By on July 16, 2018

All-New 2018 Ford F-150 - Image: Ford

Future archeologists will recognize this period in man’s history by the thick layer of Ford F-150s covering the entire planet, pointing to an era where one vehicle could seemingly do no wrong.

As the world’s best-selling vehicle line for what seems like forever, the F-Series’ sales performance over the first half of 2018 points to an impending record for the hard-working and increasingly plush lineup. Ford can be expected to push for it.

According to Automotive News, 52 percent of the brand’s truck sales typically occur in the second half of the year, which makes the first half’s 451,138 F-Series an encouraging marker. In 2004, Ford hit a high water mark: 939,511 F-Series vehicles. This year’s first-half tally is 4.2 percent higher than the first half of 2004.

F-Series sales cratered in 2009, when the automaker sold just 413,625 of the trucks in the United States. Presumably, would-be buyers were too busy fighting over a crust of bread. As the economy picked up again, sales began a steady climb, reaching 896,764 units in 2017.

Ford F-150

This year, Ford unloaded an F-Series every 35 seconds. As passenger car sales sink fast, the four-door pickup has supplemented its traditional worksite/farm role with that of a comfy family hauler, and it’s all money in the bank for a smiling Ford. In June, F-Series sales rose 1.7 percent, with volume over the first six months of 2018 rising 4.9 percent compared to the same period last year. This, despite pump prices well above last year’s average.

Being the first name in trucks works to Ford’s advantage, enough to prompt the automaker to announce the abandonment of most of its cars lines. Since the beginning of the year, Ford’s truck sales rose 4.2 percent against a car loss of 13.9 percent.

Still, Ford knows resting on its laurels isn’t an option. Both Ram and General Motors have new full-size pickups headed to market, with the 2019 Ram 1500 already on sale in V8 guise. GM plans to make a larger play with its redesigned Silverado and Sierra 1500s. With a four-cylinder base engine and available inline-six diesel on offer (MPG figures aren’t yet available), the General wants to make the decision to buy an F-150 harder than ever.

[Images: Ford Motor Company]

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123 Comments on “Shocked? Ford’s F-Series on Track for a Record Year...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Am I surprised? No, the F-150 has been the best selling truck for a long time, nothing in the world has changed that much to have a negative effect on Ford truck sales. As long as Ford keeps making good trucks, people will probably continue to buy them

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      And even when they don’t build good trucks, people will buy them. I was on that team during the dark years and I was shocked and amazed at how much abuse loyalists could take.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    The economy is rolling and companies are buying fleet vehicles, not much of a mystery here.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    We were talking about this on another site one of the reasons Ford sells so many trucks is the available options and configurations you can order on a truck compared to a car. In 1972 Ford offered 40 different passenger cars, 2-doors, 4-doors, coupes, convertibles, wagons and on and on. What do they offer today in the way of cars?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Well, what is the market demanding? Because it isn’t cars. The cars they do offer don’t sell well enough to justify themselves, I don’t see how offering more configurations would help. I don’t think a Focus convertible would turn the model’s sales around, nor would a Fusion coupe. We, as enthusiasts, would like to see such, but the market as a whole would just ignore them and continue buying Escapes and Explorers.

      The market has simply moved beyond the “car” as we have known it. Go to a parking lot at a shopping center, chances are you’ll see more utilities than sedans from most auto brands. The only major market for sedans anymore come from rental companies, and there isn’t much profit in those sales.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        That was my point Ford has evolved from offering 40 different cars and maybe a dozen trucks in 1972 to the complete reverse in 2018, because that’s what the buying public is demanding, so although we all found it shocking that Ford has decided to drop most (what’s left) of their passenger cars from a historical perspective it seems almost a natural metamorphose

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Ahh, I see. I was under the impression that you were implying that if they increased the variations of their cars, it would reverse the trend. I understand what you meant, now.

    • 0 avatar
      Sub-600

      “What do they offer today in the way of cars?” What has Ford offered in the way of cars in the past couple of decades? In a way the SUV/CUV craze has saved Ford from further embarrassment. I respect Ford for getting out of the car game. It’s kinda like the scene in ‘Magnum Force’ when Inspector Callahan tells Lieutenant Briggs “A good man always knows his limitations”.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Yes, they just need to build a full line of cars as awesome as Dodge does. Stupid Ford could never match their success in the best selling midsize, compact and subcompact car segments.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      One could argue that people still want roomy and large BOF sedans. Ford added 2 doors to the F150 way back when and as they say, the rest is history.

