By on October 2, 2017

2018 Chevy Silverado 3500 Dually

People have been predicting it for years, we foreshadowed it a few months ago, and on Thursday it finally happened: one can now waltz into a dealership and spoil the better part of a hundred grand on a pickup truck.

See that 2018 Silverado 3500 Crew Cab Dually up top, though? It doesn’t cost $100,000. It doesn’t even cost $50,000. It is, in fact, only $340 more expensive than a top-rung Honda Ridgeline.

Wait. What?

This whole sordid exercise was brought on by — as most sordid exercises are — a Craigslist ad. In it, I found a 2003 Chevy Silverado 3500 Crew Cab Dually with the *ahem * 8.1-liter V8 and manual transmission. Have mercy.

While the mighty Vortec 8100 is no longer installed behind HD bowties, its 330 horsepower is eclipsed by the 360 hp found in today’s 6.0-liter gas engine offered by The General in its HD pickups. The big-block made more torque, naturally.

What caught my eye in the Craigslist ad was the inclusion of a factory window sticker for the 2003 brute (go here if the ad disappears). All that power, all those tires, all that capability was available on the dealer lot for a grand total of $34,156 including destination. This information caused me to jump out of my seat, frightening my wife and spilling my evening double-double.

Calming myself and settling back in my Ransta Red POÄNG rocking chair, I found the GM build & price tool for HD trucks. Given the noise made late last week over Ford’s $100,000 hay-hauler, you can imagine my surprise when, after speccing out a 2018 Silverado 3500 with similar options to 2003 truck, its total came to only $44,400. That’s less than a loaded Ridgeline. It’s very nearly five grand less than a check-every-box Ford Flex. Sure, it’s even cheaper than most high-zoot minivans.

2018 Chevy Silverado 3500 DuallyAdjusted for inflation, our Craigslist find would’ve retailed for about the same amount today, give or take $1,000. Yes, both the 2003 and 2018 pickups shown here have ox-cart levels of amenities compared to the Super Duty Limited, and the bucks-deluxe model in which I relaxed at the State Fair of Texas is far more capable in many measures, thanks largely to its diesel powerplant.

Still, is Ford’s luxury truck worth a $50,000 premium over the dually shown above? Only you can answer that.

[Images: General Motors]

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94 Comments on “QOTD: Have Truck Prices Gone Mad?...”


  • avatar
    deanst

    I used to be glad that Ford would take the money from fools willing to pay $80k for a pickup – as this gave them the money to deliver us fiestas and Foci. Now that the fiesta is cancelled and the focus will be Chinese, I don’t care anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      Now it’s going to fund that hybrid Mustang/F150 and the Model E

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Actually, it’s going to fund the Ford family’s dividend payout. They went without for awhile and had to pinch pennies, sort of. The current dividend amounts to over 5% of net earnings, a very generous payout.

        Ford HAS to pay a big dividend, because the stock price is only 7 times earnings, far below the 10% standard. Because the investors (stock speculators) haven’t been paid through higher stock prices, the dividend has to go up to compensate.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      The RAM Trucks, from the Rebel, to the 1500, to the HD RAMs (Diesel and Gasoline), are BY FAR the best trucks for the money (and maybe better than Ford, GM or Toyota even if they were priced at parity- but they’re not, with the RAMs being 15% to 30% less than comparatively equipped GM and Ford competitors, a huge advantage).

      The RAMs ride better, are built as strong (stronger), have strong suspension parts and chassis, better transmissions, and have better interior materials and switchgear.

      The next gen RAM will begin assembly in December of this year at the SHAP (Sterling Heights Assembly Plant in Michigan – a facility that just received a 1.4 billion dollar retooling and renovation) and is going to be bad a$$.

      FCA’s American peeps get some things really right, such as the 300, RAM, Pacifica and Jeep Grand Cherokee/Durango.

      I have a fantasy of driving a lifted RAM 3500 over a row of 100 line-up Chinese-made Buick Envisions or Clown Buick Encores.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    What’s the exact configuration? Can you post it?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Worth noting: this is a 2wd model. Add four wheel drive and the bill goes to about fifty grand.

