure price tags. Most reasonable people saw this as unsustainable, correctly assuming cooler heads would prevail and the market would come back down to earth. The crash of ’08/’09 took care of some of the problem, while more attractive investments took care of the rest.

I’m not here to argue whether cars should be purchased as an investment. If someone has the pockets to drop several cubic acres of coin on a fleet of classic cars, then turn around and sell them a few years later for a tidy profit (*ahem* Ron Pratte *ahem*), more power to them. It might drive up the price of certain models, but that happens in just about any form of collecting — art, pop culture, or cars.

For comparison’s sake, this very clean and all-original 1991 NSX sold for $40,000 before buyer’s fees. In the right color with the right transmission, I think I’d select this 21,000-mile rocket instead of that ITR and pocket the $18k difference.

Regardless, today’s question asks what you think will be the next car — or genre of cars — to tip the scales of fortune at places like Barrett-Jackson. We’ve asked a similar question in the past, but enough time has elapsed that perhaps you’ve formed new opinions since then. Or not.

One thing’s for sure: the sale of an 1,200-mile ITR for $60k+ makes the conversation relevant again.

[images: BarrettJackson]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

71 Comments on “QOTD: Are These Bucks Too Deluxe?...”


  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I was perusing the the Vegas BJ results. Some interesting results for sure. My eyes are telling me that Chevelle and tri-5 have had their run and are now approaching pricing that a mere mortal might be able to afford a nicely represented/built original or rest-mod to drive. Personally, I love that. I had Chevelle and would like another. It was a nice driving car.

    Pickups of just about any flavor are headed north into the expensive category, sans the 68-72 Chevy short bed. Those have been done to the point that ‘everyone’ has one. Though a really nicely done (read over the top) rebuild will bring north of 50k.

    The asian imports and ‘M’ BMW that are not bastardized will bring all the dough, as we are seeing. Finally, I think a market exists for the GMW. I have seen a few here and their and the owners love them. I am not a BMW guy so I can’t say if it is an E34, 31 or R2D2 but that classic 5 series from the late 80’s early 90’s is ripe for an interior refresh and LS motor under the hood with a Tremec 6 speed. I think cars like this will start to bring serious cash.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    “Do you think collector’s tastes have shifted?”

    yes, of course. The Boomers drove musclecar auction prices up into the stratosphere. Now it’s the early Gen-Xers who are going to drive surviving sport compact prices up there as well.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    When can the majority of consumers afford to purchase a ‘collectible’ or ‘classic’ care? Once they have reached disposable income. Meaning when they have paid off the mortgage, and are ’empty nesters’, or have reached ‘peak’ earning power. Meaning 50+. Then most of them want to buy either the car that they lusted after when they were young or the same model/type that they had and remember most fondly.

    So demand is primarily based on demographics.

    Those who wanted pre WWII vehicle are now largely too old, to work on or drive their’s and thus the demand for them had decreased.

    The same will eventually happen, for 1960s/70’s muscle cars.

    We have witnessed this phenomena in the sports collectible
    and home furnishings/decor markets.

    This Integra is now just over 20 years old. Meaning that those in their late 30’s or early 40’s either remember it fondly or had experience owning/driving one. Therefore they want one, and are now starting to be able afford it. Thus cars of this era will rise in value.

    That being said there are the ‘extremely rich’ collectors who will purchase the best of any era. And some ‘special’ collectible vehicles (Duesenbergs, Bugattis, Ferraris, etc) that will always be in demand.

    However, despite all of the above, I would still prefer the NSX and believe that it intrinsically has a higher value.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I think pre war is always going to have a market, specifically at the high end. Deusenbergs for example will always be desirable and the market has transcended the “I loved them when I was young” nostalgia pushing the musclecar market.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        The best of the best will always be collectible.

        However the change in prices that we see in the auto and other collectible markets demonstrates the power of demographics.

