By on January 4, 2018

2017 Kia Soul ! Turbo lead image

2017 Kia Soul !

1.6-liter turbocharged inline-four, DOHC (201 hp @ 6,000 rpm; 195 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm)

Seven-speed dual-clutch automatic, front-wheel drive

26 city / 31 highway / 28 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

24.3 (As tested, MPG)

Base Price: $23,500 (U.S) / $27,874 (Canada)

As Tested: $23,620 (U.S) / $27,874 (Canada)

Prices include $850 freight charge in U.S. and $1,879 delivery, destination and A/C tax in Canada, and because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

Some years ago, product planners at Nissan, Honda, and Kia each decided to cut stylists out of the design process for a new car line and hand everything over to engineers. Those engineers, looking for the most practical and efficient shape to haul maximum cargo – fleshy or otherwise – each decided to use a cube for inspiration. Nissan didn’t stray far even for a name.

Each of those boxes was marketed toward the youth of the day – when they came out, I was part of that target demographic. Problem was, the kids didn’t have money to spend on a new car. That’s why many Elements, Cubes, and Souls tend to be driven by older, somewhat more affluent folks who appreciate the practicality, and can also afford it.

Well, I’m now approaching that second demographic. My forties are within sight. Is the 2017 Kia Soul right for me? In other words, is an old soul right for a new Soul?

2017 Kia Soul ! Turbo profile

Let’s get the big complaint out of the way: I am not impressed with the seven-speed dual-clutch transmission in this top-spec Soul, and it’s the only transmission offered with the turbocharged engine. Off the line, the DCT will lag before engaging a gear at times, at which point the ratio catches with a jerk. It doesn’t happen every time, and there doesn’t seem to be a way to predict it, but when there is a half-second or so delay from throttle application to forward movement, driving can be infuriating.

Beyond the recalcitrant transmission, I enjoyed driving the Soul. While it’s obviously a taller, heavier vehicle than a proper hot hatch, it’s still a short-wheelbase compact that’s tossable in the corners. When driving spiritedly, the car never felt top-heavy. 201 horsepower combined with 195 lb-ft of just-off-idle torque helps pull the hatch out of the corner with verve. The steering is direct, but somewhat numb to road imperfections.

2017 Kia Soul ! Turbo front

That short wheelbase does hinder the Soul’s ride a bit – combined with the eighteen-inch wheels, the drive on expansion-jointed roads gets choppy and noisy. I wonder if the 17 inch wheels (with appropriately taller sidewalls) from lesser Souls might fit on the !.

As an aside, I rather dislike the use of punctuation for the trim level – and neither does my word processing software. Every instance whene I list “!” causes lights and flashes and minor explosions within my PC and brain alike. Even calling the trim “Exclaim” won’t work – it makes me conflate the Hyundai Excel with the Plymouth Acclaim, two cars I don’t recall fondly. Without looking it up online, consumers don’t know that the ! is the Turbo model, while the + model is the midrange box. It’s not like there are badges on the tailgate listing the trim.

Kia, please reconsider the punctuation, or else start using some seriously funky punctuation like an interrobang or a tilde.

2017 Kia Soul ! Turbo rear

Yeah, I called the Soul an unstyled box. While there is obviously more to it than that, it’s hard to do much with slab sides. The fenders do have a bit of flare to them, while the 18-inch 10-spoke alloy wheels fitted to this Turbo add some visual interest. You can’t forget the red stripe that distinguishes the ! from more pedestrian Souls, either – a red stripe means fast, don’t you know? The signature tiger nose grille isn’t even a grille on the Soul – it’s just a bit of shiny dark plastic trimmed in chrome, where all air directed to the engine bay comes through the gaps in the big bumper.

2017 Kia Soul ! Turbo interior

Those slab sides do wonders in maximizing the interior space, however. For such a short-wheelbase car, I could stretch side to side comfortably, with three rear-seat occupants sitting silently without complaint for a drive – and without kicking my seatback once, which is an accomplishment for my youngest. The flat floor in the rear helps the center-seat passenger, who would typically splay their legs into the knees of their seatmates.

2017 Kia Soul ! Turbo rear seats

The front seats were likewise quite comfortable, with a combination of leather and patterned cloth on the surfaces highlighted by red stitching – again, red stitching means fast! The hatch swallowed everything I could toss in the rear, with room to spare.

