By on October 29, 2018

Image: Corey Lewis./TTAC

Acura’s entry level ILX is redesigned for the 2019 model year. With new styling and additional technology on board, it fulfills the brand’s desire to display a cohesive design language across all models. But is this refresh of a refresh any good? We headed to Columbus to find out.

(Full disclosure: I drove from Cincinnati to Acura’s full line event in Columbus, Ohio on my own dime. Acura provided nice food and accommodation, and a day out at the Transportation Research Center driving various Acura vehicles including the new ILX. Acura gave me a hat which I gave to my brother, and a solid metal model of an NSX.)

Image: Corey Lewis/TTACWhat Changed

The ILX has held its place as the entry-level model for the Acura brand since 2013, when it debuted as an upscale sibling to the ninth-generation Civic. Acura refreshed its smallest sedan for the 2016 model year, and is repeating the process for 2019.

Just to be clear, the 2019 ILX is the third iteration of the same underlying vehicle launched for 2013, as the sedan has not shifted to the 10th-generation Civic platform. Sharper TLX-like styling is a highlight of the newest version, as are new seats, audio system, various driver assistance aids, and the addition of Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. Three trims are available for 2019: base, Premium, and Technology. To the latter two, buyers can add the A-Spec package. It nets dark 19-inch wheels, dark-colored trim in various places, leather seats with Ultrasuede inserts, and metal plates on the pedals. Pricing starts at $25,900, which Acura points out is lower than ILX competitors. All tester models supplied were the highest trim — Technology A-Spec, which is priced at $31,550. Fortunately, all of them were white, so I didn’t have to break my white test car streak.

Image: Corey Lewis/TTACOutward Appearances

The revised look of the 2019 ILX is sharper and more angular than the outgoing design. Less anonymous and more sporty in its appearance, there’s generally more visual interest when the ILX is static. The most obvious changes on this refreshed version are the trapezoidal corporate grille at the front and a rear license plate that’s now located in the bumper. Exterior panel gaps are even all around, and trim alignment is very good. There’s a nice linear action to the door handle, which has a smooth return without any plastic clicking noises. Doors open and shut with an authoritative sound that is decidedly not economy car in nature. Nice job there.

Simply Red

The A-Spec trim of the ILX allows for a choice of black or red leather interior, with inserts of black Ultrasuede. Other trims have interiors of black, light stone, or new for 2019, brown “Espresso” leather. It’s nice to see some color returning to car interiors, and Acura is making this red a staple of A-Spec trims across their lineup.

The leather on the seats and door panels has a lightly pebbled grain, and feels soft. I did notice some rippling along the side bolsters, so a bit of attention to finishing in that area would not go amiss. The armrests at either side and the center console are nicely padded for elbow resting. Suede seat inserts add a sporty touch and some visual interest, but also have small perforations in them (said perforations remind your author of basketball shorts, though perhaps others enjoy such a literal sports reference).

Other cockpit materials are a mixed bag. While the dash is nicely padded with a textured rubber, the central screen surround and all panels flanking the center console are hard plastic. Of particular concern is the plastic around the gear shift, which was already wearing scratches in the test car (photo below). The enormous glove box latch looks out of place here. Similarly out of place is the sunroof shade, with its flimsy feel and cheap closing action. Kudos on the metal pedals which come with the A-Spec, as they feel solid and sure underfoot. The same cannot be said for the floor mats, which are really very thin.

Elsewhere up front, button placement is familiar enough to anyone who has driven a Honda or Acura vehicle made in the last few years. There’s a dual-screen setup for the stereo/climate and navigation functions, and separate climate control via knobs and buttons down below. Gauges are simple and clear, done in white lettering on a black background, and lit up with red accents. Navigating through the touch screen is easy enough for the stereo, and navigation functions are done via the large directional dial in the center of the stack.

Seats are comfortable enough, and with 10-way power adjustments most people should be able to find a happy position. Though supportive for a shorter drive, those with longer legs may find the bottom seat cushion a bit short. Hopping in the back, I was able to sit behind myself with the driver’s seat in position. My legs were touching the seat back, but we can give that a pass for such a small car.

Image: Corey Lewis/TTACDrive Around Ohio

For 2019, the engine and transmission in the ILX stay the same. All trims have the same direct-injected 2.4-liter four cylinder they’ve had previously, mated to an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic. The engine produces 201 horsepower and 180 lb-ft of torque. Said engine is smooth in its operation, and Acura has engineered out the vibrations often found in four cylinder engines. I didn’t notice any vibration at idle.