      • 0 avatar
        CKNSLS Sierra SLT

        LOU_BC

        The Panther is dead-move along……….

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @CKNSLS Sierra SLT – It isn’t my theory but one that often surfaces as the rationale for pickup sales. People like large roomy vehicles. At least 1/2 of pickup sales are “personal use”.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Also, compare the back seat of an F-150 SuperCrew to a Crown Vic. You’ve got room for days in the truck (even if the seatback is a bit upright), the Panther is cramped and uncomfortable.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        “One could argue that people still want roomy and large BOF sedans. Ford added 2 doors to the F150 way back when and as they say, the rest is history.”

        ^^This^^ What did a panther offer that you can’t get in a V8, F-150, crew cab, a trunk lid?

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “What did a panther offer that you can’t get in a V8, F-150, crew cab, a trunk lid?”

          Something that fits inside my garage.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Ranger… For you guys with dinky garages ;-)

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Only problem I have with the little trucks is the little engines.

            I need a Dakota R/T revival.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “Something that fits inside my garage.”

            — … something that got better relative fuel mileage, something that didn’t ride like a truck…. And quite bluntly, something that was easier to maneuver than a big truck.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Did you ever own a panther? They were only marginally better at some of those things and again if you want something that’s only marginally better at some of those things, Ranger

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Lie-2-me: Maybe. As soon as they come out. Right now it’s the most tempting of the current trucks despite the fact that it isn’t out yet. The new Frontier is worth considering too.

            The problem is, they’re both going to be nearly as big as the full-sized trucks, which is why Ford abandoned them in the first place. Rather than keeping them small, where their customer base wanted them, the OEMs kept making them bigger… and bigger… to the point that they’re almost as long, almost as wide AND almost as tall as the full-sized trucks of 30 years ago! They need to be shorter, lower and narrower, like their predecessors. If RAM, the only current holdout to the current mid-sized efforts, were to release a true compact instead; I’d be you’d see those so-called “micro-trucks” fly off the lots and into people’s driveways. I, myself, have waited for more than six years to see a true SMALL truck hit the markets and the outcry for the Hyundai Santa Cruz is still high, with Facebook pages and fan sites all over the internet in the hopes that the truck, as originally shown, would appear on showroom floors.

            The people who want small trucks DON’T want a full-size-wannabe; they want a true compact truck that can meet the light hauling needs of a homeowner, not the heavy towing and hauling needs of a farmer, contractor or massive RVer. They want something that can be an economical Daily Driver, seating two or three normally and maybe one or two additional on an occasional basis… as the old compacts did.

            You would be surprised at how many people want a truly SMALL truck!

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “Only problem I have with the little trucks is the little engines.”

            — When a tiny 2.7L turbo four is going into a Silverado? Dude, you’re out of touch with what these new little engines can do. Sure, my 97 Ranger with the 2.3 is weak as a kitten… in 90°+ temperatures, even without the AC compressor running… but the 2.5 in my wife’s Renegade at the same empty weight launches like a racecar by comparison AND gets better fuel mileage… The new engines are far better than those little engines in the old compacts.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            It will fit in a standard garage

          • 0 avatar
            cdotson

            “You would be surprised at how many people want a truly SMALL truck”

            If it’s more than just you and a handful of old cranks I would indeed be surprised.

            Automakers could make more money with a lower development budget by improving maneuverability and ease of parking on their largest trucks to enable them to sell more of those. It’s only a matter of time until the family/daily-driver pickups are pushed into the non-CAFE heavy duty sector. We’re perilously close to that point today and barring a CAFE rollback or rewrite it could happen as soon as political winds change.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “The new engines are far better than those little engines in the old compacts.”

