By on June 6, 2018

I didn’t fear failure when I was young. I feared being just like everybody else, another face in the crowd. In a word, I feared being average. It seemed like a fate worse than death. Well, look at me now, living in suburbia, just another middle-aged white guy with a lawn and a 401(k) and a nagging worry that each and every racing physical I take will reveal that I do, in fact, have inoperable Stage IV cancer of the colon. “You have 42 pounds of undigested meat in there,” the doctor will sigh, “just like Elvis.”

The universe depends on my average-ness. I work three jobs and I pay a truly astounding amount of taxes to at least five separate governmental entities. I haven’t taken a non-working vacation since 2006. There is not a single assistance program anywhere for which I qualify. About a decade ago I decided to go back to school in the evenings and get my doctorate in literature. “As a 35-year-old white man,” the dean told me, “you wouldn’t be eligible for any of our assistantships.”

“Not a problem,” I replied, “I’ll pay cash. How much does the degree cost?”

“Well…” he huffed. “There’s no actual cash price per se because everybody is on assistance, which is only fair given today’s bigoted climate.”

“So I can’t pay to go to school, because nobody pays and you don’t know how much I would have to pay, because there’s no cash price for presumed bigots who are not on assistance because they’re ineligible for assistance.”

“I’m not sure that’s a fair way to phrase it.” Each and every day I have a better idea of what motivated the character of “D-FENS” in Falling Down. He, too, was an average fellow.

As fate would have it, I have a perfectly average car, and a perfectly average payment. Two of them, actually, although I only have a payment on one of them. Let’s see how they are doing.


Experian says that the average car payment is $523 per month. Amazingly enough, the payment on my Accord is $517 a month. That’s spooky close. I have six more of those payments to make and then I will own my Accord free and clear.

Last week, we cleared the 60k mark on the odometer, which means I should get some service done. The arrogant paucity of Honda’s warranty encouraged me to quit dealership servicing some time ago, a pattern I won’t break this time. The only relevant items on the recommended list are a transmission fluid change and a fuel filter replacement. Since this car occasionally sees light track use it has fairly frequent brake service and oil changes off the schedule.

Surely you won’t be surprised to hear that nothing’s gone wrong with my Accord. The general level of NVH seems to be climbing a bit, which is fairly typical with Hondas. The paint remains notable for its fragility. Two of the deepest chips on the hood are now the resigned burnt sienna of early-onset rust. I could have it fixed, but it will be less hassle to wait until the hood starts to bubble — at which point I’ll hit it with a sanding disc and paint the whole thing Rustoleum flat black in an ironic tribute to the Challenger T/A 392.

I’d like to trade the Accord in on a Challenger T/A 392. I would also like to trade it in on an Energy Green 2018 Civic Si coupe. I will do neither of these things because the idea of having no payment is simply too appealing. One of my readers did me the courtesy of locating a brand-new “6-6” coupe in California. “Last chance if you want it,” he said. I do kind of want it, but not enough to reset the payment clock.

As the photo above indicates, I’ve been using the coupe to shuttle my road bike around. It performs this task very well. It performs all tasks very well. The sheer competence of the thing has afflicted me with a disturbing sort of ennui. “How many things there are here,” the sage said in the market, “that I do not want!” In the past few months I’ve driven most of the current German iron up to the S63 AMG. I would not trade my Accord for the S63 AMG. Not even if there was no cash involved. If I want something ponderous I’ll drive my Silverado.

So the next time we discuss my little grey Honda, probably around the 75k mark, it will be paid off and, I hope, causing no trouble. There are a few things I might do for it. I happen to have a very expensive “J-pipe” sitting in my basement. It would make the car louder. I could K-Tune it for extra revs. I could get a license plate frame which says “My other car is also a Honda Accord Coupe.”

The other car, as some of you will remember, is my 2013 Accord V6. I am not making payments on this one, which is nice because I’m never sure if it’s going to come home on the wrecker. Together we have combined for five Honda Challenge wins in five starts so far this year. This past weekend I raced alone in class because the S2000s and engine-swapped Integras have stopped showing up. I can’t blame them. I reset the track record on Sunday by a full 1.7 seconds. So I’m forced to race against non-Hondas. To paraphrase a boast frequently seen on the back of diesel-powered Dodge trucks, my Accord is eatin’ Mustangs and shittin’ BMWs. It is remarkably fun to drive. It sounds somewhat crazed at the peak of its rev range. It destroys two brand-new $312 Toyo Proxes RR tires every one hour and fifteen minutes of operating time. The front ones, obviously. The rear ones do nothing. They just hold up the bumper.

