By on August 1, 2018

2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk front quarter

Monday’s QOTD post by Matthew Guy inquiring about some of the seriously overpriced metal on today’s collector car market got me thinking. And what it got me thinking about was the present state of cars, and if there’s going to be much worthy of collecting at a later date.

We’re in some dark times, automotively speaking. Allow me to explain.

You see, I could quickly and easily make a list of several desirable and collector-worthy cars for each model year between 1990 and perhaps 2003. After that, things get a bit sketchier, and it’s harder to find collectible metal outside things designed with collectors in mind — like the heated garage-ready Chevrolet SSR, for example. And where things really get dicey is upon the convergence of two distinct and negative forces for those interested in cars, collecting cars, or cars of high quality.

The first negative force was the creation and subsequent Xeroxing of the CUV, as popularized first by the Lexus RX back in the late 1990s. This force continues today, and was compounded by the small economic issue North America experienced in 2008. The Great Recession drove home a point about taking certain risks, and the mostly unnecessary aspects of auto manufacturing like sourcing parts from America and fitting quality interiors to vehicles. I don’t think we’ve climbed out of that hole, especially where automobiles are concerned. Of course, it’s not all bad — just mostly. This brings me to today’s question.

Consider the most recent five model years, 2014 to 2018. Limiting future collectible considerations to these five years only, where do you see the shining stars? In a sea of CUV selections, or where Cadillac tried to act like BMW, BMW went after Lexus, and Lincoln and Acura had their internet shut off, where do you turn?

The headline image is an obvious choice, and I’m taking that one to make the game harder on you. Any HellCarSportHawk variations from FCA with their ridiculous 707 horsepowers are destined to be future collectibles. Eventually people will look at them like they do a Plymouth Superbird; their eyes fixated as the HellVehicle passes. “Remember when they used to make that?”

Off to you all.

[Image: Chris Tonn / TTAC]

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80 Comments on “QOTD: Are There Any Collectibles Amongst the Rubble?...”


  • avatar
    Syke

    The other obvious choice: Any and all top of the line Corvettes.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    It’s really tough for brands to differentiate themselves lately. If you showed someone a silhouette of a ‘67 Cougar, ‘67 Barracuda, and a ‘67 GTO they’d name them in two seconds. These days, not so much. It must suck being a cop now, how can they tell vehicles apart? Maybe a Juke would stand out but they just made the millionth one so it’ll be forever before they’re rare.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      All of those cars are 3 box rectangles other than the Barracuda, which is unique due to the bubbleback. Most GTOs are incredibly generic and forgettable. The Cougar is only memorable due to its detailing (the head and taillights mostly). They’re no different than today.

      Unless you lived through the eras, most American cars (and a lot of European) cars of the 60’s and 70’s look the same. It was all about straight edges.

      Every era has its silhouette, that the vast majority of cars fit into. Now it’s all about the coupe roofline, but cars now aren’t any more or less differentiated than they ever have been. I agree with the argument that they’re uglier, but saying cars look the same nowadays reeks of “get off my lawn” and rose-tinted nostalgia.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        You saved me the trouble of writing that, Scott. I could not agree more. Not having grown up in the era, I couldn’t tell the difference (other than as you say, the bubble back Plymouth) if I couldn’t see the details. I don’t get how a Malibu, Fusion and Accord are indistinguishable any more than those examples are. Same with Rav4, CRV and Rogue. Yes, they’re similar, if you only see them in profile with no detail, but a GTO without badges would be a great answer to “I’ll take ‘Generic American late 60s two door car’ for 200, Alex”.

        Actually, I avoided responding because most would assume I was disagreeing with him due to his trolling of me elsewhere. He and vulpine constantly bring this “all cars are the same today, unlike back in my day” line, and its very tiresome.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Both agree and disagree. CAFE requirements, pedestrian safety requirements, aerodynamics, etc all have led to most modern vehicles having to follow similar silhouettes.

          This was not true of/required by vehicle designs in previous decades.

          VW Beetles, Minis and Volvo PV’s were immediately distinguishable. And Citroen DS’s.

          You could easily identify a Rolls-Royce or a Jaguar sedan or E-Type.

