By on August 29, 2018

We’ve all been there. It happens so often we don’t even realize it. Somewhere on the horizon, something appears — a vague shape, some sort of vehicle. Within seconds of said vehicle entering your field of vision, you’ve already made up your mind about its owner.

You’re so judgmental!

Today’s inquiry was inspired by a Twitter conversation the other day. What started out as a quick comment on the Chevrolet SS turned into a multi-party exposition on the life and times of Monte Carlo owners. There were comedy moments and photos, a coworker story from Chris Tonn, and Adam Tonge might have angered a NASCAR fan.

Reading through the thread (which continued late into the evening, past my bedtime), I realized the strength of the judgment put upon Monte Carlo owners. With such wide-ranging assumptions on a single car model, I knew the question which needed asked on these pages. Which vehicles most often cause rapid-fire judgment of their owners? Guilt by association.

These judgments are likely wrong at least some (most?) of the time. But in the case of the Monte Carlo, the peanut gallery’s judgment was consistent and not subject to much dissenting opinion.

Realizing how this subject might instantly fall into a pit of unpleasantness, we’re not asking for an explanation of the specific reasons you judge owners of the vehicles you’ll put forth, just the vehicles which cause such reactions. For example, I have a few knee-jerk judgments when I see BMW X5s in particular.

Let’s hear about the vehicles you judge the most; we’ll see if any come close to the Monte Carlo.

[Image: General Motors]

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149 Comments on “QOTD: Frequently Jumping to Car Conclusions?...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    First, I assume the conversation about the Monte Carlo was about how the owner is expected to be a person of high-style, dashing excitement, and virility.

    For my answer, I’ve got to go with Golf family (OG Golf, GTI, R) and the Ridgeline.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      When I think of Monte Carlos now, I think high school kid inhereted/bought for really cheap. Not alot of baggage on those these days.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        My Uncle Tim owned a FWD W-body SS Monte when the only engine for that trim was the naturally aspirated 3800 but he was a serial W-body owner. (The only one I knew.) He also had a thing for coupes as his daily driver, my oldest memory of him involves an early 80s Grand Prix coupe.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      For me, Monte Carlos were the vehicle of choice for the unmarried uncle that children thought was cool but adults thought was just immature. He had a good-paying job but it wasn’t a career, and he seemed to have a never ending string of girlfriends that he brought to family functions. Kids loved him because he was always ready to go for a ride to get ice cream, while the adults wondered when he was ever going to live up to his potential and settle down.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    G-Wagen for sure

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I give it about 20 minutes until this thread devolves into name calling.

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    When I was in high school in the mid-80’s, you could always judge how bad a party might be if there was more than one Camaro in the parking lot.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I prefer Clarkson’s opinion of Jaguar drivers. To paraphrase, “your slightly dodgy uncle, who asks to stay at your house, and offers to trade you one of his valuable ‘original art’ works for some cash that he needs for an ‘investment’.”

  • avatar
    John R

    Nissan Altima, Audi A4, GTI, RAM-dozzers

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    The term judge seems to fall into the negative category.

    I tend to pass judgement when I see a well maintained old(er) vehicle. I think the owner understands value, taking pride in ownership.

    To each their own in terms of specific make and model, though i do chuckle sometimes when i see temp tags on highline german makes that are of medium age, 3-5 years old…ussually wondering if the new owner fully understands the game of roulette they have entered.

    • 0 avatar

      This is a good positive spin.

      When I see a late ’90s Jaguar XJ in mint condition, or an early ’90s SL500 or Tahoe, I have nothing but instant respect for the owners.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        If I see a mint Jaguar or Mercedes that is too old to currently be under lease I am always impressed.

        Either the owner “got a good one” or has sunk a small fortune into it.

      • 0 avatar
        Jagboi

        I’m glad to be respected here then, since I have 4 Jaguars ranging from 52 years old to 11 years old. I’ve entered 3 of them in JCNA Concours shows and each has been judged “best in class”.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      +1, 87 Morgan. Two or three years ago, I came up in traffic behind an early 5th-gen Coupe de Ville. My initial thought was, “Is that guy a pimp, or is it someone ‘ironically’ enjoying a Cadillac?” Then I drove up next to him and saw a well-dressed, nice-looking guy in his late 60s or early 70s. I also noticed just how bone stock the car was and how well-maintained it was. Then I realized he was a better driver than the average idiot on today’s roads. My revised take quickly became, “Oh, this is just a guy who’s found a hobby car that doesn’t break the bank, and he probably just enjoys it with no agenda beyond that.”

