By on July 12, 2018

Image: Ford Europe

Wednesday’s Bloomberg report, which claimed the current Ford Fusion will undergo the “sport wagon” treatment for its next generation, didn’t come as a shock.

Though unconfirmed, Ford admits it’s likely we’ll see the Fusion name applied to a new vehicle. Given that Ford’s stable is already packed to the rafters with crossovers and SUVs both current and promised, it isn’t surprising to hear the nameplate might soldier on with a larger cargo area, existing platform, and a raised roofline (but not *that* raised).

Are you feeling any stirrings here? Any stirrings at all?

I’m not, and I’ll tell you why. First, it’s no secret I haven’t fathered a demanding brood of overfed kids. The largest cargo I carry on a daily basis is the full-size spare in my car’s trunk, but that’s hardly the issue here.

Was there any inkling that the 2021 or 2022 Ford Fusion will appear as a fall-down-on-your-knees-sexy sport wagon, my interest might be held. The Buick Regal TourX looks great. I wonder if there’s even a dozen people in America right now thinking of signing a note on one. Same goes for the Jaguar XF Sportbrake, a niche vehicle capable of rendering Twitter pundits speechless. It’s possible I might see one in the wild.

Ford enjoys volume, and to be worthwhile, the future Fusion needs to sell in great quantities, not titillate broke auto journos. I just fear that this vehicle, if it does appear, will be anything other than a crafted-by-committee offering that, at worst, takes on a Kia Niro-like personality — albeit one with standard or available all-wheel drive. I’ll gladly be proven wrong.

Bloomberg’s sources claim the upcoming Fusion has the Subaru Outback in its sights, which conjures up visions of a lifted, cladded, off-road-ready wagon, not the bland object of my nightmares. So that’s promising. And the continuation of the CD4 platform means current hybrid and plug-in hybrid powertrains could easily carry over to satisfy Ford’s green thirst.

It’s almost certain the entry-level Fusion’s low price point would give way to something more akin to the Outback’s, meaning a base MSRP starting around $25k. As this hardly sounds like a fleet-happy model, say goodbye to the equivalent of the Fusion S, with its old 2.5-liter and tall sidewalls. Good riddance, some might say.

Am I being too cynical here in worrying that this so-called Outback fighter will bow as a bland, crossover-ized people box, or do you have more faith in Ford? What does the Blue Oval have to do to make you consider buying one?

[Image: Ford of Europe]

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73 Comments on “QOTD: Are You Tickled Pink at the Thought of a Wagony Ford Fusion Replacement?...”


  • avatar
    JimBot

    Absolutely! I too have not fathered any money sucking mini-me’s nor do I ever plan to, however I have always loved wagons and to see Ford going back in this direction is fantastic. Wagons are a niche item but they are steadily growing in popularity, in AWD form for the most part.

    I would argue that its intended audience is actually for people like us – no kids, weekend sporting (camping, skiing, kayaking, etc..) folks who may even be handy and do home improvement type work (like me) that requires some hauling of things on a small trailer or in seats that fold flat all the way to the front. I could fit a lot of 10′ 2×4’s in here!

    I would like to see a manual transmission but I think I have a better chance of dating Cindy Crawford (Gen X’er here..) lol .. wait, now I’m feeling stirrings..

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      Serious question, are they growing in popularity? Subaru is growing wagons but no one else seems to make a dent. Volvo does ok but they are shifting to more utility vehicle looking platforms, Magnum washed out, CTS washed out, Buick is up in the air but my gut sense it’s on life support.

      I like wagons and I hope they continue to exist but I fear that if it’s a wagon not branded Subaru it’s doomed.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Stupid question.

  • avatar
    cardave5150

    It’s curious that the body style that Ford could t couldn’t bother to certify for the USofA the last time the Fusion was redone looks to be the ONLY body style to be available this time. My, how times have changed. What’s next, another Mazda6 wagon?? I had one before, and loved the car.