Image: Corey Lewis/TTACThe selected drive route included higher speed highway driving, as well as back roads. Available power from a standstill and in passing situations feels more than adequate. The dual-clutch transmission responds quickly to throttle inputs, without hesitation or gear hunting. Gear changes are quick and smooth for the most part, with just a couple of slightly jerky upshifts as the car settled from acceleration. It was easy to learn the correct throttle input to order up a gear change, and within 15 minutes my right foot knew how far to travel. Brakes were strong, and brought the car to a halt very quickly when desired. Steering had a decent weight to it, and it was very easy to place the ILX in the right part of the bend as the corn fields observed silently.

Underway, the 10-speaker stereo that comes with the Technology trim produced a nice sound, and made listening to jazz along the test route enjoyable, though I found myself continually upping the volume. The volume increase was not so I could enrich my ear drums; rather it was so I could continue to hear the music. Wind noise was well isolated in the cabin of the ILX at highway speeds, but more time could have been spent either increasing sound insulation, or reducing tire roar. The tires start to sing along to the music right around 40 miles per hour. Their quad tones advance to an unpleasant harmony on the highway, making the notion of long-distance driving in the ILX fairly questionable.

[Get new and used Acura ILX pricing here!]

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the suspension on the ILX is tuned more toward sport than comfort. Small bumps in the road come through the car, conveyed via the driver’s seat and the steering wheel. It’s not intolerable, and for drivers who like a firm ride with their sporty compact sedan, it will be fine. Smooth surface driving was pleasant, without any wallow or floaty feelings.

The ILX bests its competitors on paper. At any trim level it offers up a bit more power for a bit less money. Acura views the ILX as the gateway into the brand — it’s supposed to attract the youngest and most upwardly mobile customer, then get them hooked on what Acura can provide. In this entry level luxury segment it can be difficult to pull the prestige-focused young consumer away from that silver star or blue and white roundel, but being the value choice is a place to start. Maybe work on that tire noise, though.

[Images: Corey Lewis / TTAC, Acura]

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78 Comments on “2019 Acura ILX First Drive Review – Third Time Lucky?...”


  • avatar
    earthwateruser

    Is this “meh car Monday?” The one thing I really loved about Hondas (in the pre-Acura days) was the double wishbone front suspension. I sold Hondas back then and the front suspension was a big part of demonstrating Honda’s commitment to good (and safe) handling. You could feel how good it was. Then somebody decided a McPherson strut was cheaper (yes) and could be designed to do just as good a job (I don’t agree) and the double wishbone Hondas were no more. But you could still buy the double wishbone in Acura products. But I think even Acura has now abandoned the double wishbone front suspension (except for the NSX). Is that right?

    • 0 avatar
      cammark

      The NSX and RLX are the only Honda/Acura products (USDM) that have double-wishbone in front. No one pays attention to the RLX. No one buys the RLX. Most people can’t afford or justify purchasing an NSX.

      so other than their two lowest-volume products, Honda/Acura has in fact abandoned front double-wishbone.

    • 0 avatar
      ahintofpepperjack

      The current gen Camaro is considered one of the best handling cars you can buy right now, and it uses MacPherson struts.

      • 0 avatar
        earthwateruser

        I agree that struts are used in many great handling cars. I would only say that I don’t think a strut works as well across the full spectrum of driving needs as a double wishbone setup. And I’m pretty sure the Camaro (and ANY CAR – I’m looking at you 911 – w/ front struts) could handle (and ride) even better with a double wishbone front suspension.

      • 0 avatar
        cammark

        there are plenty of examples of good-handling McPherson equipped cars: Porsche 911, Golf GTI, the latest Civic Type-R, Honda Fit…

        Most of the strengths of a well-designed double-wishbone are lost on the typical new car buyer. On top of that, a properly tuned and developed McPherson setup will satisfy all but the most die-hard enthusiasts while costing less to manufacture.

        I think part of the problem for Honda/Acura specifically is they had such a good double-wishbone in the Civic/Integra in the 90’s then replaced it with a kinda lousy McPherson set up in ’01. The new crop of cars handle well without the double-wishbone Honda was known for, but I think the bad impression was made in the minds of the cognoscenti. They’ve either looked elsewhere or refused to let go of their “golden era” cars (…like myself)

        • 0 avatar

          I used to think that too, indeed my late and lamented e46 had struts…but after two years with a car with double wishbones, the level of precision of front wheel placement is just much greater. I made sure my next car had them….