    • 0 avatar
      IHateCars

      Diesel engine will also tack on another $8K or $9K….so you are now up to $60K.

      But I do agree comfort and convenience options can tack on a lot of dough. But then, options also balloon BMW, Audi and Porsche prices as well….so I cannot feign outrage over this.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        If you can’t feign outrage at TTAC, where CAN you? Just remind yourself that in the ’60s and ’70s, pickup trucks cost less than cars and had 8 foot beds, and were still shorter than full sized cars.

        Of course, they had straight sixes and three on the tree, and a radio and sometimes heater were optional, but we shouldn’t mention that. For feigned outrage, you have to be selective with facts. It’s part of the fun.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        If you can get it, why not? It’s the way to mint money. You set things up so you make a little profit on the base model, then the options become all but pure profit.

        The profit on a $100K pickup that is fundamentally the same as a $30K pickup with some added tinsel draped over it boggles the mind. The marginal cost of the different parts just isn’t that high. Especially all the comfort stuff.

        It’s like things like the optional wheels and tires on a BMW. You can pay $5K to get bigger wheels and lower profile tires. In the aftermarket, there is only a few hundred bucks difference between wheels and tires in the stock size and those in the bigger size. Manufacturers pay even less, so that $5000 option is probably $4500 in profit. Likely more than the profit on the entire base car!

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @KrHodes1 – From the 1/2 ton 30K cheesy/stripper pickup to the base $55K F-450 crew cab dually pickup, it takes a lot more than just “tinsel”. That includes the mighty diesel, 4X4, heavy duty and commercial chassis/drivetrain/wheels/tire etc, etc.

          From there on up, yeah there’s a lot of tinsel and tech/gadgetry involved by the time you get the $80K fully luxo trucks including a glass roof, auto running-boards, Alcoa wheels to name a few.

          I don’t know if you consider any of that “value” vs the base stripper especially, but tell us what you get by the time a high end BMW or Merc doubles or triples the price from the base, vinyl seat models they’re based on.

          Here’s a hint: Those top German luxury car models, rival the net profitability of F-series while only selling a tiny fraction of total F-series sales/production figures.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    When modern diesel engines cost almost $10,000 extra on the sticker, have dubious long term reliability compared to older diesels, high maintenance and running costs, and with the current spread between diesel fuel and regular unleaded being what it is (and fairly steady for the last couple of years, at least around me), I’m amazed that no HD manufacturers have gone back to the big block concept. Driving my 8.1 back to back with a modern HD gas truck highlights the lack of low end torque and need to rev in the small blocks. Since the start of the “arms race” in the early 2000s, the diesel engines have doubled in torque; meanwhile you still can’t buy an HD gas engine with the 460 lb/ft of my 2002 8.1. It really makes me wish someone would modernize the formula, something around 400-450 hp and 550 lb/ft should be very reasonable. The diesel capabilities are also off the charts, how many are really towing 30k+ and actually need 900 lb/ft? If you could get 20k towing for a $1-2k premium over the base engine, I bet a lot of diesel owners would switch to avoid the hassle.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      “I’m amazed that no HD manufacturers have gone back to the big block concept.”

      Those big pistons are bad for emissions.

      “something around 400-450 hp and 550 lb/ft should be very reasonable”

      Ecoboost says hi.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        If Ford thought the Ecoboost could hold up to an HD duty cycle we’d see it in the Super Duty already. Same with GM and the 6.2. The compromises for fuel economy with these engines aren’t so important when there’s no window sticker or CAFE mpg to worry about.

        • 0 avatar
          scott25

          Honestly I’m surprised they haven’t turbocharged the 5.0 for the Super Duty.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            For (some) HD duty cycles, heat dissipation during continuous max output and limited airflow over the radiators is the limiting factor. Small, power dense forced induction engines are exactly the wrong solution to that problem.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        I’d love to see RAM put a 10-12 liter “Atkinson” straight 6 gasser in their HDs. The sheer size should make up for the lack of specific torque, the Atkinson valvetrain should keep it efficient, and the rev range would match up well with the input speeds of medium duty transmissions. Like the, nudge-nudge-wink-wink, G56 manual they currently only pair with the Cummins…….