2017 Kia Soul ! Turbo front seats

Kia’s touchscreen infotainment system is nothing special, and that’s a good thing. It’s responsive to inputs, and is easy to read and control while driving either by touch or the steering wheel controls. For me, I rank Kia’s UVO system up with Chrysler’s Uconnect as the best, easiest-to-use touchscreen interface in all of automobiledom. Sound quality is equally excellent, though the big box does tend to amplify boomy road noise.

2017 Kia Soul ! Turbo center stack

The Kia Soul ! is – other than the goofy exclamation point and the balky transmission – a choice that is easy to live with. I’d like to believe that the dual-clutch could be sorted with better shift programming, at which point I’d heartily recommend this to anyone needing plenty of interior space in an easy to park package.

2017 Kia Soul ! Turbo front quarter

[Images: © 2017 Chris Tonn/The Truth About Cars]

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70 Comments on “2017 Kia Soul ! Turbo Review – Good Box With a Bad ‘Box...”


  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I kinda like the Soul. The Cube doesn’t appeal to me. My 16 year old doesn’t like either. He likes 70’s era pickups and Firebirds. My 14 year old “artist” doesn’t care for them but then again, he isn’t into cars. Strangely enough, he liked the lines of the Veloster. As the author has pointed out, one does not tend to see “young” drivers in these vehicles. Anecdotally, they are the domain of women in there 50’s and up. I am 55 so demographically they missed their target audience by quite a bit.

  • avatar
    Kenn

    The powertrain being the heart and soul of a vehicle, a recalcitrant transmission – in this case, a hyper-expensive to repair or replace DCT – is a deal breaker for me. Conventional automatic transmissions have been improved enough to (wishfully) bring about a return to something that simply works properly – all the time. Or, in this case, to at least offer the choice of a manual trans.

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      Agreed. The Soul! has always been a large “meh” here, there are always so many in BHPH lots around here that they have become the new 3-owner BHPH Sentra. And the base Soul! was never much fun to drive. Not to mention one had to walk into a Kia dealer to buy one new.

      I had hope for the Soul! Turbo and still do. I should hope Kia can sort out their DCT issues, or better yet, release a manual transmission version of the Turbo. Either will make the Soul! much more engaging to drive.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The DCT in the ’17MY Tucson is supposed to be a good bit smoother than in the previous years, so hopefully Kia can do the same for the Soul going forward (Hyundai and Kia don’t share things like transmission mapping/programming).

      Even with the DCT that needs to be smoothed out, the current Soul is a marked improvement over the previous generation and expect the next gen Soul to take any leap.

      Remains to be seen if Kia will add AWD to the lineup for the next Soul.

      Guess it’ll depend on whether we’ll evetually get the Stonic (or a another new subcompact CUV); even if we do, an e-AWD option would be great.

      A true sporty variant of the Soul may also be in the works.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      sigh. VW’s DSG is a thing of beauty. It defines the class. Anything less is worthless.

      Why do you think it would be “hyper expensive”, let alone that you would ever have to “repair or replace” it???

      Youtube is your friend.

  • avatar
    pheanix

    VW Golf would like to schedule a test drive with you now

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      It’s disappointing how no one has been able to build VW Golf+Reliability, which would be a nearly perfect car.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Somehow they do just fine in Europe. I’ve never understood why VAG products break so much more in American hands, but they do.

        • 0 avatar

          Different expectations set and maintenance methods.

          Europeans are wiling to do maintenance regularly, and expect a couple things to break now and then. That’s European “reliability.”

          Americans will put gasoline in their car and maybe sometimes change the oil at Wal-Mart, and expect it never to break. That’s “reliability” here.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            I call BS. The things on VWs that break are not the things one maintains. How do you maintain a coil pack? Or window regulator? Or how would maintenance kept my wife’s MkV from blowing head and tail light bulbs monthly? Come on.

          • 0 avatar

            With VW there is some decontenting going on for the NA market. But I think the logic works with other European brand offerings sold over there and in the US.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            No, I think most German problems are either electrical, or on components that should be maintained. Should I have to replace my radiator at 5/60?

