By on August 17, 2018

lotus logo

TTAC Commentator arach writes:

Sajeev,

I need some car buying advice, and I’m not like one of those lame buyers who ask if they should buy a Honda or a Toyota, so you should definitely give me your 30 seconds of direction. (Fine, maybe this isn’t pointless. – SM)  

You see, I finally bought my DREAM car two years ago, a Ferrari 360 Spyder. I love it — BUT there’s two things I hate about it:

1. Despite just living in the US of A, there’s no dealership or shop anywhere around me that can service it.
2. Its so FREAKING EXPENSIVE. A new clutch costs me almost six grand, it costs me $600 just to get it to the shop for a $400 oil change, etc.

I was thinking about selling it and buying something else, like a Lotus Evora 400 or a Porsche 911, but the latter seems too common.

Sajeev responds:

Question back to you: is a Lotus really any better?  I assume not everything nothing Lotus can be serviced at a Toyota dealer; that’s one reason why they have a Lotus dealer network.

You have way too much faith in the parts/technology sharing of Lotus and Toyota. My knowledge of the 1993 Lincoln Mark VIII and that engine stealing bastard (a.k.a. 1996 Ford Mustang Cobra) in mind, I bet the Evora’s camshafts are also bespoke Lotus bits. I’m likely correct.

This is turning into a good Piston Slap!

arach:

That is a great question. I presume since it’s Toyota-based that an independent shop can work on them, but I falsely assumed the same about Ferrari. I live where indy shops have no problem with Porsche. There is a Maserati and Jaguar dealer nearby, while BMW, Porsche, and mainstream dealers are in reach. I was hoping for something that can be serviced at indy shops.

I called some indy shops before I bought it who “claim” they can work on them, but does Lotus lock down buyers to the dealer network?

Sajeev:

I bet Lotus locks ’em down hard: even John Deere does it.

arach:

So I made the post up at Lotustalk.com, I got nothing that gave me a ton of confidence, and it appears some Lotus dealerships may not be as wonderful as one might hope. I decided to dig into the Lotus computer systems. Hoping it was a Toyota based ECU, I did find out they are proprietary Lotus units.

I dig a little further, and it looks like the Lotus Techcentre Dignostic Computer runs about $4,000 with an annual $9XX dollar charge on top of that. This replaced the old cheap scan tool.
I fear this puts things right back to the Ferrari situation. While the Ferrari computer is way more expensive, there’s so little demand for the Lotus in any geographic area, and the idea of an indy shop ponying up $4k + 1k/year for a diagnostic tool is unlikely. This unfortunately makes me think your initial thought was correct, that the Evora is probably just as bad as the Ferrari.

Thanks for guiding me in the right direction, even if I didn’t find the result I wanted!

Any other ideas, or does this lead towards the mundane choices — a run-of-the-mill 911 or a Corvette? Any other ideas of cars worth looking into? Nobles emerge occasionally!

Sajeev:

Noble? NOBLE?

Son, how many times does it take you touching the waffle iron before you learn it burns?

Go buy a Vette, a 911, a GT350 Mustang (with all the track-focused options) or maybe wait for the new Supra. Because you don’t have the geographic luxury of buying bespoke, premium sports cars!

[Image: Lotus]

Send your queries to [email protected]m. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice.
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89 Comments on “Piston Slap: The Geographic Luxury of Bespoke Motorcar Ownership?...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “Go buy a Vette, a 911, a GT350 Mustang”

    I agree, you’ll have just as much fun with any of those and servicing and repair will make them feel like an absolute bargain compared to the Ferrari. In fact with less worry you’ll probably enjoy one of those other cars more.

    Now, if you’re a badge snob you might still have a problem

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      I used to have a z06. I put it into the wall at a race track. one week and $1100 later, I was back at it. your not joking about the bargain piece. That’s oil change territory!

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    #firstworldproblems… ;-)

    The area I live in has Toyota, Chevrolet, GMC, Buick, Nissan, Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, RAM, Ford, and Lincoln in the immediate area. Everything else is roughly 130 miles one way to reach dealers of other brands.

    I really don’t care where I BUY a car, but if it is new it sure would be nice to have a local franchise for the warranty period.

