By on February 9, 2018

All-new 2018 Jeep® Wrangler Rubicon

There’s your manifesto! This year’s Jeep Super Bowl ad was more than a breath of fresh air in the middle of turgid political pronouncements and vapid virtue signaling. It was a reminder that Fiat Chrysler Automobiles has a rock-solid grip on what its core product is and how to develop said product. In fact, other than the temporary aesthetic disaster of the square-headlight YJ, it’s fair to say that the descendants of the CJ-7 have been on a pretty solid path for the past 30 years.

Has anybody else managed their heritage brand this well for this long? The short answer is “maybe.”


Ford’s introduction of the Telnack-styled 1979 Mustang reversed the marque’s slide through elephantine Mustang Grande and Pinto-based Mustang II. There was a turbo engine from the jump and the mighty 5.0-liter from 1982 forward. You could argue that things went a little pear-shaped with the 1995 SN95 body and the gutless SOHC 4.6-liter in 1996, but there were twin-cam Cobras available and of course the 2004 Cobra “Terminator” will remain a classic until the heat death of the universe.

Chevrolet put the Vette on the right track in 1984 and it’s been there ever since, making the jump to no-excuses world-class performance with the C5 in 1997 and now taking on the world with the terrifying new ZR1. Not all of the product has been completely compelling, particularly when you’re talking about the automatic-transmission convertibles that make up the bulk of sales. But the underlying technology has been pretty freaking neat for a long time and the car has never fallen behind the competition in terms of raw pace, particularly around a racetrack.

All things considered, however, I think Jeep has done the best job, particularly since the Wrangler is the only one of these vehicles that does genuine volume any more. Feel free to disagree. Or maybe you think some other company is doing better… the BMW M3? The Mitsubishi Eclipse? The… Toyota Camry?

[Image: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

74 Comments on “QOTD: Who’s Managing Their Heritage Brand Best?...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Jeep Wrangler
    Chevrolet Corvette
    Ford F-series
    Ford Mustang
    Toyota Corolla (have been sold in the USA since 1966)

    Wanting to recognize LONG LIVED nameplates. They all are fulfilling their missions in a way that both honors their heritage and meets the modern consumers expectations.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      If one adds defunct nameplates then one should consider The Crown Victoria/Panther line which was the longest running BOF car line. IIRC the frame configuration originated in the 50’s.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Jeep’s a good example. I’d add:

    Mazda Miata
    Mercedes S-class and SL
    VW GTI

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      I think S-class is the one. For decades it’s been a subtle but universal way to show you have money, just as much at home in Beverly Hills or Monaco as it is in a Midwestern doctors office parking lot.

      Comfortable ride, high-speed stability, minimal sporting pretensions, plenty of power, and a technological preview of things “coming soon” to lesser cars. All of these have been pretty constant through the years.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Add Range Rover, Land Cruiser, Bentley, Mini, Porsche
      But there there is Niva that been same from day 1. Fiat! What else?

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Lol @ Range Rover. It started as a utilitarian off roader and is now a bling mobile for doctor’s wives. If there has been a vehicle that has strayed further than its original mission, I can’t think of one.

        Yes, you can get pickups fully loaded unlike days of old, but you can also get them with vinyl seats, rubber floors and crank windows.

  • avatar
    bluegoose

    A lot of “Jeepers” would disagree citing the Cherokee, Renegade, and the Compass being car based. Rumors of a fully independent suspension Jeep almost incited a Jeeper Riot. Jeepers are still licking their wounds over the Patriot and Compass combo. The Wrangler and Grand Cherokee have stayed the course. The rest have deviated from it.

    • 0 avatar
      carve

      The Wrangler has gotten so big and luxurious, I’m surprised Jeep hasn’t tried to fill the hole in the market by making something renegade sized with solid axles. Think a 70% scale wrangler for 70% of the money, perhaps a bit more Spartan, and I think it’d sell like hotcakes. A modern Suzuki Samurai, or perhaps slightly bigger.

