By on July 30, 2018

Today’s question is brought to you by kitchen-table musing and grumbling by two gearheads at the Guy household on Saturday. As it always does, the conversation turned to cars.

“Nothing’s affordable anymore!” ranted my friend, waving his arms while expressing a desire to own old Alfas and other machinery with the structural integrity of wet tissue paper.

The man may have a point. Do you think the values of certain desirable cars are inflated beyond reason?

I argued that the auction site Bring-a-Trailer is doing to the values of certain oddball cars what Barrett-Jackson did to the values of Hemi ‘Cudas about 10 or 15 years ago. Those machines were always extremely valuable but, in the wake of televised bidding frenzies, those cars soon started changing hands for dizzying amounts, shutting out all but the 1 percent of gearheads.

Their values have cooled, as the demographics of those with car-sized amounts of money burning holes in their bank accounts starts to shift. Gearheads — the sloppy, misty-eyed dates that we are — tend to throw caution and good reason out the window when we find ourselves in a position to finally purchase the machine we coveted as a teenager or young adult.

Me? I’d very much like to have an Integra Type R — painted Phoenix Yellow, please. Not long ago, these little rockets were desired but not wholly unattainable. Now? The two currently on BAT are already trading well into five-figure territory. It’s not like either of them are perfect examples — one has crash history and 182k miles, the other is a ten-owner car with mileage discrepancies and an outstanding lien.

I’m glad for the BAT boffins; they’ve created a great gearhead community and are proving to be one of the premier stops for rare and desirable machinery. It’s great when people start a business and are successful. I am also glad for those who have found a way to put one in their garage.

Doesn’t make it any easier to get my Integra Type R, though. What car do you think is currently trading for nutso values? Are there any others you think will soon rocket into the stratosphere?

[image: Acura]

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68 Comments on “QOTD: The Price Is Wrong?...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    I’m not going to make a “beyond reason” judgement call, but you friend is correct, values on sporty Euro cars from the late 60s to the mid 80s have greatly increased in the last decade.

    I think the affordability trick is that you have to be willing to shift your model year bracket. Rather than going after a K5 Blazer with “classic car” pricing, get an Envoy or a GMT400. Or go for a Boxster/XK8 over a 964/E-type.

    • 0 avatar

      “…get an Envoy or a…”

      That’s a bad rec. The GMT360 is not good for longevity, fuel economy, or anything else really. GMT400 is just fine.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        There are a few positive points on a 360:
        1. You can buy them at very low cost.
        2. Parts are cheap and plentiful.
        3. They made decent power in every trim.
        4. They are still a BOF SUV.
        5. What was available from Ford and ChryslerCo during this era wasn’t exactly stellar either.

        I wouldn’t recommend one for daily driving or as a mud buggy. But, I think it’s an okay alternative for someone wanting a low-priced rig for hunting trips, mulch runs, and light-ish towing.

        • 0 avatar

          As long as those provisions are there, I think it’s alright then.

          Make mine a Bravada or Rainier.

          Also, the early Envoy and TB which everyone forgets, on the S10 platform.

          #jimmydiamond

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            The only one worth having is the Trollblazer, aka Saab 9-7x.

            But ultimately, they are all crap.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Of the early 2000s SUVs, firstly I guess at this point I’d be buying purely on condition and maintenance history. But with the respective midsizers’ historic weak spots in mind, I’d try everything in my power to get into a GMT800 in the first place. If that isn’t an option, I think I’d seek out a 4.6L Explorer with the 4R70W transmission. The 4.0L versions of that truck are nothing but trouble (timing chains), but the old standby Mod motor is a fairly safe bet, albeit cramped in that engine bay. I’ve seen more erratic electrical issues with GMT360s than perhaps anything else including most Chrysler vehicles. To that point, I think I’d actually pick a ’03 Durango over a GMT360 as well. I think(?) the 5.9L was still an option then, sadly the 5.2L was superseded by the PowerTech 4.7L by then.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            You’ll be seeking for a very long time trying to find an Explorer with the 4.6 and 4R70. When the 4.6 came to the Explorer in 2002 it used the 5R55 transmission which is the weak point on those vehicles. The later 6sp seems to be a bit better. Otherwise they are solid vehicles. I’ve got a 2003 Mountaineer with the 4.6 and 5R55 transmission and replacing the transmission is the only major problem it has seen in the last 15 years and 150k miles. The only other repairs have been a front wheel bearing, rear ABS sensor and an axle seal. It does have one electrical issue in that the auto unlocking has stopped working, but since it still auto locks it hasn’t bothered me enough to worry about it. It will need upper control arms purely due to cracked boots on the ball joints and there is a squeak going over speed bumps from the driver’s side of the front suspension.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Nah, 360 me.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Ah right you are Scoutdude, I had that gen Explorer mixed up with the previous “jellybean” Explorer that avoided the 5r55e in favor of the beefier 4spd 4R70.