          As to domestic vehicles, it was easy to identify a Corvair. And most Cadillacs. Full sized Fords of the late 1960’s to mid 1970’s were somewhat distinct from other D3 sedans. The 1970’s LTD models with their slab sides particularly so. Prior to that Ford/Mercurys with the ‘reverse sloping’ rear window. Then there were oddballs like Gremlins and Pacers, or boat-tail Buicks. All readily distinguishable by those with little interest in autos.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            There are also examples today of cars that stick out. You can tell LX platform cars apart from other large cars at quite a distance. The Fiat 500 doesn’t blend in anymore than the Gremlin did. The CH-R doesn’t fit a well-defined mold, except perhaps the one left by the Juke when it went away from our market.

            CAFE and impact standards didn’t make all 1970s large cars look like each other. One over-wrought opera-lamp vinyl topped behemoth looks like the other.

            If you didn’t study cars of the 1960s and were shown a picture of a Ford, you wouldn’t be able to tell what it was. It would just blend in with everything else its size. Again, its only distinctive if you were around when it was common and therefore saw it 17 times a day and noticed that this line and that curve was unique compared to the other 170 American cars you saw that day.

        • 0 avatar
          Syke

          A lot of it has to do with person interest in the cars.

          Yeah, I can tell 1930’s cars as to make and year from fifteen feet away. And they were, for the most part, incredibly derivative of each other. But thirties cars were my start in the antique car hobby.

          Fifties care are a doddle. I lived in dad’s showroom back then.

          Modern CUVs? I absolutely cannot pick one from the other, because I don’t give a damn about them, will hopefully never own one, and wouldn’t care if they all disappeared tomorrow, other than enjoying the sudden open spaces on the road.

          And my attitude towards CUVs is probably the same as someone who has absolutely no interest in ever looking up anything about cars other than Consumer Reports and the buying sites when it comes time to buy a new one.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            That’s an excellent point. Of course cars that you like and studied seem obvious…to you. There isn’t much to convince you otherwise. But, that doesn’t make it so for other people with perhaps only a passing interest in that era.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          It’s not that different now as then. Camaros looked like Firebirds, Cougars looked like Mustangs. Fords looked like Mercurys and GM, well GMs all look the same, then and now

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Yes, and its the little differences that make one car a bit more desirable to an individual. For example, I find that I most often prefer the Oldsmobile version of a GM car. Others may prefer the Pontiac or Chevrolet versions.

            Everyone goes bonkers for a Chevelle, but I find the Cutlass more attractive. But, to a layperson, there isn’t much to identify one over the other. I recognize that.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @JT: There was a period in Canada when the Cutlass was the top selling car in the nation. Particularly liked the revolving bucket seat option.

            And thanks for helping to prove my theory regarding autos being more readily identifiable prior to the implementation of so many government regulations. The cars that you mention as ‘standing out’ in this era such as the Fiat 500 are largely ‘retro’ designs, emulating cars of the 50’s to 70’s. The Challenger is of course also a retro design. The Charger and 300 are perhaps the last of the full sized, rear wheel drive, V-8 domestic platforms. As unique as Max Rockatansky’s original ‘Interceptor’.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            That doesn’t take away from the fact that no government regulations caused cars of past eras to all look similar to a layman.

            Yes, the retro designs do stick out, there’s no denying that, but there are cars that stick out without being retro, we usually just call them ugly, or by their proper name: Lexus.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @JT: nice line about the Lexi. However we must disagree when you speak in absolutes.

            There is no doubt that there was a greater variation in auto shapes and styles and contours from particularly the period 1956 to 1973 than there is now.

            As per my examples, there were many vehicles that even non-drivers like my grandparents knew readily.

            Now it is hard to discern many if not most. And it is due to requirements for safety and mileage that previously did not exist.

            No more Mansfield style bumpers, tail fins, hood ornaments, reverse sloped rear windows, upright chrome grills (or pretty much all chrome), Continental trunks, or other ornamentation to differentiate.

            Now even headlights, except for in vehicles like the Juke, are relatively the same. Before you had round or squared, single, or double, paired horizontally or vertically or even offset vertically, or ‘hidden’ or best of all ‘pop up’. Now many of those have been lost due to regulations.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            I agree those were distinctive styling cues, but I don’t see all modern headlights as looking the same. Or grilles, etc. I do concede that there are general trends (higher belt lines, fastback rear styling), especially among sedans, and that a lot of them are brought on by regulations. But I don’t see all midsize cars as being indistinguishable as has been suggested.