    • 0 avatar
      CaptainObvious

      Yes – this exactly
      FIRST
      WORLD
      PROBLEMS

      I don’t feel bad for anyone who buys a Ferrari and then complains about the cost of ownership or finding a repair shop.

      NEXT!

      • 0 avatar
        arach

        I don’t think it is about looking for sympathy… I think its about looking for a car that balances practicality and enjoyment…

      • 0 avatar
        2manycars

        “FIRST WORLD PROBLEMS” are the only ones that matter. Sorry, the third world doesn’t count for anything.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        “I don’t feel bad for anyone who buys a Ferrari and then complains about the cost of ownership or finding a repair shop.”

        Oh, that’s not fair to begrudge a guy his passion or hobby. It’s really just a matter of priorities, some guys want to spend their hard earned money on Ferraris and some guys prefer to spend their money on other things… like a house, kids education, food

        • 0 avatar
          CaptainObvious

          Have your hobby – but don’t complain about how much it costs – you bought a Ferrari – what did you expect?

          ” Its so FREAKING EXPENSIVE. A new clutch costs me almost six grand, it costs me $600 just to get it to the shop for a $400 oil change, etc.”

          Sounds like buyer’s remorse to me.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Yeah, I kind of think this guy wants out. Ferrari owners will rarely think of buying an alternative, but this guy sounds a bit in over his head to be looking at “cheaper” sports cars

        • 0 avatar
          SSJeep

          I dont think anyone is begrudging him his hobby. But it seems to me he wasnt ready for the maintenance costs of the Ferrari 360 Spyder. There are plenty of forums out there that detail Ferrari maintenance costs, and it isnt that hard to figure them out prior to jumping in.

          In this case, he needs to budget $5.00 to $7.00 PER MILE DRIVEN for maintenance costs. Other exotics are even higher. If that is unaffordable, a Ferrari wasnt a good choice.

          • 0 avatar
            notwhoithink

            “In this case, he needs to budget $5.00 to $7.00 PER MILE DRIVEN for maintenance costs. Other exotics are even higher. If that is unaffordable, a Ferrari wasnt a good choice.”

            Or better yet, wrench on it himself. If he’s spending $600 + $400 transportation for an oil change, he can buy all the tools and supplies needed to do an oil change himself for probably 50%-75% of that price (including floor jack and stands). There are plenty of resources on the Internet about people servicing their own Ferraris. The clutch is certainly more expensive, but there’s enough info out there on these older Ferraris that it shouldn’t be difficult at all to find good sources on parts and instructions on how to service them. It’s still not as cheap as DIY on a Corvette, but if he can do the most common maintenance tasks himself for $200 in parts and supplies then it becomes a much more affordable prospect. And unless he’s racking up the miles on a museum-quality piece, nobody is going to care about him keeping his own records/receipts for the work that he did versus having copies of receipts from the authorized Ferrari dealer.

          • 0 avatar
            e30gator

            @notwhoithink

            If I were ever in the market for an older Ferrari, I personally wouldn’t have a problem with the previous owner doing the wrenching themselves, BUT from what I understand about Ferraris is that not having a dealer or authorized shop doing the work and keeping the records GREATLY impacts the value of these cars.

          • 0 avatar
            arach

            I think its a very legitimate question – since I asked it. I called shops before I bought it to see if they could work on it. They claimed they could, and then I drop the car off to them and they can’t even do an oil change on it. (The first shop I took it to managed to butcher the oil change so bad that I pad to pay thousands to have the oil cleaned out of all the orifices). I was NOT prepared for that, and I will admit it!

            I have no regrets buying the car, and it was worth every penny I put into it. It did everything I wanted it to- realized my dream and I enjoyed it despite the cost. It has cost me $18.33 per mile driven (for a comparison to the 5-7 mentioned). Truth be told, I budgeted $7k per year based on ferrarichat.com, and it has been closer to $14k/year. I have no problem technically affording it, but the value is tough once the newness wears off. It makes you think twice when you just want to go for a drive. $64 to spin around the block? hmm… maybe I don’t want to spin it around the block. $260 to drive it to work? I guess I’ll take the DD. I knew these when I bought it, but I just want to get out there and drive!