            My brother had 2 customers a while back with 3rd gen Explorers, both the 4.0L. One got fed up after his transmission rebuild took a crap and left it right there in the lot. A different customer got a leaking headgasket and during teardown it was discovered that both timing chains were very slack. The solution? My brother swapped the good transmission out of the truck with the bad headgasket (interior was trashed and smelled like cat pee to boot), into the much cleaner truck with the bad transmission. Needless to say I don’t hold the IRS Explorers in particularly high regard, although I have seen them rack up some decent mileage, often with a t-case or rear end along the way, and the obligatory control arms and such. Give me a clean 5.0L AWD “Jellybean” any day.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    It’ll be interesting to see what an Evo MR brings in about ten years, they’re still reasonable at this point.

  • avatar
    gtem

    Clean 1990s pickup trucks. I’m already seeing good condition 4wd GMT400s going for silly money, the F150s of the same are a bit more reasonable but starting to climb. 90s Broncos are already near $10k for a good rot free original one, GMT400 2 door Tahoe’s are quickly getting into the $6-8k range and climbing. I think people will miss the simple ruggedness, robust and easy to repair mechanicals, and non-try hard styling while still maintaining modernish levels of comfort and reliability and capability.

    • 0 avatar
      brettucks

      You are correct. Im my case they dont make small trucks anymore so its used only. My recent search for my 1995 4×4 Tacoma saw high asking prices for well maintained examples. The simpleness and ruggedness was one of the factors that attracted me. Im not sure they could make a ‘simple’ truck now even if they wanted to.

      Atter having s-10s and Rangers that didnt survive very well the Toyota still drives like new despite 240K on it already. I think in another 20 years they will still be holding value (unless they stop selling gas).

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      2 door GMT400 are already hard to find and if one is found that is not clapped out, figure 10k+. Towards the end few were sold in comparison to the pick up or Suburban. Some of the examples I have seen have well north of 200k on the odo.

      • 0 avatar

        It’s funny, I think that collectors will have to (or are) accepting high mileage as a fact. Collecting ’60s and ’70s metal, they’re all going to be low mileage, because anything with considerable miles on it fell apart or rusted.

        Now, you’ve got a 1997 Tahoe LTZ that’s in great condition and still runs fine, it just has 180,000 miles on it. Still worth bucks.

        But I wonder if there are some old guys out there who would still cling to their ideals that only low mileage vehicles could truly be collected.

        • 0 avatar
          Maymar

          Also, how many “low-mileage” classics have the records to back it up compared to vehicles with rolled over 5-digit odometers and passable restorations?

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I think this is natural in that these 90s trucks are just so dang durable and long-lived with EFI, etc compared to the 1950s/60s cars that would need a full rebuild and rust repair by 100k of typical use. Just took my buddy’s GMT400 K1500 out for a spin yesterday, 196k on the clock and she’s a strong runner and easy everyday driver. Needs some shocks and probably a few steering parts to tighten it up, but totally no-less practical or useful a 4wd truck than a 2018 IMO.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            On the other hand, the engine needs new rings and gets 15mpg going downhill with a tailwind. Just the price of entry.

        • 0 avatar
          Maxb49

          High mileage isn’t that big of an issue on a collector car. Engines can always be restored. Wear items can be replaced without hurting the value.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      https://mobile.craigslist.org/cto/d/chevrolet/6653349242.html

      Not perfect, but it likely has 0 rust and whatever it needs, I don’t think you’ll crest $6-8k.

