By on October 18, 2017

1997 Honda PreludeWe’ve asked you before about the particular brand you’d resurrect if given the power to bring just one back from the dead. A different Question of the Day also inquired which models trumped the previous generation by bringing fresh ideas and improvements to the redesign.

Today, we follow similar lines and ask which model was killed off too soon; which vehicle deserved one more generation.

Consumer tastes flip-flop, company finances ebb and flow, regulations are ever changing, and the names on the doors in the executive suite are not permanent. These are just a few of the factors which can spell an untimely end for a vehicle offering that at its heart is solid, desirable, and good. Here’s where you get to pick a model, and give it a stay of execution with your historical 20/20 vision goggles firmly secured.

There’s only one rule today: The model you’re saving must be continued from the time the final version left off. In other words, you can’t bring back the Honda Prelude for a new generation in 2017. It would have to be a sixth-generation Prelude, for 2002. And speaking of Japanese cars, here’s my example.

Image: 1996 Toyota Camry Coupe

The lovely Toyota Camry Coupe deserved another generation. Shown above in final, 1996 V6 SE format, Toyota decided to forego both wagon and coupe formats with the 1997 redesign. This was a mistake. The official successor model (in 1999) was the swoopy and more awkward looking Solara coupe and cabriolet. Neither of those ever had the appeal of the Camry Coupe, nor its simple and honest styling.

Image: 1999 Toyota Camry Solara

Not that it’s awful, per se, it just doesn’t have the same essential goodness. The market for a front-drive midsize Japanese coupe still existed, as Honda proved (right up to 2017) with the Accord Coupe. Nissan played the game for a while with the Altima Coupe, though it never had the mainstream appeal of the Accord or Camry options. But I think I’ve made my point.

It’s now your turn. Tell us which cancelled model really deserved another generation.

[Images: Honda, Toyota]

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137 Comments on “QOTD: Which Model Deserved One More Generation?...”


  • avatar
    scott25

    I feel like Honda Element will be a popular answer since it was just barely ahead of its time and left stale for too long, if they actually put money into making a real 2nd generation it would have taken off.

    In hindsight, another one that seems obvious is the Scion xB, as in the oversized second gen should’ve been badged as the xE or something and the 2nd gen xB should’ve been the Bb the Japanese market got (with the Yaris powertrain) so Scion would’ve had a full lineup of boxes and the original small box niche wasn’t left wide open for the Soul.

    Something that would’ve been a massive failure but would’ve been awesome is a 2nd generation Subaru Baja based on good looking, good handling mid 2000s generation of Legacy

  • avatar
    jack4x

    A few off the top of my head:

    2014 Chevy Avalanche – Would have loved to see one of these offered in the new body style with the 6.2 available. Even if sales were down the engineering for the midgate concept was done so it’s hard to see why the minimal investment wasn’t made. I also like the idea that the Avalanche was GM’s “test bed” for new truck ideas that eventually make their way into the volume Silverado, would have been neat to see what they came up with in a new generation.

    2006 Toyota MR2 – Affordable mid engine cars are a niche that’s gone away. This would have been neat either as a continuation of the Spyder from 2005 or a return to the coupe style of the earlier cars. Either way it would have been a unique competitor in the $20-30k space thats fun to drive and with enough standard Toyota parts to be cheap to run and reliable. 1989 Fiero would have been neat too.

    1997 Caprice/Roadmaster/Fleetwood/Impala SS – Imagine these cars from the factory with LS power. Don’t know how much longer they would have stayed competitive in the world of SUVs, but if Ford could sell the Panthers well into the 2000s, there’s no reason GM couldn’t have done the same with better powertrains.

    2018 Dodge Viper – A pipe dream but I would have loved to see what they came up with.

    • 0 avatar
      needlepimp

      I completely agree on the Avalanche. I recently traded my 2007 on a new Silverado, had the Avalanche still been available I would have a new one in the driveway today. By far that was one of the best vehicles I have ever had as far as usefulness and reliability, 10 years and over 100,000 miles with only normal maintenance.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Roadmaster. We could have had a giant LS1-powered tri-shield sedan with an actual tow rating.

    • 0 avatar

      Swap the platform for 97 and use a Holden Commodore one, but make it here?