    • 0 avatar
      ahintofpepperjack

      FCA could do it with the Hellcat engine. It currently has 650 lb/ft they could probably drop the HP and increase the torque too.

      Ram 1500 TowHawk?

    • 0 avatar

      I also miss the big blocks. Will be interesting to see what ram does with their next HD trucks. The 6.4 seems kind of the top dog in gas HD engines at the moment (the new Ford 6.2 seems right there too but a bit higher revving). Seems like a low pressure turbo 6.4 hemi would get you to 500 ftlbs.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        I’m very interested in the upcoming replacement for the Ford V10, the supposed 7 liter V8. Hoping they make it available in the F250/350 as well as the medium duty trucks.

        As intriguing as an Ecoboosted 5.0, detuned hellcat, or low pressure turbo 6.4 would be, I’m old school enough to want to stay naturally aspirated as long as possible. If it comes down to it though, I will buy 500 lb/ft however someone wants to sell it to me.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      The medium-duty trucks sure are going back to gas in a big way. My hometown in Maine is no longer buying diesel school buses and dump trucks. The savings in fuel isn’t worth it the added upfront and maintenance costs.

      • 0 avatar
        cdotson

        By gas do you mean gasoline or cng? I have seen some cng school buses in central Virginia but no gasoline. As far as I knew the switch to diesel school buses had less to do with acquisition, maintenance, and fuel costs and more to do with insurance costs after a bus load of kids burned in a crash about 20 years ago and gasoline was fingered as worsening the vehicle fire beyond what diesel would have. I hadn’t actually heard of the incident but an acquaintance who worked at international at the time told me we might never see another new gasoline school bus because of that incident.

        • 0 avatar
          Truckducken

          Kentucky, I-71, 1988: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrollton_bus_collision

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          In 1988 you couldn’t buy a conventional school bus with gasoline power. 84 was the last year for an IH gas engine in a school bus chassis, at least until they bought the P30 chassis from GM, called it Workhorse and used the GM engines.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    That $1,000 inflation-adjusted difference would cover the mandatory automatic on the new truck.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I think the real bargains are gas motor Ram 2500s. 4WD, solid front axle, good old manual T-case level on the floor. I see crew cabs in this configuration listed for $26-27k new with the smaller 5.7L, 6.4Ls at around $30k. That’s a heck of a lot of truck for the money IMO. They may or may not be Mexican made, however.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Ram dealers around here don’t order gas HD trucks. Basically anything that isn’t the Power Wagon or some regular cab fleet-spec stuff uses the Cummins.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Well there are quite a few online if one is willing to do a bit of traveling to get a bargain. I guess the MPG and ride suffers versus a half-ton, but the solid front axle and manual t-case are perhaps irrationally attractive to me personally, especially when the price is not just at parity, but undercuts many competing half tons.

        • 0 avatar
          87 Morgan

          A friend of mine has the Ram 2500 CC 4×4 with the 6.4L, loves it. Obviously hates the mpg, but seemingly it was 20k difference to get the diesel with the same options as the gas with less hassle.

    • 0 avatar

      Yep those are the current bargains of HD trucks. I used to never see them all Cummins trucks here in New England until the last year I have seen quite a few. I think the price gap is to large to ignore. Plus the 6.4 works well. You even get a payload boost over the diesel versions. Great setups for things like truck campers and smaller 5th wheels where you need the payload without going to a one ton.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    yes prices have gone mad, because of easy financing.

    people seem to look at “payments” rather than actual price – I saw this at the Hershey RV show a few weeks ago – people were looking at rigs that should have been well beyond their means but were considering them because of “affordable payments”.

    debt blew up the prices of houses and college education – so why not trucks?

    • 0 avatar
      saturnotaku

      If it isn’t student loans, car loans will be the next big financial bubble to burst. Auto delinquency rates are skyrocketing, and it’s only a matter of time before we see it all come crashing down.

      • 0 avatar
        walleyeman57

        One big difference between auto loans and student loans is the fact that you can repo the car/truck and resell for some portion of the balance owed. Not sure how you get back the gender studies “knowledge. “

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    “a 2018 Silverado 3500 with similar options to 2003 truck, its total came to only $44,400. That’s less than a loaded Ridgeline.”