      I say if you’re looking for a specific car, you should look outside your market. This is especially true if you’re in the salt belt, where rust-free cars are not as common and therefore command a premium.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        That’s a decent find for sure John, with some tidying up and a repaired seat cushion that’s an easy $6k truck in Indy.

        as far as the collectibility of these things, I’ll point you to shops like this that are doing some great work seeking out original truck and giving them full paint correction and other small fixes and selling for a premium. Man I’d love one of these:

        youtu.be/nR3E4ozRdrM

        Man that thing’s a peach.

    • 0 avatar
      Erikstrawn

      Hang on, what? Do you mean my ’99 ‘Burb is actually becoming valuable again? All those RX-7s I hung onto for years never appreciated, but the tow pig is the hot one? WTF!? Guess I need to hurry up and get the engine rebuild finished.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    “The man may have a point. Do you think the values of certain desirable cars are inflated beyond reason?”

    — Absolutely! Pickup trucks, especially the higher trim levels, make almost as much profit as they cost to make. Other cars, again higher trim levels and especially those that simply inspire lust for them carry almost as much as the trucks. Others carry far, far more profit but their pricing has always been out of reach of the common driver.

    This may change in the short term. Profit margins will fall but prices will have to rise just to adapt to new tariffs, both foreign and domestic. If you think cars are overpriced now, wait a few months and watch what happens if this isn’t resolved amicably between the nations. It’s Chicken Tax all over again. Even my local newspaper is having to cut ⅓ of its editions because the cost of newsprint has jumped over 30% since the beginning of the year… due to tariffs.

  • avatar
    Rhiadon

    When I want a car, it;s never just some run of the mill econobox that there were trillions of them in existence. My wife and I recently had a baby, so I started looking at what I could replace my ’05 Legacy GT Limited (see what I mean? boutique version of a small production car. Only the Spec B is more boutique). I wanted all the fizz I get from my Legacy, but I wanted it to be a sleeper of sorts with plenty of room to haul the kid and all of his accoutrements. I decided it was an ’05-’07 Forester XT that fit the bill. Of course it had to be a manual transmission. The only this missing from this unicorn was the horn.

    I found one, but I paid for it, dearly. But I got what I wanted.

  • avatar
    Jagboi

    One that’s coming up is the 80’s Ford LTD station wagons, especially the Country Squire trim. For stupid money prices, I’d vote for the Jaguar E Type.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Q: “Do you think the values of certain desirable cars are inflated beyond reason?”

    A: Not if the market will bear the price – meaning people keep buying them.

    Being Mr Obvious here: Sports figure salaries are the same sort of thing – if fans keep paying to see them, then their wages continue to climb.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    The economy is in incredibly worse shape than headlines suggest, for some different and some same/similar reasons as in 2007.

    Get the F*ck out of risk assets now or you will be sorry.

    I’m watching this play out in terms of a ramp up in CMBS delinquency rates/defaults, viewing data sets re levels of debt carried by corporations, private equity, households\'(they are way worse off than even headline figures suggest because the for now’s rebound in their home values is “prettying up” their nasty debt levels via a distortion field – in a similar way that equity values on major indexes are papering over record corporate debt – in inflation adjusted/real – levels).

    We’re seeing 4 major convergent events play out that are signalling a major downturn; 1) rising interest rates, 2) debt issuance/credit expanaion slow down dramatically, 3) breakdown (hard) in significant plurality of small cap S&P and high-beta NASDAQ stocks, 4) yield curve returning to historical norm from massively inverted condition of last 5 years.

    There has been more malinvestment creating saturation in so many segments of the economy since QE1 was launched (through QE3, not just here, but by almost every major central bank) that they’ve broken all’price discovery mechanisms, and the wash-out process will be so ugly that even now tight skilled trades and medium-to-high skill set workers are going to see demand for their work and wages fall off a cliff.

    Again, I am witnessing this like a weather pattern on Doppler radar in real time.