            But now that the dream is achieved, I miss going to car shows. My last service took 6 months just due to transport time and waiting in the shop. I want to drive. I realized the dream, which is worth something. Bucket list item CHECKED… and I’m now asking “Whats next”. I’m glad I bought the Ferrari, but I didn’t realize how much I’d miss having a car I could well… enjoy! So thats why I was wondering if an evora 400 was going to be another Ferrari experience, or something I could get back to nejoying again.

            Last time I had it sent in for routine service it was gone for 6 months, including most of summer. Cost is one thing, but not having a car to enjoy or take to car shows is even more frustrating. I was registered for multiple car shows that I instead had to skip, showing up in a beater car and saying “darn I wish I had my car”. I think to enjoy Ferrari’s you need a FLEET of them… and honestly I look forward to a day where that might be possible.

            It is first world problems. Not looking for sympathy, not trying to gripe, just really looking for help figuring out what next car to purchase and enjoy. Had a wonderful email chain with Sajeev that really helped me think through it, and I’m grateful for it! Still haven’t quite decided, but it looks like no Evora or Noble for me :)

          • 0 avatar
            notwhoithink

            @e30gator

            It really depends on the car and who the buyer is. If you have a classic or collector car (say one of the limited editions like F40 or maybe a Testarossa) then it can be important for sure. For one of the more common models (like the 360, F430, 458, etc) it has much less of an impact UNLESS your car is already museum quality. I mean, if we’re talking about a 15-18 year old 360 with 8000 miles on it then it definitely makes a difference to have all of the documentation that it was serviced appropriately by a certified Ferrari dealer. If we’re talking about a 15-18 year old 360 with 60,000 miles on it (i.e., something that the owner drove and enjoyed) then it won’t make much difference at all. As long as he keeps the receipts to show that he did the service himself (i.e., receipts for the oil, filters, gaskets, etc showing that they were the appropriate Ferrari parts), then it’s like I said:

            “unless he’s racking up the miles on a museum-quality piece, nobody is going to care about him keeping his own records/receipts for the work that he did versus having copies of receipts from the authorized Ferrari dealer.”

      • 0 avatar

        choosing beggars in TTAC ?

  • avatar
    jkk6

    Rag a 911.1 base model like a Honda, staying in the 4k-7k rev range, and keep a permanent smile that will never leave your face. I feel this way every time my friend picks me up or lets me drive his car.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Vipers and C6 Z06 (do replace the valve guides though, ~$2500) exist and we’re talking about Nobles and $1000 oil change trips.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Well he is ‘living the dream’. And owning a Noble would be a ‘wish come true’. However, as they say, be careful what you wish for.

    Even Clarkson admits that the Corvette provides performance comparable to or better than many of these exotics. And you can get it serviced at, with parts from your local Chev dealer. So the ‘logical’ decision is rather obvious, isn’t it?

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Or just service the Vette’ yourself, which is the beauty of the Vette’. An LS motor is just not that complicated and most everything can be done with a regular scan tool and a 10MM wrench; speaking from experience. It is the most unexoctic super car made.

      • 0 avatar
        notwhoithink

        ” Or just service the Vette’ yourself, which is the beauty of the Vette’. ”

        Or just service the Ferrari yourself. For most things it’s not any more complicated than a Corvette, and being a model that is nearly 20 years old there’s a plethora of resources on the Internet that can show you how to handle the routine service (as well as common issues). Start at Ferrarichat, look up Aldous Voice, and even Dan Hurlburt (Normalguysupercar on Youtube) have lots of content on this stuff. The $1000 he spends on his next oil change is more than enough to get all of the necessary tools to do the most common work.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “I was thinking about selling it and buying something else, like a Lotus Evora 400 or a Porsche 911, but the latter seems too common.”

    I know! So many proles driving 911s these days. /s

    I say check into an Elise, perhaps the Toyota motor to Lotus chassis situation was a bit more favorable?

  • avatar
    jack4x

    There is both good and bad with owning an exotic car from a mainstream brand.