As soon as I sew up the regional championship for 2018 I’m going to move to the Sport Touring class within NASA, where I will get to run against everything from turbo Miatas to Camaros. It should be fun.

Last week I was looking for something in my photo archives and I ended up taking a self-guided tour of all the neat cars I used to have and drive. Porches and Phaetons and CL55s and S8s and many things besides. The person who bought all those cars was the same person I am now, but I don’t have a good handle on what drove him. It’s not average to own three Porsches at the age of 32. It’s super-average to drive an Accord to work at the age of 46. Call it regression to the mean. I’m alright with it. The water is fine in the middle. Come on in.

Just for the amusement of you track rats, here’s the opening laps of Sunday’s race. The back tires had just been swapped and they were frosty cold, which is why it takes me about three minutes to start really putting pace on people. Have a great weekend, everyone!

[Image: Jack Baruth/TTAC]

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94 Comments on “Long-term Update: 2014 Accord EX-L V6 6MT at 60,000 Miles (and 2013 Accord EX-L V6 6MT, Too!)...”


  • avatar
    Sub-600

    Does that bicycle contraption mess up your backup camera and/or sensors?

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      No sensors on this car. It makes the camera useless. I look behind me the way human beings did before we evolved sonar.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        I’ll glance behind as well, but to me, the camera provides a better view.

        Can’t judge distance to save my life, but I almost feel like I could parallel-park the Titanic using the backup camera in my Accord.

        Yes, the “no payment” thing is nice! Despite that, it’ll be six years with this car next year, and that’s hitting a “sweet spot” in terms of trade-in value, along with just wanting something different. (Last time, I went almost seven years, got lowballed on the trade, and ended up with a minimum monthly payment at the upper range of my comfort level.) So probably around this time next year, I’ll probably trade up to an Accord Touring 2.0T, despite my misgivings about the powertrain, which I’ve detailed elsewhere in many of these Comments at length.

        • 0 avatar
          vvk

          I am the opposite. Even when I had my Traverse I would only use the camera as a supplement. I have a very keen sense of distance thanks to shooting bows all my life, but don’t trust the camera view. Also, when renting, I have found that on many cars the view is too low. Great for seeing a small child, which is its primary purpose.

  • avatar
    DownUnder2014

    Interesting!

    It is nice to see a review on these, and I am jealous of it (as we never got the Coupe, let alone the V6/6-speed Manual configuration)!

  • avatar
    ajla

    “the idea of having no payment is simply too appealing.”

    “Call it regression to the mean. I’m alright with it. The water is fine in the middle”

    Wow, I never thought I’d see a Baruth write such things.

  • avatar
    BobinPgh

    Jack, sounds like you’re not getting enough fiber in your diet. I recommend Metamucil every morning for the rest of your life, it even helps lower cholesterol! You, in fact, probably received Metamucil when you were in the hospital and I am sure your doctor recommends it too.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    ‘One of us, one of us’. And nice reference to what I believe was Michael Douglas’ best role. Underappreciated, except by some of us middle-aged ‘family providers’.

  • avatar
    I_Like_Pie

    I have that same bike. Same groupset and everything. It was made right down the road from where I am sitting right now.

    Lynskey makes the best bike frames…period.

    Nice

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I’ve been very happy with it so far.

      I also have an Urbano that is a little better speccdd and a Pro29 that is loaded. No RAGRETS.

    • 0 avatar
      srh

      Well, Lynskey makes bike frames.

      Calling them the “best” requires some support. There are many vectors to evaluate. Weight? Performance? Reliability? Looks?

      I’ve had a Lynskey and sold it. For my uses, my custom TiCycles is better in every way. Heck, my Lynskey was no “better” than the $1000 Chinese Ti frame that I rode for 12 years and more than 50,000 miles.