  • avatar
    John Scott

    If the new NA market Fusion “Active” is a slightly Outbacked version of the current Mondeo wagon I say bring it on! Even mildly lifted and clad the Mondeo wagon design should appeal to the CUV averse and the CUV converted.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    A “tall wagon” may as well be another CUV. I actually like the look of traditional station wagons, the family car when I was a kid was a ‘68 Falcon station wagon. I like the new Buick wagons. Ford’s not kidding anybody here, they want a piece of the Outback market, good luck prying Subie lovers away from those. Ford seems to be following the VW model, a vehicle for every $500 price point.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    No, because there’s already a Fusion wagony type thingy in the Ford Edge and if it’s going to be a wagon that’s lifted a bit and a bit taller then it’s already more crossover then wagon

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      No, the Edge is nothing like a Fusion wagon.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        But it’s a lot like the Fusion car with more utility, so if I want a vehicle based on the Fusion platform with the same engine options, but I want a bit more room and 4WD I’ll get an Edge
        I guess if I want a crossover that LOOKS like a Fusion wagon I could get this

        • 0 avatar

          I have pretty much decided when I trade in my Fusion it will be for a Malibu. For the first time it may actually be the better car. From the test drive I took it is certainly a quieter car. Like the Fusion it just fall shorts of the Camry and Accord, but it at least a little more interesting to look at.

          Well, it is back to GM for me. Those days driving the Intrigue seem like a thousand years ago. The early 2000s was a long time ago.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          The Ford Edge is 700lb heavier than the Fusion sedan with the same engine. It’s also taller, wider etc. I’m sure this Fusion wagon will be cheaper in the same trim/engine as a comparable Edge. From an enthusiast’s point of view there is zero reason to get an Edge over this wagon.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    In the words of Napoleon Dynamite, “Heck yes!”

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Wagon? Yes.

    Outback clone? No.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Yes. Put the 2.7 AWD combo like the current Fusion Sport and I’d consider it strongly.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I find the responses confusing. What is the excitement for? The Fusion sedan was boring; a wagon back won’t change that. But on the flip side, an Outback is a set of springs/shocks/wheels/tires away from being a regular wagon, which I thought enthusiasts would be into. So on one hand people think turning a boring sedan into a wagon will make it exciting, but on the other hand people think a lifted wagon can’t be lowered.

    I’m not excited about it… Fusion has a terrible HP to performance/fuel economy return and this will be even worse. A D pillar won’t solve the long list of the Fusion’s problems.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Your website is broken again.

    Articles didn’t show up after 7/9 until this morning, and it took me fifteen tries to log in and post this comment.

    Over 15 min after commenting, new messages don’t show up until I refresh the page a whole bunch of times.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I wasn’t interested in the current Fusion sedan, I’m not interested in a future Fusion “Outback”, I’m not interested in a future Fusion “Sport wagon”, and it is very unlikely that I’d have been interested in a next-gen Fusion sedan.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    Aside for insulting parents, children a d life itself, I’ll admit that I’m interested… if it uses Ford’s excellent hybrid and Energi powertrains. All I ‘d really wish for with my C-Max is better styling and two inches more clearance.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryannosaurus

      This was exactly what I was thinking. The C-Max has been a great car for my family (42mpg lifetime average, plenty of room for 4, and comfortable upright seating) but man is it low. We have torn off some of the under-body cladding driving over med sized water filled pot holes. And I am afraid of getting a flat tire since it only came with a can of fix-a-flat. 2 more inches would make a huge difference.

  • avatar
    mikedt

    They already have a great looking Fusion wagon – the Mondeo – in the UK.

    https://s1.cdn.autoevolution.com/images/gallery/FORD-Mondeo-Wagon-5348_31.jpg

    If they were serious about that market for the USA then I have to think it would be cheaper to just bring in or build that here.

    I can understand there not being a huge market for wagons anymore but there has to be enough of a market to make it worthwhile for 1 or 2 companies. And not a jacked up one like Subaru or an expensive one like Volvo.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    “The Buick Regal TourX looks great. I wonder if there’s even a dozen people in America right now thinking of signing a note on one.”

    Well it’s on my “must test drive” list.

    Look I’ve got an almost 4 year old and my 2nd child is due in less than a month. I want a nice big cargo area for Costco runs, good back seat room, but don’t necessarily need three rows. My next vehicle needs to be more engaging than my Highlander (which quite frankly puts me to sleep at the end of a long day.)

    Build a Fusion “ACTIVE”, give me an AWD system that actually supports spirited on road driving, and dang it I’ll have to at least test drive it.

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    Euro wagons are popular in Canada notwithstanding their high cost and reliability issues. I think the Ford Mondeo wagon would do well here.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Bland sells. Just look around for Corollas and Camrys.
    Enthusiasts do not constitute a large enough market for mass sales.