            Unless it is eligible to wear classic car tags or available used under $6K I’m not interested in buying anything that can’t do 0-60 in under 6 seconds.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Lie-2-me: The Panther did fit into a standard garage; something a full-sized, crew-cab, pickup can only barely do, if at all. You forget how tall these trucks are today, where it’s easy to scrape the roof on the open garage door (if it can even fit lengthwise) and how wide (with only about 2″ of clearance on either side.) Moreover, the Panther had a huge trunk, capable of carrying more than you would expect, though admittedly not lumberyard material.

            A Panther could achieve 18-20mpg LOADED on the highway, where a pickup of the same age would be lucky to achieve that empty (I had a 5.0 EFI F-150 that by running no faster than 65mph would achieve 19.5mpg on the expressway/Interstate highways. Empty.) The average fuel mileage of an F-150 was about 9-11mpg while the average combined fuel mileage of a Panther was 13-15mpg. Build a Panther today even with its weight and put a modern turbo four into it and you’d see 30mpg or even better, depending on how it’s driven. Aerodynamics alone can and will make a huge difference between how much fuel a sedan uses compared to an “equivalent” (meaning full-sized) pickup truck, even today.

            A 10% difference back when fuel mileages were in the low -teens, meant less than 2mpg. A 10% difference today can mean as much as 4mpg. Marginal? And I’ve routinely been able to exceed EPA fuel economy ratings by 20% and more with one very simple $50 mod (NOT an electronic change) and conservative driving habits. I have photographic proof that an old Caravan-engined JKU Wrangler can achieve 25mpg on the interstate over a 700-mile trip when the Wrangler at the time was rated at 19mpg on the highway. That’s a 25% improvement over EPA!

            Knowing how to drive safely is a big part of it. You don’t have to drive like an idiot to get from one city to the next; it’s been proven over and over and over again that driving like an idiot only gains you about 5 to 10 minutes over a 100-mile trip while the same trip made at the speed limit not only saves fuel but also leaves you less stressed as you watch all those other idiots fly past you. So what if, over a 700-mile trip, you get there an hour later; you’re also not as tired and you’ve taken far fewer risks which could have garnered stops for traffic tickets or caused a crash.

            Personally, I do believe a federally-mandated speed limit should be enforced again. Not at 55mph necessarily, but maybe at 65. But those speed limits would need to be enforced better than they are today, too. Just too many idiots taking too many chances any more. And many of those idiots drive full-sized pickup trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Vulpine, you are reading WAY too much into an off-the-cuff remark about F-150s being today’s version of the traditional body-on-frame, RWD, V8 sedan and it is. If you want such a traditional sedan you’ll have to buy a pick-up and people use pick-ups the same way they used to use full size sedans. The world is not going back to the panther, ever, but if that’s the type of vehicle you want, Ford’s got you covered

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @cdotson: “If it’s more than just you and a handful of old cranks I would indeed be surprised.”
            — Prepare to be surprised… IF anyone releases a truly compact pickup in the next few years (I’ve become jaded because Hyundai actually had a chance to steal the march on them and has wasted their time.)

            “Automakers could make more money with a lower development budget by improving maneuverability and ease of parking on their largest trucks to enable them to sell more of those. It’s only a matter of time until the family/daily-driver pickups are pushed into the non-CAFE heavy duty sector. We’re perilously close to that point today and barring a CAFE rollback or rewrite it could happen as soon as political winds change.”

            — There’s only so much you can do to improve maneuverability when you have such a long wheelbase. Because of its short wheelbase, I can do a u-turn in my old Ranger on a two-lane highway (with wide shoulders) without even having to perform what they call a two-point turn… a single turn of the wheel and I don’t even touch dirt. (Shoulders average around 8′ wide in Amish country.) A full-sized truck trying the same maneuver has to reverse at least once to achieve the same results. On a divided highway (with crossings), The old Ranger can perform a u-turn from a turn lane without even encroaching on the right-most lane of the oncoming side while a full-sized crew cab still needs that 8′ shoulder for a u-turn. The length of the truck alone is its biggest drawback. A modern crew-cab mid-sized truck is only marginally better.