      • 0 avatar
        4drSedan

        I have a Seven titanium Axiom SL. Not sure of its reputation as compared to a Lynskey but I like it. Thank Odin for the carbon fork and bars. It’s definitely a rougher ride than a full carbon bike.

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        Which reminds me… I need to send TiCycles a set of specs for dirtjump 3″ rise bars.

        Some people HATE Lynskey. And there are definitely bad ones out there. That’s why rich people ride Moots.

      • 0 avatar
        I_Like_Pie

        If you know what you are doing…Lynskey frames direct from the factory are less than $1000

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    My wife and I just paid off her truck and got the released title in the mail. What a fantastic feeling. 5 months to go on my car lease and we’ll be down to just our mortgage.

    Incidentally, I’m reminded of just how well engineered and competent Accords are. Had to drive my dad to conduct some business an hour away yesterday and we took his ’01 Accord. Still tight and virtually rattle free, and tracks strait and true on the highway. Only 109,000 on the clock with tons of life left it in after 17 years.

  • avatar
    manbearpig

    Glad I can work on cars, I’ve never had and will never have a car payment in my life.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Of course you have a car payment. It’s just a payment in time.

      Take the amount of time you’ve spent working on the car, multiply it by your rate, add the cost of everything that wouldn’t be replaced on a car under five years old, divide it by the number of months you’ve had it. That’s your payment.

      • 0 avatar
        manbearpig

        Even if you look at it that way, I pay no where near $500 a month. Plus, I don’t have a “rate” for something I consider a hobby. It’s not my profession.

        I live to learn and work with my hands. It’s called skills. It’s not a negative cost, it’s a positive one.

        • 0 avatar
          ktm

          No, its a negative cost. You just have not thought all the way through it. For every hour you spend on your car, that is an hour that you could have done something else. Tinkering to tinker is a hobby; after a while you get tired of spending the time to fix things.

          I say this as a guy who has a project car and maintains a fleet of 5 vehicles for the family. I do all maintenance, all repairs. Want to go to the beach with the family on a Sunday? Can’t, wife’s car is having some issues that I need to address.

          Want to go golfing with a buddy? Can’t, need to do routine maintenance on the cars as that is the only time I have free.

          It is all a negative cost.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “It is all a negative cost.”

            No, it is not. It sounds like the work you do is out of some type of obligation than out of any desire to be doing it.

            However, it isn’t the case for everyone that they’d rather go golfing or go to the beach over working on a car.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            No it is not at all a negative cost. Many people fall for the falacy that they should value their time at the effective hourly rate that they earn in the day job. Fact is for salaried employees working extra time doesn’t get you extra money. For hourly workers it might be possible to earn extra money, and at higher than their standard rate, but that is only if there is overtime available.

            Even if you could gain extra money by working at your job for more hours how do the rates compare. So if you pay someone $100/hr to fix your car but you only could earn an extra $50 per hour it is a positive cost if you can do it yourself even if you would take 50% longer.

            But if you don’t have the means to earn additional money with that time then you are definitely a net positive Doing it yourself as you didn’t have to spend that $100.

            Now if you want to start comparing the value of time to leisure activities you can. So is golfing worth $66/hr to you plus the greens fees? For me I’d say no. For you the answer may be different.

            Then comes the actual cash costs. If you spend that $100 on getting your car fixed will you still have the money for the greens fees? Again that all depends on the individual’s own circumstances.

        • 0 avatar
          srh

          That’s great. So what you’re saying is that the more time you spend fixing your car, the further ahead you get!

          Fortunately there is a virtually limitless supply of broken cars. You’re rich!

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            My comment is in disagreement to what “ktm” replied, not to what “manbearpig” initially said.

            I don’t think fixing an old car means “I don’t have any costs at all!!! My time is worthless! Tinker lifestyle FTW!!”

            I also don’t think working on cars is a burden and that I’d be happier spending the time golfing or going to the beach. So it’s not *all* negative cost.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Yes for every hour he spends working on his car instead of paying someone to do it he has more money left in his pocket. So yeah fixing it yourself is getting ahead. Now if fixing it yourself prevents you from earning money and the amount you earn per hour is greater than you’d pay yes you are getting behind by doing it yourself.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          I like to write.