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      ” I sold Hondas back then and the front suspension was a big part of demonstrating Honda’s commitment to good (and safe) handling.”

      I highly doubt there are any quantifiable differences in “safety” between an UCA/LCA suspension and a MacPherson strut suspension. especially for street cars.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        If you’ll recall, Ford was using UCA/LCA suspension in the Fusion and Mazda 6 about a decade ago too. There may have been some correlation between the introduction of narrow offset barrier crash testing and the demise of upper control arms.

      • 0 avatar
        earthwateruser

        Clearly, you weren’t selling Hondas in the mid 1990s then. It was presented to the customer that the handling and stability of the double wishbone suspension would allow the hapless Honda driver to maintain control in a greater spectrum of challenging road/handling conditions. It wasn’t related to impact or crush zones or anything like that. Of course, that was also a time where the “benefit” of a lower hoodline was considered to increase safety through better driver visibility. Times change.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Note to Acura: Fire whomever picked white as the color of choice for this test ride; the color does not show the lines of the vehicle at all. In Los Angeles, these are rare as unicorns and I don’t think this refresh will help at all. Still on the old Civic platform despite rave reviews of the 10th generation???????? Some of us aren’t entry buyers, we just want a smaller car and would like an upscale one at that. Hard plastics and short seat bottoms don’t do it for us. If you want to compete with Audi and BMW (and lots of us are former Honda owners and would give you a shot) you need to up your game on the interior and the bright red leather seats are NOT what I had in mind. If Acura does not feel these comments are useful because I am not their ILX customer, guess what? Neither is anyone else!

  • avatar
    chrishs2000

    Very well written review. I appreciate the non-press regurgitations.

    This car has soooooo many faults and it hurts my heart that not only is the Accord far superior but so is the Civic. But an A-Spec lease for $200/mo zero DAS would be a solid choice.

    It’s certainly a better car than a CLA, not that that’s saying much.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      Did I miss the non-press release regurgitations?

      It’s impossible to report objectively on this car and leave out the fact that it is inferior in virtually every way to the new-generation Honda Civic Touring it should have been based on. Coincidentally, last weekend I was a back-seat passenger in a base-model new Civic, $18k out the door. It had the same 2.4-liter NA engine as this car. It had a better suspension. And my knees didn’t touch the front seatback, not once.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “I was a back-seat passenger in a base-model new Civic”
        “It had the same 2.4-liter NA engine as this car.”

        This is incorrect. The base Civic uses a 158hp 2.0L. The ILX uses a 201hp 2.4L. The Acura has the same engine as the prior Civic Si but uses the DCT.

        • 0 avatar

          The Civic Touring has a 1.5L turbo four. No Civics are available with the 2.4.

          Tony, maybe you should read the press regurgitations, as you’re missing out on facts.

          • 0 avatar
            tonycd

            Corey, you and ajla are at least half right and I’m half wrong. The ’17 Civic did not have a 2.4. It had a smaller version of that engine, a 2.0 edition of the K Series engine line that includes the 2.4. The more upmarket new Civics have a completely different 1.6 turbo. So, the ’17 Civic base model’s engine has much more in common with the new ILX than with the Civic Touring, but it does not match the ILX’s displacement.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    Say what you want that car is sharp…..but so is a spec’d out Camry…

    Also I am continually surprised at the high level of road noise in some modern cars. The BMW 4 Series was absolutely insane….

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Looks like a big step up from the Civic rebadge I drove in 2014. Props for the CD player HMC.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      They are good about supporting older media formats…my dad’s 06 TL still had a cassette player (important to him at the time).

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        Is your father an audio book fan, jack4x? They seem to be half a generation behind music in terms of formats. (This makes sense in that a public library is going to be far less hasty than Joe Six Pack to discard its old formats.) IMO, it’s a good move for manufacturers to support older formats, especially the premium and near-premium brands. I’m guessing Acura, Lexus, et al. have customers who read more than does the general population.

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          Not especially, he just has a large analog music collection that he has accumulated over the decades. Once he sold that car, the box of cassettes joined the LPs in a dusty corner of the garage. By that time though he had become a die hard Sirius XM listener so the loss wasn’t as painful as it could have been.