          • 0 avatar

            Okay Chris, then you explain the differences between continents and reliability.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I always assumed VWs were “reliable” in Europe because people over there drive fewer miles, own their vehicles for fewer years, and there are a lot more Fiats, Ladas, and French cars to pull down the overall average.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            I assumed there is no practical difference, just national pride in not griping about their cars’ shortcomings. Also, lowered expectations stemming from driving mostly European vehicles.

          • 0 avatar

            You said BS, but in the end agreed with over half of what I said.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenn

            Annual owners’ surveys I’ve seen in an English publication (using JD Powers’ help) usually show the VW Golf rated at about “50” on a 1 – 100 scale. Not terrible, not great. Owners there seem to simply put up with the less-than-stellar reliability for the inherent attributes of their VWs. I don’t believe most Americans are as willing to accept that reasoning, and also are not appreciative of notably higher prices for parts and labor for maintenance and repair of Euro cars here, even a compact or subcompact, compared to the Asian brands.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Actually, VW has consistently been towards the bottom of Auto Bild’s reliability rankings (where both Hyundai and Kia have garnered the #1 spot).

          Audi, otoh, has climbed up the rankings (can see a corresponding rise in CR’s rankings).

          • 0 avatar
            pheanix

            What kind of warranties are people running on these cars? I was able to get a 60k / 6 yr bumper to bumper which doesn’t include new wipers, brakes, and oil changes.

            Toyotas start demanding some real parts after 100k, too. My friend’s last gen Rav4 was bleeding him so bad at 140,000 you’d think it was a 3 series with similar mileage. Rear diff began to self-destruct with an annoying high pitched whistle, something mysterious constantly squeaked inside one of the front strut mounts (the dealers couldn’t find it), and toward the end the thing was burning oil and throwing a red oil light within a couple thousand miles of oil changes. Of course, there was no recall for the engines and the dealers just shrugged at him. He finally got rid of it and got a Subaru Outback.

            My point is that just about anything will start bleeding you by the time you approach 150,000. Why keep a car that long, anyway? (if it’s paid off)

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    “interrobang” WTF? Must be getting old. I first thought that it was a new word for coitus interruptus.

  • avatar
    strafer

    I would go for the mid trim “+” instead, and get the reliable 2.0 engine/6 spd auto powertrain.
    140 hp should be more than plenty for a compact wagon.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Honestly a Soul is high on our list for ‘next vehicle, in either the base or 1st step-up from base variation. My daughter chooses one whenever possible from her ‘car sharing’ organization. My wife finds the dimensions of the Soul very comfortable/re-assuring to drive. In her words ‘not too big, easy to see out of, and comfortable inside. Plus we have (knock wood) a good ownership experience with Kia.

    Would like to have learned/read much more about rear seat comfort due to the short wheel base, particularly over bumps. And how is it on the highway (NVH)?

    You mentioned the Cube, and the Element but not the Xb? Wasn’t that the original ‘box on wheels’ in N.A.?

    Sorry Chris, but not a review that is up to your usual standards. Too much emphasis on nomenclature and ‘stitching’ and not enough on what matters to those actually shopping such a vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      From a rental experience last year, the ride and NVH are fine (or at least not memorably bad), although my baseline is set by a cheap Mazda. Although, fuel economy was a little disappointing – the upright profile means it’s exceedingly difficult to break 30mpg without embracing fuel crisis highway speeds (like Sammy Hagar, I can’t drive 55).

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Yes, the xB1 started the modern box look in the US. My 05 xB had more interior room than a Soul, at the expense of comfort and noise. The Soul is what the xB2 should have been.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Should be fine with the trims that get the smaller wheels.

      Here’s an Automobile Mag comparison of the ’14MY Soul and Corolla.

      http://www.automobilemag.com/news/2014-kia-soul-vs-toyota-corolla-comparison/

      There’s only so much that can be done with a beam axle rear, but Kia seems to have a pretty good job with the current Soul.

      “The suspension, which uses MacPherson struts in front and a beam axle in back, is taut, but not harsh. It’s a big step forward from the first generation. Though the ride could still be a little rough over Michigan’s pockmarked roads, it was not nearly as severe as in the Corolla. It took much more to ruffle the Soul, which felt planted and solid.”