          When I write, I get paid. I take that money and I give it to the bank.

          I don’t try to convince myself that this means I don’t have a car payment.

      • 0 avatar
        AtoB

        “Of course you have a car payment. It’s just a payment in time.

        Take the amount of time you’ve spent working on the car, multiply it by your rate, add the cost of everything that wouldn’t be replaced on a car under five years old, divide it by the number of months you’ve had it. That’s your payment.”

        That’s an extended warranty, not a car payment.

        Tomato/Potato you say? What’s the difference?

        If you miss “payments” on the warranty your car maybe dosen’t work.

        If you miss actual payments you wake up one morning and find your car gone.

    • 0 avatar
      ktm

      ajila, I have a 1972 240z with an LS1 that I built. I enjoy tinkering with cars when it is something I want to do. I even said as much in my reply to manbearpig (tinkering is a hobby). I was pointing out that wrenching on your own car to keep it maintained and to do all your repairs is a negative cost because your time is money. If you enjoy doing everything, to include losing 6 hours for a clutch replacement, great! But don’t think that it is a positive cost, you are trying to convince yourself of that.

      I am also not talking about tinkering; I am talking about, for instance, (staring at you Ford) having to replace an oil adapter gasket that requires I drain 14 quarts of coolant and 6 quarts of oil for an $18 part, then having to clean everything up, and properly dispose of the fluids. I am $140 into it for just the replacement coolant, oil, filter, and gasket; for another $120 I could just have a shop do it and call it good. However, I do it not because I want to, not because I enjoy it, but because I still have a hard time paying for something I can do.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “But don’t think that it is a positive cost, you are trying to convince yourself of that.”

        It is possible I don’t understand the concepts of “negative cost” and “positive cost” in the context of what we are talking about. So feel free to elaborate on those.

        Using your examples, if I have 6 hours of free time that I can either spend fixing my car or doing anything else and I choose to spend that time working on my car, I don’t see where the “negative” comes in at because I’ll enjoy the time working on my car more than the other options.

        I get the “time is money” thing, but under that logic, me doing *anything* that isn’t maximum income-generating is a “negative cost”. So the “cost” of spending 6 hours fixing my clutch is the same as 6 hours watching Netflix or 6 hours jazz dancing at a club.

        Regardless of the “cost” terminology, my interpretation of your earlier comment was that fixing your own vehicle is a negative undertaking in someone’s life because it takes time away from other preferable social/leisure activities. And I disagree with that conclusion because working & maintaining vehicles *is* my preferred free-time activity.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    I enjoyed watching you reel ’em in after getting around the Mustang. Great video, Jack.

  • avatar
    SilverCoupe

    A friend of mine who just turned 40 yesterday replaced his older Accord Coupe with a new one for his wife. She is happy with the Accords. For himself, he got a Porsche Cayman. ‘Cause, why not, if you can? (He has an older pickup and a restored VW Bus, too)

    I have been payment free on my A5 for seven years, but I may eventually want to upgrade to an S5 – not in lime green though!

  • avatar
    jonsey

    What are your three jobs? I know you write for R&T and have an IT job during the day…

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I do some management and tech consulting. It used to be 70% of my income but when I started working with R&T I let most of it go so I could travel without interruption.

      That’s part of the reason I don’t spend the kind of money I used to.

  • avatar
    mdanda

    I counted the use of “I” nineteen (19) times in the leading paragraphs! And the use of “Accord”? Zero (0)

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    well, i don’t don’t know who that bozo was and it doesn’t matter. what matters is, do you or do you not have a PhD, Mr. Baruth?

    Cool video. One day, I’ll get started at Watkins Glen. One day.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      My mother has a PhD in education from UVA. It was quite an education for her to go back to school after almost thirty years, even having spent most of them as a computer science professor. Higher education is now a misnomer.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    “I would also like to trade it in on an Energy Green 2018 Civic Si coupe.”

    YES! I am glad to know I’m not the only one who digs that color on the Si coupe (or the Civic coupe itself, for that matter).

    Can’t abide by that silly rear spoiler Honda slaps on it, though.