        So don’t expect your 350 cid Chev or 289 Mustang to be subject to a bidding war in the future. But a Super Bird, Shelby, Judge GTO, Z-28, etc will always have a market.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    I get it. It is a halo car from when I was young. Personally I’d probably go deep into the 30’s for a B13 SE-R in this cars condition. They seem to have all been used up though but yes, these cars and FD RX-7’s are crazy right now. I wonder if we will soon see “clones” being built as is the case with cars like the Hemi Mopar’s and Shelby’s so that mortals will be able to afford them. I would be cool with a car like this that started life as a base automatic…I like to drive my cars after all. This is probably how I’ll get that SE-R I want anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I will say, if you want to get into something from the era that is affordable I think the 300ZX is your best bet right now. I like the 3000GTs as well but they are a bit more difficult to find not run into the ground. Good perdormance, reasonably reliable, and they just ooze 90’s.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      Art;

      I owned a B13 SE-R for 3 years. I never understood the desire for them. Not fast. Poor MPG. Poor quality.
      (Good handling, visibility and room- tho).

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        It isn’t rational…It was just the “those in the know” car from my young adulthood that I never pulled the trigger on and spent 20 years wishing I had. I always drove compacts like that and the SE-R was sort of the pinnacle of the genre. The closest I got was a Saturn SL2 hence my desire for one, but it is pure nostalgia.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I think a lot of the muscle car shoppers are the same way, they saw those cars from afar as teens while their families bought plain-jane seafoam green Valiants and Impala sedans with powerglides. Are the cars actually that “good” in a pure performance sense? Maybe not, but it evokes such a strong sense of nostalgia of fulfilling a childhood dream, that people are lining up with big bucks to experience that.

          They’re not THAT special, but I feel that way about the various JDM oddities I grew up seeing on summer trips to Siberia in the 90s-2000s when they flooded the market and were still “fresh off the boat” and in awesome condition.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        They were sort of the Asian M3 and while no drag strip terror (high to mid 16’s but back then a 15 second car was considered genuinely fast) they made up for it with great handling.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    The only reason I can see that this car could have commanded this price is that this type played a significant role in a Fast and Furious movie. Otherwise, I’d consider it worthless.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Some people enjoy driving.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        They may enjoy driving, but I can’t see anyone enjoying THAT car!

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          That generation Integra was lauded as a great driving car. The “Type R” represents one of the few times in that era that we actually got the “forbidden fruit” version of such a car. Maybe not worth the asking price to most, but pretty far from worthless.

          • 0 avatar
            Dave M.

            Amen. As a late boomer, I certainly appreciate the style of cars from the 50s-70s. But unless I was doing a weekly “cruise” event, quite frankly they sucked to drive. I’ll take an R or Si or GTI any day to go out and have fun with.

            Or I’d look at a new one…the GTI and Si can be had for under $25k…with modern conveniences and safety.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Vulpine projects his own preferences onto the entire buying population of the US: news at 11.

          • 0 avatar
            Land Ark

            I took his comment as nobody is ever going to actually drive this particular car, the one with 1,200 miles, since doing so would destroy the collectibilty.

            I could be wrong.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            ^This (Gtem’s comment), x eleventybillion.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            @Land Ark

            Unfortunately not, Vulpine really can’t wrap his mind around anyone else have any other needs or likes other than his own. Well documented in these threads in the past.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            @Land Ark

            Unfortunately not, Vulpine truly can’t wrap his mind around anyone else have any other needs or likes other than his own. Well documented in these threads in the past.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Vulpine must be trolling.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @FreedMike: “Vulpine must be trolling.”

            — nope. But every one who took my name in vain certainly was.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “but I can’t see anyone enjoying THAT car”

            So you can’t see anyone enjoying what is widely regarded as one of the most honed in drivers cars (not just fwd, period) of the 90s, but you’re all about recommending a Fiat 500 to everyone.

            I don’t think it’s trolling on your behalf, I think it is genuine derangement.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            I can’t see anyone enjoying what is an ugly car in my eyes. Oh, I know there are those who do, but I am absolutely NOT one of them.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    If you pay this price because you just HAVE TO HAVE the car and don’t care what it costs – fine.