            The retro designs stick out because they’re just that, retro. They don’t look as much like modern cars, and that makes them more distinctive. The fact that they’re better or worse is a matter of personal opinion. I’ve heard people say that any Mustang after 2005 is silly and cartoonish. Same thing about Challenger and Camaro. I don’t personally think so, but everyone is different.

            The old Beetle to me was distinctive in a bad way. It was a 1930s design that lived far too long. That’s not even counting where and from whom its design came from. I’ve never liked them, yet I’m evidently in the minority.

            If there were a strong demand for such a car today, the Tata Nano would be it. But, even in India, the demand is simply not there. The beetle stuck out as much for its size as it did for its styling (or lack thereof). In a sea of LTDs and Impalas and New Yorkers, of course it’ll look distinctive.

            There were regulations that at times specified headlights in the past as well. I’d say after the mandatory sealed beams were deregulated in the mid-80s, cars became a lot more distinctive and individuality was more possible. The Taurus in particular stood out, as did the aero Thunderbird, and that had to do with a lot more than just headlights, but it was possible to incorporate them into the styling of the car for the first time in a long time.

  • avatar
    John R

    I’ll vote for the new NSX. I suspect it’ll be a product that, in hindsight, was underappreciated in it’s time like the previous NSX.

    I would have chosen the R35 GT-R (and I’m fan), but the Honda is mid-engine.

  • avatar
    HushH

    Just sneaking in at the bottom of your model year range, I’d say the CTS-V wagon will likely be a collector.

  • avatar

    Ah, I have one.

    Murano CrossCabriolet

    The Acura ZDX misses the cutoff by a year.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      I appreciate that suggestion, but I have to question if thats true.

      This website I really love called “TheTruthAboutCars.com” ran an article a couple of years ago about how cars won’t shoot up in value just because its rare.

      https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2016/01/doug-drives-no-your-rare-car-isnt-going-to-shoot-up-in-value/

      That car will be rare, but it was never desirable.

      But I say you buy one Corey and hold on to it for a few years and we can watch what happens. Maybe you can convince TTAC to take on the price for research sake?

      $13,900 on autotrader…

      • 0 avatar

        Well first off, you have to consider the author of that article and the credibility therein.

        Second, I think the Murano CC will fall into the same “limited and funky” category as the Isuzu VehiCROSS.

        • 0 avatar
          scott25

          The difference between the Murano and Vehicross is go anywhere capability. The Murano CC will be memorable and collectible, yes, but in the same way as something like the Dakota convertible. Only to a small subset of weirdos

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Stop typing what I’m thinking! Great Scott!

            Kidding of course, but again, I agree. The Murono CC will be rare and unique, but I have a feeling that people like Gtem (not to mention myself) desire the VehiCROSS as much for its off-road ability as its out-of-this-world styling.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “Murano CC will be memorable and collectible, yes, but in the same way as something like the Dakota convertible.”

            Um, more like the Aztek and Pacer and we all want one of those

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      The modern version of the metallic beige bench seat three speed manual in-line six pony car that the owner insists is a rare collectible that will make them a fortune on the auction circuit… if only they can find that one passionate drunk looking for a metallic beige bench seat three on the tree in-line sixxer pony car.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Just like Jack has pointed out: Honda Accord V6 from the previous generation, preferably a six-speed stick. Obviously, that leaves the Coupe as the desirable one. They’re certainly rare enough.

        Perhaps the Sedans might be future desirables as well, especially with the added goodies on the Touring trims. Just good old-fashioned muscle, before Honda followed the lemmings in their CAFE quest.

        Mind you, I wouldn’t expect to see an appreciation in value for these in the next fifteen years; perhaps around 2035. Who knows what will be viable for collectors if the anti-automobile proponents of GoogleAmazonFacebookBlobPods have their way?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I can see that Murano enjoying better than average resale, but collectible? Meh.

      Ironically enough, though, on the subject of Nissans, I wouldn’t be surprised if some of those Star Wars editions they put out became somewhat collectible. Of course, that depends on how Star Wars goes…

  • avatar
    arach

    Nothing has changed.

    You still have the super cars and exotics that used to have their value and will in the future.

    You still have your sports cars- Camaro, Mustang, Charger, Challenger, Corvette that used to have their value and will in their future.

    Nothings changed.