            But you are right about one point: The size and capacities of new pickup trucks are going to force a change of policy. They’re to the point now that a 1-ton full-size is capable of performing work relegated to medium-duty trucks. There is literally no reason for a privately-owned pickup truck to tow a trailer weighing three times that of the truck itself. Even at twice the weight, where we see many fifth-wheel style campers, the trailer has the capability to drag the truck around catastrophically, despite all the programming and mechanicals and other systems designed to limit the threat. The average non-CDL driver doesn’t have the training nor the skills to moderate the issues or prevent a crash. Even CDLs will occasionally get overwhelmed, as noted by how an unexpected event like a wind gust or even an idiot driver passing the truck will cause a rollover crash. (Don’t tell me it doesn’t happen; I-95 is almost notorious for them in the northeast. Philadelphia area has seen two which required the replacement of bridges within the last several years due to the rollover being a fuel tanker and in one case we had frozen meats scattered across summer-hot pavement… the stink lasted for weeks!) Now imagine a non-CDL hauling their family around with a 15000# trailer behind them, much less a 29,000# working trailer of some sort, which is now common behind those 350/3500-badged pickups. Safety alone will force them to re-regulate trucks as the new ones are so much more capable than their predecessors. CAFE will have nothing to do with it.

            That said, CAFE may end up limiting private trucks to the current mid-sized range, literally making anything physically larger a medium-duty truck simply because of its size. Oh, the moaning and whinging we will hear when that happens as the government has taken their favorite toys away from them! BUT… it will now open the door for a truly smaller truck if that happens and I personally know a number of people who WANT those truly smaller trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @ajla: “Unless it is eligible to wear classic car tags or available used under $6K I’m not interested in buying anything that can’t do 0-60 in under 6 seconds.”

            — Then why are you even here, talking on a pickup truck forum? They aren’t built for sub-6-second times.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            They’re really the best of both. Long hood for no reason, the trunk was dead weight, except for the occasional dead hooker or something, and you still had to borrow a pickup your BIL all the damn time (not a good time). Yeah no 4wd either.

            That whole time, we were eagerly waiting for the dropping of crew cab 1/2 tons, 5.5 ft beds, we just didn’t know it.

            And they fit in the standard garage, by design.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @L2m: “Vulpine, you are reading WAY too much into an off-the-cuff remark about F-150s being today’s version of the traditional body-on-frame, RWD, V8 sedan and it is.”
            — No, sir, I am not. I’m making the simple point that the truck has replaced the big sedan ONLY because the big sedan is no longer available. The OEMs have made a mistake by going to these egg-shaped crossovers and dropping the truly desirable models and as a result they have pushed people into buying vehicles that are far more vehicle than they can effectively handle–albeit at huge profits for the OEMs.

            “If you want such a traditional sedan you’ll have to buy a pick-up and people use pick-ups the same way they used to use full size sedans. ”
            — That’s just it, L2m. I do NOT want a traditional sedan of ANY type, nor do I want a full-sized (or even near-full-sized) pickup truck. And I totally despise the modern CUV. They’re all a waste of metal as far as I’m concerned.

            “The world is not going back to the panther, ever, but if that’s the type of vehicle you want, Ford’s got you covered.
            — You don’t know that. I will wager that when electrification is complete, Panther-sized sedans and coupes will return. But as I said, that’s not the type of vehicle I want (outside of a very specific antique.) I’ve never liked sedans; I’ve always purchased coupes for myself and usually in the mid-size range when they were available. Put a ’72 Cutlass beside a Tesla Model S and you’d see they’re nearly the same length and the Model S is classed as a full-sized car today. I have never wanted nor needed a car with four full-sized doors, though the Saturn Ion idea of a 2-door car with half-doors to access the back would work fine for those few times such space is needed.

            The biggest car I’ve ever owned was a ’73 Gran Torino (sedan, but I didn’t buy it.) The biggest truck I have ever owned was a ’90 F-150 regular cab. I didn’t like either one though they met the need at the time I owned them. I don’t like BIG.