    If you are doing it because you think this is an investment – f#$k you and your bank account.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Cars like this are Gen X’s hemi MOPARs and Shelbys. See the FD RX-7 also. I don’t really do cars as an investment, but if you are just buying the cars you lusted after in your youth but were too poor to drive anything but a clapped out mid 80’s Escort then this is likely on your list. The boomers are aging out of driving and the Millenials don’t have disposable income by in large yet so it is Gen X’s turn to drive the collector car market for a bit.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        And I fully support driving them.

        I’d love a late 80s Mustang LX 5.0 and I would drive the heck out of it. Same with an IROC 5.7 Camaro.

        But I’m not going to buy one, seal it in a climate controlled bubble and wait for Barrett Jackson 2035.

    • 0 avatar
      Joe Enrico

      and remember, in order to get bid up to that amount, there were a few others who thought it was worth nearly the same. More than 50k for a rice rocket? sheesh.

      and another trailer queen comes to the masses.

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        50k+ for, let’s say a Chevelle, doesn’t make any sense either. Nothing special about American muscle except that some of those cars survived. And people who wanted them from afar can now afford to buy them. Same with this car.

        I’m 41, this was a car most car guys who were into imports wanted when I was younger. Some of them have money to spend on something they think is special or special to them. Most have been smashed, rusted out or ruined by “tuners”, so this is an incredible example and a few people thought it was worth it.

        I get the frustration with trailer queens, but should they all be driven? I don’t have a good answer for that.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          I mean if the dude wants to very occasionally drive it, thats cool. I mean the first Mustang gets driven on occasion. I have no beef with a car such as this being a trailer queen though. Honestly if you want to daily one it would be cheaper to buy a well preserved slushbox equipped model or something and build a “type R” clone though or just get a more traditionally used one and refersh it.

          Anything at this age, mileage, and condition is not likely to see much time on the road…even something like a 1200 mile Citation X11

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    Read an article last year on the Type r. I personally don’t understand spending $58k on any Integra. Yet this article spoke of this model reaching six figures within the next five years. And I guess this is the start to reaching six figures.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I like to look back on some of the cars I owned that may one day be worthy of a weekend Mecum or Barrett Jackson.

    I think the Land Ark’s heyday is over.

    I had a 1990 Maxima SE, I could see a low mile one of those becoming collectible. Not mine though as it was almost totally rust when I got it.

    I had 2 Dodge Dakota R/Ts which I’m sure will eventually be sought after if not modified. The biggest drawback being that they were only automatics.

    I don’t think the ’97 Audi A6 will ever garner much interest. But the ’97 328i I intended to buy that day may.

    Perhaps the Scion tC will one day, but likely the 2009 TRD Release series and not the regular versions.

    The 99-00 Civic coupes may just shock you one day. The Si, of course, but potentially even the EX if it was left stock.

    The IS300 sedan and Sportcross are ripe for becoming collectible. But there were a lot of them and once Altezzas become importable, I think that would squash them ever having real value.

    Currently my fingers are crossed that my 07 Legacy GT wagon and 06 GTO become huge collectors items. Specifically right around the time I decide to sell them.

  • avatar
    Cole Trickle

    I think the market is topping out on the old “box” broncos but I’m seeing clean “OJ” broncos going for 20k or more. When I was shopping for a replacement for my Wrangler, I wanted a 4wd that would seat 5 and had a top that came off. That left the K5 Blazer/Jimmy and the Bronco. I drove a lot of both and the GM’s were all in horrendous shape and falling apart. The Broncos seemed to have held up much better. Most of them had few if any issues and drove much better, even lifted. I think we will continue to see those prices rise as 90’s kids can more easily afford weekend toys but want to take the kids along with them.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    I would love to find a manual SC300 in this sort of shape.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I wonder if we’re ready for perhaps rare/exotic Jeeps or SUVs? We already have the Grand Wagoneer