    Every car over 30 years is worth more than its original MSRP no matter how lame. Someone tried to call my bluff on this statement and we put it to the test. Even a Dodge Omni from 1987 is worth 30% more today than it was new.

    so EVERY car will be worth something if its still in good shape in 30 years.
    Exotics and sports cars are more likely to have excessively high value just like they have for the last 50 years.

    game-changing SUVs like the Cayenne will hold higher levels of value, but not as much as the exotics and sports cars. Unique trend setters like the Tesla Roadster and the Porsche Panamera will too, as they will be remembered as starting a new market. I know the roadster missed the cutoff.

    Cars like the Chevy SS will hold their value and have a strong resale just like we predict, but they could be chalked into the “Sports car” market. This does fall into your time period.

    Again, I don’t think anything has changed.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I agree to a point. Like APaGttH touched on below, everything *eventually* can become a collectable. Time alone makes it rare, even if they sold millions of them back in the day. Most cars get used up and disposed of without a thought to what they may be worth one day. Find a clean 6 cylinder Falcon on eBay, a car nobody ever considered to be more than basic transportation for many years, yet now, its collectable.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Interesting thread. I think there are still a few; you just need to go down the rabbit hole of rare permutations. I’m leaving out exotica (anything by Porsche or nicer)

    First thing that comes to mind- anything with 6 or more cylinders, 4 doors, and 3 pedals. So the SS, ATS-V, M3 and even the 335i/340i are fair game. Sadly I think that’s IT for that segment.

    Another group is anything that revs higher than 7K RPM with 3 pedals. Frisbee twins are probably the poster child. 9th gen Civic Si is another candidate. Updated Miata is another one.

    I could see RCRB pickups being another one. We never got a follow up to the Lightning/SRT-10…. but RCRB V8 pickups of the current gens are probably rarer than either and fun in their own way. I think RCSB trucks were available but they were lot cancer so they stopped offering them.

    I could see the last of the EJ equipped WRX STIs being valuable to some.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    If Tesla doesn’t survive, any of those. Any “V” Cadillacs, maybe even the Raptor, although trucks and SUVs have a more difficult time being “classic”
    There’s a slew of exotic BMWs and Mercs that will probably qualify

  • avatar

    I want that Jeep in the photo.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    I look at the current state of the pony cars, the eyebrow-raising competence of full size pickups, renewed interest in midsize pickups, good stuff like ZR2 and TRD Pro, the Civic Si & R, the GTI, Focus ST, Fiesta ST (that may be a collectible), Miata, Giulia, Stinger/G70, and the general ease at which a sub-6 second run to 60 is obtained, and I’m not so sure we are in automotive dark times. From $25K to $100K MSRP, there are multiple interesting vehicles to choose from.

    Collectible? I don’t know. In 1991 would I think a stick-shift 318i in refrigerator white would sell for $13,000 with nearly 200K miles in 2018? There are some nice machines being produced today, we’ll see what happens in 20 years.

  • avatar
    labelnerd

    An original Kia Stinger.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I was first going to go with the CTS-V wagon, bonus points for MT. I have so much want for one of these.

    I think the Raptor F150 will reach collector status as well.

    Since 2000 or so, cars/trucks have been screwed together so much better than they were in the 60’s that picking a classic is kind of tough. It is not like you buy a car drive it for 5 years and it is garbage afterwards, so a collector car would be one that was bought, driven for 3 years and parked somewhere or was a rare variant (SS 454 as example). It is not uncommon to see a 2001 Chevy pickup driving around, or F150, Lexus so and so forth. So the rarity factor is not as prevalent as it once was. My last thought on the topic is selection of options is not what it once was so optioning up the powertrain (non mopar) is not available, thus making it harder to option up a 1 of 100 kind of thing.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I don’t know how the market for older SVT Mustangs has held out, I saw a ’96-ish Cobra today and it looked a little sad but I was never a fan of the SN95. (Quick search shows $7k-$10k, depending on mileage.)

    I can see the Ford Raptor being collectible. For the big Euro-3: BMW M family, especially the M2. The Mercedes AMGs, and the Audi S cars. Jaguar F-Type.

    CUVs/SUVs? Maybe not so much, except for the performance monsters.

  • avatar
    brettucks

    Im thinking some of the Teslas in smaller produced numbers – especially if Tesla’s not around in the future.

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      Doubt it. They’ll be as collectible and relevant as Tandy computers are right now, and for the same reasons.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        I tend to think the same way, and have stated in the past that high-tech cars will have a hard time becoming collectable. However, if you look at ICE vehicles, their popularity can still exist even when time and technology has passed them by. You can buy a much faster (and better in every conceivable way) car than an original ’66 Mustang today, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t collectable or desirsble. BEVs may prove to hold the same distinction.