      • 0 avatar
        focus-ed

        “I wonder if the 17 inch wheels (with appropriately taller sidewalls) from lesser Souls might fit on the !.” – I can see no problems considering that I’ve mounted 16″ onto my non-PP mk7 GTI (required minor modification to wheel balance weights placement). With good sporty tires (G-FORCE COMP-2 A/S) I don’t miss much performance (205 are lighter and may actually be more fun in corners) and I’ve never worried about imperfect road surface, curb etc. 18″s have been collecting dust in my garage.
        Unfortunately there’s no fix for Soul’s gearbox other than switch to NA 2.0 and getting it with MT (dealer permitting to have one).

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    FWIW, I found the DCT in the Niro to be quite pleasant during a test drive. Two differences – I think it was a 6-speed, and being a hybrid it is certainly programmed differently than the Soul’s transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Hyundai improved the mapping of the DCT in the ’17MY Tucson, so maybe both Hyundai and Kia have just gotten better at programming the DCT.

      Still, I’d rather stick to the tried-and-true 6 spd AT (doubt we’ll ever see the newer 8 spd AT in something like the Soul).

      There’s a new DCT due in a couple of years but that’s supposed to be for higher performance models like the i30N.

      Reportedly, H/K are working on a wet DCT.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      I’d bet they’re using the electric motor for launch assistance, and perhaps for smoothing shift transitions also. In my view, a nice engineering approach.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    201 hp and 195 lb-ft. Those hamsters will live their lives a quarter mile at at time now.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    The red trim reminds me a lot of the Celebrity Eurosport and the Lumina Euro. Not sure that’s a very distinguished heritage.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Our neighbors have one of these, in an off-white with this same red trim. Looks quite fitting in our neighborhood of fixed up bungalows.

      As others have mentioned, a bad transmission utterly ruins this as a vehicle to even consider in my mind. It’s the kind of thing that constantly frustrating any time you’re not cruising on the highway. If it weren’t for that, it sounds like a great package of a very potent motor in a small box on wheels.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’m not secure enough to own one and I don’t know if the DCT is in it for the long haul but the Soul Turbo is a fun car.

  • avatar

    Our next Buy/Drive/Burn is now going to be on lil boxes.
    On the hillside.
    Oh the ticky tacky little boxes, all the same.

  • avatar

    I like the look of the Soul. Don’t like the interior or that DCT or the noise. But I think in this segment with the Fit and… Golf(?) that it’s a decent option.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      I’d probably consider it a compact competitor, more than a subcompact. It definitely has (at least) compact interior space.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I just cannot unsee the AMC Gremlin look in the D-pillar of this and the Ford Escape/C-Max, to name a few!

      Still wouldn’t trust the long-term reliability just yet, either, though a couple I know has gotten yeoman duty out of a 2009 or 2010 Rio, with only oil changes and other routine maintenance, and it’s not a bad ride to boot; they just traded his well-worn 2000 Civic for a closeout 2017 Soul, which has more than enough room for them and their two kids.

  • avatar
    mister steve

    I have a buddy who owned, in order, the original Scion XB, a Nissan Cube and now has a high mileage Honda Element. Yes, he’s in his mid-50s.

    He was pretty meh about the XB, HATED the Cube (it broke, constantly) and is scouring the country for a good used Element as a replacement for the current one. He’s finding that good, used Elements are getting rare, and even marginal examples are fetching a premium price.

    I’ll never understand why Honda discontinued the Element, though I suspect it might be related to the car being US/Canadia-only.

    The Soul’s a good little box of a car. That said, my buddy has, shall we say, a large frame and the car doesn’t fit him very well.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Remember James May driving/reviewing an Element. So was it available in the UK?

      Have a relative who just put over $2k into his Element as he believes that there is no other auto out there that fits his needs as well and good examples of Elements are becoming very hard to find, thus people are paying premiums for them.

      The one drawback with the Element is that it is strictly a 4-seater.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      If I’m not mistaken Honda ended the Element due to upcoming crashworthiness standards that it wouldn’t have met. That said, why they didn’t replace it is beyond me. I really wanted to test drive one when I was in the market 4 years ago…it was perfect for what I need….

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        They could probably do a nice one using the CR-V chassis and powertrain as a base. That would be roughly the size of the original Odyssey.