      A true successor to the original Jeep would be a modern 4-seat UTV. I think if someone made a UTV with airbags, crumple zones, a basic soft-top body and a heater and AC, that would actually probably do pretty well, too.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Think a 70% scale wrangler for 70% of the money…

        If only it cost 70% as much to produce. Ask the car makers why they don’t discount a Canyon/Colorado/Tacoma as much as a Sierra/Silverado/Tundra on a daily basis.

        • 0 avatar
          carve

          A base Accord is about $7.50 per pound. A base civic is about $6.87 per pound.

          A base Civic is 80% the price and 87% the weight, so basically 87% scale for 80% of the price. So, they make it smaller and lighter, but much of the savings is by making it less luxurious.

          Jeep making a mini-Wrangler, in the same vein that the Civic is a mini-Accord, would be a good seller, but I think they should take it even a bit further.

          A current base Jeep is about 30% bigger than a Wrangler from the early 90’s. Make it about 3000 pounds with a small turbo 4 and solid axles with a basic stereo, crank windows or plastic windows, soft top only, and a tough unibody like an XJ is fine.

          • 0 avatar
            jeffzekas

            A small size Jeep Wrangler has already been made. It was called the Suzuki Samurai. Still an awesome little vehicle, though hard to find in unmolested condition.

          • 0 avatar
            carve

            That’s why I specifically mentioned that vehicle. There are no small, capable (much less affordable) off roaders currently available in the US though.

            I think it’d be good for brand image, too, since they currently only have about 1 and 3/4 off roaders in the stable (Grand Cherokee and Cherokee trailhawk comprising the 3/4)

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          This is the exact niche I’m waiting for someone to exploit.

          My thought was actually that as fun as it’d be to imagine a solid-front axle rig, perhaps a slight softening to something like what the old Tracker was (IFS, solid rear axle), and heck, maybe even a reinforced unibody layout would work okay, although I believe part of what makes drop-top Jeep-type vehicles possible without expensive engineering is them having a frame underneath. Some kind of basic 4cyl engine, 2 speed transfer case. Set starting price just under $20k with 4wd.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          That would be a 1975 Wagoneer! Can I get one with the 401 cid V8?

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          The explosive growth in Wrangler sales has been exclusively due to it’s growth in size. For those that want a small offroader, a 2 door model is still offered. Still the unlimited outsells it by a huge ratio.

          • 0 avatar
            carve

            The 2-door base Wrangler is still 1000 pounds heavier than it was 25 years ago.

            Also, by using a modern high power-to-weight ration motor, the whole vehicle can be made much lighter than they were having to support the weight of those old 600 pound 180 hp motors

      • 0 avatar
        slap

        The problem is that a smaller Wrangler sold alongside the current Wrangler would not bring many new sales to Jeep, it would just cannibalize the current Wrangler sales.

        • 0 avatar
          carve

          You’re talking about the company that sold the Cherokee and liberty at the same time, as well as the compass and patriot and the JK alongside the JL.

          It would cannibalize some sales, but no more than the Civic cannibalizes Accord sales. Furthermore, the Wrangler has been priced out of the market for many people who’d like a cool off-roader. People who can do with less space and luxury would be new buyers who currently can’t afford a Wrangler. A mini ute could also fit a lot of places the Wrangler can’t squeeze through. It’d be fun.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            That mini-ute would also be closer to the original WW2 Jeep, actually designed to squeeze into places a bigger vehicle couldn’t go.

            Jeep has been doing what GM did in the ’50s. The 1952 Chevy, Olds, and Pontiac were all the same car. Each had different exterior clues and different trim levels, but all the parts were nearly interchangable.

      • 0 avatar
        mikeg216

        That’s called a two door wrangler sport with no options.. Good luck finding one

  • avatar
    MrIcky

    Hard to argue on Jeep. It’s been funny watching the Jeep Zealots go through the phases: 4 months ago) NO! no need for changes, it’s great as is; 2 months ago) well I guess it’s ok, but the grill looks bad- shouldn’t slope back like that! not interested; The night of 2/4/2018) hmmmmm, what can I sell to come up with a down payment….