    Minivans decimated the market for wagons because they did just about everything that a family/average consumer required a wagon to do, only better.

    The same with CUV’s in comparison to sedans and coupes.

    Remember the average age of a new car buyer in North America.

    Yes, I like the looks of the vehicle in the picture and the concept. But a ‘sportwagon’ will probably be too expensive. And a wagon with low ground clearance and a lowered roofline is not something that I would acquire.

    You are now free to disagree with me. And I may not respond because this ‘gersplukin’ website is again not working properly.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      Minivans decimated the market for wagons because women decided wagons were not stylish and wanted the “new thing”.

      CUVs and SUVs decimated the market for minivans for the same reason.

      While I don’t know what will decimate the market for CUVs and SUVs, I doubt that a lifted and butched up Fusion/Mondeo wagon is it. The Freestyle/TaurusX didn’t set the world on fire.

      That said, I could be a candidate for one if Ford didn’t go overboard with the styling and offered it as a PHEV with at least 30 miles of electric range.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Yes, if they’re ditching most cars at least give us a car like wagon. Subaru sells plenty of Legacy Outback’s and the VW Sportwagon seems to have caught on.
    Personally I’m hankering for a Mustang shooting brake.

  • avatar

    Musk is right Ford is a brain dead morgue. Subaru has this market cornered with vastly superior products. The last American mid-sized family sedan looks to be the Malibu. The sedan is getting the best reviews ever for a GM family sedan.

    Both the 200 and Fusion didn’t make the cut. Ford and FCA simply suck. Maybe I should say Sergio and Hackett are failures.

    What a f**king disgrace!!

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I’m not familial with Malibu but all of the “midsizes” are too small which is one of the reasons why Camcord still owns the segment.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        The “midsizers” are actually OK size-wise IMHO, they are encroaching on the territory of what was a full size in the past with some of their interior room measurements. I’d much rather take a long trip in the back seat of a current Malibu than in the backseat of the 1987 Cutlass Supreme sedan that my family owned when I was still being forced into the backseat for trips.

        The problem with sedans for many families is – roof lines force the doors openings to be designed in such a way that you really have to duck to get in OR Dad hits his head ducking out after strapping junior into the car seat AND many people have been brainwashed into thinking they HAVE to HAVE that occasional use 3rd row. Having owned a 3-row CUV since 2014 I now realize that it mostly means I get drafted to haul out of town relatives around.

        No thank you.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      I will go out on a limb here and do what most people seem unwilling to do. Subaru may have the cross-country wagon market cornered, but why? Really why? With the exception of the BRZ, WRX, STi, nothing Subaru really makes is remotely special.

      I will go further out on that limb. Their base engines and CVT aren’t great. Their interiors are so-so at best and their styling sucks donkey b#$%s. They are an appliance brand, fairly reliable yes, but not so far ahead of industry average that consumers should really take notice. 95% of buyers are staying on road all of the time, Subaru’s will not be used for serious rock-crawling, off road duty.

      Their place in the market is driven almost exclusively by advertising and …image. They have rather successfully planted their brand image in consumer brains that they are the outdoorsy type, urban hipster, eco-friendly, pet friendly, etc, etc. All this has literally no basis in fact or reality and their cars probably serve their audience no better than a car from another manufacturer would. But image sells. All that is really needed to unseat Subaru is a sustained advertising blitz by another manufacturer that taps these feel good demographics. Maybe only certain automakers could pull that off with would be Subaru intenders.

      Im not sure when, but eventually people will realize “why did I buy a Subaru again?” “Why did I pay full price”. Subaru is in a bubble right now, I think it will pop eventually. Not to say their sales will skid, but only so many people willing to pay full MSRP for a middling vehicle because Subaru contribute $5 per vehicle sold to the Humane Society. Sorry, I just don’t drink the Kool Aide, you are welcome to partake as often as you like though of course.

      • 0 avatar
        Brumus

        Well put, thegamper.

        Many are hoodwinked by Subaru’s AWD/safety branding, not realizing a FWD Focus/Rogue/CX5/etc., etc., with proper winter tires is far more capable in wintry conditions than is a Subaru with all-season (read: no-season) tires.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        Let me add my accolades to what thegamper posted.I have long lambasted Subaru’s “feel good” advertising and marketing as some of the worst treacle since Saturday morning sugary cereal commercials.