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        The recent Chinese-market Buick Park Avenue used the LWB Commodore body, or what we know as the Caprice PPV. However, it was not bestowed with a V8. It had the underwhelming 2.8-liter turbo V6, the 3.0-liter N/A V6 and the 3.6-liter N/A V6.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I think I’d keep it BOF. Holden’s V platform was likely sportier but it was just as old as the B-body at that time, and I dont know if it could support the dimensions needed. The Roadmaster should be a car version of the Suburban. At least 215 inches long and 78 inches wide.

        A Commodore would have made a nice Catalina/Chevelle/Intrigue. Instead we got the Catera.

        • 0 avatar

          “The Roadmaster should be a car version of the Suburban. At least 215 inches long and 78 inches wide.”

          Well heck.

          “A Commodore would have made a nice Catalina/Chevelle/Intrigue. Instead we got the Catera.”

          And sh!t.

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    Ford Capri but with a torque arm rear suspension and LSD.
    http://www.barons-auctions.com/content/uploaded/galleries/folder_676/1_1_DSC02136.JPG

  • avatar
    jdrgoat

    This is right up my alley, I just had to finally register to reply. There are a couple that jump right to my mind when this question comes up.

    The Pontiac Solstice (and Saturn Sky) deserved a second generation, even if they had to be built as a Chevy or Buick. They came out with a fantastic suspension/chassis, light(ish) weight, and were the first solid competition to the Miata in ages. They had a lot of compromises, though. It came out before the interior renaissance that occured at GM after 08-ish, which could have greatly improved its appeal. And if they had found a way to relocate the fuel tank, and make an actual, usable trunk, that would have helped a lot, too.

    The other car I desperately wish got a second generation is the Fiero. It was so close to actually happening, and management had a lot of reasons to not short-change it as badly on the second go-around. The Corvette had the ZR-1, so that rumor of stepping on their toes shouldn’t have applied. The 3.4 DTC (say what you will about it in hindsight, but it made good power for its day) would have been a drastic improvement over either the Iron Duke or the 2.8. And there was new competition in the Miata, as well as the second gen MR2, to keep some rivalry interesting a la Mustang vs Camaro.

  • avatar
    Tarditi

    Nissan XTerra – great body-on-frame SUV that Nissan couldn’t care to market, so the sales evaporated.
    Can’t blame consumer interest – look at the 5 years before Nissan pulled the model – all the literature and most of the ads deliberately avoided the Xterra. It just didn’t fit with their vision.

    • 0 avatar

      I think the pricing for those was a bit off. It never had the name recognition or quality of something like a 4Runner – it’s only real competitor. There was no luxurious trim, either.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        I think the “real world” prices were actually fairly reasonable, for what you got. It undercut the 4Runner fairly seriously, but at the same time it was significantly less polished on the road and not quite as useful (less rear seat space for car seats, smaller cargo area) IMO, ultimately what made me decide against getting one to replace my old 4Runner. I agree, the Xterra should have been revised, even just some better seats and a coil sprung rear end would have done wonders. I bet you if it was still on sale even totally un-revised, it’d be selling quite well right now.

    • 0 avatar
      calsonicgtr

      At the very least they should have done another generation and sold them in Colorado. I see XTerras all over the place out here

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      I second this. Best SUV in the tradition of the IH Scout.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      Our weird jobless hippy neighbour has an Xterra sitting in her mother’s driveway and it’s been there for months. I don’t think it runs any longer. She’d probably give it away for a pound of her favourite skunk herb.

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      Correct. Nissan Xterra was killed before its time. The model was long in the tooth, but a few upgrades to the overall package, and the 2wd versions needed to be culled to make the Xterra brand more potent.

      My brother as a Pro-4x. It’s a solid offroad vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        ktm

        My wife had a 2002 Xterra SE in yellow. I loved it, but it was underpowered and sucked gas badly. We only ever averaged 16 mpg with that V-6 and it did not have the power to offset the poor fuel economy.

  • avatar
    iNeon

    Dodge neon and Chrysler PT Cruiser– it makes so much sense that no one thought of it.

    A fresh neon is exactly what Chrysler needed in 2006-2010, and a fresh PT Cruiser is exactly what Chrysler needed in 2011 to present.

    Same argument can be made for Dart/200.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    The Phaeton. And Volkswagen would probably have done it too, if not for the fact that they (rightfully) had to pay for the diesel scandal.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    DeLorean DMC-12

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Lexus SC – but in the spirit of the original, not the two (usable) seat convertible it became.