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    I think Saabs may become collectibles. I can see a Viggen bringing top $$ 20 years from now at an auction.

    2014 to 2018….never mind.

    I will concur with others that say Tesla, whether Tesla survives or not. There will always be some status symbol associated with having one of the first Teslas. Yeah I know Tesla was around before 2014, but it’s close enough that in the consciousness of the general public it will be one of the “early ones”.

    • 0 avatar
      nsk

      That’s a great point about Saab Viggens. By coincidence I was looking yesterday at Viggens and Aeros, and they all seem to have +50k miles and are in crappy shape. I had a 9-5 Aero in undergrad, and my dad had a 9000 Aero when I was a kid; both were black and manual shift, and very cool in their weirdness yet actually decent to drive.

      I think there will always be a weirdo fringe of people who like these cars and that cars in great condition with low miles will command significantly higher prices than others, but I’d be surprised if transaction values begin to approach original MSRP.

      • 0 avatar
        I_like_stuff

        I had a 2004 93 Aero convertible. I loved that car and regret selling it. Also had an ’89 900 Turbo SPG. I sold it with 245K miles.

        But yeah most of the what’s out there is very high mileage and beaten up. Which is why I think the rare one, with low-ish miles and well taken care of (assuming such creatures actually exist) will be worth a lot.

  • avatar
    TW5

    BMW M2
    Camaro Z28
    Mustang 350R
    Charger/Challenger Hellcat
    Ford Raptor
    RAM Rebel
    Toyota TRD Pro (maybe TRD Offroad too)
    Tacoma TRD
    Jeep Rubicon
    9th Generation Civic SI

    Too many to list.

  • avatar
    gglockster

    The first generation Tesla roadster. Dodge Viper. One of the less usual Ford Mustangs. A BMW with a stick shift.

    The problem with any future collectable car will be getting the software to work. In the 20th Century you could either go to scrap yard or get a custom manufactured part. In the 21st Century so much of every car is locked up by DRM software, that it will be nightmare to restore.

    In general cars are not going to be collectable in 20 years. The enthusiast community especially in the US is shrinking. IMHO the future collector is a young kid today who lusts after an awesome car and in 20 years time strikes it rich and can then scratch that itch. The itch becomes an addiction. I just don’t see that “need” in the future.

    • 0 avatar
      e30gator

      Meh….I heard the same thing back in the 90’s when I was a teenager about how we didn’t appreciate the magic that was the 60’s muscle car era, etc, etc…

      But now, 20 years later and being able to afford some of the cool cars of my youth, I find myself scouring Craigslist looking at old e36 BMWs, 90’s Cherokees, and Eclipses.

      Besides, I see students at the school where I teach getting excited talking about S-10 Chevy pickups. There’s still hope.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Okay whats fading away and will soon be gone .? In order.

    #1 Manual shift, RWD
    #2 V8 Engines
    #3 Convertible

    So on the “cheap” end we have Camaros and Mustangs V8 convertibles Want to spend more money ??(not sure if these guys are available with a stick ?? ) Mercedes , Audi and BMW V8 convert. Keep one of these vehicles in pristine shape , and it may be worth something in the years to come… Or not ?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Chrysler 300 SRT8
    Cadillac CTS-V
    Focus RS
    Nissan GT-R
    Ford Raptor

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    2014 F-150 SVT Raptor. That was the last year of the 6.2 V8.

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      That’s a good one. I also think 5.0L V8’s could be desirable somewhere down the road, the same way the old 4.9L (300) Inline 6 still has a cult following, and can fetch decent money for a nice example with documented mileage to show how many times the odometer has actually rolled.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Of course there will be: Any and all convertibles, high performance Camaros, Mustangs and Challengers for starters.

    Most Corvettes.

    I wouldn’t put it past some to regard the Pontiac Aztek as a future collectible for its quirky design.

    I once believed that with the death of the pillarless hardtop, there would no longer be anything to get excited about, but I’ve been proven wrong.