    • 0 avatar
      I_like_stuff

      I’ve been reading this exact thing on ZeroHedge for oh, about 6 years. The broken clock will be right eventually I guess.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      We’ve had a nice, long run for sure out of the great recession, but a downturn will come again, just a matter of time. I’ve used the opportunity of steady employment and good times to clean up my own balance sheet and lock in a 30 year mortgage at 3.375%. Now I’m socking away cash waiting for everything to go on sale during the next recession. Like I recently told a realtor, if you’re cryin’, I’m buyin’.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Id’ say yes, and this is stupid, but when a clean, low mileage B13 Sentra SE-R surfaces on BAT, I will likely be willing to write a check for more than the original MSRP for the right car because, as the article says, this is the car I coveted back in the day and searches have only turned up cars that look like they did 250,000 miles in Baghdad. So I guess I’m part of the problem.

    • 0 avatar

      Amen.

      On that particular example, I had a B14 200SX SE-R and walked by its twin the other day in a big box store parking lot. I forgot how *small* that sucker was. Sort of cured my

      Still, the B13 was a sweetheart with its lighter weight and IRS, and uncorked SR20DE that’d sping all day to 7750 with a chip.

      My K20 10th Gen Civic is my (realistic) replacement. The K20 and SR20 are awfully similar.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    >>“Nothing’s affordable anymore!” ranted my friend

    Nothing *he wants* is affordable. This is because he and his demographic have transitioned into the collector car market with their disposable income and are all searching for cars of their mutually shared taste. The BAT website didn’t invent that market, it serves it. As certain generations age, they take their car preferences with them into the collector car market and drive pricing.

    I’d expect many limited edition Japanese brand sport compacts from the 90’s/early 2000’s to increase in value as Gen Y millenial whatever you want to call them gain prominence. If you can buy any car that appeared in the first few Fast and the Furious movies at a bargain, you’ll probably do OK.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    It’s the backlash against new autos/trucks, planned obsolescence, etc. It gets worse every year, and it’s tough to chart. Experts think slumping sales, or lack growth, means consumers have less free income or other theories.

    Meanwhile the aftermarket and replacement parts industries are absolutely booming.

    It’s easier to see with HD pickups. New truck sales are very strong, but $60K or more for a new mid-trim crew cab with diesel and 4wd? Or $30K for a cosmetically and mechanically refurbished “equivalent” from around 2006, pre-emissions (no DEF, urea, etc) including tuning/bulletproofing and pocket the extra $30K?

    There’s clearly a market for these and companies dedicated to providing them, with a waiting list. It’s similar to the “glider” scenario.

    But how far does $20K get you in new autos? I know $10K gets you a near mint condition ’88 MR2 supercharged.

    2018 Corolla S? Or ’04 low miles, supercharged V8, forged internals. Cobra Mustang! That’s not for everyone that’s also disappointed with new cars, I get it, especially since “Terminators” only came in stick shifts (6-speed Tremecs, not Chinese Getrags).

    2018 Wrangler base stripper, or a low miles 2010, same basic truck for 1/2 the price, well equipped and a handful of mods, upgrades and lockers?

    This kind of used car “downgrades” are happening at an increasing rate, even if not documented, researched or admitted to by industry “experts”.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    The last two generations of GM B-body ANYTHING the last generation of the RWD C-body and anything 1996 or older RWD with a Cadillac crest on it.

    All those prices are silly and more often than not it is a for a 200,000 mile example with mismatched tires and broken switches.

    Interestingly the family of 6 at my church whom I used to observe getting in and out of a circa 1996 Fleetwood (so clean you could eat off of it) have switched to an Escalade ESV from early in the 3rd generation.

    I wonder what happened to his old Caddy? Pearl white, white vinyl top, and windows tinted to FBI levels.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    With some cases like the Integra Type R, prices are going up both because of “Gran Turismo nostalgia” and the simple fact that finding a decent one is quite difficult, BaT hasnt done much for them. Videogames are kinda in a similar spot unfortunately.

    I think that most older cars have gone up to unreasonable prices, especially
    Porsches. You used to be able to get a 912 for reasonable costs at one point. Auctions and BaT have become the Bluebook of classic cars since they’re one of the few sources for understanding a cars value.