    Yes, my Viper is relatively inexpensive and easy to service (oil change ~$150 including the 11 quarts of synthetic, brake pads for under $100, etc). It is very convenient to be able to call a Dodge dealer down the road and have a part there next day. Things like Uconnect being shared across the entire company make them more robust and easier to update and use.

    BUT

    At least for me, it is a nerve wracking proposition to have my car handled by the same people who are slinging around 07 Caravans at 30 mph through the service bay. My wife has been harassed by 19 year old oil change flunkies when bringing the car in. The service managers are somewhat better, but their typical day is spent arguing with someone over a $20 shop fee vs thoroughly discussing a potentially serious repair with the owner of a $100k car.

    I don’t regret my purchase, since I do a lot of work myself, and have a good independent mechanic in the family that I trust with the other things. However, that might be different if I needed to rely on the dealer for more than just warranty work. My advice would be to browse a model specific forum for the vehicles you’re interested in. There is usually a section for good and bad dealers.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      My wife has been harassed by 19 year old oil change flunkies when bringing the car in.

      That’s the benefit of my career – 90% of the local oil change flunkies had me as their 7th grade NM History teacher. :-P

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Yikes, I hope you were nice and all your former students like you or they might take it out on your car

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Here’s what usually happens:

          Kid walks up to me voluntarily, I start racking my brain because being in education in a small county for the past 16 years or so, having worked from the elementary to the 8th grade level – everyone under the age of 35 looks vaguely familiar.

          Generally they want to shake my hand and see if I remember them. It is almost always followed by a statement like: “All that stuff you tried to teach us about life turned out to be true. Sadly I still had to learn the hard way.”

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Lol, didn’t we all?

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            @PrincipleDan…Very cool, and kudos to the kid for admitting it.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            I had one of those moments with my own son recently.

            We have an F150 4×4 that is kept as his house for me to use when I’m working on that or other properties I own in the area and because he lives at the bottom of a steep hill in an area where it will snow when it snows no where else.

            I put a tool box on it and put the necessary Zombie escape/Snowpocalypse items in. Tire chains, tow strap, 12v compressor, jumper cables, tie downs. I then told him never ever go home with less than 1/4 tank, do not ever find out when the low fuel light comes on.

            Well his roommate got a new bed and they took the tool box out to haul it. It then sat in the garage for a number of months.

            Well a few weeks ago he ran out of gas and found himself sitting in the middle of the road. They tired to tow it out of the road with the light duty tie downs and broke them and he made lots of people unhappy that were afraid to show it.

            At least he was man enough to tell me yeah dad you were right I can’t let the truck get that low on fuel.

            I can say that a number of my students do appreciate the life lessons that I try to give them, that is outside of our subject matter, but only time will tell if they sunk in or not.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      I think thats one place where a corvette may be a little cleaner than the Viper. How many vipers do you really think the dealer works on, compared to how many corvettes a chevy dealer works on?

      Its probably similar to a Ford GT getting serviced at a Ford Dealer though… Dropping jaws pulling into the same place that sold it!

      Glad you get to enjoy the Viper though. Wonderful car.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        Good point, Chevy sells as many Vettes every year as Dodge sold all Vipers from 1992-2017.

        But if this guy thinks a 911 is too common, a Corvette may not be what he’s looking for.

        I can’t imagine bringing a Ford GT to a Ford dealer for service. I think if I had that kind of money I’d just bite the bullet and forget the warranty entirely.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    If an ‘exotic’ is what you want, but need to be able to service it locally I humbly recommend a Morgan Aero 8. They are BMW powered, so you can get your service thrills at any BMW dealership.

    They are unique, gorgeous, fast and fun. You can be guaranteed that no one at C&C will have one.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Get a Panoz. Problem solved!

  • avatar
    random1

    I’m wondering where in the US you are both a) really far from a Ferrari dealer and b) 911s are really common.

    • 0 avatar
      Flipper35

      I am in small town USA in the upper midwest. There isn’t a Ferrari dealer close to me either but Porsche products are, while not exactly common, seen every few days driving around. In the small town of 1200 where I grew up I had a longhood 911 and my kindergarten teacher had a longhood 911.