    Imagine a 2nd and 3rd generation SC that was essentially a LS coupe.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    I guess the market’s not there, but my wife LOVES her ’06 Solara Convertible and is very sad that there are precisely zero replacements with the same capabilities outside of $70k+ European options. It combines a usable back seat AND a usable trunk, which are qualities you just can’t get new in anything but I suppose a Wrangler Unlimited. (She did the Jeep thing, and while it was fun, the gas-sucking, having to wear earplugs on the highway, and the frequent maintenance required were less fun.)

    • 0 avatar
      427Cobra

      there’s always the Buick Cascada…

      • 0 avatar
        sirwired

        The Cascada is closest, but the trunk is slightly smaller (with a much smaller opening) and the rear seats have 3″ less room.

        And it’s orphaned Opal-ness does not inspire confidence for long-term parts availability.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          The bodyshell and elements like the convertible top may be unique to the Cascada and thus a bit difficult to find, but unlike earlier Opel imports (like the Saturn Astra and 2nd-gen Saturn Vue / Chevy Captiva Sport)…the Cascada is all global-parts-bin General Motors. The door handles, instrument panel, infotainment system, powertrain, brakes, suspension, et cetera are all found on other GM cars. It is basically a Buick Verano cabriolet, and there’s nothing about it that’s particularly Opel.

          Which is a good thing.

          I too lament the loss of the mid-sized affordable cabriolet. Other than the Cascada, the Mustang is cramped for rear seat occupants, and the Camaro is both cramped and has poor visibility.

          • 0 avatar
            FuzzyPlushroom

            Belatedly, my grandparents are in the same boat. They have a surprisingly sound ’04 Sebring convertible now (90k on the clock, zero rust, no obvious sludge in the 2.7, transmission only slightly clunky) and know it won’t last forever, but even the newest Solara convertibles are already nine years old, and my grandfather hated the high beltline and the ride of the newer (pre-200) Sebring he test-drove, so I doubt he’d be happier hanging his arm out of a 200. (I’m not sure how well my grandmother could see out of it!) The Cascada would probably be too cramped-feeling and too European – if repair costs were no object, I suspect they’d have one of the last C70s.

            Hell, maybe my grandmother could talk him into a V6 or Ecoboost Mustang. They rarely have passengers, anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      freekcj

      Murano Cabrio?

  • avatar
    Nedmundo

    Honda S-2000 tops the list. Rumors suggest something like it might return, which would be awesome.

    Mazdaspeed 6 is next up for me. Today, the Fusion Sport is the only high-performance AWD variant of a mainstream sedan, and a Mazdaspeed 6 would probably be better. In a similar vein, another Subaru Legacy GT would be nice.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      another Subaru Legacy GT…

      Dear Subaru – I’d be perfectly happy with it being a Legacy GT sedan. Make it the only way to get a manual transmission in a Legacy and you’d likely sell a few based on that fact alone.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      I’ve been shopping cars, and … sadly … continuing to maintain my manual transmission Legacy GT wagon still keeps being a better option. Cars I like more are Expensive!

  • avatar
    Dan

    The Camaro. And the Firebird too. GM bungled these as only GM could and managed to miss out on the entire 2000s boom. Ford sold a literal million Mustangs into the market that they had abandoned.

    Also, the Ramcharger. All of the success of the 94 Ram could have carried over into this, at the same time that the big SUV market was exploding

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      This is what I was going to say too. The Mustang wouldn’t have hung on to its -300hp v8 for so long if it had had some competition. And the Camaro might not be just another retro mobile if production hadn’t stopped. The Camaro had always been different with each new generation.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    can’t believe I’m the first one to say there should have been a (new) 2012 Ranger here.

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    Lincoln Mark Series

    *shakes fist at PAG*

    • 0 avatar

      2003 Continental based on new Jaguar/PAG XJ aluminum platform.

    • 0 avatar
      mmreeses

      that always irked me about Lincoln. Get rid of names? except Navigator, fine.

      Lincoln already has a logical alphanumeric system the Mark series. Make your flagship the Mark X and move on down the line.

      But that’s too obvious and sensible.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I agree with you, in theory, but…

      The Mark VIII had excellent build quality and was put on a well-engineered platform, especially compared to its cross-town rivals, the Cadillac Eldorado / ETC and, to a lesser-extent, the Buick Riviera.