        On the way home for work, I was behind an Outback and a Dodge Journey. If I didn’t know the differences between the two, I’d say they could be the same car.

        Hell, I think I’d rather have the Journey, especially the one with the Pentastar V6, with it’s sweet 283 HP…

  • avatar
    gtem

    “First, it’s no secret I haven’t fathered a demanding brood of overfed kids.”

    How does it feel knowing that you will die and not leave any legacy to the world?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      It’s not so bad.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Having not had any children of my own until I was approximately 37 years old – I think for men, children usually fall into the: “Can’t miss what you don’t have” category.

        • 0 avatar
          Sub-600

          My neighbor was 59 years-old when he finally got one past the goalie. It was the year I got my Charger. I said to him “Some guys have kids, some guys get a Hemi”. I won’t repeat what he said to me, lol.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      I never really look at the legacy aspect of having children. On some levels I’m a pretty reluctant parent, especially when my entire weekend is sucked up by events that I don’t want to do. I will say that the best thing about having kids in my opinion is a truly unconditional love. I really don’t think you can get that sort of feeling anywhere else. Not to mention pride. One of my kids is a pretty great athlete. It is pretty darn satisfying to watch her stomp the hopes and dreams from her opponents and their parents lol.

      But, I think I fairly easily spend $1000 a month on travel teams, club dues, etc just to keep my kids busy. That isn’t to mention all the other incidentals of supporting kids. I could buy another house right now if I cashed in their college funds. Buy a boat with the grocery bill. Its not lost on me that I could take some great vacations, drive a Porsche, etc if I didn’t have kids.

      I certainly wouldn’t encourage selfish people to have kids and it is definitely not all rainbows and unicorns. But for those who have kids, they will all tell you that their life wouldn’t be complete without them. I don’t know what could be a better sales pitch really.

      • 0 avatar
        Sub-600

        My kid is grown, has a Master’s, and now lives overseas. She’s happy and now I can blow money on premium gas, tires, and car insurance. It’s definitely rewarding although I’m in no hurry for grandkids.

    • 0 avatar

      There are plenty of people on the planet Earth including couple of billions of well educated and ambitious Indians and Chinese. So I would not worry about Europeans or Americans not having enough children. Everything will be okay, people will look different but may be more united and less nationalistic. Look at European soccer teams – how many ethnically Europeans are there now and compare with e.g. European teams circa 1966 FIFA World Cup.

      BTW congrats to Croatians – French team seems to be very strong but I am not ruling out Croatia winning World Cup. What a surprise!

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        ” So I would not worry about Europeans or Americans not having enough children. Everything will be okay, people will look different but may be more united and less nationalistic. ”

        Why are you bringing ethnicity and nationalism into this out of the blue? But since you did…

        “Look at European soccer teams – how many ethnically Europeans are there now and compare with e.g. European teams circa 1966 FIFA World Cup.”

        And why is this a fundamentally good thing? Why aren’t people ever complaining that the Senegalese or Nigerian team is too black and doesn’t have enough multi-ethnic Europeans on it?

        I want no part of this cultural-suicide cult.

        • 0 avatar

          Place holder

        • 0 avatar

          Consider Pax Romana. It was something similar to NATO and Rome was like United States of the ancient world. Rome conquered vast territories almost all known world and most of those people happily joined Pax Romana (except Germanic tribes and some other savages) because of peace and prosperity it provided for extended period of time until the fall of Roman Empire (which itself was the process that last lasted over 300 years – longer than British Empire, USA or USSR). So Romans were super advanced civilisation but you will not find Roman anywhere today. Roman culture survived but Roman people were replaced by other people – said savages (Germans, British, Hungarians and etc). Pax Romana is well documented from beginning to the bitter end, we can study how it evolved how and why it fell and what happened with peoples and cultures.

          Why do you thing that Pax Americana will be different and modern Europeans will survive for many centuries? We already see that they are actively replaced by other less advanced people who have higher potential to survive.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “We already see that they are actively replaced by other less advanced people who have higher potential to survive.”

            In European countries where the governments aren’t dead set on importing 3rd world masses and instead make an effort to bolster native birth rates, we see that this doesn’t have to be the case.

            I don’t know about you but I don’t see the US/EU paradigm of “Bomb the world, invite the world” as resulting in an advanced, stable Roman-style society in the long run.