    But what really bugs ME about this situation is this:

    1. Millennial wants an old car
    2. Millennial sees said old car has gone up to stupid levels of pricing.
    3. Older wealthy collector notices that millennials arent buying older cars, writes articles whining about it.
    4. Said collector turns around sells his barn find ’72 Charger for $500,000

    • 0 avatar
      I_like_stuff

      Old Porsches are in a bubble and will pop at the slightest bit of economic uncertainty. And speaking of Porsches, you can get a 996 for under $20K these days. To me that’s the all time bargain in the auto world right now. But wait a minute, they have reeaaaaaaly ugly headlights and hence no such thing shall ever grace the presence of my driveway, say the purists. Meh. OK. Makes them that much cheaper for the rest of us, while you spend $60K on an ’82 Targa, cuz…..STUFF!!

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I think sometimes people get skewed by these barn finds. For example, 65 GT-350 is dug out of a barn and sells for cgazy money. Guy finds 74 Mustang with “low miles” because the ODO has rolled and figures its worth similar money.

      Having the ability to market to a national audience so easily has pushed up the prices of more pedestrian offerings (or at least the amounts people are willing to ask) because all it takes is one fool. I see this all the time on Facebook Groups. Somebody has an old Town Car or Buick that was Grandpa’s last ride and they want stupid money because low miles (stupid money being like 10 grand over top retail). Typically somebody bites.

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    THE RENT’S TOO DAMN HIGH!!

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    I’m not sure, but to me this sounds like you think you are entitled to a Type R. At least with housing you can justify that it is for a family and raising kid in a good and safe neighborhood. For collector items? Seriously?

    Personally if I “really” want a Type R but can’t afford it, I’d try to get a GSR and get there with engine swap, suspension tuning, body kit, etc. Yeah I know it is lame to build a knock off, but still, it is still an Integra. If you want a better driving car there’s S2000, ya know.

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    Everything old is cool again. In my neck of the woods the hot new trend housing wise is buying houses built in the 50s-70s and renovating them. What was only a few years ago “OMG that is so hideous and ugly” is now “wow this would look really cool if we redid the kitchen and bathrooms and put in new hardwood floors”. RVs and boats too. Vintage stuff, redone is crazy expensive. Also the big trend of backyard gardening and backyard chickens, GMO free food, organic food, etc. Vintage cars are just part of this new “old is good” dynamic that’s happening society wide.

    My theory is that in a 24/7 hyper digital digital world where you can’t ever get away, people crave something from the “good old days”, be it a house, a car, a boat, raising chickens, what have you. So it’s not just old guys who dreamt of a 1969 Camaro growing up who are buying the Camaro. It’s also 35 year olds who think of 1969 as a simpler time that they will never experience and driving that car connects them to that era.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      Agree with you, but the demographic you’re referring to lusts after Vanagons, Land Cruisers or 60’s wagons more than the traditional pony or muscle cars.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      Yup, everything that your mom and dad grew up with is now “cool”, and things that you grew up with is “out”.

      Fashion, food, cars, houses (although it has more to do with lot size and location, IMO). You name it.

  • avatar

    My dad handed down a 95 K1500 with a GenIII 350 TBI in it to me.

    Whenever I got it serviced or repaired, the guy at the shop kept wanting to buy it off me. Those fairly-simple GMT400 trucks are appreciating, espeically the Vortec trucks.

  • avatar
    volvo

    Another thing to consider when paying rather high price for a desired car. Anything manufactured after the mid 80s will have a limited shelf life due to eventual unavailability of various ECU, ECM, EEMS boxes. If you need a part for a post war car up to the mid 80s in the worst case one could have the part made for you. Not going to happen when the proprietary computer box on your 2005 racer dies and there are no serviceable junk yard replacements.
    So while the car may serve you well it will not be a long term collectable and you need to be careful about the price.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      There have been people “remanufacturing” automotive computers since the 80’s. I doubt that will stop in the future.

