By on January 4, 2018

2017 Volkswagen Amarok, Image: Volkswagen

Amarok. The worst sounds mystical, conjuring up images of hairy Ice Age beasts and the grizzled 24-year-old grandfathers who once hunted them. Amarok also refers to a midsize Volkswagen pickup that’s built in Argentina and sold overseas, a pickup the automaker now wants to trademark in the United States.

Is this the first step towards Volkswagen — or a partner — joining the midsize pickup fray in America, or simply a “just in case” exercise? Volkswagen’s not saying. However, looking at the overall midsize pickup segment, is there really a case to be made for a new player, especially when there’s already a Ford Ranger on the way?

The trademark application, noticed by Motor Authority, carries a filing date of November 22, 2017, and comes a few months after an intriguing report. In late August of last year, a source told Wall Street Journal that Volkswagen was engaged in tentative talks with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles concerning the possible joint production of light utility vehicles.

FCA, doing what it does best, made the first overtures. Of particular interest to FCA was a small commercial van and a midsize pickup. The automaker already builds the Fiat-based Ram ProMaster, but you won’t find a Ram badge anywhere near a midsize pickup — a product gap that’ll leave it the odd Detroiter out when the Ranger arrives for 2019. Meanwhile, FCA burned through a pile of development cash with the expensive redesigns (and retoolings) needed for the next-generation 2018 Jeep Wrangler and 2019 Ram 1500.

Volkswagen, of course, does have a midsize pickup, and has since 2010. We haven’t heard anything about how the FCA-VW date went, so there’s no telling if this romance will yield offspring. Any Amarok sold in the U.S., or any badge-engineered vehicle based on it, will need a U.S. production site to avoid the dreaded Chicken Tax.

The thing is, after an impressive ramp-up in 2016, the midsize pickup segment isn’t performing all that hot. With five entries — the Chevrolet Colorado, GMC Canyon, Toyota Tacoma, Nissan Frontier, and Honda Ridgeline — growth isn’t what you’d expect for a utility segment. Full-size pickups are truly hot, spurred by ever-higher trim levels and sky-high incentives, while lower-margin midsizers have a harder time making their case to would-be buyers.

Tacoma sales rose 10.9 percent in December, year-over-year, with the calendar year showing a 3.4 percent increase over 2016. The Tacoma, with extra production capacity coming online soon, is still the one to beat. In contrast, the only other midsizer making gains last year was the lower-volume Colorado, which saw sales rise 2.1 percent in December. Total sales for 2017 were 3.9 percent higher than 2016. However, its Canyon twin slipped 14.9 percent last month, and 14.3 percent over the full year.

Frontier sales fell 3.1 percent, year-over-year, in December, closing out the calendar with a 14.5-percent drop for 2017. As for the unibody Honda Ridgeline, which debuted in June 2016, year-over-year sales amounted to a 27.4-percent drop last month. Only the fact that Honda started selling the thing in mid-year helped the model post a year-to-date increase.

What’s the bigger picture here? The midsize pickup segment posted growth of 1.6 percent in 2017. That’s heading in the right direction, but not at a rapid clip. Only two out of the five models have any forward traction, suggesting a segment with limited growth potential. Also, the Ranger arrives later this year with a familiar and well-loved name, ready to poach buyers from the other five.

It’s not the friendliest landscape out there. Should VW or FCA brass decide to join the market, you can bet there’ll be dissenters among the ranks.

[Image: Volkswagen]

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72 Comments on “Volkswagen Trademarks a Pickup Name, But Is It Worth Pulling the Trigger on Another Midsize?...”


  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    My brother & I saw an Amarok up close at a tradeshow in Munich in ’14. If we could get an Amarok equipped like that one (TDI, manual, 4WD, rubber mats, cab & chassis with an aftermarket bed), I would have a new daily driver. I don’t just talk, I buy. We already bought a Ford Transit C&C with many of those features and really like it. The only issue is that the fuel economy is not that great with the little PowerStroke…only about 18 MPG.