      As to the topic up top, I can see the appeal of a Noble or Rossion, especially over a Ferrari, but I am one to build engines and do my own body work so they appeal to me. As would a GT40 replica or possibly a Factory 5 GTM. If you want it serviced those might be a better option than a factory car since they are pretty common powertrain components.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      Cincinnati, OH

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Here’s a real suggestion.

    If you like having all the modern technologies etc – follow the other posters advice about getting something like a Corvette.

    If you like having something special different out-of-the-ordinary to drive, get something engaging but not quite exotic to drive daily. That could be anything from a Civic Type R to a Hellcat. Then go buy a classic muscle car that any competent indy mechanic can work on for a fairly cheap price.

    • 0 avatar

      I know where there’s a ’73 Barracuda with a 2007 Hemi 5.7 and full Gerst coilover suspension and Wilwood disc brake conversion for sale. Best of all worlds.

    • 0 avatar
      someoldfool

      The midwest doesn’t see many Corvettes any more. Back when it was in danger of becoming a “secretary’s car” they seemed to be everywhere. Not so much now. I did some car shopping a while ago and considered the Corvette. Its impracticality was too much. I don’t mind the lack of space inside, it’s the cold weather stuff. It has huge summer only tires. So I’d have to get all season or snow tires for 5 months out of the year. And even then the Chevy sales guy said Corvettes are terrible performers in cold weather when the roads aren’t clean and dry. Terrible. Oh well….

      No one here has mentioned the NSX. I know there’s a lot of irrational Honda hate and Acura sneering that goes on here. But really, you want an exotic that’s reliable? Can get at least some service done locally for less that $500 an hour? Get an NSX. I did not because the seats don’t fit my bony behind.

      • 0 avatar
        arach

        Funny thing about the NSX is that they have NSX-only car shows close by all the time, and one of the top national NSX-only repair shops is not far away.

        I think the hardest thing about NSXes is that I looked at them 15 years ago when they were like $17k… and today they are like 50… haha. But easy to work on… good local shop… not a crazy idea.

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          The early JDM NSXes are old enough to import now, if you want some “rare car” cachet that you can drive every day.

        • 0 avatar
          Manic

          You need something very sporty from a brand that has dealership nearby…. MB AMG GT, BMW M6, Jaguar F-Type SVR or R Coupe, some more unique flavor of 911, Maserati Granturismo, Aston Martin, Bentley Continental Supersports or GTC.
          Some of these brands have to have dealer there.

          • 0 avatar
            Johnster

            This more along the line of thought I was going to suggest. The Acura NSX has already been suggested. You might also consider the Audi A8, Lexus LC, Nissan GT-R or a Shelby Ford Mustang Cobra.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        Salesman lied to you, shocker I know. I drive me Vette’ year round in CO, weather permitting. Too dangerous in the snow. I bought mine with the intent of hammering the miles on it as a commuter car. Thus far, it has been a great decision; FWIW I bought an 05′ too, so I am DD’ing an almost 14 year old car…

  • avatar
    ThomasSchiffer

    I will never understand how someone buys a Ferrari and then complains about the maintenance costs. When you buy an expensive exotic vehicle you need to be prepared to pay for expensive servicing and parts.

    And I assume that these days Ferraris have become more service-friendly than before. It is my understanding that the Ferraris of the 1970s and 1990s for example required the entire engine-transmission to be removed in order for the mechanics to service them. That was not cheap.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “I will never understand how someone buys a Ferrari and then complains about the maintenance costs. When you buy an expensive exotic vehicle you need to be prepared to pay for expensive servicing and parts.”

      a lot of people go in not understanding that. being able to afford to *buy* an exotic is not the same thing as being able to afford to *own* one.

      which is why I get a bit of schadenfreude over those Bitcoin/cryptocurrency dorks who bragged about “buying a Lambo;” reality will hit them in the face really quickly.

      • 0 avatar
        ThomasSchiffer

        That is a good point. And it sadly seems to be quite common among the car buying public.

        • 0 avatar
          arach

          One more thought… Being able to OWN one is different than being able to DRIVE one.

          I had a corvette z06 that I ran into a wall at a race track. I loved that car because I could afford to WRECK IT. If I could afford to wreck it, then I could have a blast driving it as fast as I could on a race car track.