      The other thing is that in recent years many of those boxes have become much more universal. There was a time when you had a different computer for each calibration or set of options. Now those computers are programed for the vehicle they are installed in. So with a quick reflash there will be a number of choices instead of searching out the one exact unit needed.

      • 0 avatar
        volvo

        That is good to know. But I do wonder how the CARB/DMV computers will look upon those changes when you go in for your biannual smog check. For newer vehicle they don’t look at timing, tailpipe emissions or any other hardware they just interrogate the on board computer system. Modifications there do raise a red flag.
        A correctly rebuilt unit would pass muster but I wonder about a “recalibrated” unit.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          What’s a smog check? Never had to deal with such a thing.

          Not everyone lives in California or the like, it only seems that way sometimes. If you choose to live somewhere that makes life even more painful than it needs to be, that’s on you.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          A correctly rebuilt modern unit will not have a calibration program in it and it won’t run the vehicle out of the box. It will need to be programmed to match the vehicle including the VIN which is something that the OBD II testing checks for.

          Programing is usually done by the installer but there are companies that will program it based on your VIN for an additional charge.

          Here is how it works.

          If the computer is damaged but still alive. Say a short has taken out one of the coil or injector drivers. The technician will connect the equipment to the OBD-II port and capture the current calibration. That will be stored on the programming device. The new unit will then be installed and the data that was captured from the old computer will be uploaded to the new computer. For all intents and purposes the new computer will be a clone of the old computer.

          If the computer is totally dead and won’t talk to the scan tool, then you will need to provide the VIN to the mfg and they will supply the needed program for the vehicle. There are usually 1-time and subscription options though some mfgs do have it available for free. Once that is downloaded to the programmer it is installed in the new unit. It can also be installed in a used unit if desired.

          Fact is updated calibrations are quite common to fix a bug, and it may be a quiet action where only those people who complain get the fix. That is why there are often times a list of acceptable calibrations for a given vehicle.

          The other time that calibrations are updated is when they are caught cheating on emissions like VW did. I can see for example CA not passing a VW that doesn’t have the updated emissions compliant calibration.

          So as long as it is loaded with a calibration that is on the list for that vehicle and it is programmed with the proper VIN the testing system will not care and will have no way to tell if it is the original, a new, used or rebuilt unit.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The best way to not go wrong is stick with the mainstream cars/trucks when possible. You’re likely relying completely on the aftermarket anyway, even with say a Mustang.

      So if you find the ECU or ABS module “re-popped”, what about body parts, headlights/markers/tail lights, trim, bumper covers, etc, following a minor incident?

      I know many such parts are not re-popped for my Mustang SVO (specifics), with less than 10K total production. I spotted one in a backyard an hour ago while looking for an address, made note of the street.

      I have sparkling new NOS headlights/markers, plus NOS bi-plane spoiler for the SVO that I’m putting off installing, since they’re irreplaceable.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      My bet is they can repurpose another model’s ECU in place. Those hardware are likely similar enough that if you mod the fuel map and calibration in there, you can get it working with another working unit.

      We have plenty of Chevy to pull for every Caddy that ran out of parts.

      If the market is big enough there’s general controller company that people use for R&D. Sort of like those “game doctor” people sell in Asia to mod their 90s Nintendo, it started as a development tool, but piracy is a big market later.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    These sorts of cars can now be easily marketed on a national level rather than your local auto trader. The larger pool of buyers pushes prices up on these as much as anything. Cheaper to find that pristine one and fly out to get it rather than getting a local basketcase.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      That right there is the root of the increase in pricing of the the types of vehicles found on BAT and similar places. Instead of competing against yourself or 1 or 2 other buyers in your local area you are now competing with 100’s of buyers around the country and planet in some cases.

      • 0 avatar
        I_like_stuff

        But the reverse is true as well. As a seller instead of competing against 1 or 2 in your area, you are competing against 100s of sellers nationally. So no, BAT or eBay didn’t increase prices since both supply and demand increased with better access to information for buyers and better access for sellers.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          There aren’t 100’s of these cars for sale at any given time. 10’s would surprise me at this point. The cars that go for big money do so because they are rare. BAT only features rare and unusual cars.