    Not everybody wants a $45K truck. Keep a base model to keep the price down and fleet sales will come.

    • 0 avatar
      newenthusiast

      Interesting. I know nothing of the thought process behind why some truck buyers get certain options, but you mentioned TDI. That would be a unique offering in this segment, as far as I know. I have no idea what kind of sales numbers would be needed for profitability, but if was built in the US, and it was the the only diesel in the segment, I guess it would a pretty small target number.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Lol the only diesel? VW wouldn’t dare bring a diesel here. We’re more likely to see a diesel Rolls Royce.

        Besides, the Colorado and Canyon offer a diesel, and the Ranger will too. The upcoming Wrangler pickup will as well.

        • 0 avatar
          newenthusiast

          Well, I said I don’t much about trucks. I see and hear full size diesels all the time. But the mid-size segment is nothing I really follow or care bout.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            And you’re also completely unaware of VW’s recent (since 2015) shall we say “troubled” relationship with diesel as well, I’m assuming.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @newenthusiast – not unique.

        Colorado and Canyon get a 4 cyl diesel. I’ve seen a few out and about, even one that was loaded up with the off road goodies.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I test drove a diesel CC Z71 Colorado a few months ago, at $41k I’d never seriously consider one but the smaller diesel+4wd midsize truck is a massively appealing combination to me. I was REALLY impressed with the powertrain. Effortlessly accelerating up a moderate hill from 70-75mph with the torque converter locked up in 6th while getting 30mpg overall (indicated), that was impressive. Looking in the rearview mirror and seeing daylight between the bed/tailgate interface and the very sloppy sheetmetal work upon closer inspection, very unimpressive. Not sure if that’s the norm on Colorados or not.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @gtem – Remember GM sells you the engine and throws in the rest of the vehicle for free. ;-)

            I also think a Canyon Denali is pretty ridiculous but the last time I was getting my teeth cleaned I noticed that one of the two doctors who are partnered in the practice had a diamond white 4×4 crew cab Canyon Denali sitting in his parking spot.

            Although the guy can drive what he wants, he takes what the insurance pays and doesn’t ask for a penny more.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Yeah, it is an appealing combination, but when I tried to build my ideal Canyon, a 4wd crew cab diesel manual, it was not possible. With the automatic, yes it was quite expensive for what it is.

            I don’t know how Ford plans to market the F-150 with the diesel V-6, but if they offer it in an XL SuperCrew 4wd, that would be awesome and probably compete with the GM twins on price, since they seem to be so inflated.

            In a way, you can’t blame GM. I imagine it costs nearly the same to manufacture a Canyon as it does a Sierra, so even though we expect a smaller vehicle to be significantly cheaper, it just doesn’t work that way in reality. This is also why they struggle to make a profit on small cars. They’re not *that* much cheaper to build than larger cars that command more money.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I’m greatly hoping an Ecoboost V6 Ranger forces GM to build a V8 Colorado.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            The 2.7L EcoBoost seems like a natural for the Ranger Raptor.

            The new 3.3L n/a V-6 in the F-150 would be a good choice for the volume Ranger models.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            The membrane switches on the steering wheel give me pause.

            They’ll bust-through the day after the warranty expires!

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Those membrane switches were a concern for me too, when I looked into one. But worse, I hated that big, plastic, rear seat support plinth that’s essentially non-removable and eliminates the advantages of folding up the back seat for tools and packages.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Not every truck is $45k. I mean no offence, but there are still base model trucks from Ford, GM and Ram. And yes, they’re out there. They aren’t going to be on the front line between the Z71 High Country and Yukon Denalis, but they’re still available.

      • 0 avatar
        newenthusiast

        No, I am very well aware of VAG’s defeat device and WVU discovering their cheating.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Right, so the chances of VW bringing another diesel to North America (or really, anywhere) are about the same as Tesla admitting defeat and putting a carbureted V-8 in the Model S and X.