          Being able to afford to DRIVE a car to its full potential is even different from being able to OWN a car!

  • avatar
    WallMeerkat

    At one point Lotus was owned by Proton and apparently uses some Ford parts for switchgear.

  • avatar
    Kita Ikki

    Now who is lamer? The guy who happily enjoys his Toyota or Honda, or the guy who buys a Ferrari and whines that it’s “freaking expensive?”

  • avatar
    01 Deville

    I am assuming badge is important so a viper or classic muscle car won’t do.

    I would say look into Mercedes AMG GT or Audi R8.
    Less common than a 911 but still can be serviced reasonably.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I liked one of Alex Dykes’ recent reviews where he was talking about Genesis and said: “What’s a badge worth to you? If the answer is $5,000 to $10,000 – buy a BMW or MB or Audi. If the answer is Not Much – look at Genesis.

      It must be the way I was raised but the brand is never worth to me what it seems to be worth to other people.

      • 0 avatar
        01 Deville

        I would say badge/brand is a huge factor for a plurality of US buyers, such as Ford vs. Chevy truck buyers. In this case brand doesn’t necessarily equate with money but personal preference which is also true for my point as a Mercedes AMG costs about as much as a Viper.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      R8s have the lambo drive train, and my understanding is even Audi dealers can’t work on them. I do have a friend with an R8 and he has to ship it away even though there are audi dealers close by. He says the audi dealer will ship it, but they charge more than it costs him to send it up himself… so I don’t know if thats a lot better.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Get a Honda.

    Or a Toyota.

    Sajeev can help you decide which is better.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    If you must have a Ferrari – go Magnum PI and get a 308 or 328 Ferrari which are much more DIY or Indy mechanic friendly. If you want something “unique” and easy to work on and cheap to repair, get a well-sorted and built Cobra, Lotus 7, or Porsche 550 replica, or a C1 to C3 Corvette restomoded to C4 to C6 technology. If Porsche 911s are too common, how about something from from the other Germans: BMW z3M, z4M, M3, i8; MB AMG SL or SLK; Audi R8, TTRS – which should all be serviceable at the BMW, MB, or Audi dealer or a good Indy mechanic at rates that will seem like a bargain compared to a Ferrari.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      My neighbor just got his X5 M back form the dealer; $17k in warranty work..no B.S on a 56k mile SUV. I read through the 7 page R.O. I would highly recommend one as a CPO, but no so much after that.

      • 0 avatar
        stingray65

        $17K in 56K miles – I’m not sure any Ferrari has ever been driven 56K miles, but if they did I expect just “normal maintenance” would double that $17K.

  • avatar
    Eliyahu

    Load up your F-150 4 X 4 and enjoy. Put a sticker that says powered by Ferrari, and see if anyone notices. Use the savings to rent the exotics on vacation.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I vote R8,because gated shifter

    • 0 avatar
      ccd3

      That would be the 1st gen R8, the current gen R8 does not offer a manual. A used R8 with a manual would be relatively easy to get serviced and probably not depreciate much

  • avatar
    SilverCoupe

    If there is an Audi dealer near you, an R8 might be a possibility.
    Still not going to be inexpensive, of course.

  • avatar
    ccd3

    I’ve heard that AMG service costs are HIGH

  • avatar
    ccd3

    I’m surprised that nobody mentioned the NSX. Even the current gen NSX would be relatively easy to get serviced and probably cheaper than most cars of its type to get serviced.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Cayman S.

  • avatar
    cgjeep

    Can’t believe no one suggested this. Lexus LFA. Instead of getting an “English Toyota” get an actual Toyota. Should be great to drive and I imagine it would get respect at car shows and the like. Should hold value well too. Other suggestion is Audi A8 but someone already mentioned it.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      *Liked the idea*

      *Looked up the going prices on these things*

      *Nolonger liked the idea*

      https://www.cargurus.com/Cars/l-Used-Lexus-LFA-d2082

      They were $375 new. Dealers couldn’t sell them, so they were discounting the heck out of them.

      Today the CHEAPEST one on the market is $420k, and the second cheapest is $510. INSANE.

