By on December 2, 2017

2018 Ford F-150 , Image: Ford

With a single month remaining in 2017, automakers are ramping up sales efforts in the hopes of finishing the year on a high note. At this time of year, most stores deploy all the tools in their arsenal, from magical incentives to generous trade-in values, in a bid to compete with consumer dollars generally spent elsewhere during December.

The preceding month was solid but not stunning, leading some to openly wonder if this’ll be the first year since the Bankruptcy Days that total industry sales will be a few units less than the previous 12 months.

Absent of Nissan’s numbers as of this writing (thanks what the company described as a “significant IT systems outage”), the U.S. auto market held its ground in November. Assuming the duo of Nissan and Infiniti sold roughly the same amount of cars as this time last year, the entire market was virtually flat, off less than two-tenths of a percent to a monthly total somewhere in the ballpark of 1.3 million units sold in November.

[UPDATE] After fixing its IT snafu, Nissan reported strong sales for both the Nissan and Infiniti brands, bringing the total units sold for all brands who report their sales to just under sixteen million vehicles, year-to-date, in 2017.

American Nov sales

Year-to-date, the story is largely the same, with – using the same assumptions about Nissan – the number of automobiles sold to American customers year-to-date in 2017 remaining largely the same as it was 12 months ago. We will update this post with complete numbers when they become available.

Notably, the Ford brand sold 14,284 more vehicles in November 2017 than it did during the same month in 2016, the only stand-alone brand to crack the 200,000 mark. Honda also saw major gains, recording an 8.2 percent increase in November sales versus the same time period last year. Having the CR-V and Pilot sell like proverbial hotcakes (up 25 percent to 32,206 and 57 percent to 12,189 respectively), and with the Civic posting continual YoY increases since July, surely explains Honda’s robust numbers.

According to the industry buffs at Kelly Blue Book, the average transaction price of a vehicle in America hit an all-time high of $35,870, no doubt driven by the manufacturer proclivity to finance new vehicle over extremely long-term notes. Most of those are, naturally, high(er) profit SUVs and crossovers.

While the total number of sales may be largely flat compared to this time last year, one can safely say the amount of profit raked in is greater — all thanks to all those high-margin units finding homes in driveways across America.

[Image: Ford Motor Company]

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41 Comments on “U.S. Auto Sales Brand-by-Brand Results – November 2017 YTD...”


  • avatar
    raph

    Man, it looks like the Giulia was a good move for Alfa! I wonder if they can keep the momentum up?

  • avatar
    Sjalabais

    How do you explain the imploding sales at Kia? Lack of -UVs?

  • avatar
    Joss

    Smart must be dumbfounded. While Mitsubishi’s on a tear…

  • avatar
    vent-L-8

    Does anyone have Tesla US sales numbers so we could see how many actual cars they are selling?

    • 0 avatar
      pragmatic

      Behind the smoke and mirrors are more mirrors and smoke

      • 0 avatar
        vent-L-8

        I read they were selling over 10,000 units per quarter of the model S, I can’t find where I read that but its not insignificant if true. Weather or not it can be done and come anywhere close to breaking even is another issue altogether. It seems that there is so much animosity towards them on the car sites I read these past months.

        • 0 avatar
          Speed3

          Per goodcarbadcar they sold 5,100 last month with a YTD of 50,000. So that’s about the same as Porsche.

          I have also ready that the monthly volume of Model 3s is still in the hundreds, that’s probably the key figure to watch – how quickly they can ramp up production.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      You can see all EV sales here:

      https://insideevs.com/monthly-plug-in-sales-scorecard/

      Tesla’s numbers are always an estimate until their quarterly reports come out.

      Insideevs’ estimates for US numbers are:
      November 2017
      Model S – 1335
      Model X – 1875
      Model 3 – 345

      YTD
      Model S – 22085
      Model x – 18015
      Model 3 – 712

      The one to watch is the Model 3, because its annual production is supposed to far exceed the S and X, and it will be the future of the company.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Hey look at Acura made a gain. They have been pushing the TLX hard, either that or they sold some NSX. Probably just SUVs like everyone else.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Am I missing something, or is Toyota/Lexus ahead of Ford/Lincoln for the year? Nice. They’re the only keeper-car company left.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Giant maw FTW! (Even though Lincoln is up YTD while Lexus is down.)