    Time will tell, of course.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I just became the owner of a 2014 Stingray “Premier Edition” #380 of 500 – and guess what: it sells for exactly the same money as any other ’14 Stingray with the similar options goes for. It appears GM thought it would become some kind of collectable but the market (so far) does not agree. Now if the C8 goes mid engine V6 turbo then maybe my ‘Vette’s value will go up as it becomes 1 of 500 of last of the V8 RWD ‘Vettes. However I doubt it. While looking for mine I found 4 others for sale so apparently some other people also figure this “collectable” ain’t worth holding onto.

  • avatar
    scott25

    Basically any car that is the last of its breed that then became either turbocharged or hybridized, or was the last made with an iconic engine.

    Agree with the last Civic Si due to it being the last with the high reviving VTEC YO motor. If the next Corvette becomes mid-engined the current Z06 and ZR1 will have additional gravitas. The last of the Lancer Evo Xs, despite it not being THE iconic Evo (that would be the V and the IX). The 458 Italia, absolutely. The last of the naturally aspirated V10 Lamborghinis and Audi R8s.

    Otherwise, definitely the Fiesta ST and Focus RS, not so sure about the Focus ST. Stock 86s and BRZs will probably have the same value in 30 years that stock AE86s and Silvias have today. 2-door JK Wranglers will find value somewhere in between CJs and 80s/90s Wranglers. I think the Hyundai Genesis Coupe will develop a cult following. For some reason I think those backwards-cap Mini Coupes will become a loveable oddball one day.

    Some that I don’t see ever becoming collectible are the NSX and the R35 GT-R, don’t have the same appeal as their predecessors. 4 door Wranglers.

    Desirable and collectible aren’t the same thing but manual transmission CX-5s and Forester XTs will be the darlings of Kijiji for a long time to come. 2015-17 Mustang V6s will also be highly lusted after by the everyman who can’t afford a V8 but doesn’t want a 4 cylinder.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I’d also add any “last of their kind” cars like Taurus SHO, Accord coupe, hell maybe even the Chrysler 200.

      At the rate I see Crown Vics being ragged out and destroyed, a later model that is nicely equipped and well taken care of may hold some value.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I think some will like the GTO and SS, but they didn’t sell well. So will the rarity help them or will people not care. Sort of like the SVO, great car, didn’t sell well and now low milage clean examples languish with their for sale signs. ps I owned and liked the SVO.

  • avatar
    e30gator

    Car collectability is all about nostalgia for what the current young generation lusted after or remembers the most when those cars were built. The nostalgia part usually comes when these cars are no longer common sights on the road.

    A case in point would be an early Chrysler minivan. A first gen Caravan would actually be a cool car to cruise around in and remember all those soccer practices and trips to the mall with friends.

    Hellcats and Raptors aside, many younger enthusiasts probably think a loaded Toyota Highlander with a period-correct Thule roof rack would be a fun Cars & Coffee cruiser someday just as I think a nice ’84 Toyota Cressida wagon is now.

    Also, I hear a lot of kids talk about the coolness of Teslas.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      …Car collectability is all about nostalgia for what the current young generation lusted after or remembers the most when those cars were built…

      This. Exactly this. This is why a 1982 Mercury LN7 just sold for $7,250. This is clean example Chevettes are going for STUPID money. Look at what 70s Civics and Accords are selling for. Never mind the whole “donk” crew and their love Panther, Fox, and B-Body everything. Eventually those restored cars will have that suspension yanked and will find new life. Talk about stupid money, look at what late 80s Ford Mustang LX 5.0 notchbacks are selling for.

      If you told people in 1957 people would lose their $h1t over a Chevy sedan in 50 years you’d be laughed at.

      • 0 avatar
        e30gator

        Hell, I already see people seeking out old Nokia cellphones. So, yes.

        I threw away at least three original Nintendos and my Atari 2600 once they started getting glitchy, and now there’s a big collector market for all that crap.

        • 0 avatar
          iNeon

          Vintage videogames are skyrocketing.

          Look up a copy of the Lunar remakes for PSX– or the originals for Sega CD. Prepare yourself.

          But those games are iconic.

          Sold a Macintosh //c to a *museum* a couple years back.

          Waiting for the G3 upgraded 8600 to appreciate a bit. That machine fills me with absolute wonder and deserves more respect.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          Had an Atari 5200 system when I was younger.

          Much better, much faster graphics, but the mechanics inside the joysticks liked to eat through the thin boot. (The membrane switches on the steering wheels of recent Chevvies, unlike the actual buttons in Bruicks, seem destined to fail in the same way.)

          “Pole Position” on that system was a real kick!