    Technically, no. A loaded RTL-E, the top Ridgeline trim, is $42,560 with destination. A Black Edition, which is just an RTL-E with black paint and accents, maxes out at $44,060, also with destination.

    Yes, this doesn’t include any dealer-added accessories like bike racks and running boards and tonneau covers and that crap, but I don’t think that stuff counts.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Don’t forget that a Canyon/Colorado (soon to be joined by Ranger) are much nicer and more capable than they were 20 years ago and can be found in lower specs for prices on either side of $30K.

    Unless I needed HD capacity (which I don’t) a crew cab Canyon SLE V6 4×4 would be just fine by me.

    • 0 avatar
      sgtjmack

      Unless you want a teenager or other larger, full sized adult to sit in the back seat. I have a ’14 Tacoma, and looked at the Colorado. My 11 year old daughter is too big to sit in the back seat comfortably, so we looked at a Silverado. Couldn’t get my payments low enough, so they pulled a Colorado around. The back seat is not only narrower from door to door, but also less leg and knee room.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      Exactly. A 1997 F-150 had a starting price of $14,505 (XL, V6, 2WD, no options.) if you go by the CPI inflation adjustment calculators, that translates to $22,300 today. Today, an 2018 F-150 starts at $27,425 (like for like, XL, V6, 2WD, no options.) So yeah, about $5,000 more out of the gate. But what does that $5,000 get you? More powerful engine (290 vs. 205,) a 6 speed vs. a 4 speed trans, better fuel economy (19/25 vs. 15/20,) a *much* nicer interior, etc. Oh, and that aluminum body wasn’t cheap either.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    Nobody is being forced to shell out for a top-of-the-line, $100,000 Platinum Limited Z71 1894 Edition.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    I remember about 12-13 years ago being shocked when I was walking by a Ford dealership and they had the “Harley Davidson” edition of an F and the thing was something like $40k. Now I think they all start in that neighborhood and go up. I have no idea how people pay for them.

    • 0 avatar
      LS1Fan

      It makes sense ,from a certain viewpoint.

      In rural,low cost of living states it’s hard to find logistical support for European luxury cars. A loaded pickup truck says you’re successful without triggering stigmas -and theres a practicality bonus of occasionally towing a boat or camper.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      “I have no idea how people pay for them.”

      1. 72- and 84-month loans
      2. Solid resale on older models, if your old truck is worth $20k, and you trade it in on a new $50k truck, you’re already 40% there.
      3. Sticker prices being disconnected from transaction prices

      That being said, agreed. I know where we are on the income scale, as a dual-professional couple, and I have no idea how people who have a MUCH smaller income can afford these things. It’s crazy.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Too many people forget your #2. For someone who wants to trade say every 5-6 years, trucks are the way to go. I’ve noticed most of them buy one higher trimmed than the one before every time they trade keys.

        Some of the B&B may laught at the guys with “beds full of air” but their cost of ownership is likely quite low.

  • avatar
    SD 328I

    Why are you comparing a fully loaded Ford HD to this “poverty” spec Chevy HD? Why not an apples to apples comparison based on equal specs.

  • avatar
    427Cobra

    I just went through this a little over a year ago. It was time to replace my 2000 Super Duty V10 4×4 supercab. I needed more room (crew cab) for my 110 lb dog, & some big-ticket maintenance items were piling up. I found a leftover ’15 Super Duty crew cab 4×4 gasser with the 6.2L, but best they would do was $3k off. Found a better-equipped Ram 2500 6.4L crew cab 4×4 with 4.10s & got $10.6k off with next to no negotiation & financing below 2%. I’ve been very happy with the purchase. I averaged 18 mpg on a recent camping trip to Mammoth with 2 adults, 1 very large dog, and a bed fully-loaded with camping gear… and that was driving through the Mojave desert in 110 degree heat with the A/C cranked. Yes, the transmission programming could be better, but overall, no complaints.

  • avatar

    Ah, marketing. I still want to see actual build prices for an assortment of vehicles, but never actually will, as I didn’t go work in the Car Industry at a high level. I mean, you can read politician’s emails, get NSA hacking software, download any TV show, but you can’t see this one ?