            But as far as Ford having me covered? Not really. Their reliability, at least while in my possession, has been crap. Brand new? Warranty issues. Used? Frequent and often expensive repairs. Even my current Ranger is costing me more than it should despite its ridiculously-low mileage (certifiable) as it is so grossly underpowered in hot weather and would throw its tail out to the sides on any kind of rough surface without my keeping four bags of sand in the bed back at the tailgate. I’ve not had any luck with a single Ford product I’ve ever owned–other than bad. My parents migrated away from Ford themselves after being dedicated Ford owners for their first 20 years of driving. After owning three GM cars they really liked, they traded for a Ford (which I ‘adopted’ years later) while they went back to GM. I’d driven GMs almost exclusively until I ‘adopted’ that Ford and after having to swap the engine less than a year after spending $750 on a timing chain replacement (in ’88), I went back to GM and stayed with them until they, too, started having frequent issues. I’ve gone to FCA and so far been happy with their reliability over either of the other US brands.

            Again, Ford doesn’t have me covered, though I acknowledge I may be forced to go Ford if no one else makes what I need. Ford will NOT like me as a customer.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Then why are you even here, talking on a pickup truck forum? They aren’t built for sub-6-second times.”

            If trucks are going to be lauded as “car replacements” then they are going to need to meet car standards.

            “And they fit in the standard garage, by design.”

            I don’t know what a “standard garage” size is or when it would have came into code, but my house was built in 1958 and the garage is only 225 inches long.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Vulpine, for God’s sake ease up on the coffee

            “— That’s just it, L2m. I do NOT want a traditional sedan of ANY type, nor do I want a full-sized (or even near-full-sized) pickup truck. And I totally despise the modern CUV. They’re all a waste of metal as far as I’m concerned.”

            Then do not, under any circumstances, buy one

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @ajla: “I don’t know what a “standard garage” size is or when it would have came into code, but my house was built in 1958 and the garage is only 225 inches long.”
            — And a full-sized pickup truck of the day would fit into that garage. My ’97 Ranger could fit inside that garage. Could ANY modern mid-sized or full-sized pickup fit in that garage?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @L2m: “Then do not, under any circumstances, buy one”
            — What’s left?

            That IS my point, by the way. Choice, REAL choice, has been taken away from us. Partially by Federal legislation and partially by corporate cost-cutting combined with maximizing profits.

            I know a woman who refuses to buy any Toyota Tacoma (or equivalent) built after Y2K. She says they’re too big. Over the last 20 years she’s purchased no fewer than three older versions as she wears them out even faster because they’re almost shot when she buys them and gets them fixed up.

            I myself have never and will never buy a sedan, though I did buy a 4-door SUV and a four-door SUW. My wife’s Renegade is more SUV than CUV, even if it isn’t BoF. Two of the three pickup trucks I’ve owned were significantly smaller than the fulll-sized trucks of their day. Not a mere 10% smaller like the modern mid-sized trucks but a full 25% smaller by volume and weight.

            So tell me. What am I supposed to buy if I need an open bed BUT need it small enough for true economy, reasonable performance (not sub-6-second but sub-10 second is good) and good inside and outside accessibility to the load?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The standard garage is 12X24 ft. Good round numbers, easy for architects/contractors/inspectors to remember. Not some 225.55″ BS.

            What you have is substandard. Or what’s called a “tool shed”. Its been this way since fullsize cars, tailfins, continental kits, etc.

            If you mean to say it’s a tight fit, especially with just a 8×7 ft door, I’m listening. Or if with all your other junk, bikes hanging on the walls, washer/dryer/freezer improvised, it’s even tighter, OK fine.

            Basically, fullsize pickups are for outside, even if they’ll totally fit inside the garage. Most everyone else is OK with this. Block heaters aren’t anything new.

  • avatar
    Carroll Prescott

    Sadly, during the 1960’s, it was entirely possible that car nameplates would sell in the volume of the F-150. Now that the infestation of the putrid CUV’s and SUV’s have taken hold, products selling at the volume of the F-Series may never happen again.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Negative Nancy strikes again.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Hey, I drive a Ford Putrid CUV 4WD and I like it!

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Wagon = Awesome
      Wagon with a couple extra inches of ground clearance and AWD = Putrid.

      Got it.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        @AV: it does indeed seem that ‘purists’, many of those posting on auto sites, and auto ‘journalists’ seem to hold that sentiment.