          He’s a weird mix of old and new school though, so while he likes Acura for the “tech-luxury” image and is well read as you guessed, I don’t think he has ever listened to an audio book, and much prefers the hardcover.

          • 0 avatar
            PeriSoft

            “By that time though he had become a die hard Sirius XM listener”

            Lateral move in sound quality from cassettes, I guess… ;)

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I just want to recognize Corey for solid writing (he could be more critical in his eye but I do like his general prose.)

    So I just played with the Civic sedan configuration tool and saw that the highest I could spec out a sedan was just a hair under $29K. This A-spec ILX is a tick over $31K.

    Chevy vs Oldsmobile all over again.

  • avatar
    bufguy

    Shrink that damn badge on the grille!!!

  • avatar
    ajla

    I *really* like how low and narrow that center console is. I also like that it has a conventional shifter.

  • avatar
    Fordson

    Which competitor does this car offer more power than?

    An Autobahn-level GTI is the most obvious competitor and makes more power and more torque, and a much wider powerband. And is faster.

    Plus, it’s on a 2013 platform still, rather than the newer scaleable modular platform.

    • 0 avatar

      The GTI is not an entry level luxury vehicle. The competitors to this car are things like the CLA, the QX30, 3 Series, and the A3.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I dunno, I drove a top-spec GTI and it may not have the bougie cachet (as if Acura does, but I digress), but it’s equipped similarly and would anhihlate the ILX performance-wise.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        “The GTI is not an entry level luxury vehicle.”

        And the ILX is? How so? For that matter what makes a 3 Series, CLA, QX30 or an A3 a luxury vehicle?

        For what it’s worth, I’d take a GTI over all of the above. Spend less money, have more fun, and have a longer warranty.

      • 0 avatar
        Fordson

        The most-expensive-possible ILX is pricewise similar to the most base, stripped A3 or CLA…that does not make it a direct competitor. And the Infiniti QX30 is not even a car. The most base, stripped 3-series is a couple thousand more than even a loaded ILX.

        • 0 avatar

          -shrug-

          I’ve shared the competitors as Acura outlined them, that’s really all I can do. They use the other entry level models from other marques. Some of them happen to be CUVs, like the QX30, MKC, and Lexus UX.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        Corey, the GTI is not an entry level luxury vehicle. And neither is this slightly tarted-up last-gen Civic. A3? 3 Series? They’re the “competitors” to this car in the same way a baseball bat is a competitor to a baby seal. Next time, skip the press briefing and just take notes after you drive the car.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Enjoyed the review, Corey! Have you driven any of this car’s competitors (A3, CLA, etc) by chance?

    I actually like the look of this (particularly in red), but I can’t see it selling – Acura lost whatever cred it had in the compact sport sedan market around the same time Bill Clinton left office. Yes, it’s cheaper than an A3 or CLA, but it’s also substantially slower. If you’re in the market for something with leather and all the toys that’s somewhat raucous, a GTI SE would seem to make a lot more sense, and would be a lot quicker.

    • 0 avatar

      Thanks! Unfortunately I haven’t. I’d be particularly interested in the A3 and the 3 Series. Especially how the BMW in its bargain basement nature stacks up to the ILX.

      There’s a new electric blue paint for the 2019 A-Spec trim that I like.

      https://www.caranddriver.com/news/2019-acura-ilx-update-photos-info

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      When hell freezes over would Honda offer those other cars to compare…probably. excuse it doesn’t.

      • 0 avatar

        There is no way a manufacturer is going to have journalists come and test out 10 different cars to show their car is best. That’s just an immense amount of trouble for no benefit. Not even *Buick* does this. You want each manufacturer to play Consumer Reports.

        Keep it real.

        • 0 avatar

          GM did just that some time ago to its own detriment. Imagine driving STS after E class as an example. Or Saturn ION after anything else.

          • 0 avatar
            Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

            Yep, I attended such an “Auto Show in Motion” event in DFW in late 2004. Of note, I remember being distinctly unimpressed by the 2004 Epsilon-based Malibu compared to the Accord, Camry and (I think) Legacy that were also on hand. Those cars all had worn tires and hadn’t been cleaned in some time while the Malibu, of course, was pristine.

            Also, all C6 ‘Vette and CTS-V demos were required to be accompanied by a GM employee, and the course was laid out in such a way that you drove it all in 2nd gear.