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    Presumably if you’re spending $60k on an ITR you probably already have an NSX. If I had oodles of money and some spare garage space, I could see parking an NSX and an ITR alongside my S2000 as some kind of “Honda ultra collector set” or something.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    I’m not sure you will ever see regular 6 figure valuations on 80-90s Japanese or American cars, and only a few Europeans. Think what you can buy new or near new for $58K or less – Corvette, V-8 Camaro/Mustang/Challenger, M2/M3/M4, Cayman/Boxster, Golf R, Audi TT/RS, MB AMGs, not to mention Raptors, Grand Cherokee SRTs, GLC 4.3, and other hot CUV/SUV/pickups. There can’t be many genX and millenials who would have the funds and desire to buy an expensive 20-30 year old car that will be slower, must less safe, certain to rust at the first whiff of moisture, and likely have very iffy parts availability than a newer model, plus have no connectivity to their iPhone and very likely a manual transmission they don’t know how to shift.

    The 1960s-early 70s was a very special era because cars from that era represent peak no-regulation cars, and hence were faster and better looking than the emission choked, big bumper cars that followed for the next 25 years. Nobody made anything faster or better looking than a Hemi-Cuda or Tri-power GTO or Fuelie Corvette or GT350 or Cobra until this century, which is why those cars were so dearly loved by nostalgic boomers. I just don’t see a repeat of those. The interesting question is whether Xers and millenials will ever pay big bucks for “classic” iPhones and Blackberries.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      “There can’t be many genX and millenials who would have the funds and desire to buy an expensive 20-30 year old car that will be slower, must less safe, certain to rust at the first whiff of moisture, and likely have very iffy parts availability than a newer model, plus have no connectivity to their iPhone and very likely a manual transmission they don’t know how to shift.”

      You’re using the generalized stereotype for people of that age. The type of person buying the Cudas and Chevelles as nostalgia pieces while prices started to climb weren’t your average Boomer either. They were the enthusiast crowd. So the right type of Gen Xer/Millenial enthusiast is going to buy the right type of cars until speculators get involved and then into the stratosphere it’ll go – just like what happened with muscle cars.

      And your description of the unsafe, slow, rust-prone cars couldn’t be more correctly applied to the cars of the 60s and 70s you are comparing modern classic cars to. Why would you buy a 70 Chevelle LS6 when you can get more power and safety from a modern Mustang?

      “The interesting question is whether Xers and millenials will ever pay big bucks for “classic” iPhones”

      This is already happening. 1st gen iPhones new in the box are outrageously expensive. One recently sold for $2,650.

      • 0 avatar
        Land Ark

        One recently sold for $2,650.
        Edit: Holy cow! One sold in August for $5,600.

        • 0 avatar
          gearhead77

          That’s amazing. No, really. A car, any car, can go from point A to B and take you with it. But a 6k 1st Gen iPhone can only be a phone.

          I understand that collectible pricing works on all things. Shoes are another thing that apparently fetch weird money for what are just shoes. But hey, to each their own. Spend your money how you want.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            “But a 6k 1st Gen iPhone can only be a phone.”

            No, it really cant even do that. Most of the 2g spectrum has been reallocated so it wont work anymore. It would be the same as firing up your 1998 Nokia Banana phone…you might look like NEO calling for an exit from The Matrix…but you are going to be hosed should you actually need to make a call. I suppose you could use it as an MP3 player, but even on WiFi IOS 4 or whatever they last got is going to be basically useless.

      • 0 avatar
        stingray65

        Ark – I think the LS6 to modern Mustang comparison is definitely one reason why 60s muscle car prices have leveled off or declined. The LS6 was one of my dream cars in high school, but even if I had the money for a nice one lying around I would much rather have a new Camaro or Mustang or Corvette because of the better performance, safety, convenience, comfort, warranty, etc. My point was, however, that the modern to old comparison was favorable to the new cars 20 years ago because an LS6 was faster and better looking than the then new mid-90s Mustang or Camaro (or any Integra).