          VAG had even discouraged diesel subsidies in Europe recently, trying to further distance themselves from the fuel.

          If the Amarok did come here, its likely to have the same powertrain options as the Atlas.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Nobody has yet said that the Amarok in the US would necessarily carry a diesel engine (even if that is their dominant engine in the markets advertising it.)

            At one time, diesel in the US was a cost-saving thing as diesel fuel was no more expensive than regular gas (and often less) with a +50% or better fuel economy. Now the fuel is as expensive as Premium (and sometimes more) while the economy is only little better than a gasser (especially when you add the cost of the particulate fluid now mandated.) Add to this the Dieselgate issues and diesel engines are not going to be that much of an improvement any more.

            Oil companies in particular have learned how to get the same price per mile out of diesel as they get on gasoline, meaning the user isn’t saving anything going diesel for economy while the diesel no longer offers a real torque advantage over turbocharged gas.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            I guess if you only read 10% of this conversation, then you’re right, nobody mentioned a diesel in the Amarok. Sorry, my mistake.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Try again, John. Show me, in the article, where a diesel engine was mentioned. I’m not talking about commenters who have opinions on everything (including myself), I’m talking about market analysts and reporters who are reporting the possibility of this relationship.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “Not everybody wants a $45K truck.”

      Add a diesel, 4×4, and 4 doors and you have a 45k truck.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Well, since I don’t want diesel or four full doors (half doors work just fine) then I should be able to stay below $35K, right?

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Vulpine – bottom basement 4×2 extended cab Colorado without any options is around 24k in Canada. In my part of the world, 4×2’s are lot poison. I was tempted to get a new reg cab 4×2 F150 for my sons last year because it had sat on the dealer lot for close to 1 1/2 years. It was deeply discounted so cost would have been a few k more than a new Colorado ext cab.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “@Vulpine – bottom basement 4×2 Colorado without any options is around 24k in Canada.”

            Kind of my point, no? But I won’t buy a Colorado because of how they support the rear seat cushions in the extended cab. You would expect to have a nice, flat load floor when you raise the seats, but NOooooo… you have to put up with a big, plastic, seat support loaded with holes that takes up the whole floor. Sure, you could take the seats out and remove that plastic piece, but you can’t take the plastic piece out and keep the seats usable. Even the Ridgeline does better than that!

  • avatar
    kkop

    “The worst sounds mystical” ??

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    In before a chicken tax rant!

    Since the Fed’s have caught on to Ford importing the Transit Connect as passenger vans and then converting them to cargo spec, they have been paying the chicken tax on them and THE WORLD HASNT COME TO AN END. They still sell ’em.

    Anybody can feel free to correct me if I’m wrong, but all the information I can find suggests that Ford has paid the tax on them for quite a while now. If Ford can do it on a small cargo van, there is no reason Mercedes couldn’t afford it on the Nissan X-Class, or VW on this vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Actually, Ford has been smartly circumventing the chicken tax by doing that. Since they’re imported as “passenger vehicles”, they avoid the tax. That is not something that will work for an actual pickup truck, even if it’s very comfortable and passenger-oriented.

      Edit: you’re right. Originally, they got away with that, and then the Feds busted them and made them pay it.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Right, I knew they were doing that at first, but got “caught” (I am pretty sure it was public knowledge beforehand, so I’m using that term loosely). Now they pay the tariff.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Ford is still in court over the Transit Connect van dispute.
          I assume they are paying the tariff in the meantime.

          Most experts do say that the import tariff on trucks should be abolished.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      Wouldn’t the most likely answer be VW building them at either Tennessee or their Mexican plant? They could also potentially use Audi’s relatively new Mexican plant.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Tennessee is either expanding the existing plant or adding a new one to start building their BEVs for US sales. At least, that’s what other articles have suggested. Then again, if the Amarok is based on one of the SUV models (maybe?) the existing plant might be able to add it to their assembly lines.