        I however agree with the majority of consumers. A vehicle is a ‘tool’ to fulfill a task. And the CUV is for a great many of us the 2nd most efficient
        form of that ‘tool’. The most efficient being a minivan, unfortunately there is now a dearth of actual ‘mini’, minivans on the North American market.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      Thank God. 50 years ago I would have been looking at a Nova or such…sensibly sized, relatively economical. Today’s choices in that ‘compact’ category, regardless if a sedan or CUV, are tremendously more comfortable, powerful, safer, more reliable, much more efficient, and longer lasting. I’d even add in there’s a great choice today in style. Sure overall the shapes all seem similar….as they did in 1968 and 1938, etc.

      These are the good old days….

  • avatar
    bkojote

    Not surprising. It’s the right product (a well engineered truck) with a solid reputation at the right time.

    The current administration is going to very quickly pump and dump the economy riding off of the past 8 years of economic growth. If you are running a business now is the time to buy while credit is available and before trade wars drive up the cost of these significantly in the next 2 years. The GM and RAM duos are going to get kneecapped.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      TDS

      • 0 avatar
        civicjohn

        thelaine,

        +1

      • 0 avatar

        Not sure that’s really TDS (I assume you mean the Trump Acronym). Many economists on the Right and left have been warning that the cuts during an already hot economy will likely mean trouble long term. Many also see an issue with Trade wars. Seems like simply a informed opinion that differs from yours.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          I have to agree with mopar4wd on this one. Overall,short term, tariffs will affect GDP nominally in a “hot” economy BUT those directly affected will be f^cked over rather soon.

          The head of Siemens stated that countries need to prepare for the next wave of “industrial revolution” due to A/I and other assorted electronic technologies. He stated that with each “industrial revolution” there has been at least a 30% loss in jobs that are eventually are adsorbed/created elsewhere.

          Tariffs on “off-shored” jobs aren’t going to save any jobs from Mr.Roboto.

          • 0 avatar

            There is always recession after growth. Boom always ends with bust and then next boom takes place and so on. It does not matter if DEMs or REPs or Martians are in power.

            I have no doubt that US and world economy are ripe the next recession. What happens if T is reelected? Will the world come to the end?

  • avatar
    googly

    As per my understanding in Canada Ford is selling the F-150 for less in C$ than in the USA in $US when all incentives are included. I see lots of F-150 crew cabs mostly XTR, in the Toronto area.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Steph, when you say “F-Series”, are you including the F-250 and F-350 Super Duty? Because when Ford uses that term, they are.

    • 0 avatar
      TwoBelugas

      that’s the way everyone does it, GM doesn’t separate out Silverado 1500 versus HDs(likewise for Sierras), Ram lumps 1500 and HDs, even Nissan count together Titan XD(the 3/4 ton sized&weighted 5/8 truck that no one buys) and the 1/2 ton Titan

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      The F-250 and F-350 account for ~32% of the total F-Series, while F-450, 550, 650, and 750 account for ~2% (yes, two percent).

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      They included it when they were actually different trucks so now that they are back to being more alike than different I am sure they do.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @dukeisduke – Ford= any F series with a pickup box. Chassis cab trucks F450 and up are counted separately. Ram does the same thing and so does GM.

  • avatar
    relton

    One of the overlooked reasons Ford sells so many trucks is that they have lots of dealers that sell only trucks. Plus, the remaining dealers seem to have more people properly trained in selling trucks. This is especially important for commercial and fleet sales.

    • 0 avatar
      cdotson

      Ford is the only one of the Big 3 pickup makers that has consistently had a full line of Class 2 through Class 7 trucks and they are all “F Series” trucks.

      GM hasn’t had a truck above Class 3 in 10+ years, although they’re getting back into Class 4/5. Ram went up to Class 4/5 for the first time within the past 10 years.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        “F-series” is just F-150 to F-450 “pickups”. Not counted are cab-n-chassis F-450s and up.

        There’s no official “F-550 pickup” and F-650s/750s are a different platform, and not much is “pickup” about them, except their cabs.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    So, I think I figured out the reason behind these login issues. I have had to “click” on this article an average of 5 times for each comment I have made, due to having to login over and over. More clicks = more revenue. I hate to be so cynical, but this sh¡t is ridiculous.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    JohnTaurus must have the all time record of comments on TTAC and literally lives on TTAC 24/7/365., morning, noon and midnight, even Friday and Saturday nights.