    Metal aside, you have a powertrain with electronics…these are amortized over many lines. In Car Electronics, also mostly the same over many liines. Add as options a transfer case and diff for AWD. Interior, hard or soft plastic, and seating in two or three trim levels. Unless you have a one-off engine (and even Vette motors are shared, and look at FCA for big engine-creep) you are putting known prices in the car. I recall that GM had the same price for the 3.6 V6 or small V8 in the SS at fleet level. Makes some sense, as the 3.6 is more complicated.

    What makes that work truck ( for which $ is the object, foof and prestige mean zero ) half the price is marketing.

    It may be a whole $4k difference to produce the base truck vs Cowboy Cadillac, but “marketing”. Add to this the easy payments (I went to a Ford Website recently, following a “low monthly payment” tease ad inserted on a web page….it was for 72 months. !!!!

    If you can sell a frame it cost you $15k to build (w-a-g) for $100 k, wouldn’t you ?

  • avatar
    sgtjmack

    I believe he said he did an across the board comparison.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Q: “Have Truck Prices Gone Mad?”

    A: Yes, to the same extent that sports tickets have. Willing buyers + willing sellers = bonanza market.

  • avatar
    ajla

    When the Ram Express came out in 2011 it came standard with the 5.7L, a 3.55 rear end, and 20-inch wheels. It was $23830 for the 4×2 reg cab which adjusts to $25897.

    thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/04/the-ram-express-cheap

    The same truck as equipped for the 2018MY is $33K (the Express no longer comes standard with the V8 or 20s). It’s the same engine and platform as in 2011 with the only upgrade as the 8A vs the 6A.

  • avatar
    BobNelson

    You can buy a variety of VERY nice cars/CUVs/minivans for 50 grand… and then your friendly neighborhood U-Haul will rent you a pickup for twenty bucks a day on those rare occasions when you actually need a loadbed.

    Yeeeesh!

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      Where on earth are you seeing 20 bucks a day? I rented one a few years ago that was closer to 50 a day and you had better not scratch the unlined bed. My truck (2015 F150XLT Super Crew) was 36k after all the rebates and other shenanigans. Im averaging a little over 22mpg in it. I go on at least one 2 week campout a year plus several weekend outings with my travel trailer. I’ve now twice used it to pull home a project car and several trips to the mulch yard. That 50 bucks a day starts to add up pretty quick. It isn’t much more expensive to operate daily than any other car and as has been pointed out about the resale, I’d be willing to bet that even in my case, which is fairly light use for a truck the whole “rent a truck” bit would end up costing more. If we are talking one weekend a year, maybe you are right but if you use your truck as a truck at all it really doesn’t make sense.

      • 0 avatar
        sgtjmack

        U-haul, $19.95 a day to rent a pick up.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          @sgtjmack – they’ll only let you go so far with their truck.

          I towed one of their car trailers almost 2000 miles with my Mustang on it when I picked it up in 2013 but they would not have let me rent one of their pick up trucks to tow said trailer with.

          I looked into it just because I thought about saving wear and tear on my F150.

          • 0 avatar
            sgtjmack

            You are correct, you need to use one of their larger trucks with larger brakes to tow a dolly or car trailer. Those start at $40 a day, or less if it is local.

          • 0 avatar
            sgtjmack

            You are correct, you need to use one of their larger trucks with larger brakes to tow a dolly or car trailer. Those start at $40 a day, or less if it is local. If they don’t have to wait for a truck to be dropped off to them, they charge less.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          But that UHaul teaser rate doesn’t include any miles and their miles aren’t cheap so you can easily drop $50 for a day of use of their pickups or vans.

          • 0 avatar
            sgtjmack

            Includes miles, but not gas, or tax of course.

          • 0 avatar
            BobNelson

            sgtjmack,

            Sixty cents per mile, plus gas, at U-Haul.

            So let’s accept your $50/day. How many days per year do you need a loadbed? Most folks almost never need more than a CUV’s trunk. Most folks wouldn’t be spending more than a hundred bucks per year for loadbed rental… and their everyday driver would be far more comfortable, quiet, performant, etc than any truck.