          And ultimately, every used car is a unique snowflake, and they get more unique as the years go by. A 3yo Camry is a very different proposition than a 20yo limited-edition Acura.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          For BAT the cars they feature are unique, pretty 1 of 1 left like it for sale at this point in their life. So there is an increase in exposure to buyers and no increase in supply.

          For cars that are still quite common you do have and increase in both supply and demand to a point. However for a common as dirt car most people are willing to buy something from across the country unless the price is significantly less for some reason.

  • avatar
    kkop

    There are certainly good deals to be had, if you are willing to compromise.

    Our Regular Cab 2014 Ram 1500 with 5.7 hemi and projector lights, but cloth interior and 6spd auto was ours for 22K out-the-door. It’s now at 80,000 miles and still going strong. Sure, there’s no Navigation and the UConnect is the cheapo 5″, but who cares? All the desirable basics are there (for us).

    In trucks, work trims are still very good deals IMO.

  • avatar
    analogman

    Yes, many sectors of the collector/’interesting’ car market are in an over-inflated price bubble (pick your favorite segment, 1990’s Japanese cars due to Millennial interest, air-cooled Porsches because of over-paid venture capitalists, techies, and hedge fund managers, etc.). It’s happened before, and it will happen again.

    Car prices get over-heated whenever the stock market becomes over-valued (and the market has had a long run, and by most traditional (= rational) fundamental measures, is over-valued). It’s both because some people feel ‘rich’ seeing the values of their portfolios soar and feel comfortable paying more for toys, and others sense the market is over-valued and want to take some money off the table and put it into ‘tangible’ assets.

    Yes, you can drive a car and not a stock, and the car looks prettier in the garage. But, just like stocks, that doesn’t guarantee that the price won’t drop, or that it will ever return to its previous highs.

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    While I would LOVE to get back into a Corrado like my ’94 VR6 supercharged (aftermarket).. Many issues raised here give me PLENTY of reasons it won’t ever happen.

    1) The reliability of that vs. modding my ’05 Legacy GT. Sure, I modded the Corrado MORE, but it was WAY less reliable.. Especially that supercharger. When it was running right, it was AMAZING. But overall, I’ve had way more good days vs. bad with my LGT, and it’s got similar power levels, if not more.

    2) Parts availability – when I hit a deer in the Corrado in ’04, I was told I was getting the last driver’s side door in all of North America, and it had to be shipped halfway across the continent

    3) Stage of life. In my late 40s. Have way more $$ now, less time. For years I’ve said, I want “designed by VW” (or Audi), built by Toyota.

  • avatar
    bodayguy

    I bought an NSX last year. Yeah, probably the Gen X collector bug hit me or something. But I also have a 60s Riviera, so I’m not ONLY rehashing my youth.

    Also sold a car on BaT 2 years ago. It was fun. Anything interesting and in good shape will do nicely on there, problem is everybody thinks their garage heap is in that category now.

    Ran into a guy with a yellow Integra Type R at the coin-op car wash about five years ago. Practically ran up to him and lectured, “don’t sell this!” He looked bewildered.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      I generally make a point of telling anyone with a stock-ish S2000, FD RX7, or MKIV Supra to keep it original. And shake my head disapprovingly at anyone who modifies them.

      • 0 avatar
        PandaBear

        One of my friend mod his S2000 club racer for track (including a whole dry sump system) , but he is really using it as a tool for the job instead of collecting it and look at it though.

        He does keep all the original parts so when time comes it is going back to stock to be sold.

  • avatar
    mechaman

    The last Accord I liked the looks of was the ’07 model. Apparently some sellers think that no matter how many miles they put on theirs, the car never depreciated…

    • 0 avatar
      volvo

      We have a 2007 Accord V6 and it is a beautiful car IMO. I don’t know if your comment about miles was directed at this year Accord but with 160K miles, body and interior both 9.5/10 and no major expenses other than routine maintenance to this point of ownership I do not know another car I would like to replace it with. Between soy based wiring, CVT, small displacement turbos and their appearance most current cars just do not appeal to me. Perhaps that is why that generation Accords in decent condition are price high.

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