  • avatar
    don1967

    Ford builds a nice truck, but when it was time to replace my 2008 F150 I ended up with a 2018 Silverado.

    It’s not clear to me why Ford would offer a sweet V8 for Luddites like me, yet pair it with a high-tech ten-speed automatic. Where’s the sense of nostalgia? Where’s the throaty, rising crescendo that makes your hair stand on end? What you get now is a dashboard light show, accompanied by a series of abbreviated little power surges stitched together so tightly as to be almost… turbo-like.

    Ah, I just answered my own question.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      MPG trumps nostalgia, and the 10 speed is also used in some GM applications. Smaller steps between ratios, according to them, maximises engine power for better for acceleration.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Isnt the transmission the same between both trucks? I know my 2015 F150 is the 6 speed. Having said that I felt like they did a much better job making the engine and trans work together. I only drove the 5.3 in the Silverado, but it felt like the engine and trans hated each other. Hopefully they have made that better.

      Also it is a DOHC, DI V8…harly a motor for Luddites lol.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “It’s not clear to me why Ford would offer a sweet V8 for Luddites like me, yet pair it with a high-tech ten-speed automatic.”

      5.0 Coyote…… or is your definition of “sweet V8” include pushrods?

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    You would think the other brands would have learned something from Ford, here. Ford’s the only brand that kept “suicide doors” on its extended cab versions and they appear to be vastly more popular than the GM or RAM extended-cab versions. I see a lot of Colorados and Tacomas, also with “suicide” back doors on their extended cabs.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Ever think of doing any research, VP? Ford (and Nissan) are able to pass side-impact crash tests with rear-hinged doors on extended cabs, GM and Ram are not.

      By your logic, Nissan should he second to Ford in sales. How’s that working out for them?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Vulpine – extended cab sales aren’t that large.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Try again, JT. There’s a difference between “not able” and “not willing.” Clearly GM •can• pass, since the Colorado does it, Obviously all GM and Ram need to do is try, because I really don’t see how those front-hinged half-doors even begin to be useful in an extended cab.

    And you’d be surprised at how many Nissan Titan King Cabs I see as work trucks around my area.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Let me take a page from your book: You must PROVE that they can pass with rear hinged doors on the Silverado/Sierra. Colorado is not the same truck, ergo it isn’t proof.

      In all seriousness, I believe the switch was made on the previous generation due to the reason I stated. The Colorado is smaller, and as inconvenient as they are on a full-size truck, they’d be damn-near unusable on a smaller truck.

      Your contention is also ignoring the fact that crew cabs vastly outsell extended cabs these days, thus making your “excuse” for Ford’s dominance invalid.

      I’m happy the Nissan Titan is selling in such outstanding volumes, based on your observation alone. That is some outstanding research.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    “In all seriousness, I believe the switch was made on the previous generation due to the reason I stated. ”
    — That much of your statement is true. But that does not mean they could not have fixed it with the newer generation. Rather, they chose not to fix it to keep costs down… and is, I believe, one reason why you do not see many extended cab GM full-sized trucks at all and even the Ram versions are relatively rare.

    To be blunt, if I were planning on a full-sized truck equipped the way I want, I’d be stuck with Ford and Nissan. At least with the 10% smaller versions, I have a better choice of brands. But what I really want is 15% smaller than the existing Mid-sizers, with the proper rear-hinged doors on the extended cab models.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      So, one’s purchase decision hinges upon hinges….. how unhinged!

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      A truck 15% smaller than existing midsizers wouldn’t just be compact, it’d be positively dinky–even smaller than an ’80s Hilux. Roughly a 108″ WB, 62″ wide, and about 192″ long (assuming the bed remained the same length). I do agree with you on clamshell doors, though.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        It seems you’re getting my point, Doc.

        • 0 avatar
          SD 328I

          You know all the current mid-sized trucks in the US market were sourced or based on international models.

          Even the GM twins (Colorado and Canyon) are based off of Isuzu’s D-Max truck world design.

          That this means is that no one is the World is making / selling a mainstream small sized pickup truck. They are all mid-sized.