  • avatar
    srh

    I was tempted by that 2017 Accord Coupe in California until I looked into it. The dealer has added the “Honda Factory Performance” package which is basically $6000 (claimed) worth of boy-racer body-modifications, and they’re asking MSRP. With all the ugly crap on it, I’d want a substantial discount.

    I’m curious why you’re interested in the Civic si as an alternative. I’m looking for an affordable, peppy coupe to replace my BMW 4-series which is almost off-lease but the Accord Coupe seems substantially peppier than the si and the NA 6 soo much nicer than the turbo 1.5L.. That said I’ve driven neither.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      The Civic Si is very much a subset of the Accord’s virtues and the engine ain’t close. But it’s new and cute.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        It’s also got great steering and one of the best manuals you can buy. It feels racy. I wish Honda would have made it a bit quicker, passed on the boy-racer rear wing, given the radio actual knobs, and skipped all the silly electronic instrumentation.

  • avatar
    jvossman

    I’ve admired your 6M Honda and your writings about it since you bought. Is that actually a Lynskey ti gravel bike? I’m finding gravel riding (in Miami this means canals and levees) are much safer and relaxing than actual road. Enjoy your writings very much!

  • avatar
    geozinger

    392 Chally is my old man dream car. It could be sh!t brown, I’d still love it.

  • avatar
    ZCD2.7T

    Fun watching you on track.

    It must be REALLY fun to be able to absolutely put the motor on everything in your class, while also keeping up in the corners. No wonder everyone else stopped showing up! ;-)

  • avatar
    rjg

    I just turned 44 and have developed a bad crush on a Dodge Charger Scat Pack. Must be a mid-life crisis thing. Never had any interest in American cars / muscle cars before.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    Had this conversation with my wife this morning. My DD Accord-with-HIDs TSX is long since paid for, and her RDX has about a year to go, meaning we’ll be car payment free for the first time in our 10-year marriage. Usually I’d hustle out to spend $500/mo (and we treat “$500 a month” like drag racers treat “9-second car”, anything up to $599.99 qualifies) on a new whip as soon as the title hits the mailbox.

    But Christ there’s nothing interesting in a people mover for that money. I thought about buying a new Accord, but there’s no way that’s worth ~$500/mo more than the 95k mile TSX I have. I had a TLX loaner a few weeks ago and it had the fit and finish of a Lada the day after nickel vodka night. Lease an SUV like a Grand Cherokee (can’t buy a well equipped one for $500/mo without a 5-figure down payment, ugh) and that’s so…ordinary. Toyed with the idea of leasing a Giulia but I don’t want to be throwing the snow tires on the S2000 in the winter because the Alfa crapped itself AGAIN.

    Nope, just going to sit back and stash some cash until something truly appealing comes along. The TSX does just fine.

    • 0 avatar
      Cactuar

      Try the payment-free lifestyle for at least a year before jumping on a new car, I’d say. There is an emotional thing going on when you see how much cash you can pile up each month because you don’t owe anyone a dime (mortgage excluded). In our 10-year marriage we’ve been debt free for three years and we’re not going back to debt slavery, no freakin way. There’s not a toy in this world that would make me trade my financial independence.

      5/5, would recommend this lifestyle again.

      • 0 avatar
        srh

        Totally this. Put the car payment in an account, and pledge to pay cash for your next car (even if there’s 0% financing, still pay cash).

        When it comes time to buy a new car there are few better ways to convince yourself to skip the $1000 heated shifter knob than realizing that it’s not $15/month, it’s **$1000**. That mentality is how you build real wealth with few real sacrifices.

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          Funny, I thought you built wealth by arbitraging cheap money and high investment returns, using other people’s money at low interest to buy things while letting your own money generate compound returns.

          Huh, who knew?

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      Yeah, if they’re well cared for, I’d gladly take an old 6-speed TSX and an S2000 over shopping for anything new, regardless of my financial situation.

  • avatar
    4drSedan

    Jack!

    I need your input here. 6 Months ago I bought a 2017 Accord Sport Sedan, 4 Cyl, 6 MT (Save the Manuals).

    I cannot get comfortable in that car to save my life, to the point that I am thinking of trading it in. Please tell me if you have experienced any of the following….