        Probably would be a license to print money, but Honda’s stretching themselves a bit thin with three forms of Clarity, plus the upcoming Insight, a.k.a., Civic Hybrid, plus a smaller Pilot Sport. Good eggs, but wrong basket.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      There is a very dedicated crew of Element owners around Seattle, and the consensus is that nothing else will do. They really love the open interior layout.

      Really good Elements are out there but fetch absolutely insane prices. If you had one in like-new condition you could get more than original MSRP for it.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Honda killed the Element because they were only selling about 11K per year in its twilight years. People who like them really like them (I’m one), but most people are turned off by suicide doors and seating for only 4.

      I would have liked to see an improved second-gen that probably could have sold better, but it still would have been eclipsed by CR-V sales. So in the short term it made sense to kill it, but part of what made Honda Honda was their willingness to try outside-the-box concepts. They seem to be backing off from that, which is sad.

      • 0 avatar
        scott25

        If the crossover trend continues I could see the Element coming back as a CRV with a less feminine image. It’ll have a B pillar though.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          You’d hope so, but like I said above, they’re dumping resources into hybrid cars.

          And frankly, they went a bit too far with the Accord, styling-wise, even though the interior is best in-segment; there’s some question of a possible nip-tuck upcoming, just as with the 2012 Civic. (Months after it was released, I’ve yet to see a 2018 Accord outside of a dealer, though the new Odyssey seems to be the official vehicle of my town, just as with the previous generation.)

          Point being, Honda’s been a little wide of the goalposts of late, and the bean counters and environmentalists still seem to hold enough sway that something like a new Element would be lower on the priority list than further “green-ification.”

  • avatar
    SC5door

    Having dealt with Hyundai’s 7 speed DCT for over 60K miles, I can confirm from my experience that it’s an awful gearbox. Hyundai/KIA still decided to release it sketchy software from the get-go and then ended up having to recall for software updates and buyback Tuscon 1.6T models for false neutral (commonly referred to as “no-go”) and crappy shifting. I do understand that it’s a double dry clutch so will have some rough edges, but not to the extent the problems this one has.

    Hyundai’s customer service has been abysmal regarding my issues and just told me to continue taking the car back to the dealer and closed the case. After several dealers, one finally listened and actually confirmed there’s an issue with mine (shudders when downshifting, poor up shifting, and severe lurching). It’s now been in the shop for a week and half; once it’s paid off, I’m trading for a RAV-4 or CRV.

    It’s too bad they didn’t use the 8 speed auto with the 1.6T if they were going automatic only, it honestly ruins the car for many people. Buyer beware.

    Edit:

    I’m a little surprised on the lack of press for all the issues with the 7 speed DCT. I guess all the complaints to the NHTSA hasn’t grabbed anyone’s attention…..

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I like my grandmother’s 2014 Soul, which has the 2.0-liter N/A direct-injected I4, but it’s terrible on the highway. Monday, I drove it to the border and back, which is 2.5 hours each way, and it had to downshift twice to get any passing power or go up even a moderate hill. Plus it stayed high up in the rev range at interstate speeds and that, combined with the boxy shape, meant it averaged about 25 MPG.

    But since she mostly just put-puts around town, it works for her.

    • 0 avatar

      And, it can hold root beer too.

    • 0 avatar
      tmport

      25mpg on the highway is really awful. How fast were you driving? I can easily get 35mpg going 65-70 in my Soul +.

      The downshifting, I agree, is annoying. One way to avoid that is to move it over into manual mode when cruising on the highway–that’ll keep it in 6th gear.

    • 0 avatar
      tsoden

      I rented a Soul + for two weeks when in Florida early last year. I think it might have had the turbo engine in it… but the fuel economy was great. The Soul was always in the mid 30 MPG range… and I had no issues with performance. Flip the switch to sport mode and the driving dynamics changed quite a bit… a lot more responsive on the throttle.

      Drivers seat comfort was not nearly as good as I thought it would be. The seats started out as being comfortable, but after 4 hours+ on several sight seeing tours, my back was begging for some lumbar support.

      Oh and people say the trunk is roomy… well there were three of us on this trip and the trunk just BARELY held our luggage. which was two large suitcases and a couple carry on’s, and my son’s trunkie. Some of the luggage actually had to be put in the back seat because it as too large to allow proper closure on the hatch.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Is the 7spd DCT this bad in the Optima? The 1.6T looks like the most appealing engine in the low end of the Kia spectrum, but it only comes with this transmission.