      But the personal luxury coupe market was indeed dying. Lincoln could have, if it had wanted to, dug its heels in and built something that was enough of a statement in design, but that’s not what would have happened. If you look at where Lincoln was headed after about 1998, you’ll see that a Mark IX wouldn’t have been anything close to satisfactory. It would have looked and felt cheap, and probably would have cost more. However, if the LS and its DEW architecture are any indication, it could have been rather athletic.

      The real sad thing was that the Mark VIII’s demise helped kill any commitment Lincoln had toward RWD cars. These days, they are making what I would consider to be quality premium vehicles, but they’ve given up the opportunity to justify RWD for those cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Dy-no-mite Jay

      YES!

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    Olds Aurora (surviving on as a Buick).

    Put a Mercedes badge on the Aurora, shorten it by a few inches and it would have sold like hotcakes.

    oh wait, that was the Mercedes CLS.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    MAGA!!!

    (Make Acura Great Again)

    Integra, Legend, & Vigor.

    I **might** consider this brand again if….

  • avatar
    01 Deville

    Mitsubishi Montero. It was solidly built, had great on road manners, good towing capacity and was decent soft-roader. Would have liked Mistsubishi to source a V8 from whoever could supply it.
    Having owned a 95 fleetwood, can’t make a case for B-bodies as they were quite indifferently engineered/packaged/put together. An entirely new chasis on that dying segment would not have been worth the investment.
    Another generation of H3 would have been nice with maybe duramax but in real world GM was going bankrupt.
    V70 (not the XC70) also deserved another generation being a third row alternative to E-Class wagons.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Good one on the Montero. Again, given current tastes, I figure selling the current gen IV from overseas would actually work pretty well if they kept prices competitive with the 4Runner.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Duesenberg Model J or Cord 812.

  • avatar

    Oldsmobile Aurora

    Pontiac Aztek

    HUMMER H3

  • avatar
    NMGOM

    Corvair

    • 0 avatar
      NMGOM

      This may be a stretch, since it didn’t even complete its first generation, but I always thought the “Tucker 48” should have continued. Most innovative car ever, for its era. Maybe too much so, as the Big Three ganged up against it.

      =========================

  • avatar
    incautious

    The original E body Challenger/Barracuda. Gm would go on the sell zillions of F body cars proving there was indeed a market for these cars

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Studebaker
    Nissan 240Sx
    Mazda 929
    Honda CRX
    Crown Vic (after some modernization)
    Chevy Commodore
    Mitsu Evo
    Mitsu 3000
    Mitsu Eclipse
    Ford Ranger

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Agree on the Nissan 240Sx and Honda CRX, as were are still waiting for something modern to truly replace these.

      However the Eclipse? They ruined that car so it needed to die. I should know… I owned a ’96 GS-T and the next gen was terrible, the styling copied Pontiac with the “ribs” and had a slower, heavier V6 up front and lost the AWD. It somehow survived another generation but just got uglier.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      A modern Crown Vic would be fascinating. Another generation 240 and I might own one. Hell yea on the Ranger.

      I agree with JMII on the Eclipse. It was a great car for what it was. The last generation turned it to crap. One more generation would be undeserved.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Ford Thunderbird/Mercury Cougar Lincoln Mark VIII MN-12
    There was a post 97 version of the T-bird on the drawing board with a SVT package.

    A Mark IX based on the LS platform. There was a prototype.

  • avatar
    BoogerROTN

    I know “wagon love” is cheating around here, but it would have been nice to see a few more iterations (2nd and 3rd gen) of the Mazda6 wagon.

    Mazda probably ditched it because of the prohibitive cost of brown paint…

  • avatar
    TW5

    Suzuki Samurai

    If Suzuki had the wherewithal to keep the Samurai soldiering on in simple agricultural form, I think it would still be a cult classic.

  • avatar
    Ermel

    Mazda RX-8.

    VW Corrado.

    Opel Omega/Senator, and earlier Monza — big RWD sedans and 3-door fastback, respectively. Well, big für Germany where they lived, you’d probably call them compact or something.

    Mercedes SLC.

    Citroen C6.

  • avatar
    gottacook

    We have three older Subarus in two body shapes that had long lives but aren’t made any more. One is an ’03 Legacy wagon (offered through ’07 in about the same configuration as the original 1990 model); the others are 10-year-old Foresters (from the original 12-year run of the model, 1997-2008). The latter have big upright windshields that are the closest thing to a first-gen Scion xB. If Subaru offered true successors, we’d be in the market soon.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Regarding the transition from Camry to Solara, what you mean by “Essential goodness”?