    1) The steering wheel is too small. It is impossible to rest one’s elbow on the door armrest and comfortably grip the wheel.
    2) The Speedometer is so big (and again small wheel) that lowering the steering wheel to a comfortable position cuts through the top 13 of the speedo.
    3. The seat cuts into the thighs numbing the legs and the headrest (er, restraints) are angled so far forward it forces one’s chin into the chest.
    4. The distance to 3rd and 5th gear is loooong as is the clutch pedal travel(I’m thinking of getting a clutch pedal block).

    Is it me or the car?

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      1) I think that’s par for the course in a modern car, particularly one of Accord width or more. A Civic would have the same size wheel but the door would be closer.
      2) Yeah, it was a stupid design meant to make you pay extra for the upscale models.
      3) I’ve heard a lot of BAD THINGS about Accord LX, Sport, and EX seats. My EX-L seats are okay but nothing better than okay.
      4) Mine is the same way. My Accord race car has three completely re-positioned pedals. It’s not that tough to do.

      So I’d say it’s mostly the car, not you. Take a look at the 2018 model, or have the pedals adjusted a bit. Find a set of EX-L or TLX seats.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      @4drSedan, I hear you. And wonder if that is not one reason why pick-ups are becoming so popular.

      Had to return a rental Kia Optima last year as after 1/2 hour, as the headrest pushed my head and neck so far forward that I could not drive it.

      Recently returned a rental Audi A3 within 15 minutes as I could not get comfortable in its seat.

      Having trouble finding vehicles with seats that don’t create a sciatic problem and cause my right leg to go numb. The less bolstering the better, for me.

      Having problems finding vehicles that have arm rests at the proper height for long drives. Wish I could get a new car with ‘vent’ windows so that I could open one and drive with my arm on the doorframe, like John Milner.

      Sick of speedometers that go to 240+. In many instances that means that only 1/3 of the speedo is ever used. The gradations are too small and the part of the speedo most used is often obscured rather than being at or near the top and in full view.

      Too many vehicles have pedal positioning and pedal size are made for people with ‘baby’ feet.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        I haven’t had much trouble getting comfortable in cars (I guess I’m just shaped exactly average), but the speedometer thing is hilarious. My brick-shaped truck-based SUV that feels light in the front above 80 mph has a 160-mph speedo, which I chuckle every time I see. (Toyota claims the thing has a top speed of 137 mph, which just sounds like a guaranteed rollover accident.)

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        @ 4drSedan & Arthur Dailey – Yep, the headrest thing seems to be a relatively recent phenomenon. Apparently, the less gap between a crash test dummy’s head and the headrest (sorry, “head restraint”), the better test results end up being. There are some models and trim levels with fore-aft adjustment of the headrest but many without. And some default to a Slouchy McSlouch position. For example, see: https://www.clublexus.com/forums/nx-models-2015-present/768152-nx-headrest-too-close-uncomfortable-w-proposed-solution-merged-threads.html

        On the non-F-Sport Lexus NX, it’s bad enough that for the second half of an all-day drive, I actually removed the driver’s headrest and re-installed it facing backwards. Admittedly this was kind of stupid, but it was a worthwhile calculated risk IMO. (And yeah, I’d be singing a different tune had I been in an accident.)

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          I tried the same in the Optima. Still wasn’t comfortable. So I removed it for the drive back to the rental office.

          But then I am old enough to have driven cars that did not have head ‘restraints’.

  • avatar
    cammark

    I expected a J-pipe install (long-style, deleting the third cat) to make more noise too. It really only changes the noise with the exception of a small RPM range at partial throttle where it is a bit louder.

  • avatar
    raph

    39 more months and I’ll be in no payment land which will wrap near continuous car payments since 2002. (un)fortunately for me I suppose the cost of SE Mustangs are fast outpacing my paycheck making it an easy choice as I hear the upcoming GT500 is supposed to be somewhere in the neighborhood of 80k.

    In any event it will be nice to have that income freed up and put to more practical and productive uses.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I never liked the look on Accord coupe. And I don’t understand the point in car racing. At least, I don’t understand why race Mustang vs Accord? this activity in fact should be forbidden. Why burn gas needlessly? Why destroy tires? If the engine was custom built – I understand. This is the test for your creation. But if you race Honda engine… Honda already tested it.