  • avatar
    cgjeep

    Sorry or another suggestion would be a more “classic Ferrari” that would be simpler to repair by more shops, no special computers needed. Won’t be cheaper to drive I imagine but should have no loss in value.

  • avatar
    CobraJet

    Help me understand. Why does an oil change cost $400 for any vehicle? Can’t a person do it themselves. Sounds like for that price there must be lots of add-ons, like air filters, brake fluid flushes, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      They need to enter the record into the dealer database, or else the resell value will greatly depreciate.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      10 qts of imported oil, two filters, brass rings, secondary seal kit, and a filter run you about $180 in parts.

      Low ground clearance, a TON of bolts, a really challenging procedure with ample cursing, and $220 is insurance so you don’t f-up a $50,000 engine ;)

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OujWNMpdvHQ Here’s a video. The process is about the same

      Then you have to deal with future buyers not belieging that you actually did it and insisting on $10k off the car price ;)

    • 0 avatar
      01 Deville

      My dentist uncle went for an oil change in Chicago area for his range rover bought new and still under warranty. Came back home after paying $4k in service costs including brakes. Nothing surprises me anymore

  • avatar

    You could always move to Miami or West Palm Beach. Here there are ample supplies of the most unusual and exotic vehicles and you would never have any trouble getting your car serviced. Maybe get a vacation home here for you and your car?

    Of course the real estate prices might be a problem :(.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      As someone who works in Boca this man speaks the truth.

      Now I recently got a C7 ‘Vette after my brother recommended a Porsche (he has a Boxster GTS). ‘Vette service is reasonable, Porsche service… not so much. Aside from the obvious cost difference the mid-engine configuration means you have to drop the engine to do pretty much anything. Also just random over engineer stuff, for example: to change brake pads you have to pull the calipers off! Why? On the ‘Vette its the same as my old Nissan – two pins and they slide right out. It takes longer to jack the car and remove the wheel. So I plan on doing as much of the maintenance items myself (fluid changes, etc). There are some “special” parts like the mag-ride suspension that require the dealer’s computer to sort out, but its a front mounted American V8 so everything else is shade-tree mechanic stuff (in theory, time will tell). The other electronics are GM parts bin, IE: the radio/navigation is the same thing you get in a Silverado.

      • 0 avatar
        NTI 987

        If your brother is paying to have the calipers removed to replace brake pads, he needs to have his head examined. Every modern Porsche I’ve ever worked on has the same two pins you are talking about.

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    You should talk to your accountants and bankers, not to us mortals on a car site.

    If you can afford a Ferrari and is thinking about a Noble, but a vette or 911 are too common for you, then you don’t have a car problem but a money problem.

    Now if you have money but want to spend it wisely, you need to talk to your bankers and accountants.

    Who knows, maybe you can start a company or roll that car into your existing company’s asset and pay $200 to rent it every time you drive it, like the executives who “rent” their employers’ private jets and pay for a first class ticket to make it “square”.

    This is not even a 1st world problem, it is a 0.01%er problem.

  • avatar
    DianaWilson

    That’s really a great idea.

  • avatar
    ryanwm80

    If I was in this situation I think I would be looking at either a Dodge Viper or an NRG DeLorean. Motor Trend did a Head2Head video with the latest Corvette against the latest Viper at Laguna Seca, and I expected the Corvette would be the winner and the auto journalists would deride the Viper as being crude and unrefined – neither of those happened. I like how when the engine approaches red line the gauge cluster fades away and is replaced with image of a snake. As far as maintenance costs go – ask the man who owns one. Doug Demuro bought a used Dodge Viper GTS and made a video about his ownership experience and the costs of repairs. Another affordable exotic alternative is an electric DeLorean, and I know NRG made an electric version that costs about $100,000 – I saw it at the SEMA show in 2011. Peak torque occurs at 0 rpm, regenerative braking, and the current DeLorean company (in Texas?) makes new chassis that are stronger and lighter than the originals.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    What you really need is a track-day car like a Radical and a Lexus LX tow vehicle. There, i fixed it.

  • avatar
    manu06

    Just get a 2019 Mazda MX5. Not an exotic but you need some bang for your buck.

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