    I think the Aztek deserved another generation, had it been made now it would have saved Pontiac.

    Caprice, it had decent enough police/cabbie demand.

    Town Car/Crown Vic, there was still a fleet market for these, just retool the F-150 frame a bit and there you go!

    Honda S2000: Stock these are nice, it just took Honda time to make them more livable on the streets.

    Chevy Corvair: Later on it became pretty advanced for a mid sized domestic, many companies in Europe copied it too (Renault, Sunbeam, NSU, VW 411, BMW). The much more conventional Camaro ended up taking over.

    Nissan 4DSC: Imagine this but with ordinary seatbelts and a VQ in it, the perfect Maxima.

    • 0 avatar
      Ermel

      Interesting how Renault, Volkswagen, NSU, and BMW “copied” the Corvair instead of the other way round. I think you need to read up on their histories a bit.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        I meant that from an aesthetic pov, the Corvair came out in the early 60s, a few years later the Imp, Renault 8, and NSU TT. All somewhat blocky sedans with similar styling. Years later you got the VW 411.

        • 0 avatar
          Ermel

          Okay, I kind of agree there. Although the 411 looks nothing like the Corvair to me — much to the VW’s disadvantage though.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            As one of the very few North Americans to have owned a Type IV VW, I appreciate that comment.

            Remember that the Type IV came in multiple forms, as a 3 door and 4 door saloon, and as a 3 door squareback/shooting brake.

            As it retained the antiquated air-cooled, rear engine design of the 911 (and some other VW vehicles) there was no rear ‘trunk’ on the saloon. The squareback had both the wagon component and a front ‘trunk’.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            My Type 3 Fastback had both a rear mailbox trunk and a comparment for the engine, that wasnt fun to work on!

            Never had a Type 4 though, my father did have a Corvair briefly and it was pretty easy to work on, sold it cuz rust made it structurally unsound.

  • avatar
    turf3

    Fiero.

    Corvair.

    Ford Ranger, Nissan Pickup, small Toyota pickup, Chevy S-10

    Volvo 240.

    Studebaker Starlight Coupe (take off the wings and put a non-spaghetti frame under it, please).

    El Camino.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      “Volvo 240.”
      It kinda continued on as the pricier Americanized Volvo 940.

      • 0 avatar
        FuzzyPlushroom

        I was thinking that the 940 and 960 (well, S90/V90 in their new scheme) deserved a redesign. Call ’em the 1999 S/V80 and S/V90, and have ’em sit exactly where you’d think.

        Imagine Volvo’s late-’90s design language over, heck, even the monoleaf-IRS late-960 chassis, with the 850/S70/S60’s N/A and turbo fives and eventually the larger cars’ turbo-six bolted up to an Aisin-Warner or ZF automatic that could actually handle the 2.9T’s torque. It could have been a larger/cruder-in-some-ways Swedish E39, or a prettier, cheaper, less rust-prone W210, with a bit of additional practicality.

        (This could go further, of course. Squeeze a front diff in there, make it optional on S/V80T and S/V90 – take advantage of its capability when marketing the full-size Cross Countries. If the AWD cars sit a bit higher, hey, that’s hardly a bad thing as long as it doesn’t make the sedans look too goofy. Heck, they could have built a large crossover off of this, too, though I’m not sure it would’ve been easy to make it as safe as the XC90 we got.)

        Take a moment and imagine the original S80 with another 2″ of hood/front fender/cowl between the wheel arches and front doors. Ponder what it would be like if its issues were limited to electrical problems and crappy leather – like owning that W210 without MB-Tex in the Southwest, perhaps.

        (Full disclosure: I do miss my old 740T in some ways, even compared to my current [fourth] 240.)

  • avatar
    True_Blue

    A “ninth-generation” G-body Riviera.

    I still pause when I see a non-hooptied Riv, packing the S/C 3.8. That was an elegant design – especially compared to the seventh-gen.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    My top pick would be a new 929.
    AWD and the size of an A8L.
    Take that new engine tech they are coming out with and put it to use in a 3.5 V6 with (I ELOOP) and a 10 speed auto..I will be waiting in line with cash in hand.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    A Mazdaspeed anything would be nice. Pretty dull lineup over at Mazda, aside from the Miata. Another RX-7 to follow the FD car. Another RX-8 just so we could have a sweet handling rotary powered car.