      That’s the best way to interpret the numbers to get past the fact that the Ford brand is ahead of Toyota (as well as every other brand). Excellent job.

      • 0 avatar
        deanst

        Yea, I’m sure Toyota is secretly deeply disappointed that they have to resort to high revenue, high profit Lexus sales in order to beat Fo Mo Co.

        On a serious note, why are ford’s numbers here not matching their press release? Was there a revision, or is this a TTAC error?

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Toyota/Lexus sold 273K more cars this year than last year while Ford/Lincoln sold 27K fewer. Is that a good way to interpret the numbers?

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          Not sure if this scenario is repeated enough times to make a meaningful difference, but an acquaintance, VERY surprisingly, bought a Tundra over an F150, simply due to Ford requiring some sky high, pimped out $60+K trim level to fit radar cruise and related tech.

          While Toyota and Honda are both busy making it standard, on everything from Ace-of-Base mopeds on up. Which it should be, as it’s cheap as heck to fit if you buy in OEM volumes, and the pedestrian detection and auto-emergency-brake feature requiring the same hardware, literally do save lives. The latter probably doubly so in a tall hooded pickup, although I doubt anyone has bothered to break those out for individual study.

    • 0 avatar

      Toyota is more like GM and VW than Ford which is a smaller company. Ford does not even have RWD car platform. Difference is pretty small though and Lincoln was mishandled for decades. Lincoln was the best selling luxury brand in 1989-90.

      • 0 avatar
        PenguinBoy

        “Ford does not even have RWD car platform.”
        Is the Mustang FWD or AWD then?

      • 0 avatar
        Dy-no-mite Jay

        Mustang?

        And anyways, most people buying cars, buy fwd. Besides, the most popular and profitable vehicle types right now are the crossover and suv, which Ford has no shortage of as that is what they are (smartly) investing in. Between Ford and Lincoln, I count no less than 9 currently available with at least 2 more on the way.

        And all of this ignores the frosting on their cake that is the f series pickup.

  • avatar

    don’t buy a Lacrosse. the heaters don’t work and they can’t fix it.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      My heater works fine.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      WHEN WILL YOU ADMIT IT, ASSUMING YOU DON’T YET KNOW IT?

      GENERAL MOTORS MAKES GARBAGE (including your beloved Buick garbage, now made in China with 88% Chinese-sourced parts, exported to American-flag waving Buick Dealerships).

      How many times do people have to be burned by the steaming piles of sh!t that the taxpayer bailed out, bankrupted GM, before they avoid at all costs!

      *I had a Mercedes GLC with 2,300 miles on the odometer for 3 days this week on a biz trip and it was an unmitigated pile of steaming sh!t, also. It was *literally* 1 to 1 1/2 notches above a Nissan Rogue, with a cheap interior, overly stiff suspension, severely compromised rear cargo space, a very un-Mercedes like flexing chassis, a diesel loud POS 2.0T liter 4 banger, and idiotic controls (anyone who spends even 70% of the MSRP on either a Mercedes CLA [see my prior review] or GLC is a f’ing moron who would be better off with the equivalent Hyundai products). What an overpriced, cheap-feeling, cheap-sounding, turd shaped lump of sh!t of a vehicle, yet another of the Mercedes rentals I have had recently. The fact that Mercedes is using the same 2.0T in this GLCrap also in the C and *gasp* E class is SACRILEGIOUS AND BEYOND A MORTAL SIN!

      FCUK YOU MERCEDES AND YOUR CLACKITY, PIECE OF SH!T VEHIClES, ALSO! STICK THESE DIRECTLY UP YOUR ARSEHOLE!!!

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “don’t buy a Lacrosse”

      H-body > Epsilon P2

      imgur.com/a/Kz8wO

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Buickman–Did you get a new Lacrosse? I haven’t heard of a heater problem before. One of my neighbors has a 2012 hybrid Lacrosse and it has been a very reliable car (beautiful car in champagne). I haven’t driven on but I have driven an Impala. I have a more favorable opinion of Impala since driving one. Both the Lacrosse and Impala are really nice looking and comfortable cars. I really enjoyed driving the Impala.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    Every GM brand was down this month. Only GMC is up ytd. And think about all their brand new crossovers on the market! Not a good sign…

  • avatar
    xtoyota

    When will MINI dealers give up ??????
    Move MINI back to BMW dealers


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