          • 0 avatar
            sgtjmack

            I agree 100%. If you only use the bed on occasions, then a truck may not be a better daily driver choice, especially if fuel and comfort are an issue for you. I got my companies mixed up, u-haul does charge a per mile, but Pensky and Home Depot don’t.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            I think you folks greatly underestimate ho often a typical truck owner uses their truck. I mean I’d break even in just trips to home depot hauling lumber and that doesn’t account for trailer towing and the monthly trek to whatever boy scout campout my kids troop is on. It is a ton of vehicle for 36k

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            And honestly it would make more sense in my case to do the reverse…Daily my F-150 and rent a small car for the once or twice a year I go to downtown Atlanta which is really the only time my truck feels maybe too big.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Yeah but “Life’s too short!”, as one of my friends put it. He commutes 160 miles a day, RT to San Diego, heavy traffic for hours. It’s just an extra cab 2wd, but his Silverado 1500 is 100% his daily driver, hauling air, just himself.

            And so what? He makes plenty of money, and just can’t put up with a sh!tty little car and a choppy ride, just to save a few bucks. It’s like when I’m doing the CO to CA run. I want to be comfortable, so NO rental car for me. I can sleep in the truck no problem. Fully reclined seat or in the bed. 15 mpg average, hours at 80 mph, who cares?

            I’d hate to be blown around by simis in a small car.

            Last Thanksgiving I drove my F-150 empty to CA and I expected to come back empty too, but a buddy I visited was moving back to Colorado Springs soon, so of course I offered to bring back a load of boxes. Win/win. Then I hit major snow through Flagstaff, near whiteout, so a heavy load paid off anyway.

  • avatar
    cdotson

    As a potential truck buyer I want to say yes but have difficulty justifying the claim. Trucks today are larger, more capable, more efficient, and nicer than trucks of the early years of this century.

    I bought my 2002 Ram new as the 2003s were hitting the lots. Its transaction price back then was a hair above 26k IIRC. It’s a V8 gas 5spd manual 1/2 ton so it’s like is far removed from present purchasers, but toss in another 1k for the auto. Adjusted for inflation it would come to about $37k in 2016. The Ram 2017 build and price tool prices one at $40k for a similar 2wd quad-cab 6′-4″ bed with trailer hitch. The newer truck has a far more powerful engine, many more transmission gears, and 20″ wheels vs. my 17s, but by and large has barely outpaced inflation.

    My 2014 Elantra GT however also has more speeds, power, and equipment than its 2002 analog while selling for under the inflation-adjusted price. It appears the Civic Si is also offering much more than in years past for less money adjusted for inflation.

    So which is mad, trucks selling for parity or barely more over inflation, or cars offering more for less over time?

    Maybe the better gauge is adjusting for real wage. By that metric I can see a better rationale behind sticker shock-inducing truck prices.

  • avatar
    olivebranch2006

    Good point on this article and I completely agree. Truck prices are going completely mad. Wife and I bought a brand new factory order Ford Truck in December 2010. It is a 2011 so redesigned body, suspension, and the new diesel/transmission powertrain. We negotiated upon ordering in September 2010 and took delivery December 2010. Price was about 400 below invoice if I recall. Specs:
    2011 Ford F250 King Ranch 4×4
    Crew Cab Short Bed
    Electronic Locking Rear Diff
    6.7 Diesel
    Chrome Package for the nice side steps
    All Terrain Tires Upgrade
    Tow Package
    Heavy Duty Alternator
    Bed Extender
    Tailgate Step
    White Platinum Tri-Coat (metallic paint costs extra)

    Total price before tax/license $52,000.

    At the time there was no limited or platinum. King Range was the top of the line and we love the saddle leather.

    So top of the line Ford truck with almost every option. We skipped sunroof and navigation.

    In conclusion: A new 2011 F250 Diesel practically fully loaded at $52,000 and now they are $100,000. Yeah I would say prices have unusually inflated.

    If you build the same exact King Range F250 truck we purchased as a new 2017 model… I didn’t add the newfangled massage seats and LED lighting. No sunroof either:

    MSRP
    $71,600

    I’m guessing Invoice is 68,000 or so.