  • avatar
    clkimmel

    Someone just bought a 1972 Gran Torino station wagon for $47500.00 on Bring a Trailer.

    https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1972-ford-gran-torino-4/

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    My .02$.Most Gen Xers like myself are well into their 40s, have seen their parent and themselves go through 2 significant market corrections,and are very fiscally conservative, but I’d imagine we’re the last generation of car enthusiasts.We have also been able to buy very low, when in it comes to investment, and are starting to spread our wings.
    We all grew up driving FWD cars,with the rare fox body stang/IROC/Supra.The baby boomers right now should consider unloading their Tripowers and HEMIs, I really don’t have any interest in those.Modern muscle cars can satisfy the itch for those cars.
    Any Supra-though Gen 1 is most intriguing,
    1st GEN NSX, z32, FD Rx7, 3000 GT, MR2s- these will bounce.
    I’d love to have back my 92 LX 5.0-bought in 2000, sold in 04.Or my E36 coupe,sold in 2007 All driveable collectibles in my opinion-airbags, FI, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      People commenting on millennials having no interest in cars need to look beyond coastal city-aimed publications and out into the rest of the country. Plenty of people out there my age (33) and younger who are into cars, either by owning old or modern iron, or by attending car shows, events, clubs, etc.

      30 year old Baby Boomers weren’t paying $100,000 for Hemi Cudas in 1980 either.

      • 0 avatar
        cimarron typeR

        I live in KC. Most 30 y/o aspire to G wagons, ML63s, and Range Rover Sports, and the rich teenage kids all drive off lease lux SUVs and lifted trucks/Wranglers. Whereas in the late 80s,90s, we all wanted 5.0 or Integras with 1000 watt stereos.
        Eventually cars and coffee will probably held in a corn field.Which is fine, at least they’re internally combusted.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      The Z32 may be your last chance to get into one of these cars of the era cheap. The NSX is not cheap per say, but may be the greatest bang for the buck from this era. The FD RX-7 ship has sailed. 3000GTs that aren’t basketcases are few and far between.

      Original Fox Bodys have been on the rise for some time as most of them got cut up and modded 20 years ago. If you don’t have to have a Mustang a fox body Thunderbird of the era is downright cheap. I’d t5 swap a Lincoln Mark VII LSC and build it for my money though. 3rd gen F bodys dont seem to have survived in the numbers of the Mustang. Honestly I’d probably get a C4 Vette if I were going GM…Way easier to find one not driven into the ground and decent bang for the buck.

      I am a slow car fast kind of guy though. I love the simple cars like the Sentra and Civics of the day that got shown some performance love from the factory.

      • 0 avatar
        cimarron typeR

        +1 on the C4. Its funny you mention the LSC, that’s a car I’ve always liked the shape. I spent a lot of time in an Turbo Coupe Tbird, one of my best friends mom daily drove one -pretty cool to see a middle aged farmer’s wife ( to a city kid)driving a manual sports coupe.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      cimarron typeR, I think the car hold a different place in the memories of Baby Boomers vs. Gen X and Millenials. The car allowed a Baby Boomer guy to find girls and fool around with them. By the time the younger generation came to that stage of life, parents were out of the house at work so a car wasn’t as significant part of the same activities. Some of the younger guys still want performance models they couldn’t afford when they were young, but their memories about cars are just about the cars.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        George I think it was the same for most of Gen X as well. I am on the tail end of the generation and a car still meant freedom and going on dates. We were all out of high school and in the workforce before basic cell phones, let alone smartphones became ubiquitous. I think our childhood was closer to those before it than after it.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I kinda hope that less cars become “collector cars”, the more that go up in price the less accessible they become to those “millennials who arent interested in cars”.

    I do like Integras from this time period, them and their bold Ferrari-inspired headlights. But as with most cars I’d prefer to see it at autocross or something (and I’m sure thats what the designers intended), anything above becoming an “investment” to sit in storage for eternity.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    That era of Japanese cars was pretty special.

    There is very little to compare them to attribute wise and the designs are very distinctive….