    I’ve had conversations with at 3 jeep fanatics that have basically followed that course.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I recently read a funny tongue in cheek hater how-to guide for JK owners.

      tl;dr Now that there is a newer, more expensive Wrangler on the market, they have something to hate on and proclaim that the JK was the last “real” Jeep.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    The Chevrolet Suburban has been in continuous production since 1935. The longest such streak in automotive history. It’s still a big truck.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Heads up: new articles don’t show up unless one is logged on. This issue happened before.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Best: Miata and Power Wagon

    Worst: Jaguar

  • avatar
    Boff

    I’d slot the Porsche 911 in alongside the Wrangler. It has persisted and thrived despite its “unique” drivetrain layout, pretenders to its throne from elsewhere in the company, and the ongoing softness of the sports car market.

  • avatar
    MeJ

    Corvette for sure.
    Porsche 911
    Jeep Wrangler.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    No 911? The 996 proved to be nowhere near the apocalyptic stumble the purists proclaimed it to be.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I’m not sure where you are getting that.

      A good condition 1998 911 is worth FIVE good condition 1999 911s.

      Watercooled M96 cars are resale poison.

      The current 991 is a weird bloated puffer fish of a car with a Panamera’s worth of interior width, offering 2006 Corvette Z51 pace at 2017 Corvette ZR1 money.

      • 0 avatar
        silentsod

        If they don’t have to be current then consider the 996 the YJ of the 911 line up and it had a good run from 64-2012.

        The 997 is still a properly proportioned 911 with the same dynamics as the originals only minus a rear suspension that’s actively trying to kill you.

        I moved my SC yesterday and even though it needs some work (new shocks, some interior bits and bobs, an aftermarket A/C maybe someday) it’s a 40 year old car that still feels damn good to drive (915 gearbox notwithstanding).

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      The tradition of the 911 has been preserved in exterior design, clientele, and abstract marketing concepts, but not in fact. The old air-cooled Porsches are quite different to the new 911’s, and experienced Porsche drivers will struggle to feel a strong connection between old and new, imo.

      The 911 is still a legendary sportscar, but the modern turbocharged, rearish-engined, water-cooled, 4-wheel-steer 911’s have little in common with the air-cooled, naturally-aspirated, rear-engined cars that vanished after the 993.

      Besides the major changes, the intangibles are much different, too. There is nothing like the aromatic melange of acrid Pirelli rubber and sweet Mobil 1 synthetic wafting through the garage after an invigorating drive. Those aspects of ownership are unique to air-cooled models with engine hanging off the back axle.

  • avatar
    civicjohn

    Honda Accord.

    I’ll be back in a minute, just need to grab my helmet and flak jacket.

  • avatar
    Middle-Aged Miata Man

    Toyota Corolla. I can’t think of any other automaker (not even Jeep) that can get by for so long with a middling offering that nevertheless remains popular, yet presents no competitive advantage other than the customers’ belief that it will always start, always run, always come through for them when they need it to.

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      The same can be said for all Toyota/Lexus products. The only categories they care to lead are reliability and resale. They’ve built an empire, and it’s not hard to see why. If you have the same vehicle for a quarter century, and it operates without major problems, it will become a member of the family.

  • avatar

    I think Land Rover / Range Rover has done well with their heritage items. They frequently trot out old Defender and Range Rover models, and talk about their history and model development.

    The shape of the original Range Rover even in silhouette, is easily recognizable. People who know nothing about cars know what old and new Range Rovers look like.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    Bugatti
    Porsche

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    Probably a weird choice, but Mazda. They’ve stubbornly kept their “zoom-zoom” DNA despite the general market preferring softer/quieter-riding/roomier vehicles. The 6 is still very much recognizable in the vein of the 626, whereas the Accord of the 90’s and the Accord of today might as well be from different companies altogether.