  • avatar
    DRdR

    Amaroks are no longer exclusively made in Argentina. For some years now VW moved production to Germany and Africa. Last year VW introduced the V6 model.
    A friend of mine owns one, and he likes it because it drives and feels just like a car, unlike the Ranger and the Hilux.
    FCA has a similar product but smaller, since it shares the platform, engines and transmissions with the Jeep Renegade. It is the made-in-Brazil Fiat Toro, and I think it is a South-America-only pick-up.
    In some other markets FCA sells the Fullback, which is a rebadged Mitsubishi L200.

  • avatar
    Turbo Is Black Magic

    I know I’m in the minority but I would buy one in a heartbeat. VW does not get a lot of love here, but I’m on my fourth GTI (2015 MK7) and my wife has a 14 Touareg , both have ton of miles on them and we have never had any issues with them. I love the German interior feel and vault like qualities they have as well as the very European ride quality… I would pick one up in a hurry… well as long as it’s not like the new Tiguan or Atlas… those are both hot garbage.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I feel like a VW pickup truck would be going after the same market segment as the Honda Ridgeline.

    If it turned into a Fiatsler partnership they’d be a tough sell a RAM dealers with the actual transaction prices on the full size RAM being fairly low.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      That’s what I was thinking. Now VW has to ask themselves if they can build and sell a better Ridgeline. Price will be the key I think.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I’m betting the ATP for the Ram will pickup (all pun intended) nicely when the new model hits showrooms. Its the oldest (volume selling, so not to include the Tundra) design, so I would imagine the best way to move them is more heavy handed discounts than what Ford and GM can get away with.

      I would like to see it here, not that I have any personal interest in buying one. I just like to see a larger variety and more diversity in the market place. Problem is, Honda already builds a pretty decent unibody truck (with likely better reliability than the VW), and after the pent-up demand was absorbed, its not exactly setting sales charts ablaze.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      PrincipleDan,
      The Amarok is a BOF pickup. Its is akin to a Colorado and Tacoma.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        But in the United States the customer who would want to buy one is the same kind of customer who would want to buy a Ridgeline. I never spoke about vehicle construction.

        Ridgeline owners don’t give two shakes if their vehicle is unibody or BOF.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          What is your reasoning for an Amarok customer cross-shopping Ridgelines and not Colorados? There seems to be no logical comparison as the Ridgeline is simply too different (a lot more bells and whistles, I will give it that.) But as a working truck, the Amarok has already proven itself as a strong contender against every other “global” pickup on the market, including Mercedes, Nissan, Toyota, Isuzu, Ford and GM.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I cannot see FCA building a truck for VAG since the Jeep pickup is going to production.

      There is no chicken tax in Canada and I don’t see VAG showing any signs of bringing it to Canada. There have been rumours which are unsubstantiated wet dreams of Euro-truck enthusiasts.

      years ago I read that VAG claimed that they would need to sell at least 100,000 units to make it worthwhile building a factory for USA consumption.
      There is no way that I can see VAG selling that many in the USA.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        The Jeep Scrambler is going to be a pretty big truck–at least as large as the other mid-sized trucks if I read the dimensions right.
        It may feel smaller due to the narrower body but the wide track and wheel flares will have the overall width just as large.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Vulpine – The Strada is marketed as the Ram 500 in Mexico. IIRC it is made in Brazil. Does Brazil have an FTA with the USA? If NAFTA was settled it would not be too hard for FCA to do some assembly in Mexico to deal with the chicken tax.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            … Can’t find any mention of a “Ram 500” on any search engine; the Strada is the Ram 700, even in Mexico.

            And unfortunately, Brazil is not a NAFTA signatory (North American Free Trade Agreement) since it’s a South American country. It would have to be built IN Mexico to qualify as NAFTA and avoid the Chicken Tax.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Question for the B&B…

    Is the Amarok a Ridgeline-esque fwd based unibody platform, or BOF rwd type?