    The 2.0-engined Soul is solid but very bland. And it chews through gas on the highway.

  • avatar
    srh

    My girlfriend pointed out a couple years ago that the brake lights on the soul look like the muscle emoji. Now I can’t unsee it, particularly at night.

    Looks like the new soul maintained that!

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I had a Soul as a rental once briefly and I thought it was fine. This was when I still had my Mazda 5 and was considering another box-y type vehicle. The guy they stole from Audi certainly improved the interiors from a looks standpoint. Wasn’t bad to drive, not engaging though, but that’s not why people buy these.

    But, in the end, I wound up with a VW Golf. Proper Germanic driving traits, good looking interior and a good drivetrain without the faddish boxy outside. I considered a Scion Xb once, it was one of the final “Release Editions” and it had a bunch of the TRD stuff on it. But in the end, it was a noisy box that wasn’t any real fun to drive. You cannot deny the space utilization in these things, certainly a great value car if you don’t mind driving a cube. I’d rather see more of these on the road over the Buick Encore or even more boring and plain Chevy Trax.

    I had no love for the Cube though.

  • avatar
    Yankee

    As 48-year-old mechanic for the past 30 years, I drive a 2006 Scion xB because if you keep the windows rolled up you can’t hear the people laughing at you, and I need an appliance on wheels that can go get the parts for all the cars I work on without any issues of it’s own. I have just shy of 150k on it and other than maintenance items, I’ve replaced the muffler and one oxygen sensor. I was looking at the Soul as a replacement some day, but (1) it won’t hold as much as my xB (which has hauled engines, transmissions, a small sofa for a friend, and 55-gallon water heater still in the box with the hatch closed), (2) the visibility out of it isn’t nearly as good, and (3) the gas mileage isn’t as good (I get 30 pretty much no matter how I drive it, except in the winter it dips into the high 20s). Of course, the Soul has a lot more safety gear than my toaster has, but I’m still not sold on the overall value.

    • 0 avatar
      sco

      More love for the xB1. My 2006 Xb is a commuter car during the week but on the weekends hauls (with the tailgate closed) 8 foot long pieces of lumber, 2 bales of straw, 300 ft rolls of field fencing, whatever you got. 257,000 miles- original clutch, no issues.

  • avatar
    frostymajor

    Have a KIA Soul Turbo Tech and love it. Had an accident and the only downside is that the car is so new the parts aren’t in the pipeline yet. We’ve been without our car for close to 3 months now bit to give Kia its due, they have picked up the cost of our rental when the insurance ran out. And the got us a Soul, even though it isn’t the turbo tech. Still love the car. For older folks like ourselves it easier to get into than most small cars, it has tons of room inside (we went from a Ford Flex), gets great mileage, and is wonderful and fun to drive. We put on over 11000 klicks in just 6 months, and as my wife is just learning to drive a smaller vehicle is just what the doctor ordered. Despite the troubles, stilllove it.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    “As an aside, I rather dislike the use of punctuation for the trim level – and neither does my word processing software. Every instance whene I list “!” causes lights and flashes and minor explosions within my PC and brain alike.”

    It’s called a bang. Just a plain old bang.

  • avatar
    scott25

    To anyone complaining about the transmission, Kia has a Forte5 SX for you, same motor with a manual option with a normal car seating position.

    FINALLY both a review and a comments section with not one referral to the Soul as a crossover. It’s not, by any stretch of the imagination, unless judged solely by the seating position. Of course, that’s the reason I didn’t even consider one, it feels like a bus.

    On a related note, has any mainstream manufacturer made a DCT that isn’t total garbage except VW? What’s the point? A regular automatic or a CVT are good enough for 99.999% of non-manual applications.

    The Kia Soul has to be in the running for least offensive new vehicle purchase. Nobody from any walk of life, political inclination, or vehicular interest will bedgrudge you for driving a Soul. The only thing that would seal the deal is if it was built in North America.

  • avatar
    picard234

    I’m leasing one of these. Most all the comments are spot on. There seems to be no rhyme or reason when takeoff will be smooth or when it will “lag.” It’s a great fun little car around town, crashy and loud on the highway; I managed over 35MPG when fleeing Hurricane Irma in mostly highway driving.

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