    I’m probably the only person who believes this, but I think Hyundai had a good first effort at a RWD sports car with the Genesis Coupe. They could have made it a more of a player with a more refined second generation. This same logic also applies to the Fiero and Solstice/Sky.

    A continuing evolution of the Camaro/Firebird would be better than where we’re at now, stuck in retro land until the end of time.

  • avatar
    turf3

    Citroen DS. Replace the hydraulic systems with GM equivalents, use coil springs instead of hydraulics for suspension, fit it with powerful AC. Keep the styling just as it is, please.

    Jaguar E-type, eliminating the extra chrome they added to the second series, and using halogen headlights to allow the sleek headlight covers of the first series. Replace the Lucas electrics with Denso electrics. Fit it with powerful AC. Keep the styling just like first series E-type, please.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    MR2. Corvair. S2000.
    (How can I fit a 4 door Mustang into this thread…)

  • avatar
    Russycle

    Pontiac Bonneville. Keep the 3.8, lose the cladding and plastic interior. Drop in a 6-speed manual while you’re at it.

  • avatar
    Marko

    1992 Jeep Grand Wagoneer. What better way to usher in the “new” era of Chrysler by launching a genuine flagship? A truly modern, ultra-luxurious, and truly American SUV. Based on the ZJ, but a lengthened and widened version (third row optional) – it would look very grand (but restrained at the same time – these are bought by old money, after all) and would look nothing like the plebeian Grand Cherokee that would arrive a year later. Offered exclusively with the 5.9L Magnum. It would make Range Rovers look like the Lucasfilled claptrap that they are, and it would be a cheap shot to say that “luxurious” Explorer Limiteds and Oldsmobile Bravadas would suddenly show their tarted-up Terminix truck roots – but there you go. BMW would be scrambling to develop a competitor, and Mercedes would suddenly realize that the G-Wagen needed some serious updates…no, they weren’t sold in America yet, but even European buyers would take notice. Jeep would also have an “American delivery” option for foreign buyers, with a wide range of custom colors and upholstery options. Lexus would probably rebadge a Land Cruiser – but nothing would be as exclusive as this Jeep.

    Now, I wonder if Lee Iacocca would have demanded they keep the wood trim…

  • avatar
    Polishdon

    Easy. The Dodge Magnum wagon.

  • avatar
    MisterLeo

    FJ Cruiser. The stellar resale value alone indicates that there was and is still a market for a second gen.

  • avatar

    Fiero-killed off by GM incompetence. Books have been written.

    Toyota Celica Supra – I still like the square ones with the i-6. Bonus points for “celica” in the badge.

    Mitsubishi Eclipse…you know, there was a time Mitsu wasn’t a joke. The early Eclipse in 2wd 16v trim was a nice runner, and hit the usable/sporty curve perfectly, esp. manual. The AWD turbo version was very competent.

  • avatar
    Erikstrawn

    RX-7! RX-7! RX-7!
    Crown Vic
    Lotus Elise/Exige

  • avatar
    PartyST

    Nissan 240SX hatchback
    Honda Element
    Any actually compact sized pick up (thanks, CAFE)
    Toyota MR2

  • avatar

    This most likely doesn’t fit the question, but I would have liked to see Dodge build the late 90’s concept Charger as a continuation of the nameplate in 1988 when there was the long gap between versions. I thought it was a great looking car with many nods back to earlier models’ styling. I would have bought one in a heartbeat (and probably still be driving it today). It certainly would have been a better continuation if it had been built as the 4th gen model. The 4th gen was not what I think of when I think Charger. It just was not “sporty” in any sense of the word. The 5th gen brought that back a bit. The late 90’s concept would have been an appropriate followup (in looks at the very least) as a 4th gen or as a radical change in the aforementioned gap in production.

  • avatar

    Pontiac Fiero, of course!

  • avatar
    stanczyk

    Where all the Coupes gone ?!?

    It would be nice to see new .. Monte Carlo , .. Riviera .. etc..

    .. and whare is Eldorado >P .. > or .. CTS-coupe (old one was wicked , sharp [email protected]!

  • avatar
    Jeff Semenak

    Ford Flex even though, it’s not dead yet. Just sleeping.

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  • Lie2me: Kia/Hyundai are making some decent crossovers for the money and it appears the sales figures show that. Those...

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