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    I get the idea of not having a payment but at my age, I’m tired of being my own warranty.

    Yes, you’re paying several hundred a month for a car but you’re getting peace of mind for that price.

    The car I bought with cash? Well, I didn’t have 30 grand lying around not doing anything so I have to do all the wrenching myself.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      “I get the idea of not having a payment …Well, I didn’t have 30 grand lying around”

      I have exactly same feeling. so I buy cars that cost way less than 30 grand. In fact, less than 20 grand. And I drive long years. By the time I buy next, I already collected some cash. And with all the deals that available, buying new is better than used.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      Agree 100% that there’s nothing fun about busting your knuckles while the sun beats down, the mosquitoes eat you, and the neighbors’ hired Salvadorans conduct their 500th consecutive Saturday morning performance of two stroke blower concerto in A minor.

      But as cringeworthy as $120 an hour to put it on the lift and bust someone else’s knuckles is instead, $5,000 a year of car note that you’re not paying will put it up there for quite a while.

      How often do they really break?

  • avatar
    65corvair

    I ’14 Accord four door, 4 cyl with 6 speed manual had 113,000 miles. Great car, one trip to the dealer for a batter sensor recall. Front brakes last month, with I did. Had a few miles left but was going on a vacation in the mountains and didn’t want to worry about the pads getting too thin. As for paint quality, it great. One 1 mm chip on the hood that didn’t make it through the primer. Tires were great, over 70 K on first set, since winter was coming I got new one.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Not economically viable.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    One of these days my vehicle will actually be the right choice for me and I’ll keep it long enough to have it paid off for awhile.

    I had just paid off the G8 GXP when I decided it was too fast for Seattle driving and not luxurious enough.

    I paid off the LS460 early to make shopping for its replacement easier, but I would otherwise have had about a year left on the loan. It turned out that with two kids and a full kitchen setup a sedan, even a big one, wasn’t a good road trip car.

    I’ve got two years and change left on the LX570, and so far it’s doing just fine. The thing will last for the next three decades if I want it to, and I kind of hope it does. It’s built like a tank underneath; my mechanic looked it over, seven years old with 67k miles, and said “Everything under there looks like new except the brake pads.”

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Nice race video. Did you write an article describing the mods to the Accord for racing?
    .
    .

  • avatar
    pwrwrench

    Interesting video. I thought that Mustang was heading for the grass at least three times.
    That track looks hectic for motorcycles. Too many barriers close to the pavement. That might be because of the camera lens.

    I have never had a car payment. In my younger days even organized crime would not have loaned me money. It’s not that I did not pay for things, but I had no credit history.
    Later I did not see the percentage for me in getting a car loan. Of the ten or so cars I have had in fifty years only one was new. Got that mostly for the S O at the time. Paid cash because of an inheritance.
    Had a mortgage for ten years, but life changed and I was able to pay off the remainder. Still in the house another tens years after.
    I realize most people don’t, or can’t, do things this way. I have no monthly payments except utilities. Of course there are taxes and insurance.
    With the cars I’ve had I did 99% of repairs and maintenance. I was in the vehicle repair business for 30 years. A different situation to most others.
    Racing anything, cars, motorcycles, bicycles, or belt sanders makes no sense from a certain viewpoint. From some viewpoints life in our present society, or any other in history, makes no sense either.
    “Everyone should do what makes them happy.”, said the woman as she smiled and licked the cow’s ass.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I’m living sort of a parallel automotive life. I bought a 2014 Fusion Energi a little more than four years ago, it’s just about to roll through 55,000 miles. So far, it’s gotten two oil changes and a set of tires. Oh, and $9000 worth of bodywork repairs after some young woman clobbered me in the driver’s door on I-75 in Florida.

    I’ve used it as a daily driver for the last four years. Both my daughters have learned to drive in it. We’ve loaded four of us and a weekend’s worth of baggage, and headed off to visit my mother. It does everything well, it’s comfortable around town and great on the highway. Fueling cost of the plug in hybrid drivetrain is very low, but the trunk is half taken up with the battery. The paint looks like it did the day it came home, and the interior has very little wear, other than the spot in the carpet where I push off with my right leg when getting out.