          • 0 avatar

            You know, nobody invited Germans or Huns to come to Rome. Rome came to the dead end as an economic and political system. Roman style democracy was not perfect and turned into autocracy/dictatorship and economy based on slavery become obsolete. It was the time for Rome to die and be replaced with something more modern. Civil war was the definite sign that Rome is coming to end. Murdering Caesar made things only worse. No one could reverse historic trend.

            Historic changes may be unpleasant but necessary. Japanese came uninvited and wiped out Big Three exactly for same reasons. Note that multiple attempt by GM to transform itself failed. NUMMI and project Saturn did not help because GM ignored lessons to be learned. GM become too old and rigid to adapt and had to be destroyed and rebuilt from scratch. That’s how things turn out eventually. Everything has an expiration date. It may take hundreds of years but cannot be stopped.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          “I want no part of this cultural-suicide cult.”

          news flash: your culture was different before you arrived in this world, and it will keep changing after you’ve left it.

          you are not so important that you are the sole arbiter of what a culture “should be.”

          but, it’s pretty common in guys around their 40s to suffer from this Unwarranted Self Importance. they get it in their heads that the way things were when they were 18 was “correct” and should be forced to never change.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “How does it feel knowing that you will die and not leave any legacy to the world?”

      Incredibly liberating. I don’t care one whit about my “legacy.” I’m nobody; I don’t harbor this incredibly overinflated sense of self-importance that other nobodies concerned about their “legacies” have.

  • avatar

    In the spirit of today’s contentious political climate I will simply say, “f**k Ford!

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Call me a cynic, but it will probably suck.

    Trying is the first step toward failure.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Ford needs the Fusion to stay relevant on some of the racing circuits. It is conceivably possible that some of those circuits will start accepting “Estate” cars in place of “Saloons.” (Wagons vs Sedans)

    Personally, all the brands need to bring back the coupes. BMW is doing it with their 2/4/6/8-series models and while they’re not doing great, they do seem to be keeping their platforms selling better than the sedan-only brands.

  • avatar
    "scarey"

    Good-looking car. But looks can be deceiving. Will probably be built in Somalia with a two-cylinder variable displacement triple turbo engine, an eleven speed automatic transmission and stop/start feature. And no spare tire, just a set of tire plugs (and a foot-powered tire pump). Will MSRP at $39,999,00 for a loss leader stripped down Deuce of Base plasticky interior with toxc smell model.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Bloomberg is full of it. We will not be getting a Mondeo Estate or any kind of sport wagon. It won’t be painted brown and it won’t come with a manual. I’d guess something like a lifted Focus which would be closer to a Outback and might produce enough volume to make the bean counters happy. Enthusiasts? Not so much.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    The connection between Subaru and the actual outback is non-existent. Industrial Japan and Ayers Rock.

    Initially and for about three years until 1998, the model was the Legacy Outback. Then the Legacy part was dropped. Despite this being 20 years ago, some TTAC commenters haven’t updated their brains yet.

    So this gives Ford an opportunity. Call the hypothetical new vehicle the Ford Fusion Serengeti. The Serengeti is as divorced from Dearborn as the Outback is from Tokyo. Whew! One hurdle passed. In 20 years TTAC commenters will still call it Fusion Serengeti, even though if it’s a great success, the Fusion part was dropped in 2023. So Ford marketers will be overjoyed at the long-lasting Fusion name.

    Of course by 2038 there will be DC fast chargers all over the outback and Serengeti because these beasts will be Electro.

    Battle of the titans: Subaru Outback vs Ford Serengeti
    Wombat Central vs Hyena Home

    Of course, Serengeti is only one name choice. They could commemorate the 98% of Ontario devoid of humans, and call it the Fusion Bush. Or get 5% off import duties in China by calling it the Fusion Gobi Made in America for maximum cognitive dissonance.

  • avatar
    OzCop

    My wife would rock one of those…and we have zero young’uns at home these days. However, she does like the smaller SUV, currently a current generation Escape, Titanium edition. The slightly lower profile would be welcoming…

  • avatar
    rpol35

    Hmmmmmm…a brown station wagon on TTAC, does it have a manual transmission?

  • avatar
    S1L1SC

    I ended up buying a Ford Transig Connecg because no one had a nice, affordable wagon. So I would be all over this in 4-5 years…

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