    The sole knock against heritage is not carrying the rotary forward, but that’s more about sanity than anything else.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I’d argue Mazda jumped off the deep end with their over the top styling and “zoom-zoom” obsession. They made some fantastic “vanilla” offerings in the 80s-90s, cars that struck a good balance of utility, comfort, and had an extra little “something,” in the form of nice direct steering and competent handling, even on things like their MK1 MPVs and pickup trucks. But that was more of a “cream on top” feature rather than their very crux of the design and engineering. Now, you can argue that Mazda with their vanilla approach ended up in some dire straits, and in the modern landscape they can only exist by having a well defined niche. But I dream of a Mazda where they still develop and sell their own trucks, make a nice van, etc. My family still has an ’89 MPV with 245k miles on the clock, and had owned until last fall a ’98 Allsport MPV for 15 years. Very fond memories associate with both.

  • avatar
    TW5

    Jeep should be commended for their preservation work regarding the 2-door Wrangler. The list of features they have retained over the years is impressive considering the pressures acting on the automotive industry to make everything safer, more fuel-efficient, and more profitable. However, the Jeep brand as a whole has been dangerously diluted. The company once pursued absolute improvement in offroad performance, now they merely endeavor to be the class leader. Diluting the brand has led to questionable products like the 4-door Jeep Wrangler Unlimited, which was necessary because the Grand Cherokee was neutered after WJ.

    Mazda probably deserves the award for best management of a heritage nameplate with the Miata. The Miata seems to be essentially the same vehicle they introduced in the late 80s. The only major change I can recall is the new hardtop variant, which hardly hurts the vehicles sporting credentials. The latest generation even dropped 100kg compared to the previous gen. When does that happen in this automotive era?

  • avatar
    arach

    Ferrari.

    I think they have done a better job as even the mighty wrangler.

    5 years ago I would have cited Harley, but they’ve gone AWOL

    and I might even say mazda… problem is their heritage is mediocre at best.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    I think Jack’s ellipsis nailed it for cars … Camry. The Wrangler is up there. I’m still mad about the Mustang II. Since the headline says “Brand” props are due to Lambo and Ferrari, but neither of them has kept a single model alive, relevant, and true to it’s spirit in the way the article focuses on. The GTI has always been nice, but it’s not at all the same thing it started out as. The Miata is off to a good start, but it’s still new. All three “big 3” full size trucks are the real title holders.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    I wouldn’t agree on the Camry. Its brand recognition came from offering higher mechanical and material quality than its competitors and being worth the step up in price, so it was both desirable and a left brain victor. They’re still left-brain friendly, but since the 2007 generation haven’t felt remotely special compared to the competition. Unless Jack’s using it on a racetrack. The 3.5 was big news for a little while as well, but that was 10 years ago.

    If anything from Toyota qualifies it is the Tacoma, 4Runner, and Land Cruiser, though I think the Wrangler, RAM, F150, Miata, Suburban, and Accord have held more consistently to their defining traits over the years.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      umm… can I change my vote to Suburban?

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I agree 30-mile. The long term reliability and resale part of the Camry equation is still there, but the sensation of sitting down in one and going “holy sh*t this is well made” is long gone. As silly as it sounds, driving my beige ’96 ES300 felt “special.” Driving my wife’s ’12 Camry back to back with a new malibu/Sonata/Altima does not leave much room for differentiation. If anything, I got that “wow, this is nicer than expected” feeling when I sat in a refreshed Passat, of all things.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    First place is Land Rover with the Defenders, basic and agricultural, just like the originals.

    Second would have to be Toyota with Landcruisers, not the wagons, but the 70 Series, still rough as guts as the original FJs. The new FJ is just a hairdresser wagon, built on a cheapened Prado setup.

    I think overall Jeep (3rd place) with the Wrangler has managed to do it best in the US.

    Most of the other manufacturers seems to be hit and miss with their vehicles.

    The F150 or any pickup for that matter is not following their heritage that closely.

    The best vehicles Ford has in its stable are the Transit and Mustang. The Transit has not been reworked like the F Series into tockley enhancing soft power wagons, they still are very much the working vehicles they started out to be.

