By on August 28, 2018

Peaking sharply in 2015, domestic sales of Nissan’s Versa slipped as North America pivoted toward crossover vehicles. While that’s normally a shame, there isn’t a lot of praise to heap upon the model. But is certainly is cheap!

Upgraded in the middle of 2018 to include a standard rear-view camera, along with a 7.0-inch color touchscreen, audio streaming via Bluetooth, Siri Eyes Free, a USB connection, new speakers, and — get this — an auxiliary input, Nissan intends to further improve the model for with the SV Special Edition package. However, bargain hunters might rejoice, as the model’s overall pricing will enter 2019 nearly unchanged.

That’s $12,360 (plus a $895 destination fee) for what is inarguably a new car. Hardware includes a 109-horsepower 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine mated to a five-speed manual, offering impressive fuel economy and absolutely nothing else. 

Relatively slow, fairly clumsy, and not particularly nice inside, the Versa is still so cheap that you really can’t complain too much. In fact, the base model almost makes the Kia Rio look expensive by comparison.

For 2019, Nissan brings in an $800 upgrade via the SV Special Edition package. The bundle adds 15-inch aluminum wheels, fog lamps, chrome accenting on the front fascia, special edition badging, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, and some Piano Black trim pieces for the interior. The current 2018.5 model will also be available with the SV Special Edition pack on top-trimmed variants as a $500 extra.

While any improvements to the Versa’s cabin is a blessing, the addition of glossy black plastic around the console and a new steering wheel probably can’t be considered a “game changer.” Fortunately, you also get Nissan’s Intelligent Key system with a push-button starter, immobilizer, tire pressure monitoring, and NissanConnect SM featuring Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and SiriusXM Satellite connectivity.

It’s not a bad little bundle if you plan on spending a lot of time inside the vehicle (or if it were available on all trim levels). But we can’t help but remind everyone there are more enjoyable alternatives out there for an extra grand or three. However, with a starting MSRP below $13k and a reasonable amount of interior space for the segment, it’s hard not to at least mention the Versa to people who don’t care about driving and simply need a fuel-efficient car, capable of holding four adults, on the ultra cheap.

As previously stated, the 2019 Nissan Versa starts at $12,360 when equipped with a manual transmission. Upgrading to the S Plus with an Xtronic (CVT) transmission brings that cost $14,500, while the Versa SV begins at $15,990 (plus destination). That represents a paltry $50 increase over the mid-year version, which was mandated by federal safety laws and added $200 to the old Versa’s price.

[Image: Nissan]

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71 Comments on “Upgraded Nissan Versa Still Dirt Cheap, Gets Budget-friendly Special Edition...”


  • avatar
    FreedMike

    The only worthy upgrade I can think of for this car would be to kill it with fire. It’s awful. Better alternatives exist.

    • 0 avatar
      Robbie

      $12,360… What would you buy instead?

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        This is price for 2-3 years old Camry with ~30K at the auction.

        • 0 avatar
          Robbie

          Ah no… new car! Imagine a parent who wants a car with a warranty for a kid who goes to college and not remotely deal with repairs.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Robbie,

            1 – which parent wants to jam their child into a car like this. It is unsafe.
            2 – smart used car will need less repairs than a Nissan
            3 – what college? What car? colleges often don’t even allow students to have cars when they live on campus and and when they live off campus, there is usually a premium on parking, etc.
            4 – parents want kids to go away to college without cars. Because if they have prove that child 100 miles away, they get insurance break.

          • 0 avatar
            dukeisduke

            I sent my kid off to college with her 2012 Kia Forte Koup SX with 116k miles. All new tires, new plugs and all new brake pads (Kia parts), and changed the oil, using Mobil 1 Annual Protection (the expensive one-year/20,000 mile stuff) so I don’t have to change the oil again until next summer. Parking exists on campus (around the perimeter), and driving isn’t allowed on campus Mon-Fri between 7:30am and 5:30pm, except for service vehicles.

            I did get the recall notice for the SRS control module just before she left (the original recall has been expanded to cover hers), and my guess is the repair will be done by the Kia dealer out there where she goes to school (the parts aren’t available yet).

          • 0 avatar
            ACCvsBig10

            this isnt a college car, this a vehicle for like high school student who commutes to school or work, so parent dont have to be bothered

          • 0 avatar
            jmcdono362

            I just found a 2011 Camry with 18K miles for $12,900 on the used market. That’s basically almost a nice comfortable new car for a reasonable price that’s backed with a strong reputation for reliability.