    So $16,000 increase in 6 years time. Oh and the new model has aluminum body which meets the newer Federal Roof Strength Rollover Safety standards. I suppose that is worth something…

    We’ll keep our truck for 20-30 years I hope. So far no issues!

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      To be fair that almost $100k price is for a F450 with significantly more capability than a F250.

    • 0 avatar
      No Nickname Required

      I don’t completely disagree with you but consider this: resale value. I don’t have any idea how many miles you put on your truck but let’s say you drive 15000 miles per year. Your 2011 F250 King Ranch still carries a trade in value of approximately $35,000. Consider that you could have bought a 2011 MB E350 for about the price you paid for your King Ranch (invoice on a 2011 E350 started at $45k with a few options easily pushing that figure to $52k). What is a 2011 E350 with 90,000 miles worth today? About $13,000…

      • 0 avatar
        sgtjmack

        Hold on there cowboy. Trade in values fluctuate a lot, and are subject to market conditions, as well as regional supply and demand.

        Only in recent years, say the last 5 years, have used trucks heals a lot of value. It only takes another oil crisis somewhere in the world to make gas/diesel prices sky rocket, and you’ll see once again the trade in value plummet.

        I remember a few years ago many dealerships across the nation were taking in trucks and S.U.V.’s of all sizes for next to nothing. The Honda dealership I was working at was so busy we couldn’t keep cars in stock, and out wholesale lot was so full that we had to stop taking them in, or would give pennies on the dollar. The Ford and Chevy dealer that the same owner owned just down the street wouldn’t even take any truck in on trade if it were more than 5 years old, and even then, once again, paid pennies on the dollar for trade in value. It took a long time to get rid of the trucks and S.U.V’s.

        Again, everything is relative in the car world.

      • 0 avatar
        olivebranch2006

        NoNickName
        VERY true. Diesels always carry more value in trucks than gassers. Our truck is 6 years old with 41,000 miles. Totally brand new condition. Kelly blue book private party value is at $48,000. I’ve tracked kelly blue book value in quicken for this truck since purchasing new. It has fluctuated anywhere from $42,000 to $50,000. The initial value drop at 2 years old went down to $42,000 and slowly notched up as I didn’t drive it much.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    How many people need that much Truck everyday? Nothing wrong with owning a used Accord and borrowing or renting a truck when you really need it.

    Being frugal pays dividends :-)

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Where can you rent a dually? Even so, I absolutely hate renting trucks. You know darn well it doesn’t compare to “owning it” the way you want it, and having it always at the ready *when* you want it.

      Yeah if dually crew cab owners can get by with a Camry, all but 4 or 5 times out of the year, they’re probably being foolish, but what do *I* know?

      I can say it ruins the “spirit” when you constantly have to “plan ahead” for everything, even when plans don’t “fall through”.

      I also know getting “more truck” than you thought you could constantly use, opens the door to new (often fun) activities you hadn’t thought of. Believe me your friends and family will find perfect uses for it… Now that can be a good thing or bad thing, depending.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      Yeah, because I always loan my truck out to my neighbors lol. Never let your friend borrow your truck or girlfriend…He’ll sling a rod in both of them.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        98% of the damage to my trucks are by friends and family, but we’re talking “trucks”. Those things ad “character” to them, but in the end, they’re just “things”.

        But like anything else, if I’m not getting some kind of “value” for my trouble, I won’t keep loaning them my “tools”.

        So I’m set up to win either way, and any time they want to takeover payments and upkeep on my girlfriend, and I switch to “borrower”, I win again!

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          98% of the damage to my trucks are by friends and family…

          “YES THIS IS MY TRUCK. NO I WILL NOT HELP YOU MOVE.” – bumper sticker, my truck

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Well then I’m cursed since I enjoy helping friends/family move. Maybe they “take advantage”, but I don’t mind. I’ll help strangers too. Whatever.

            Maybe I feel guilty a little, I’m so blessed to have good truck, hauling air most of the time, especially if they have nothing, dirt poor, etc?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Daily drive the HD truck and then rent a Sentra when you need to go to urban areas.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Forget about “mad”, I’d go completely insane having to pay more than $40K for a stinkin’ Ridgleline with worse (towing) fuel economy!!!