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    What’s the bigger picture? One the OEMs don’t want to admit, really. They brought a larger mid-sized truck to market when what is needed is a SMALLER mid-sized pickup. Where I live I see quite a few older (pre-2000) mid-sized trucks and I recently returned from Tennessee where nearly a quarter of all trucks I saw on the road were pre-2000 models, most in remarkably good condition. My own ’97 Ranger came from there and it’s practically new, inside and out, due to the lack of corrosive road salts during winter.

    No, what’s needed are true small trucks; trucks that don’t compete in size with the “big boys” for market; trucks that can pull people out of their compact- to mid-sized CUVs. IF (and unfortunately that’s a very big word) Hyundai or FCA were to bring their compact models into the US, you would see why the mid-sized models aren’t doing as well as the OEMs hoped.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Have to admit I’m not a fan of the fact that it’s crew-cab only. Extended cab is more than enough for me.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      No if about it, Hyundai has greenlit the Santa Cruz for production.

      If the market is demanding smaller trucks, why are full-size trucks selling like hotcakes?

      I can’t see any pickup competing with CUVs, they’re replacing sedans as family cars. A compact truck doesn’t lend itself to that role very well. Sure, some midsize crewcab trucks could/do fill that role, but people who buy CUVs are generally doing so because of the utility of out-of-the-elements cargo capabilities and roomier passenger accommodations.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        “No if about it, Hyundai has greenlit the Santa Cruz for production.”
        —- They’ve green-lit a pickup truck; not necessarily the Santa Cruz.

        “If the market is demanding smaller trucks, why are full-size trucks selling like hotcakes?”
        —- Because the available “smaller trucks” are nearly the same size as full-sized trucks and after incentives also offer no savings over those full-sized trucks. The market is demanding trucks that are size-competitive to the average CUV (compact to mid-sized) and not trucks you need a running board just to climb into them. The problem is, the market is being ignored by the OEMs except in a few, very limited, market areas where cost is more important than size. The Chevy Tornado, Fiat Strada and, perhaps, the Hyundai Santa Cruz could well blast open an all-new (well, abandoned) compact truck market that once was rather large.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Most news outlets are reporting that it will be smaller than the Ridgeline, so something close to the concept is expected.

          I am not arguing against small trucks, I’m just not sure the market for them is as big as you seem to think. I’ve long advocated that Ford should build an open-bed version of the Transit Connect. If the Hyundai trucklet is small and is successful, I hope they’ll do just that. It would make sense to move production to North America once the NAFTA situation is settled, for both the van and (possible) pickup version.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            I’ve personally talked to a number of people who said the old (pre-2010) Colorado was MUCH too big and wished for something the size of the original B-2000 Mazda or Chevy Luv. These were roughly the same size as the modern Jeep Cherokee before adding the second-row seats, if not a little smaller overall (height and width.) Making pickups that could ride lower (really don’t need 7″+ ground clearance for the average AWD) and that you could actually sit DOWN into, rather than up.

            They don’t have to look like a new version of the old Ranchero/El Camino–they can look at least something like trucks–as long as they aren’t 18 feet long and 7 feet tall. And no, I don’t have a problem taking a 4- or 5-foot bed over something longer; I simply don’t carry long loads that often and we’ve clearly seen how some companies are learning how to stretch their 4.5-foot bed to carry a bike or lumber effectively while keeping the closed length reasonable.

            These people want the Tornado/Strada/Santa Cruz Concept. They’re not buying any truck today because they’re all Too Big. And yes, even a Ford Transit Connect with an open bed is bigger than they want, but would make an excellent, true mid-sized, pickup.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    I wouldn’t worry too much about an FCA-VW marriage. Too much bitterness between VW and Fiat in the past. They could prove me wrong, but I would not bet on it.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    Today’s “midsize” pickups are bigger than the jelly bean F-150’s from the ‘90s. Midsize and full size are too close together.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    A pickup with a VW badge would make the Canyon and Ridgeline look like best sellers.