            Far better than Nissan Versa.

            With those miles, you could probably get an extended warranty with it too.

      • 0 avatar
        Tele Vision

        I bought a ten year-old CTS-V for that money. Basically the same idea: a manual transmission and room for four but with nearly four times the power – and several peeled cows.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “$12,360… What would you buy instead?”

        Chevy Spark. Around here, you can pick one up for ten grand, and it’s a lot better than the Versa to drive.

        That, or about 100 different year-old used compacts.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Spark has marginal rear passenger room (read: can’t for a car seat with a passenger in the front seat) nor can it fit as much in its tiny truncated hatch cargo area. It’s also down about 10% on power. When you’re working with that little, that 10 extra hp is noticeable.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I tried both of these cars out as possible rides for my 22-year-old daughter. The Versa is roomy, but it’s uncomfortable. From my kid’s perspective, though (and mine), a big back seat is a nice to have, not a need to have. Ditto for a large trunk, but a hatchback offers superior cargo room.

            But I need a car that feels refined, and the Spark drives vastly better. It drives like a very small modern car. The Versa drives like something I’d imagine was sold behind the Iron Curtain.

            To each his own, of course.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            with seats down, sure the hatch forms a larger “cube” of space. With the rear seats in use, the versa sedan smokes all the small hatchbacks in terms of usable space. If it were a young immigrant family shopping (the folks I see in Versas), the roomy Nissan sedan is the easy choice.

      • 0 avatar
        KevinC

        You could find a base Kia Soul in that range and it would be 1000x better. The Versa is a dog with fleas.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Agreed, and then there’s this: it’s about 99% certain that the folks buying these uber-cheap cars will be taking out a five year note (at minimum), and there’s no chance of trading early on any of these cars, so it makes sense to spend a bit more for something you’d be happier with in a few years’ time. And I could see living with something like a Soul (or Rio) for four or five years…not a Versa. No way.

          YMMV, of course.

      • 0 avatar
        SSJeep

        As a new car that is compliant with both current safety legislation and current emissions requirements, the Versa is a good deal. There are not any cheaper new cars, and one could afford a new Versa while working at Starbucks.

        The Versa is also a darling of Uber and Lyft due to operating expenses and dependability.

        Im sure you will see several comments saying that “I can get a 15 year used Cadillac TahoYukoBurbAlade for the same price”. These people are entirely missing the point. This is a NEW CAR. Its not a wreck bought at auction nor is it on its 5th owner. And as a new car, its a good deal for an unremarkable appliance.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      Ha! Last November when we had to get my wife a new car, take a guess what we bought? We are now proud owners of a 2017 Nissan Note SR that is pretty much loaded. I can’t remember the details right now but I think it came in under $17k or so.

      Overall, we are reasonably happy with it. In some ways it is worse than the Honda Fit it replaced. In some ways it is better. Such as being able to get sat-nav in the Nissan Note without a sunroof or leather seats. Honda bundles sat-nav with those two features that my wife would rather not have.

  • avatar
    gtem

    “offering impressive fuel economy and absolutely nothing else”

    How about a midsize sedan’s worth of trunk space and enough legroom to fit either 4 full grown adults or 2 talll adults and 2 rear facing child seats. I think it’s the only subcompact segment car that can pull that off. Usefully more substantial on the road than a Mirage as well which it shares the price basement with. In the rest of the world such sedan designs are common, maximum utility for minimal cost. I’ve test driven a base 5spd car and found it endearing in s 3rd world taxi sort of way.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      I haven’t been in the current Versa, but I believe you.

      I can’t speak to its driving dynamics or its durability, but I once got to ride in a colleague’s ’05-ish Versa hatchback (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissan_Tiida#First_generation_(C11;_2004%E2%80%932012) ). That car’s back seat was amazing, almost limo-like head and legroom. Three abreast would’ve been tight (as it is in virtually all 21-st century cars), but it had amazing room for four.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      It’s roomy, but the seating is uncomfortable.

      It also has steering that doesn’t self-center. And a gear shifter that’s about as precise as stirring a toilet brush around in its’ base.

      It does have that “third world taxi” kind of feel, but better stuff is out there.

    • 0 avatar
      stuckonthetrain

      ^ This. When traveling abroad, we’ve rented versions of most competing cars and the Versa basically feels like an 8th-gen Impala compared to, say, a Spark (which is admittedly sort of more fun and direct given its bantam size and weight) or a – shudder – Dodge Vision (a re-badged Fiat Siena, which drives like a Korean subcompact from 4 generations ago, but built by Brazilians).

  • avatar
    salmonmigration

    This car was first released in 2012, but it was not designed to pass the small-overlap crash test. How this happened is beyond me. Maybe Nissan thought crash test ratings were a passing fad. Maybe the engineers never heard that there was a new test for 2012 MY cars.

    In any case it’s legal to sell in the US and it’s way cheaper than a (smaller) Mitsubishi Mirage which by itself basically deserves a Nobel.

    • 0 avatar
      Magnusmaster

      The Versa was designed for third-world markets, most of which have no crash tests at all, never mind small-overlap crash tests.

      • 0 avatar
        SSJeep

        This is not correct. The Versa was originally designed to take advantage of Japan road taxes by being under a specific size and power threshold. The Versa had to pass both Japan and US crash tests in order to be sold in both countries.

        The Versa is not the only vehicle to fare poorly on the small overlap crash test when it was put through the ringer. Even larger vehicles like the Dodge Challenger failed the small overlap. So the Versa was redesigned to pass. The Dodge has not yet been redesigned.

        The Versa is not the smallest car in Nissan’s lineup. That would be the Micra. Neither are big sellers in third-world markets – unless you consider Ireland, Mexico, Singapore, and Brazil to be third-world (which they are not).

  • avatar
    salmonmigration

    See, Toyota/BMW? The cheapest car in the world (in the US) has Android Auto and Apple Carplay for $500. We know you’re being greedy.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Yea, but driving it is a mental torture. Its like having a board hanging off your neck – “Idiot”. This is like hating self. This is like self-punishment. This is like wasting your life while depriving self of any joy.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    “Nissan brings in an $800 upgrade via the SV Special Edition package. The bundle adds 15-inch aluminum wheels, fog lamps, chrome accenting on the front fascia, special edition badging, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, and some Piano Black trim pieces”

    That’s a lot of BLING for not a lot of KA-CHING! Now you don’t need to spend Altima money to see your finger oils all over glossy interior plastics.

    Seriously though, if you need a roomy new car for as cheap as possible, this isn’t bad. Get the stick to avoid the CVT and this car deserves praise for hitting where the others aren’t.

  • avatar
    RHD

    We need a compare of the three cheapest cars available on the market – comfort, noise, economy, acceleration, visibility, safety, cargo room, overall livability, and for good measure, insurance cost.
    Compared to not too long ago, these cars are likely head and shoulders above similarly priced choices, with inflation taken into account.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      This…Stack it up against my 92 Saturn SL with AC as the only option checked. No power anything to include the steering and a D/S mirror only. All motivated by 84 flaming horsepower.

      Still I liked it. It was one of those that made you feel like Mario Andretti because you were beating it to within an inch of its life to make it move.

      Anyway, I digress.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Considering what the cheapest cars were like in the 1960s to 80s this car is heaven. A 60s era Beetle was more expensive inflation adjusted than a new Versa, and came with approximately 45 horsepower, drum brakes, no power assisted anything, A/C and automatic transmission not even available as an option, and all the safety of riding a motorcycle naked on a wet gravel road with bald tires in heavy traffic, but at least it was well built. In comparison to the Beetle, a 1970s base Vega, Pinto, or Chevette featured a cardboard interior and the build quality of Monday morning Russian Lada, and were all more expensive that the Versa on an inflation adjusted basis.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      I 2nd that comment.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I argue you cannot make such a comparison because you don’t take into account every other variable such as disposable income, tax rates, avg pay rates etc. Factoring those in, you may come to the conclusion the Beetle was significantly cheaper than said Versa in its time which negates the whole “now is the golden age” meme. There is no golden age if proles can’t afford it.

      • 0 avatar
        stingray65

        So you really think people were richer in the 1960s and 70s? If people can’t afford to buy a Versa today its because they are spending lots of money on smart phones, big screen TVs, international vacations, higher education, etc. that were not available or only for the super rich in the old days. I might add that the 60s Beetle or 70s Chevette would be a rusty, oil smoking wreck somewhere between 3-5 years and 50-75,000 miles, while the Versa will still be going strong – thus in the good old days you probably needed to buy 2-3 new cars to get the reliable life of the cheapest cars of today.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          You’re both right. Some things are less expensive now. For instance electronics. A big screen TV today costs the same dollar figure as a 20″ colour did in the late 1960’s. So using inflationary dollars it is much less expensive.

          And cars today, even these low cost ones, have features that were not even available in the most expensive cars of the 1960’s, are better ‘screwed together’, more reliable and much safer than cars of the 1960’s.

          However disposable income, and social mobility in North America peaked circa 1974.

        • 0 avatar
          KalapanaBlack7G

          Adjusted average pay rates are lower, housing costs are dramatically higher. Thus a Versa that is 10% cheaper becomes a moot point if earnings are 30% lower and adjusted housing is 100% more expensive.

        • 0 avatar
          forward_look

          In the 70’s I was driving a Dodge Colt. I will never even get in another Mitsubishi again.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    I’ll be the first to say that I’m not a Nissan fan at all. But I’ve come to garner some respect for this little beast. It’s very popular in my neck of the woods with both the low wage working set and the H1B visa types. I can easily see the appeal of buying a brand new car under warranty for such a low price. My local credit union is offering 84 months at 3.49%, which comes out to $215 a month on $15,990. 7 years is a long time, but unless you pile on the miles, 3 years under the bumper-to-bumper and 5 years under the powertrain warranty is worthwhile. That’s all assuming you take the full 7 years to pay it off.

    I’ve got an employee that’s been driving one of these the entire 3 years she’s worked for me. Never had a break down or failed to get her to work in that time. Can’t say that at all for the rest of my team. Dishonorable mentions to the Chevy Cruze and pretty much any Jeeps in the area of reliability.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Matt and I must have very different expectations from or taste in cars.

    1) “The addition of glossy black plastic around the console.” Just something that will easily scratch and cheapen the look of the car in a few years. 2)”A new steering wheel”. Well if leather wrapped that is a nice upgrade. Heated would be better. 3) “You also get Nissan’s Intelligent Key system with a push-button starter.” I don’t want a push button starter. They were replaced decades ago because the key in the ignition switch is a better system. 4) “Tire pressure monitoring.” Which is a pain and added cost when you swap over to winter tires. 5)”NissanConnect”. Good.
    6)”Sirius XM connectivity.” Just what percent of vehicle buyers/owners actually pay for a subscription to this service? Something I would never use, unless it was free.

    Other than that, I approve of a new vehicle at that price point. Sure that they will sell quite a few in Quebec. And if the back seat has anywhere near comparable headroom to the previous generation Versa, then it is far better to ride back there than in any of its competitors, or many cars the next size up.

    • 0 avatar
      KalapanaBlack7G

      Every Versa has TPMS standard. It was mandated at the federal level in 2007.

      My guess is this article reports a misreading of the optional Intelligent Key system. Every Nissan with IK has a system that honks the horn when proper level is reached during inflation with the key on or in acc. Which would be bundled with the Intelligent Key. But even the $12k Versa with a regular key and no keyless entry has TPMS sensors in every wheel, which means it is legal to be sold in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      deanst

      It’s not sold in Canada. We get a $10,000 micra.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      @Arthur Dailey:

      You’re an idiot.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      Arthur,

      “I don’t want a push button starter. They were replaced decades ago because the key in the ignition switch is a better system. ”

      There’s no functional difference anymore. a start button just tells the BCM to send a CAN message to the PCM to operate the starter until it senses the engine is running. Turning the key just tells the BCM to send a CAN message to the PCM to operate the starter until it senses the engine is running. The days of hard-wired ignition switches are long gone.

      “Just what percent of vehicle buyers/owners actually pay for a subscription to this service?”

      I do. Terrestrial radio is a wasteland of 25 minutes of advertising per hour (FM) or right-wing/religious talk radio (AM.) Streaming is worse than satellite at helping me find new stuff. I can put on my desired music channel and not only be free from ads, I’ll encounter new bands/performers I was unaware of. And besides, to me the service is worth it for the comedy channels alone. esp. since they don’t censor or water down any of it; you want to hear Redd Foxx, Carlin, Jackie Martling, or Lisa Lampanelli at their most biting or blue, they’ll play it.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        @jimz: Thanks.Maybe it is just demographics, but can anyone explain the benefits of a push button ignition?

        I and many of my peers prefer to have the key in an ignition switch. It is a ‘memory trick’. Can share many stories of co-workers, friends and families who have experienced issues when renting a vehicle with an off/on button and forgetting/misplacing/leaving their keys.

        As for satellite radio, their business model is indeed now turning a profit, after they merged with their major competitor. However, financial opinions on their longterm viability are mixed. Anecdotally, I find that the majority of their subscribers are boomers and members of the younger generations are not radio users.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “Terrestrial radio is a wasteland of 25 minutes of advertising per hour (FM) or right-wing/religious talk radio (AM.) ”

        THIS. I just did a Denver-St. Louis road trip over I-70 and it’s a vast wasteland out there. Thank God the car I was driving had XM and Android Auto.

  • avatar
    Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

    Nothing says “young professional” like black rims and ventshades on a $12K econobox.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    This has to be one of the most, if not the most awful car on sale today.

    My experience is only rentals, but the groans and creaks and bad wheel hub and garbage brakes etc were honestly pathetic. My 2006 Corolla, which is no wonder-car itself, felt far better made, better to drive, quieter etc than a brand new Versa.

    Awful car. Anyone that can only afford this car would be better off buying just about anything else used.

    Terrible machine.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    I’ve never been in one, but I’m surprised at all the negativity toward it.
    Went to the Nissan website and looked at the standard features.
    On the basis of dollars for the content, it looks like a good deal.

    • 0 avatar
      KalapanaBlack7G

      Drive one. It earns the moniker of “penalty box.” in addition, the parts are all cost-cut as much as they possibly can be, meaning they wear out quickly. Want an exhaust that rusts through in 4 years and 40k miles? Versa offers that standard, too. And because it’s a modern Nissan, the parts are generally expensive (moreso than for a Camry or Accord), tough to find aftermarket, and the design means lots of labor to replace them (2+ hours for control arms, more for front C/V axles), and it all costs as much or more than a 3x more expensive car and wears out 3x as often. As a transportation device to be dumped before the warranty expires or a cheap rental car to buy in bulk-it’s perfect. But these cars are blatantly, maliciously designed by Nissan to be as inexpensive to slap together as possible and then thrown away very quickly.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        I assume the front end is a simple and straight forward macpherson, what exactly makes the lower control arms and CV boots difficult or expensive to replace? And I also assume the exhaust is stainless steel, have they really been rotting out in 4 years? Any forums or other evidence you could point me to?

        • 0 avatar
          SSJeep

          gtem, I dont think you will see a lot of evidence to back up the claims above. I have driven one and know people who have owned them and used them for years on salt ridden roads – and no exhaust has rusted out. Nor have any broken down or overheated.

      • 0 avatar
        HaveNissanWillTravel

        You obviously haven’t driven or looked underneath one of these vehicles. It is about as simple and straightforward as an 80’s Honda sans the ridiculous timing belt and double wishbones.

      • 0 avatar
        packardhell1

        “But these cars are blatantly, maliciously designed by Nissan to be as inexpensive to slap together as possible and then thrown away very quickly.”

        My wife and I bought our first throw-away car in 2003 and it was a brand new Hyundai Accent. It is not a Nissan as the story is, but I would say it is a similar class of vehicle (and equally made fun of). I imagine the parts quality is likely crappier than this Nissan. If it wasn’t the cheapest car in America at the time, it was pretty close. We did opt for the 4-speed auto. We paid $12,400 for it in March 2003, but I think a stick shift coupe could be had for $9,999.

        Were the parts cost-cut? You betcha. Is there rust? Yes, there is some on the driver-side fender. Did the exhaust rust? Yes, there is a small hole in the exhaust pipe right after the catalytic converter. However, I don’t think that is too bad for being 15 years old, having 103k miles, and living in Illinois where we get snow + salt. I see trucks around here that rust around the wheel wells when they are less than 10 years old, so I think my little econobox is doing just fine.

        I do need to replace the struts and CV joints soon (the joints are fine, but the boots need replacing). If you say the parts wear out three times as often, that means every other front-wheel-drive car shouldn’t need a CV or strut replacement until 300k miles. Maybe that’s true, I don’t know. Kudos to those who can get a car to 300k miles on the same pair of struts.

        Kalapana, I don’t think your comments are justified. You may call it a penalty box, but it was a good choice for us for our stage in life then and now. I won’t be in a penalty box when I am 50 because I’m driving a payment-free car while my friends have $400/mo+ car payments. Yes, it’s slow and I am a little envious of my friends’ financed vehicles. However, it has been good to us and I will only sell it when I have to. Own one for as long as I have and then you can complain about them.

  • avatar
    smartascii

    If your requirements are, “New car with warranty,” and that’s all, the Mirage wins with a 10-year powertrain warranty. It’s also terrible, and smaller, but it’s also more frequent sold with cash on the hood and can be cheaper in actual cost. As an added bonus, it comes in purple, and since these cars are clearly bought by people with different priorities from mine, that may well be a selling point.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      The mirage is truly an underpowered tiny 1980s penalty box compared to the versa. Maybe more fun to zip around city streets in with a stick shift, but the Versa can actually handle family duty and highway commutes.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    It’s a crapbox, but it has a 5 speed so that would make it bearable.

    • 0 avatar
      Lockstops

      “That’s $12,360 for what is inarguably a new car. Hardware includes a 109-horsepower 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine mated to a five-speed manual”: Sounds like a challenge.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    If I could buy a stripped-out hatchback for $12,360, I would have bought one by now. I hate trunks.

  • avatar
    HaveNissanWillTravel

    We absolutely love our ‘17 Versa. I bought it on Black Friday 2016 and it now sits at 3,800 miles, not exactly high mileage. I bought it as a back up family vehicle with our every day steeds being an’11 Quest at 200k miles and my company car Escape, hence the super low miles on the Versa. I got the 5-speed because my wife drives a stick and for this family of six, sometimes everyone doesn’t go to the mall together and it’s easy just to hop in and go in the little Versa.

    It has a very compliant ride, huge trunk for groceries and back seat room rivaling the Altima. Sure, it’s not a luxury vehicle, but the AC blows frigid in the heat of Summer, it looks attractive with my added OE fog lamps and alloys and the 5-speed makes it fun to tool around town in.

    Love our little Versa. And MANY cars were not designed with the small overlap test in mind. MANY. I’ll take my chances on this and other newly invented tests to keep the IIHS in business.

    And as the Tiida, Sunny, Latio or Almera this car is sold by the many hundreds of thousands worldwide and not just in third-world countries some of which have faster internet than the USA will have 5 years from now.

  • avatar
    vehic1

    I’m sure it’s reasonable from a $ perspective, but it looks SO much dorkier than even a Sentra; styling by OrthopedicSensibleShoes.

  • avatar
    riggodeezil

    “SV Special Edition pack”. BAHAHAHA!!!! Talk about lipstick on a pig. Yeah, sure, Versa is better than a 1980s crap-box. But, so what?

  • avatar
    210delray

    A little off-topic, but I think the time has come to drop the charade of the destination fee, now that it adds a grand or so to the sticker price. Just incorporate it into the base price of the car!

    • 0 avatar
      riggodeezil

      But: “Freight is non-negotiable” says the oily-haired sales monkey in a polyester clip-on tie. If you roll it into MSRP they will have to change tactics. They just love playing games with “destination”, including trying to get you to pay the freight for a Sequoia when you are buying a Yaris. On their websites, they often include it in MSRP but back it out of the “sales price” to make it look like they are offering “a deal”. Natch, it gets added back in when you start talking numbers. All of this creative chiseling would disappear if freight were no longer a separate thing.

  • avatar
    JohnH

    It’s so cheap they didn’t bother to bring it to the Monterey Paddock- last weekend -or if they did I missed it. I don’t think it was there.( Nissan was the featured mark at Laguna Seca Reunion this year-first time ever for a Japanese brand. )

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    I rented one in Florida 2 years ago. Aside from poor directional stability on the interstate I was impressed. HUGE back seat, big trunk. Would I want to drive 1000 miles with 4 people on board? Nope. Would I consider it for a 5th car/cheap beater? Absolutely!

    I am not a fan of “modern” Nissans. Back in the 80s and early 90s I owned several, and they were cheaper alternatives to Honda and Toyota, but rock-tough and reliable. Now I don’t trust their long term reliability. This one’s cheap enough that I would roll the dice if I had the need for yet another car.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      “Would I want to drive 1000 miles with 4 people on board?”

      Been there, done that. Last month for my grandmother’s birthday, my family went 1000 miles from Dallas to South Bend in our Versa Note.

      OK, it was 3 people, not 4. But you get the idea.

  • avatar
    Niraj D

    S U B C O M P A C T C U L T U R E


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  • jh26036: You miss the best part then, putting quality miles on a car you just bought. These big sedans eat up miles...

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