            Apparently GM killed the idea two years later: https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-2006-05-03-0605030232-story.html

          • 0 avatar

            Malibu looked archaic like 20 y.o. car and it was sharing platform with SAAB – unbelievable how GM was able to dumb down platform. And engine was another story – pushrod which belongs to 70s. Pontiac G6 – I do not know where to start – why did they even bother?

  • avatar
    R Henry

    Some Algebra:

    I(L)+x = Civic + ($$$$)

  • avatar
    Fred

    As a TSX Sportwagon owner I’m prejudice, but I don’t find the ILX unattractive. I do like it’s styling over the Civic. Still, it needs some help. Newer platform, a hatch and a manual would sell me. The last two aren’t going to happen, so I’d look at a TLX similar equipped for about $5000 more. Heck might as well get the V6 and AWD.

  • avatar
    ceipower

    So this is the new Integra. Yes , I’ll never warm up to Honda’s alphabet soup name system. It’s too stupid , just as Honda/Acura stylist seem to have been asleep at the wheel for well over a decade. Who Cares , really? I’m surprised that Honda hasn’t washed out the Acura franchise…it certainly can’t be contributing to their bottom line that is under constant strain thanks to the Honda Jet program eating money for over a decade with no return.

  • avatar

    I was also at this event for a different publication, and I drove the hell out of the ILX on the same public roads and thought it was quite good. I would have enjoyed some track time with it as well, but, alas, we weren’t given the opportunity.

    I’ve driven almost all of the benchmark/comparison cars, and I’d gladly take the ILX over most of them. I’ll echo Corey’s comments about the DCT, and go a step further. I think it’s the best transmission in the class, by far, and it makes the available horsepower feel stronger and more potent than the numbers would indicate. Lateral grip was very good, and the understeer was negligible. To my brain, it felt like a grown-up 9th gen Civic Si. Shocker, right?

    That center console, though, is garbage. Climate control knobs and buttons wouldn’t be out of place in a Yaris. CarPlay really didn’t work at all (and I didn’t want to fuss with it much at triple digits). The dual screen set up is a disaster.

    FIN

  • avatar
    hubcap

    Acura: This is a proper entry level luxury car.

    General Public: Really? It doesn’t look or feel like a luxury car. It almost seems like you took a general, run of the mill platform and applied lipstick in strategic places.

    Acura: Who you gonna believe? Me, or your lying eyes?

    General Public: You’re right, it is a proper entry level luxury car. When I write the check, how many additional zeroes do I need to pay the luxury tax?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      More like

      General public: what is a “platform” and why should I care? At least it isn’t as tacky as the CLA my neighbor bought.

      Or, actually it’s

      General public: a sedan? Why?

  • avatar
    analogman

    No manual transmission = absolutely no chance I would ever consider buying this car.

    Otherwise, it looks appealing to me. I like the idea of a more comfortable, more luxurious ‘smaller’ car. But I like the fun of rowing my own gears even more.

    It’s too bad. I’ve owned multiple Acura and Honda products, and loved the TL and CL (both with sticks). But without a manual transmission, it’s just not fun enough for me, so it’s not on the list.

    R.I.P. Honda. They used to make great cars.

  • avatar
    ACCvsBig10

    Wonder why they kept the traditional shifter in the model vs other acuras?

  • avatar
    legacygt

    Nothing about this car looks or feels particularly special. In this segment, Acura should be looking at the Mercedes CLA. That car was an instant hit without being particularly good. In fact, strip off the badges and I bet a blind taste test would put the CLA mid-pack (at best) among compact sedans with most drivers prefering a Civic or Mazda3 or Focus to the CLA. The Acura brand doesn’t carry the cachet of Mercedes but if Mercedes could convince buyers that the CLA is a legitimate luxury car, Acura should have no trouble doing the same with the ILX.

    Of course, Acura could do absolutely nothing other than throw the word “Integra” on the back of this thing and sales would double.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      And this is the struggle I will soon be facing for my 74-year old mother. She’s slowly going to be looking at her “last” car ever. Currently drives a 2012 Buick Verano that she absolutely loves. Right size, shape and comfort for her. She has no desire for anything larger and won’t want anything that abuses her when she goes down the road. So what the heck do you recommend then as a slightly aspirational car that fits that narrow bandwidth? The ILX appears like it would be a bit on the “sporting” side as far as comfort goes. I personally like the conservative style of the A3 (and the size is right for her), but again…not quite as “coddling” as she’d prefer? Anything above that size is probably going to be seen as too big for her wants and needs. So where does a 74-year old go for around $30k new to get something that fits that bill?