    One with a Ram badge might give the Frontier a run for 4th place behind the Tacoma, Ranger and Colorado. Which is where I expect them to be at the end of the Ranger’s first full year.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Some people should hold their assumptions to themselves; we have absolutely no idea how well a pickup with the VW badge on it would do. You might be right, but you could be very, very wrong. What little I’ve seen about the Amarok make it look significantly stronger than the Colorado while being a true BoF truck, unlike the Ridgeline. Enough people swear by the VW name now that if they had the choice of an American full-sized truck or a VW mid-sized, they’d probably choose the VW, up to and including trading in their American Aluminum to do so.

      The Ram badge on it? Maybe. Maybe not. I agree that Ram needs to bring in something but I personally believe they’d see a much stronger opening market with the Ram 700 as compared to an Amarok-based Ram 1000. At least for a while, they’d own an otherwise abandoned market–assuming the Santa Cruz does not make it into the US market.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Vulpine,
        I find it hard to believe VW would go to bed with FCA.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          I’m not saying they will; I’m only saying that IF they did, it would probably be like that. You’ll note that I segued to FCA already having something that would carry a bigger opening market than an Amarok-based Ram 1000.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “Some people should hold their assumptions to themselves; we have absolutely no idea how well a pickup with the VW badge on it would do.”

        answer:

        About as well as the rest of the VW line in the USA and Canada.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Yes you should hold your assumptions to yourself and stop putting words in my mouth.

        I never said that Ram needed something in this segment just that if it does come to the US with Ram and VW badges Ram dealers would move most of the metal.

        There are lots of reasons to think the VW couldn’t move enough of these to make it profitable. The main ones however are that they don’t have a lot of dealers and that they hurt their reputation with their most faithful customers. The fact that it won’t have the diesel engine that created many of those faithful owners doesn’t improve the outlook either.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          We will have to wait and see. While I’m not necessarily a customer for the Amarok (too big for my taste) there are still quite a few people in the US who still buy VW, even after Dieselgate.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Yeah there are still customers for VW products but they are pretty far and few between.

            Honda moved 1,486,827 total vehicles but only 34,749 of those were Ridgelines.

            VW in contrast moved 339,676 total vehicles so if they matched Honda’s take rate that would be less than 8,000 units.

            Even if they matched the take rate for Nissan’s Frontier they would be only moving about 17,500 units per year, or half that of the Ridgeline or Canyon.

            So yeah there is good reason to think that they would not sell very well at all. Honda has higher owner loyalty and a bit of history of happy customers in the Ridgeline. Nissan has a long history of making decent if not top of the class less than full size trucks and a much larger customer base.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Scoutdude – agreed. Ram will not be allowed to build a smaller truck with Jeep building a jeep based pickup.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Van. Bring me a van, VW. Something to go against Sienna, Odyssey and Pacifica. Make it so it will fit in my garage unlike the Metris from MB, but about that size. Transporter, Caravelle ( Sharan is too small is seems, Mazda 5 like) whatever. Hell, make it Atlas based for the US market, how hard could that be?

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I see it this way.

    VW doesn’t have an assured Amarok US market. As Steph pointed out the anti competitive Chicken Tax rules out importation.

    The Amarok is AN expensive pickup.

    So a partnership is needed for US (NAFTA) manufacture.

    One way could be to manufacture the Amarok in Mexico. Use Mexico for some global supply as well as the US.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Big Al from Oz – agreed but with #45 and his “Morons Are Governing America” mindset, VAG is not going to set up shop in Mexico until NAFTA is sorted out. Even the Canadian side of the agreement is in trouble. Any import plan for the USA will be put on hold by almost everyone.

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    Trucks are the mostest worstest things on Mother Gaia. Those things needs to be outlawed ASAP!!

    Oh what’s that? It’s a German truck? I love it!!!


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