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Hmmmmmmmmmmm I wonder if Uncle Tim still has his old ColecoVision? Grandma garage sale sold Dad’s old original Atari in the early 80s.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Never driven a StarTac or an iPhone 3, are they nice vehicles?

        Oh wait, those aren’t cars? Seems like he said “Car collectability”. Yeah, he did, right there in the quote you used.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    * Pontiac G8 GXP – already collectible and appreciating
    * Pontiac Solstice GXP couple – already collectible and appreciating
    * Certain flavors of the Mustang without question
    * Certain flavors of the Camaro without question
    * Certain flavors of the Challenger without question
    * Anything with the word Demon on it
    * Certain Toyota Tacoma trims
    * FJ Cruiser has the quirky
    * Pontiac Aztek is pure quirk and has a rabid following
    * Cadillac CTS-V coupe and wagon – especially manual
    * Chrysler 300 in the defunct SRT-8 trim with high equipment
    * Chevy SS – but only with a manual
    * Corvette in Z06 and Gran Sport trim
    * Mazda MX-5 and more likely the Fiat twin – only with manual
    * Saturn SKY Redline with manual
    * Honda Crosstour – has that Pontiac Aztek vibe
    * Diesel VWs impacted by the recall but got a fix – they have a story

    Just about anything that is remotely performance oriented with a manual will have potential. 30 years from now manual transmission will likely be dead and row your own with RWD in particular will be, “well would you look at that.”

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    Any Charger or Challenger with the Hemi will be SOME kind of collectible. The V6 models may well be fodder for engine upgrades into whatever is coming next in terms of insane horsepower, or at minimum just swaps to ANY Hemi.

    The Magnum and 300 in any Hemi trim but especially SRT8s will absolutely become collectible. Much lower production numbers and as much as I love the Challenger, theyre getting common. A magnum or 300 in Hemi trim though? That’s a sweet find NOW, let alone in 20 years.

    FCA loves special editions. So those Rams in SRT-10, Rumble Bee and Daytona trims will become collectors items. Same with the annual Mopar editions of whatever vehicle was featured.

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    Any Charger or Challenger with the Hemi will be SOME kind of collectible. The V6 models may well be fodder for engine upgrades into whatever is coming next in terms of insane horsepower, or at minimum just swaps to ANY Hemi.

    The Magnum and 300 in any Hemi trim but especially SRT8s will absolutely become collectible. Much lower production numbers and as much as I love the Challenger, theyre getting common. A magnum or 300 in Hemi trim though? That’s a sweet find NOW, let alone in 20 years.

    FCA loves special editions. So those Rams in SRT-10, Rumble Bee and Daytona trims will become collectors items. Same with the annual Mopar editions of whatever vehicle was featured.

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      I was going to make a joke and say the Taurus SHO, but this is the modern car that will be remembered fondly: what Dodge made. Dodge is likely to still be trundling along making something similar to it, beholden to some second or third corporate master hence, but the shape of the Challenger is not going to fade from memory.

      The FCA 300 is too ugly, but they didn’t mess up the Challenger, and it’s such a nice boulevard cruiser.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        The Taurus SHO won’t be remembered fondly as an American 6 cylinder car that was faster than German V-8s costing $10k+ more? (And many forms of the V-8 LX cars as well.)

  • avatar
    bking12762

    I think a distinction can be made between collector cars and special interest cars.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I have a 2017 SS, one of the last ones made and one of 12 as configured. Rare color, 6mt. I kept it completely stock, I didn’t even tint the windows.

    I didn’t think it would ever be worth anything but I thought it would be cool to keep it in good shape and original. Maybe I’d make some money back someday, maybe I’d pass it on to my son when he starts driving in 7 years.

    That all ended 2 weeks ago when my car was sideswiped by a fedex truck while parked in front of my house. The initial estimate is just over $25k to repair it. It looks like she might not be coming home. I loved that damn car but I hope they total it.

    Le sigh

  • avatar
    Erikstrawn

    V8 Charger/300s – There’s a million of them out there and nobody’s collecting them, not to mention they don’t last long. Any two door V8 Chrysler product from the ’60s and ’70s is at least worth its weight in beer, and I think as the LX platform cars disappear everyone will forget how unreliable they are and they’ll go up in value. Plus, the platform has been in production long enough that there will be a significant aftermarket for parts.

  • avatar
    rnc

    Land Rover Defender

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