          Of course this is not including kei car trucks in Japan or tiny work trucks from India and China. Most of those can’t reach highway speeds.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Look up the Fiat Strada/Ram 700 pickup in South America/Mexico.

            While you’re at it, look up the Chevy Tornado/GMC Montana in those same regions.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    And how is 3 years even realistic…Ignoring the normal Teslaspeak on dates, where will they build it. The plant in China will be a no go as it would be subject to the same tariffs that caused Toyota and Nissan to build trucks in the US. My assumption would be Freemont (moving all 3 production to China, but they will need to build these at a volume that is exponential compared to anything they have built to this point. Doesn’t sdeem like Freemont is up to it.

    This ignores the whole designing the truck, building the assembly line to build the truck, and getting traditional truck buyers to accept the truck bit. 3 Years seems really optimistic.

    But then what, well probably nothing. Toyota and Nissan couldn’t crack the fullsized truck nut, but lets assume they do. Nothing revolutionary here, Ford, GM, Ram, and anyone else slaps an electric driveline in a truck that is a known quantity.

    You and I both know that at least initially, the truck with the most to lose is probably the Ridgeline. I don’t see a ton of cross shopping between fullsized truck buyers and Tesla. If they have any brains they will shop it as a fleet vehicle where the cost of ownership and the ability to use it as a power station would be benefits. However to be a serious fleet player they would need to expand their dealership network and potentially sell them at a loss…not a giant markup on work trucks.

    So if this thing starts to gain traction a company that knows how to build trucks in massive volume adapts an electric driveline, uses that volume to undercut Tesla. And probably has them on dealer lots while Tesla is still taking deposits. Thats what.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Ford and Ram are already experimenting with partial electrification with their trucks, with the Hybrid F-150 coming and Ram’s eTorque system already hitting dealerships. If electric trucks become a thing, I promise the “legacy” automakers will lead the way.

      And, they’ll actually have the ability to meet demand, should it materialize.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    What we really need here is more of JohnTaurus’s input and comments.

    His comments have only comprised 35% of all total comments under this article, well below his usual 48%, for all articles generally, and 56% for Ford-related articles.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I’m truly, genuinely glad that Ford is THE DOMINANT pickup truck seller, with the F-Series assembled in The United States of America, WITH 85% USA-produced parts and components content.

    Much better this than seeing Guangzhou-Guadalajara Motors (GM) sell their garbage pickup trucks, many of which are assembled outside the USA, and all of which have NEARLY 50% FOREIGN COMPANY-PRODUCED PARTS AND COMPONENTS (most low quality emanating from rathole lowest-bidder suppliers in back alleys in China, Thailand, Myanmar, Mexico, Columbia, etc.).

    Even the RAM is WAY MORE USA, assembled in the US, of a minimum of 74% parts/components supplied by AMERICAN-HQ’d companies.

    DO NOT BUY GUANGHZHOU-GUADALAJARA MOTORS (GM) rolling dumpster fire vehicles (Chevy, Buick, GMC or Cadillac).

    BUY FORD F-ERIES OR RAM PIXKJP TRUCKS.

    FRUCK-A-RU, GUANGZHOU-GUADALAJARA MOTORS (GM)!

  • avatar

    Come on guys! It has just been announced that for the first time ever GM has surpassed Ford in overall trucks sales. Ford is now behind GM in everything! Musk was right to call Ford a morgue.

    • 0 avatar
      SD 328I

      Not the first time ever, for the last 4 years GM has surpassed Ford in overall truck sales.

      This is because Ford doesn’t offer a mid-sized pickup, while GM came out with the popular Canyon and Colorado mid-sized trucks several years ago.

      However, that will change, Ford is bring back the Ranger next year, expect they will get back their Total Truck sales crown again.

  • avatar
    V16

    There’s a good reason the ‘F-Series’ is referred to as, “THE FRANCHISE.”

  • avatar
    SD 328I

    “Unless it is eligible to wear classic car tags or available used under $6K I’m not interested in buying anything that can’t do 0-60 in under 6 seconds.”

    F150 Supercrew 4×4 with the 2.7L Ecoboost motor was recently tested doing 0-60 in 5.7 seconds.

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