      As far as the ILX goes, if I was in the market, I’d probably still go straight to Honda and just get the Civic…

  • avatar
    cognoscenti

    The enemy of this car is in house. For the quoted price of $31,550 for the Technology A-Spec ILX, you can get a loaded Accord Touring with the 2.0t and 10-speed automatic that beats this car in every category. And before you start quoting MSRP figures on the Accord, know that RTP on the Accord Touring lately has legitimately been ~$31K.

    • 0 avatar
      tylanner

      By your “beats this car in every category” metric you’d favor the Accord every damn time since the beginning….

      Honda/Acura and Toyota/Lexus distinctions are rarely performance based…it’s everything that you didn’t mention where this car wins handily…these differences are meaningful because they are real…

    • 0 avatar
      johnny_5.0

      Convenient how you use MSRP for one and ATP for another. You think these are all leaving the lot for sticker?

  • avatar
    stingray65

    $32K for a glorified Civic with a very iffy “luxury” badge. CPO BMW 328s and MB C-300s from 2015 with AWD are available all day for less than $25K (and non-CPO less than $20K), and 2016 CPO BMW 320s are available for around $20K. I don’t see Acura being competitive with brand snobs on a budget, and I’d still rather have a rear-drive oriented chassis than FWD.

  • avatar
    stuki

    No manual, eh? What a waste.

  • avatar
    ravenchris

    I do not like most Honda products.
    Conversely, I do like the courage of this author. Especially to be an automobile reviewer in front of this crowd.

    • 0 avatar
      jdowmiller

      Agreed. I cringed for Corey as a I made my way closer to the comment section. …
      Anyway, who is this car for? No one buys sedans anymore…except me. I’m in the market for a sporty luxury sedan. Why would I buy this over an A3? Resale? Reliability? Ok, those are legitimate considerations. What about actual performance and comfort? Is this Acura at least competitive at the price point? A 320 sells for about $5000 more but has a rinky dink 180 hp. There’s an A3 at the local dealer right now for < 28k, non Quattro of course. This ILX make a case for itself I suppose – it’s not a total waste as it has been in past iterations – but I’m confused as to where it stacks up.

  • avatar
    chiefmonkey

    Today’s Acuras are just so tacky looking.

    Interestingly enough, Acura seems to be the favored brand of the mob today. Sylvester Zottola, an associate of the Bonanno family, was shot dead in the Bronx in a maroon Acura MDX. His attacker also drove an Acura. I guess the mob isn’t what it used to be

  • avatar
    open country

    I am square in the stated demographic for this model, and have tried to like it, but can’t. Weird styling and hard to ignore the Civic underpinnings. Side note – I would never own a car with red leather – I want to relax when commuting, not get a migraine.

    I have, despite Acura’s boringness, strongly considered a CPO 2015-2017 TLX, which can be had for $20k out the door with under 30k miles on them. Why someone would go ILX over that option is beyond me.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    I think one thing everyone has to add in here , with the I would buy a used 3 series or a new GTI and have more fun is this car will 99% of the time have less issues with it’s ownership than most of the competition. My guess is that will mean a ton to folks looking at it. No idea what the real world OTD pricing will be but it should be a solid ownership experience. There are worse choice’s one can make with spending mid 20’s for a car.

  • avatar
    sandro_cl_type_s

    The A-Spec package should add actual performance and not just visual cruft to the vehicle. In a previous article, Corey wrote how Acura brought out the CL Type-S at this launch event. Well, the Type-S actually improved performance over the CL in myriad ways, large and small. Increased HP was just the most obvious, but many other things changed.

    Why not make the A-spec package an actual performance package, and drop some of the fancy lux stuff that younger buyers don’t want anyway? It was the performance Acuras that make their reputation. Just incorporating styling cues from the NSX is not good enough. Give the ILX A-Spec more HP/torque, bigger brakes, less curb weight. Drop the moon-roof, and parking sensors, and all the crap real driving enthusiasts don’t care about anyway, and just give us a car that feels special bc it is special.

  • avatar
    aajax

    I can tolerate a sweet exhaust note, but wind and road noise and non-compliant suspensions are deal breakers, unless you’re selling me a truck or an off-roader.

  • avatar
    Jacob

    I wonder how many of these we’ll see on the road.


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