    The backdrop of Japanese reliability really keeps the low-end of the market from bottoming out but as we approach the 25 year import restriction lift on these gems I would have to say that too much was paid…

  • avatar
    JMII

    I’d rather have the NSX for this kind of coin. However Type Rs that survived are rare so clearly the market has spoken – 90s Japanese sport compacts are tomorrows collectors cars. It only makes sense as my generation grew up lusting after such rides. I get the muscle car thing, but honestly I have no connection to such vehicles other then my father having a ’65 Mustang and selling right after I was born in ’71. I could see paying good money for late 80s CRX one day, those cars were just so perfect when I was in high school. My brother owned one and I’d love to have a mint one just as time capsule type example. As mentioned the Supras and RX-7s have already reached cult status with Z cars and some Hondas beginning to catch buyers eyes. The GTR is already legendary. I think the Integra Type R holds a special place since it basically defined Acura back in the day and 95% of them were stolen and used for engine swaps. A clean example is rare so people are trying to squirrel them away.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    ITRs are pretty much the e30 M3 of the 90s.Everyone had a chance to get one…until you can’t, and next they’re unobtanium.
    My brother had a GSR and he was paranoid it would get stolen from downtown Pittsburgh where he was living during ownership.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      This. They were plentiful until they weren’t is all of the collector car market. A 57 Chevy in 1967 was just a decade old used car.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Agree. I missed the boat on the Integra. Fortunately I scratched the E30 itch while stationed in Europe in the late 90’s/Early 2000s…A beautiful white euro spec 318i touring that had 12000 kms on it at purchase.

      Problem is it ruined me and I cant pull the trigger on a new 3 because while they may be better than the 318, they are not even close to my memories of driving that car along the Amalfi Coast. Ah well.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I mean, it’s too much for me personally, but if you like it and have the money, go ahead. I’m a fan of survivor cars and this car survived where most of its line-mates haven’t. Again, not worth it to me, but for a time capsule of 90’s Japanese performance, I don’t think it’s too much.

    I can remember when this was a new car. I can remember when these were just used cars and not so rare. So can many others here. It’s a 20 plus year old performance car now, no different than what a 72 Chevelle SS would have been around 1992. 57k for this could be a bargain now! COULD be…

    The folks that bought (and drove up) the market for a ’72 Chevelle are no different than the folks who bid this thing to 57k. It was something they wanted when young(er) and couldn’t afford it. Now they can and they put a premium on their memories and yours.

    I would like to have a Fox- body Mustang convertible from 87-92, LX preferred but if the right GT came along. I hope I can get a decent driver before they all are beyond my meager budget. I’m considering buying a 92 Chrysler Lebaron LX convertible I found locally for under 2k that’s in OK shape just because I kind of miss seeing them and have been looking for a cheap 4 place convertible all summer.

    I have no NEED for a 25 year old convertible(of any stripe), but I WANT one. I want that automotive touchstone to a different automotive time to share with my boys and whoever else appreciates the time before trucks, SUV’s and CUV’s dominated our roads. I’m hopeful that’s what’s going on here too.

    And if they’re just speculating, I hope the market implodes on them.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Awesome on the Lebaron. I haven’t seen one of those on the road in a decade though.

      To me, cars like these are time machines. I love my Fiesta ST. It is way better in every way (styling excluded) than the SE-R I lust after. But when I get into a 1993ish model and shut the door its like I’ve gone back…no aches and pains of 20 years of the Army, no trying to get the car to link with the computer in my pocket so I don’t have to wait an extra 15 minutes to get that message from work, and all of those grunge bands I listen too are still alive and putting out music. It just makes you happy. That is what people are paying for. I was never an Integra guy, but would I pay that sort of money should a model that IS my bag and in that condition come up? In a heartbeat. Heck if someone finds any of the actual vehicles from my youth still kicking (not the same model, but the actual vehicle I owned) I’d probably significantly overpay for what is sure to be a crapbox by now just to keep it from becoming a washing machine.

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        Lebaron was a no go and the want was strong. Car was overall decent on the surface. Digital dash that still worked (including the ABS light) leather interior in good shape. Windows barely worked, rear quarters didn’t at all. Ran fine, forgot about the “hair-trigger” throttle in these to make them feel stronger (GM was good for it too). Lot was only 5 minutes from my house, so I took it home.

        Underneath, oil was leaking from every seal and the forward cylinder bank and had been for a long time. Judging from the amp in the trunk, it became
        the original owners kids car until they didn’t want it anymore or didn’t want to fix the oil leaks and other issues. Reading up on allpar.com, these engines were fine unless they overheated or were starved for oil. Couldn’t be sure that hadn’t happened here.

        In short, it was more project than I wanted. If oil had only been coming out of the main seal or top end, etc. If it had only needed a roof or if the quarter windows had worked. If I had a 3 car garage or a separate garage to pull it apart, not my 2 car with a bunch of kids stuff in it and my desire not to scrape windows in the winter on my ’17 VW which would have been outside.

        Probably could of got it for 1500, but put another $1000 into it and would have had a 25 year old still only worth 2k. I loved it, but not THAT much.

        But the feeling of driving around with the top down on a sunny day and listening to that old V6 burble along (with a small exhaust leak) was enjoyable. The search for the drop top goes on, though at this point, I might just finish the degree I’m working on and put money away for a driveable Fox Mustang convertible in a year or so.

  • avatar
    PentastarPride

    Uggh. This is the kind of car you’re stuck around in traffic. You can’t see it in traffic but you can certainly hear it, even though you’re driving right next to a fully loaded Peterbilt.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Stock they were as quiet as anything else and nobody (now anyway) is cutting up a type R and mounting a fart can. These never were hand-me-down Civics that people did that sort of crap to. I bet most of these were sold with “Market Adjustments” on them.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I see the market not slowing down, I can think of certain areas, SoCal especially, where there is absolutely a prestige to owning the lowest mile ITR available. One of my buddies from grad school who is from Ontario, CA. His FD Rx7 (given as a college grad present ) has probably 40-50k miles, and rarely leaves the garage, and he just went through an extensive pseudo restoration on blue Bugeye WRX, with fresh rally blue paint, 2.5l engine swap.

    I’ve always liked the Lebaron turbos, especially white over black leather interior. Have you considered a Miata? at least there are clubs/events to take your kids to.
    At one point I was looking for a 1st Gen Supra (not Celica Supra) for a little while, at one point there was only 1 running example on autotrader. I’m sure lots of people are just sitting on theirs until they increase in value, kind of like 240z’s did.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I assume you are replying to Gearhead77. I think I see somewhat eye to eye with him on this. I have owned multiple Miatas (early NA’s to late Mazdaspeed NB). They are great cars. But they aren’t cars that you think of as being “of that era”. Again, not to knock them, I love them. But if I want to shut the door and forget Kurt Cobain has been dead for nearly a quarter of a century, I want something like a 300zx or something that takes you back.

      Perhaps the only time on this forum that the answer IS NOT Miata.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      Can’t take the family for ice cream in a Miata ;) Probably the only way the wife will give permission for a “fun car” too. My in-laws had one when I first met my wife. When a 92 LeBaron was only 5 years old!

      Art is correct. A Miata is timeless, no matter the generation. A LeBaron from the 80’s-90’s is a product of its time. It wasn’t a great time or a great car,but it’s the time I grew up in and would like a living piece of, even if only for a while. Such is the reason for 60k Integras and whatnot.

      (I want a Miata too but..)


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • redapple: Freed I think you got it. They are not big on Autonomy either. They let others work the bugs out and...
  • FreedMike: I’d say that if Toyota has something up its’ sleeve with batteries, then it makes even more...
  • MRF 95 T-Bird: My next door neighbor growing up outside of NYC had a 80 Omega in the same tan color. By around 1985...
  • brettc: Maine uses salt on major roads, but then they use a lot of sand as well on lower trafficked roads. I’m...
  • rpn453: The Micra is still available in Canada at an MSRP of CDN$10500 (US$7900). I’d be interested in test...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States