    But you can expect 10 to $12K off “the sticker” on a dually crew cab SLT/XLT gas, and even with 4wd, it’s just under $40K. A tremendous value especially when you can sell it for about a third of that, some 15 years later.

  • avatar
    arach

    I don’t think prices have gone Mad.

    I think modern trucks are a tremendous value.

    I have a Ford F350 Lariat.

    I get fuel economy better than a luxury sedan from 10 years ago. Its prices similar to a Mercedes or something, but its HUGE. I can carry anything I want in the thing. It has nice leather seats, and a great infotainment system. Its super comfortable and rides really well. It can tow a dang house if it needs to, so there’s absolutely nothing I can’t do with it if I want to. I get a step to get into the tailgate, and lights in the bed… I get luxury features like radar cruise control. There’s nothing I can get in a Mercedes that I can’t get in my truck, but the truck is bigger and more powerful. To me thats a real value, its like I get all the capability AND all the luxury in one vehicle. Heck the power numbers my diesel puts down lets me keep up with cars 1/2 my size, and pass at will- even WITH a trailer.

    I’ve bought a lot of trucks in my life, and trucks today are so much nicer than the trucks I got in the 80s and early 90s. They are way more luxurious than what I got in the late 90s and early 2000s. They have so many cool features that I’m in heaven- Fold down metal trays in the back seat, rear headrest DVD players, around view cameras…

    I know someones going to say, “But its not a mercedes, its a ford”. OK whats your point? That the name “Mercedes” is worth a lot more than the name “Ford”? maybe your right… if you live in the city… I get more compliments on my truck than I ever have on a porsche, mercedes, or BMW! In fact it kind of makes me chuckle how often I get people complimenting my truck.

    My Lariat was CHEAPER than an entry level S-Class, but I’d say its a much better value- so much more that I get. Its similar priced to a well optioned E-class, but the E-class is a little small and unless you get the AMG, the E-Class is underpowered… but the base E43 AMG only has 396 HP and 284 lb-ft of torque… for $72k+??? It takes $104k to get the 603 HP and 627 lb-ft of torque… In the ford I get 440 HP and 925 lb-ft of torque… starting at only $60,790 for the Lariat trim. Wow… that makes the ford seem like a steal compared to the E43 AMG, and dang the features that come with that now? unreal.

    But say I splurge for the Platinum, the top of the line trim. Now its priced similarly to the E43 AMG. In the F350 Platinum, I can find very few features the AMG has that the F350 doesn’t have, but a whole lot of features the Platinum does have that the AMG does NOT, especially in base format.

    I don’t know… People are complaining about how expensive they are getting, but you get a LOT OF TRUCK for that price. Sure a base truck is more expensive, but does that mean its a bad value? I think the value has skyrocketed. More expensive, yes- but also a whole lot better.

    And that leads me to the kicker… those are based on MSRP, but who pays MSRP for a truck? I got $14,000 off of MSRP. So if MSRP for the lariat is $60,790 and you get 14k of, that puts you near 47k… and WOW. What gives you a better VALUE than 47k F350 Lariat Diesel?

    IMHO the trucks are now legitimate contenders for high lines. No one would have suggested that in 1995.

    • 0 avatar
      turbosasquatch

      This!

      $100,000 for an S-class and no one bats an eye, but $100k for a much more capable and nearly as luxurious F450 and everyone thinks it’s a crazy price!

      I’m sorry, but it’s almost the definition of buying a badge.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Nailed it.

      Your truck and the others just like it offer a better value for the dollar than any MB, BMW, Audi at the price point in terms of long term ownership and resale dollars.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      “… trucks are now legitimate contenders for high lines.”

      Right you are, and discerning buyers agree because the OEMs wouldn’t make them if they couldn’t sell them.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    But muh global DEEEEEESIL midsize truck…

  • avatar
    turbosasquatch

    So a loaded HD pickup for a little under $100k is crazy but a Panamera or S class for over $100k is a great car and worth it?

    Maybe the HD pickup needs a Porsche badge…

  • avatar
    Dan

    To be fair, anything short of throwing your dollar bills into the fireplace a large handful at a time is a better value than German jewelry.

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