    I do know someone will state “But, but, but the F Series do have entry models”. But the Transit doesn’t have those powdery, flowery, softened pretend luxury fixtures.

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      Congrats on sending me to the Urban Dictionary!

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The Transit is wimpy compared to its US predecessor the E-Series/Econoline/Club Wagon. Take a look at the US sales, it started strong thanks to the hard working reputation of Ford trucks in general and the E-Series specifically. But look at 2017 and it is down will the good old GM twins are up. The simple reason is up time and the Transit is not holding a candle to the old E-Series of the GM twins in that department. I mean seriously who puts a Guibo in a work vehicle??? Maybe it is acceptable in your German sedan, but it isn’t acceptable in a vehicle that is expected to go 350k~500K where you have to replace it every year or every other year.

      Some will say the Mustang is staying to its roots in the fact that it is RWD but that isn’t really its true roots. Its true roots are as a stylish small step up from the smallest and cheapest car in the Ford product line, that can also be loaded up with a wide array of options to customize to each consumer’s individual taste with massive profit margins.

      So if it was true to its roots it would be built on the Focus platform and in base form would start for just a few dollars more than the Focus.

      Don’t get me wrong I’m happy the Mustang is still RWD and offers a V8, but it is not true to its original mission.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Scoutdude, aka DiM,
        I think the article is about heritage, isn’t it?

        As for the Heritage I think you are a little confused on what Heritage is.

        Try also looking at target market and how much divergence from the original concept is evident.

        Remember the E Series is not related to the Transit. I don’t know how you got that confused.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Yes but the Transit replaced the E-Series in the US so for the purposes of this article its only heritage could be considered the E-series.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Scoutdude,
            The original E Series design was heavily based on the Transit.

            The original E Series was designed to compete against the likes of the VW Van.

            The first Transit was German from the early 50s, the British made the Thames van. The British took on the Transit name in the mid 60s.

            Not all is at it appears.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            The Original Econoline/Falcon Station Bus was not based on the Transit in any way shape or form.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Um, Scoutdude,
            Re-read what I wrote. Where did I say it was based?

            Hmmm……. design is not based.

            You see Ford needed to combat Chrysler and GM with a small van in the early sixties as they came out with a VW van alternatives.

            So, Ford went and used the design for the first of the Econlines.

            The Transit and Econoline were not platformed shared, even though the Econoline is based on the Transit/Thames van.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Based I mean not platform sharing, but design.

            I do apologise.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            The design of situating the driver on top of the front axle with the engine near the front wheels is often called in the U.S. “cab over”, short for cab over engine configuration, and in Europe a “forward control” vehicle. The body styling borrowed heavily from the smaller, UK-made Ford Thames 400E van that had been in production since 1957

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Scoutdude,
            Here I some interesting info the Fordson E83W was the predecessor to the Thames van, which the body of the Econline is based on!

            Check out the image, cool van.

            http://ccmv.aecsouthall.co.uk/p356003244/h35FF7A22#h35ff7a22

            Here’s a cool British site the Fordson was also made into a miniature pickup, that would suit Vulpine down to a T.

            http://www.simoncars.co.uk/fordcv/e83w.html

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “I do apologise.”

            Big Al apologizing……….WTF?

            End days are near!

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      How is an FJ at all “built on a cheapened” Prado setup” Now, if you’re talking about the interior and such I might agree. But the bones are all the same. FJ benefits from slightly better approach/breakover/departure and wide availability of a rear locker.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        gtem,
        Here in Australia the FJ Cruiser was significantly cheaper than the Prado and it didn’t come with a diesel. The 4 litre V6 is thirsty.

        The body and interior are cheaper, I even think there are slight differences between the chassis of the two. The Prado even comes standard with a 155 litre fuel supply. Add this with the turbo diesel and you can see how desirable the Prado is.

        This doesn’t even consider comfort and off road ability. The FJ is a capable off roader, but not as good as the Prado.