      It also gave me a smidgen of respect for that era de Ville. On the downside, I think Cadillac’s cachet has eroded massively since, say, the mid-1960s. On the upside, however:
      – the downsized C-bodies are a fundamentally decent platform.
      – a ’77-’80 de Ville nets you a “real” Cadillac engine in the 425 or 368. (And I think the ’81 8-6-4 is just a disconnected wire away from behaving like an earlier 368.)
      – if the car’s in good shape, its fundamental strength–relaxed, comfortable cruising–is the same now as it was 40 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Extemely well said. Its more about condition than make/model, with a few exceptions.

      I also realize that some people may be good-hearted, hard-working, and not drug abusers or criminals yet have to drive a ragged out Sentra or something. Life sucks sometimes.

      But, some, you can tell are driving that around because their next hit of meth is far more important than if the tires on their ride are smoother than the multi-colored paint.

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        “I also realize that some people may be good-hearted, hard-working, and not drug abusers or criminals yet have to drive a ragged out Sentra or something. Life sucks sometimes.”

        And +1 on that, JohnTaurus

        I used to know a man who lived in a small town. His vehicle was always a crappy pick-up which seemed to be just on the safe side of falling apart. His back story: He was an entrepreneur, but not a successful one by 21st-century Americans standards. He ran a restaurant where older people in the town liked to eat and two or three employees earned enough to live on. He owned a couple of properties which he rented to lower-income people, and he made just enough money to pay the property taxes and keep them in decent repair. He also catered for a local nursing home and charged just enough to break even.

        When he died, his net worth was in the four figures. Had he spent more money on transportation, he would have been in the red.

        The crowd at his funeral exceeded the capacity of the church by about 25%.

        • 0 avatar

          This was a nice story.

          • 0 avatar
            SSJeep

            ^^^ This, Corey Lewis. I dont judge anyone for what they drive. For the bumper stickers on the back, maybe… But not for the car itself. I find almost every car to be interesting in one way or another.

            One of my acquaintances drives a Prius to work every day and has an unnamed exotic sports car in the garage that he drives on nice weekends.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    I’ll admit to plenty of rash judgements based on vehicles, but I’m also prone to rashly judge anyone with an anti-tailgating bumper sticker. If it happens to you so often you feel compelled to warn others about how you’ll react to it, you might be the problem.

  • avatar
    vehic1

    Muscle cars and trucks – biggest in small towns; Subarus – young/hipster or snow belt; minivans and rounded CUVs = Mommycars.

  • avatar
    YellowDuck

    New convertible corvette. Retired or nearly retired suburban man finally with the courage to do something for himself, damn what anyone thinks, my time is limited.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I didn’t get the convertible and am still two decades away from retirement, have no kids, but it is true: our time is limited – so I’m driving a V8 powered monster.

      • 0 avatar
        Tele Vision

        When my wife was pregnant 4.5 years ago I started looking for a Miata. Every time she saw me browsing on The Google she got huffy: “Looking for your escape pod?”, as it was a two-seater. I actually wanted it as a year-round commuter car as they’re great in the Winter with good tires and a few sandbags in the trunk. I though that if she’s getting miffed about a Miata she won’t be any more angry about a Corvette. Within an hour I’d rediscovered the Gen I CTS-V. She was OK with that, door- and seat-wise, and I was OK with a manual transmission and 400 horsepower in a sleeper. I pulled the trigger and have been loving it ever since. My wee boi digs it, too!

  • avatar
    BunkerMan

    RAM Sport 4×4. 3+ year old Mazda 3.

    PT Cruiser / Chevy HHR

    In the past, it was a Pontiac Sunfire coupe.

  • avatar
    Fonzy

    Dodge Journey or anything Mitsubishi. It’s a moving credit score indicator.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Old Camaros and trailer parks

    • 0 avatar
      TimK

      I remember a story out of north GA some time ago. Boyfriend was visiting his honey at her trailer and parked his shiny new Camaro outside. Lady goes to work and leaves him in charge of her four kids. Trailer catches fire, he rushes outside to move his car, the kids all die…

      IIRC the police tried to find something to charge him with, but there was little they could do.

  • avatar
    GTL

    A friend and I were waiting in line in my car to pay a toll behind a Corvette. Our conversation turned to what kind of person drives a ‘vette…pretentious, condescending, superficial were some of the words bandied about. When we got to the toll booth window, the attendant said “Go on through; the car ahead of you paid your toll.”

    We were very chagrined, to say the least.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      So, professional lip readers drive Corvettes then. He could see your conversation in his rear view mirror

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      I think there are regular corvette owners and zr1 owners. Regular corvette owners seem to just feel lucky that they finally ‘made it’. They drive too slow but generally are just having fun. ZR1 owners will tell you endlessly about nordschleife times and value vs ‘x’ exotic car. Even if you only asked about the weather.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        You forgot about the other two kinds of ‘Vette owners: wax ’em or track ’em. I’m the later but have to admit I’m slowly becoming the former. If your going to have a nice car you need to keep it clean.

        Per my wife driving a ‘Vette means every parking lot becomes a Cars and Coffee meet. Just last weekend she took our C7 out to grab some sandwiches and three separate people stopped her in the parking lot to ask various questions: It that new? No its actually used and 4 years old already. I’ve never seen that color! Yeah its blue while most people get red, white, black or grey in that order, the green ones are really rare. How much power? 460 HP thank you very much.

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        I’m not sure of the percentage, but MrIcky is right that there’s a cohort of regular Corvette owners who just prefer to have a fast grand tourer/sports car at that price point instead of a premium sedan. (And I think ‘regular’ could apply both to the trim level and the people.) My recently retired dentist bought a C7 convertible last summer. He doesn’t come off as an overt Corvette guy or a car guy in general, but he’s driven a succession of, say, four to six Porsches and Corvettes over the past 35 years.

        And that answers another question: Yes, there are some people who cross-shop the Corvette against the 911, Boxster, and Cayman.

        • 0 avatar
          Featherston

          Addendum: While he’s owned at least one 911, that would have been in the pre-Boxster days. Looking at Porsche’s website, I infer the “lower” 911 has been phased out to minimize overlap with the Boxster/Cayman. My point is that he has cross-shopped Corvettes against Porsches that are in the same broad price tier.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          Put me it the category of someone who cross-shopped a C7 with a 911. Ultimately I couldn’t justify spending $40K more even though the 911 is a better car. It’s just not $40K better IMO. And for the record, I’m not 60, fat, bald, condescending or conservative. I just love performance cars and for $75K there is not a better option out there for something new.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            @ golden2husky – Agreed. For whatever reason, negative stereotypes get bandied about all the time for the Corvette but not for Porsches. It’s a bit odd when you consider two of the most celebrated Porschephiles are:
            – a comedian/actor who, while talented and very successful, comes off as more than a bit of a jerk in interviews.
            – a guy who looks like he’s homeless and is a terrible driver (www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmpFRdi0ddo).

            I try not to let those two color my impression of Porsche, just as I try not to let CORVETTE SUMMER color my impression of Corvettes.

            How do you like your C7 so far? Apart from my dentist, I only know one person who’s looked at them. A friend was very interested, but his wife put the kibosh on a two-seater until their kids are out of the house. (A nicely kept E90 M3 that they bought used would have been sold to make way for the Corvette.)

    • 0 avatar

      As far as Vettes go, there is one parked in front of a not quite well kept/quite old trailer in a park several blocks east of me. Very nice looking car juxtaposed against the trailer. To me it speaks to what the owner values the most – as it is in most situations that appear incongruent on the surface.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Every make and model has both its target audience and its actual owner trends. It’s not judgmental to assume things, it’s astutely observational. Some cars are generally owned by people who are not only not good at driving, but downright stupid, and it’s good to know to keep an eye on them and expect them to prove you right.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Another car stereotype discussion. I don’t see any new ground getting covered here.

  • avatar
    Car Ramrod

    When I see a brown manual diesel wagon, I assume it’s an auto journalist.

    Also, old Volvo= resourceful cheapskate

  • avatar
    random1

    Landrover LR2/3/4/5

    Amazing how quickly that stereotype went from genuine off-road to pure soccer mom. (And I even had an LR4 for a bit)

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    If I see you driving a FWD Jeep (too cheap to at least buy the AWD/4×4 version) I immediately judge you as a poser simply wanting the front of your vehicle to say “JEEP” and would have purchased a smart car if it had been badged JEEP.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I now have a 2015 Grand Cherokee Overland. It’s just RWD; I don’t need the 4WD system, so I found one without it. It does have the tow package, which is great.

      Still, I think there’s plenty to like about the FWD-based Jeeps I don’t have any love for the new Compass, but I’m starting to like the Renegade because I actually drove one (the styling is even growing on me), and the Cherokee has plenty of merit.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        BUT it’s a JEEP. It was basically born out of solving the equation (WAR + 4wd) = X

        A 2wd Jeep feels like your pi$$ing all over the brands heritage.

        But I’m just some guy on the internet and this is just my opinion. :-)

        I do admire Kyree that you drive what you please and don’t really seem to care what anybody else thinks. Plus you have owned a wide variety of vehicles from a wide variety of manufacturers.

        I hope the Jeep treats you well. I would consider a Grand Cherokee Laredo S 4×4 with tow package – lower MSRP means more money to spend on that trip to Wally World.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        You know driving a 2WD Jeep is equal to a V6 Mustang or Camaro… just sayin’

  • avatar
    Rasputin

    Bro-dozers.
    Raised vehicles.
    Pick-ups driven by drivers with clean hands.
    Did I mention bro-dozers?

    Judgement generally negative, as in “compensating for lack of …..”

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Pick-ups driven by drivers with clean hands.

      Wow good thing I often had to break out the Armor All cleaning supplies for the places my hands touched in my old F150 – they were constantly turning dull and gray./s

      Wouldn’t want to be judged.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      lol, 3 categories that are basically just ‘pick ups’.

      You must REALLY hate pick ups. Even diesel mechanics wash up for dinner btw.

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      ” “compensating for lack of …..”

      AGAIN with this tired and lame line? It seems to me that its just sour grapes from beta males who got friend zoned by one too many pretty ladies riding shotgun in those lifted trucks. Then again, a guy who is that concerned about what other dudes are packing might want to do some honest self evaluation. Because that raises a VERY important question…

    • 0 avatar
      ptschett

      …you do know there are things that a pickup with its ground clearance & cargo capacity can be useful for, that don’t particularly dirty the driver’s hands, right?
      Examples include (especially in a farming context) but are not limited to:
      -dealing with idiot blocks oops i mean small square bales
      -carrying wire, boards, fence posts, tools, etc. out to fix a fence
      -driving out to a field on rural roads to run a tractor or other farm machine, then driving back to the farmstead when done
      -alternately, towing said tractor / farm machine home when done
      -taking supplies to the field for the job (baler twine, net wrap for a big round baler, repair parts, etc.)
      -herding cattle in a pasture that is staying pasture & not tilled land because it’s too hilly & the rocks haven’t been picked
      -running to town to get supplies (baler twine, pesticides, bags of seed, small implements or skid-steer attachments, etc.) to bring back & use

    • 0 avatar
      The Ghost of Buckshot Jones

      I have a lifted crew cab pickup that tows my racecar and a 500 pack of latex gloves with a sink in my garage. Most people learn how to wash their hands by the time they turn three years old, you might want to work on that.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I’ve already said my piece about people who buy Ford Raptors. Awesome truck, horrible clientele.

  • avatar
    200k-min

    Corolla drivers. Always driving at, or under, the speed limit. People that just hate to drive and don’t give two shits about what they’re driving other than economy.

  • avatar
    jkk6

    Civic SI, Cayman, STI, EVOs driven by female drivers. They were sexy 10 years ago, even sexier now. Admiration turned fetish.

  • avatar
    volvo

    Escalade

    C series MBZ

    And my impressions are not favorable

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Escalade just celebrated 20 years of existence as a nameplate – FYI.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        The types that drive them have been around since the beginning of time

        • 0 avatar
          ernest

          Yep. And they often have a Ford Super Duty pickup parked next to it in the driveway. It may look redneck- but that’s close to $200,000 in the driveway, plus the obligatory boat, towable RV, and ATV’s. Very common out here.

      • 0 avatar
        volvo

        I thought the point was impression of the drivers/wowners?

        The Escalade my be a decent vehicle but why not get a Tahoe or Yukon built on the same platform?

        • 0 avatar
          I_like_stuff

          The Lexus may be a decent vehicle, but why not the Toyota version built on the same platform?

          The Acura may be a decent vehicle, but why not the Honda version built on the same platform?

          The Infiniti may be a decent vehicle but why not the Nissan version built on the same platform?

          Oh right, different rules for American and foreign manufacturers. If it’s not American, it’s good. If it’s American it’s bad. I forgot the rules for a second. My bad.

        • 0 avatar
          The Ghost of Buckshot Jones

          Because F-you money, that’s why. A properly equipped Yukon/’burban doesn’t really come in at much under the Caddy, might as well go all out if you’re dropping that coin.

          • 0 avatar
            volvo

            quote “Because F-you money, that’s why. A properly equipped Yukon/’burban doesn’t really come in at much under the Caddy, might as well go all out if you’re dropping that coin.”

            I understand the prices are about the same. I guess the best auto analogy dates back to the early 1960s when you could get a Rolls Royce silver cloud or Bentley S3. The were both Rolls Royce under the skin but the Bentley had much less bling. Those who wanted to be understated chose the Bentley. FWIW Rolls Royce survived and Bentley disappeared for a couple of decades.

      • 0 avatar

        I’m glad Dan reminded me, and now we’ll be discussing Escalade very soon. ;)

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    I own 3 vehicles:

    1. A RAM truck, so I am a dumb uneducated hick redneck

    2. A Mercedes E300, so I am an a-hole elitist 1%er (this is my wife’s car, but I drive it occasionally as well)

    3 A Porsche 911, so I am a pretentious dips-*hit going through a mid-life crisis

    Stereotypes are fun!!

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    Sports cars with an auto transmission. Impression of driver = no bueno.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Mini with a girl in it – cute. Mini with a guy… is still Mini with a girl (sort of)

  • avatar
    SixspeedSi

    First one that comes to my mind is the Camry driver. Now broadened to the “Toyota Driver” as Corollas, Rav4’s, etc. are so popular.

    Basically, these people never remember to turn their headlights on during dusk/early night and are just generally bad and unaware drivers. They seem to not know any defensive driving technique and are always in some sort of “zone” when driving around. I always keep a keen eye on the “Toyota Driver” as you don’t know what rash move they’ll never perform next. It’s usually never intentional.

    As of late, the “Toyota Driver” has trickled down into other brands. I’ve seen many Nissan Rouges and Subaru Forester drive in a similar manner. s

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      Yup. Pretty much ANY Toyota (excepting the pickups, FJs, Celica/Supra) you see is usually painted ToiletBowl White or some other similarly imaginative hue and doing 15mph under in the left lane.

      Lets not forget that seemingly overnight, hordes of charcoal grey or merlot buicks schlepped around by WWII gen blue hairs have been replaced by Boomer blue hairs in Priuses. All dutifully in that left lane at or under the speed limit with the blinker on.

    • 0 avatar
      chuckrs

      Wait a minute. I drive my wife’s Camry as much as she does. I am glad for the standard SE trim steering wheel with all the fiddly stuff on it. That was a $1500 option in my car, a Cayman S. Mine no has. Plus, it is true that it is more fun to drive a slow car fast than a fast car slow. Fast/quick is of course relative with the 4 cylinder engine.
      Yes, for my wife, it is an appliance, and she enjoys it just as much as she does her new dishwasher.

  • avatar
    GS 455

    Honda CRV. If I come to a red light with three vehicles in one lane and a lone CRV in the other I go in the lane with the 3 other cars. They WILL go faster than the CRV.

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    8 year old Beige Corolla driving slowly yet semi-erratically, with little to no spatial awareness.

    Inevitable recent immigrant from the sub-continent.

    That’s Racist.

  • avatar
    jfk-usaf

    I can think of many assumptions (almost all negative – but not all) around the following nameplates but I’ll leave it with just the name plates…
    First the negative:
    Monte Carlo
    Escalade
    Camaro
    Corvette
    WRX
    H2
    Civic (w/ non OEM add-ons)
    Prius
    Elcamino

    Positive assumptions:
    Saab
    BMW (Pre-2006, w/o aftermarket add-ons)

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    10-year-old Toyota Camry.

    Indian, Pakistani or Arab IT guy or gas station franchisee who isn’t into cars and just wants an appliance.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      This is easy not true because you know how many seniors drive 10yo Camry? But you’re right – those groups are practically have only Toyonda cars. One dude at work listened to me and bought Mazda6.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Nowadays for me, this question is irrelevant, but when in high school, in the small community I grew up in, nobody ever had a new car – neither did most parents, and if they did, it was a base model, even if it was an Impala or Galaxie.

    The rest of us kids – we didn’t drive cars, we drove “bombs”! We compared cheap bodywork and rust.

    In other words, we were all in the same boat! No stigma about anything.

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    I almost forgot.

    Beat up 10-year-old crew cab pickup with racks of lawn tools towing a box trailer full of riding mowers just screams “illegal aliens.”

    Breaking the laws Americans won’t break.

  • avatar
    Verbal

    Prius. Usually with an NPR sticker on the back, a gray-haired white woman behind the wheel, traveling at 5-10 mph below the posted limit.

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      You forgot:

      –the mid 50s 300lb blob that looks a LOT like Rob Riener. Most likely a pompous intellectual/government bearacrat/other self righteous gasbag type.

      –spindly looking nerdy IT guy type.

      –spinster librarian/music teacher

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    I base my judgement of a car owner on:

    a) the condition of the car
    b) the condition and the brand of the tires

    My judgement is not based on the brand of the car. I’ve seen some immaculate Pontiac Sunfires. Even if I hate that car with a passion, it says a lot about the owner that the car is still running and is so well kept. I’ve also seen first gen X5’s with missing BMW center caps on the wheels. That screams BHPH lot and a shallow individual.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      True in its own way.

      I have no judgement on Honda Pilot owners, but I know a lady with a professional job who owns a 2nd gen Pilot. However it has the cheapest nastiest Chinese made tires on it, purchased by her and she is the original owner.

      I judge her for stupid frugality.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        My father-in-law owned a repair business. It was amazing that these expensive vehicles would roll in for repair – rarely for scheduled service beyond an oil change – and when it needed work, well how cheap can the repair be. Struts? Almost never. Tires? “what’s the cheapest that will fit?” Unreal. Imagine my 26-year-old station car with Koni struts…now I’m an outlier…

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Hey now, I’m college educated and hold down a professional job – and used to own a 1986 Monte Carlo SS. It was a nice clean Tennessee car too.

    I ended up pulling out the 305, installing a roller-cam 355 in it, also redid the sun damaged interior and putting in a rebuilt / upgraded TH200-4R transmission.

    But yeah – there’s a stigma with the MCSS – the whole NASCAR thing – white trash, whatever you wanna call it. My car was certainly a cop magnet… and – this was the early-aughts, mind you, every kid in a Honda Accord or Civic with a wing on the back wanted to race it.

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    –Challenger/Charger/Camaro/Mustang: Every auto rag ever claims these are the darling of Boomers trying to relive their youth. That’s maybe 5-10% true. As a Challenger owner and member of a handful of enthusiast groups/clubs, the biggest market for these seems to be military veterans aged mid 20s to late 40s.

    –Jeep XJ with offroad mods: Poser, OR new generation of offroad enthusiasts

    –Subaru sti/wrx, Mitsu Evo, Focus RS/ST: flat brimmed hats turned sideways, white framed sunglasses, TapOut clothing, vapes.

    –Any midsize or under sedan: IDGAF about cars or driving.

    –Any crossover CUV: Frumpy soccer mom

    –Any hybrid or electric car: Projected image: “I’m saving the world. Look at me, I’m hip and forward thinking”. Real image: old, out of touch, nerdy.

    –Lifted pickup or Jeep: Done up properly with style and engineered with intent of actually using it: Cool!
    On 22″ rims with lots of chrome: Poser with no taste.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I only really seriously look out for cars with obvious collision damage as a way to avoid those who have busy bumpers.

    However, the stereotype which usually proves correct is that people in Toyotas do not know what they’re doing. It’s best to pass them as soon as possible if you plan on getting anywhere.

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    e

  • avatar
    bobtheowl

    The only cars I judge (possibly unfairly) are Honda Accord coupes. To me it seems like they tend to fit more of the BMW driver stereotype.

    They’ll tailgate you when traffic is moving slowly, camp in the left lane when traffic is moving quickly, generally don’t use turn signals, and change lanes without looking to see if anyone’s there.

    Oddly enough I typically don’t notice these sorts of issues with BMW drivers.


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