    The only downside is that I’ve gotten a taste to do some track driving, and I’m not willing to put the hybrid battery through that sort of abuse, so I’ve been renting, which I don’t really like. I’m really sort of pissed that Ford is going to stop selling them here. Not so much for myself, I don’t need this much space any more and will get something smaller next time.

    The reason cars like this exist is that they just work for a lot of people.

  • avatar
    SWA737

    Now you can afford to buy an airplane.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    My payment on my wife’s Odyssey is $514/month. I guess I’m average too…

  • avatar
    ex_machina

    Jack Baruth – You are me.

    43yo, white father of 3; driving a 2006 Acura TSX 6M with 150k miles (turned this morning) who can’t find a “reasonable dad car” in the new or used car market which I can justify giving up the TSX in trade for a car payment. The TSX is competently just amazing enough at everything I throw at it.

    The only (2) vehicles that peak my spidey senses are the (completely not reasonable) Porsche Cayman and (possibly justifiable as my oldest turns 16 and can take over ownership of the TSX) Subaru BRZ.

  • avatar
    pb35

    The payment on my SS is about $475/mo. My wife’s Volvo is 11 years old and paid for. I’m about to take it in for service next week. It’s been over a year since it’s seen a lift so I expect to make the equivalent of about 4 or 5 payments on it at once.

  • avatar

    Guess I’ll join the 40+ Dad with a payment club LOL

    40 years old, two cars, one car payment.

    2016 Honda CRV EX-L AWD – Family car, $365/month lease. It’s been from Portland to Dallas to Seattle and back to Portland again with no issues.

    1998 Ford Escort SE Wagon 5MT – Bought this with money that I had won playing craps, because while living in Seattle, we had one car and everyday was a living hell not having another car. After a few modifications, I’m starting to enjoy driving it now.

    I’ve thought about upgrading both cars, but since I work from home and my (pregnant) wife is a SAHM, we don’t drive much now…so it doesn’t make financial sense to upgrade our cars and monthly payments for them to sit in the garage and driveway, respectively.

    All that being said, I hope to be able to get my dream car someday…2012+ Jaguar XK.

  • avatar
    Jacob

    Sadly, these old Accords is the only way we can still enjoy the power and sounds of the Honda V6 engines in future. The 2018 Accord comes with only two engine options, 1.5 and 2.0L 4-cylinder turbo. These are nice and pretty adequate engines, but gone are the times when your four-door family Accord could shred the tires and accelerate to 60mph in 5.5 seconds (20 years ago, that was Porsche territory).

  • avatar
    Shortest Circuit

    I wonder how often the ‘stang driver has checked his mirrors. Nice to see the traction come in around the 2-3min mark, before that some corners are stitched together in 4-5 parts, but after that… nice lines.

  • avatar
    Carroll Prescott

    I can relate. My freshman year in college where I applied for student grants was an eye-opening affair, my parents, a father who was an E-6 in the Navy and my mother, a part time hourly wage bookkeeper, owned a house (bank financing with monthly mortgage payments), and had a five year old and a seven year old vehicle in the driveway, made too much money (!) for me to get more than $40 per semester in grants. I had a year younger sibling but she didn’t add much of a burden in the eyes of college financial aid folks.

    Fast forward decades and my stupidity in employment had me stay with a business that was freshly hatched and bit the dust after five years (not my business); I worked six days a week, had no pay increase in all the time I worked and I took one vacation for a week. When the place went belly up, I was going on 50 and had vast experience in the food/restaurant/retail business, yet it did not take long to sense that grey hair and a birth date in the 1960’s was a red flag that I was not worth hiring.

    Life is a bitch – but now I work for the best place ever having also taken my skills to do web design – this client of mine recognized I was not just an average chap and offered me contract work outside of web stuff and soon I was hired on a part time basis and now work full time and I am so happy I was not hired for any of the scum companies that actually interviewed me.

    I’ve had to adjust my lifestyle down for the pay that I receive, but I truly am blessed.

    I hope you will make the most out of your situation and I am sorry you own Honduhs.

  • avatar
    WildcatMatt

    “YOU FORGOT THE BRIEFCASE!”

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