        A big negative for me regarding the FJ Cruiser is it’s awful style.

        Now, live axles all round from a 70 Series (since they are based on the same platform), diesel, and a decent looking body would of made the FJ Cruiser a far better option to own. But, it was designed to look pretty (ugly really).

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Explain to me how the FJ falls short of the Prado offroad, in technical detail.

          Same front and rear suspension, same drivetrains, to the point of interchangeability. FJ has better approach/breakover/departure angles. Where does the Prado come out ahead?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      So, your best example is a vehicle that isn’t made anymore, and the rest have to be explained to death to the point where the meaning is lost.

      Excellent rambling, once again proving your extremely limited (and that’s being kind) grasp of automobiles. And it only takes you 4 replies to Scoutdude where you contradict yourself over and over to “prove” your point…which, evidently, is that you have no point.

      If anything lives up to its heritage best, it is you. Your heritage being incoherent rambling about things which you obviously know very little about.

  • avatar
    ernest

    I would argue that the F-Series pickup, in terms of units sold and profitability, is the most successful model ever sold by anyone, anywhere, in the history of the Automobile business. On that basis, I’d place the F-Series #1, Jeep #2, and the Corvette #3.

  • avatar

    I put Jaguar Numero Uno. Because of its decision to bring out the ‘remaining’ racing versions of E- and D-Type Jaguars, which were sold out in less time than it cost you to say Jeep Wrangler.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    I like your list.

    I add Tacoma as a candidate.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @pmirp1 – the Toyota Tacoma hasn’t been around all that long. It started in 1995. The Hilux has been around longer and globally is to trucks what the F Series is to trucks in USA and Canada.

  • avatar

    “This year’s Jeep Super Bowl ad was more than a breath of fresh air in the middle of turgid political pronouncements and vapid virtue signaling. ”

    Yeah, FCA saved the virtue signalling for the ad’s disclaimer. Sure, they did it to preemptively head off the outrage du jour club, but it’s still there.:

    “This video was filmed on a man-made lake and man-made waterfall. The video was filmed on private land in the Southwest and the water does not flow to another natural body of water. The waterfall was also man-made for purposes of filming.

    The Jeep® brand and FCA cooperate with federal/state/local governments and organizations, including Tread Lightly and Access Fund, around the world to help ensure that its vehicles are being utilized in a legal and responsible manner, and follow those guidelines when demonstrating their off-road capabilities.”

  • avatar
    SilverCoupe

    Gee, no one has said Cadillac, I wonder why?

    • 0 avatar
      DEVILLE88

      i have to agrre with most that jeep is being handled pretty well. i would love to say Cadillac as i am a major Cadillac guy and GM as well…..but i can’t :(. GM just announced the retirement of the Impala and sonic that does not instill confidence in the company. they tease with cars like escala and give us domestic BMW’s. the Escalade is a great suv and i like what they offer now,,,but don’t love it. i’m tired of the Art and Science look and would love to see something that harkens back to it’s heydays. Camaro and Corvette are champs. i’ve lost a lot of enthusiasm for GM. at least i can go back in time and buy a car that says that GM was great at one time:(

  • avatar
    phila_DLJ

    “It was a reminder that Fiat Chrysler Automobiles has a rock-solid grip on what its core product is and how to develop said product”

    I don’t know, it sounds like the depiction of the fancy new Jeep driving right through a stream (even if a tiny disclaimer said it was an artificial stream on private property) angered some fishers, some of whom own Jeeps.

Read all comments

Recent Comments

  • Fred: Manufacture’s go thru these buying spree and then the eventual sell off. Then again his allows some new...
  • SCE to AUX: Good, brief article on “Five Nines” as it relates to safety: https://www.eetimes.com/is-...
  • slavuta: This is the right way to have a debate youtube.com/watch?v=iAwioqbvui s
  • tankinbeans: A large misgiving of mine is the mechanics behind how the system works and losing track of what does...
  • Lou_BC: “left utopia” A utopia is by definition….? “place or state of things in which...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber