By on October 25, 2017

Toyota Factory Kentucky

Domestic automakers and suppliers have already expressed concerns that leaving the North American Free Trade Agreement could be detrimental to the industry. Numerous automotive trade groups have claimed that losing NAFTA would result in less efficient and more costly ways of doing business.

Hoping to steer Donald Trump away from the idea of abandoning the three-country accord, manufacturers, parts suppliers, and dealers have come together to form the “Driving American Jobs” coalition. The group’s primary goal is to prove that NAFTA has been beneficial to the participating countries, especially the United States. It also makes the claim that withdrawing from NAFTA would re-establish trade barriers, hurt the U.S. economy and cost jobs.

“We need you to tell your elected officials that you don’t change the game in the middle of a comeback. We’re winning with NAFTA,” urges the group’s website.

It’s pathos, pure and simple, is but not without supporting facts. For example, the collation makes mention that the United States produced one million more cars in 2016 than it did in 1993, the year before NAFTA took effect. It also cited $9.5 billion in new investments into the industry for 2017. However, much of the rhetoric used in Tuesday’s announcement dealt with a common theme — jobs.

The council includes members of the American Automotive Policy Council, The American International Automobile Dealers Association, The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, the Association of Global Automakers, and the Motor & Equipment Manufacturers Association. All of them claim the trade agreement is essential for maintaining employment in the United States.

“America’s 1.1 million dealership employees rely on NAFTA to offer customers a wide selection of safe, affordable new cars and trucks,” said Cody Lusk, president of the American International Automobile Dealers Association. “It’s clear NAFTA is working for the towns and communities served at the 16,700 dealerships across America, and helping create more stable, skilled American jobs with each passing year.”

Trump has made American jobs the cornerstone of his campaign and has even gone so far to suggest leaving NAFTA would only help employment in the U.S. Detractors abound, however, and Driving American Jobs is among them. It wants to convince the public to rally around the accord and convince Congress to reform instead of rebuff.

“Our biggest concern is for American workers and customers,” said Jennifer Thomas, vice president of federal affairs at the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers. “Pulling out of NAFTA would lead to a decrease in vehicle production, a decline in jobs and an increase in what our customers spend when buying a new vehicle. Not to mention this would also have an impact on our abilities to export vehicles to foreign markets.”

Driving American Jobs’ website really hits that point home by including a handful of personal accounts from people employed within the automotive sector that underscore just how good things have been with NAFTA. While these are clearly cherry picked to bolster support for its cause, they remain real-world examples of the trade agreement working.

There also exists a growing consensus among economists, with no ties to the coalition, that leaving the accord would be catastrophic. NAFTA is far from miraculous, and it definitely cost the U.S. some manufacturing jobs early on. But most experts have viewed it as important to the longterm survivability of the American automotive industry. Hoping to convince you to believe the same, Driving American Jobs urges individuals to contact the White House with news of your newfound advocacy.

“American automakers are driving the revival of American manufacturing,” said former governor and current president of the American Automotive Policy Council Matt Blunt.

“When you examine the data there’s no question that NAFTA has helped advance the global competitiveness of the U.S. auto industry sector. Now we have an opportunity to strengthen North America as a manufacturing powerhouse with a modern NAFTA that maintains the features that are working and makes improvements to benefit American workers and jobs. We look forward to working with the coalition, the Trump administration, members of Congress and all stakeholders to ensure American autos remain competitive in our global economy.”

[Image: Toyota]

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48 Comments on “Automakers Unify to Urge Trump to Keep NAFTA...”


  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    I’m sold. If giant corporations say something is good, it must be good. Right?

    I’m old enough to remember when lefties were against doing what Big (Insert Industry Here) wanted. But now that evil Trump is in power, all of a sudden helping out Big Cars, Big Pharma and Big Health Insurance is imperative.

    Let me guess…if NAFTA goes away, hundreds of thousands of children will die. Or something,.

    • 0 avatar
      don1967

      Good observation about leftists changing camps, but in fairness they’re not the only ones.

      Many fiscal conservatives (myself included) have re-thought their love of globalism, and are now willing to pay a little more for cars and toasters if it means giving their neighbour a job instead of a welfare cheque. We saw how free trade caused a rise in the number of people depending on Big Brother, and we didn’t like it.

      Leftists, meanwhile, have grown comfortable with globalism for the same reason. They like their cheap cars and toasters, their excuses for underachieving together, and the ever-increasing role of government in running their lives and those of the people around them.

      • 0 avatar
        srh

        The move by “Republicans” against free trade is certainly not by the conservatives in the party. The party has re-aligned itself.

        Global free trade is still the free lunch it has always been. The laws of economics have not changed just because Trump became President.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          “Global free trade is still the free lunch it has always been. ”

          So you dropped out of high school? or maybe I’m just not catching the sarcasm.

          In case you haven’t noticed a quarter of the party are hard leftists. The entire country has moved so far left that Trump who spent his whole life as a Democrat is now a centrist.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            …..In case you haven’t noticed a quarter of the party are hard leftists. The entire country has moved so far left that Trump who spent his whole life as a Democrat is now a centrist….

            wow..You need to get out more. Trump as a centrist??? He is not even remotely a traditional Republican. What ‘pub supports trade barriers? The real change is coming as the Republican party fractures and the classic Republican gets pushed out (or chooses to leave) and the radical alt right becomes established. Be careful what you wish for Hummer, unless you are a .5%er. The new order that the alt’s would bring in will work hard to drive all economic gain to the very top. Just look at the gift that was just handed to financial industry. That is just the beginning. Another four years will certainly enable two more justices in the SC to go hard right. Mix in Putin’s efforts to destabilize Europe and alter American politics and you have a recipe for a world I have no interest in living in. Putin must be sporting quite a chubby right now. Even he has to be surprised at the efficacy of his efforts.

          • 0 avatar
            srh

            I’d encourage you to learn economics from sources other than the Trump administration and union propaganda.

            Find me a serious economist who disputes that free trade benefits every country that partakes.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Holden you truly believe everything your spoonfed dontcha?

            No crap he’s not remotely a traditional republican, the Rinos that call them self republicans are being pushed out because their lazy sacks of crap that are bought and paid for by the same people that run the democrat party. Trump is truly the change that libertarians and republicans have been asking for. Gift to the financial industry? The last administration let the financial industry pick and choose their cabinet, I can’t think of how much more you can coddle them.

            Yea I can see how much putin probably loves America after Hillary sold him our Uraniam. Watching the left fall further apart everyday and create new stories trying to hide the fractures makes looking at the events of the day so exciting.

            Why the heck would I need an economist, the fact that an organization called the World Trade Organization exists is proof enough, no matter how unintelligent the elite members that own it are. Free trade between America and China would completely destroy our country. There would be no incentive to create anything in this country that wasn’t mined or fractured out of the ground.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        This is me. I’d rather pay a little more to keep my neighbors, friends and family at work rather than get the cheapest product and see those same people out of work. Is it really worth the less expensive good if more people wind up earning less and thus become more and more dependent on the government to provide for them? I’m all for trade, but the word “fair” needs to come before that, and my personal belief (I’m not an expert, so take that for what it’s worth) most of the trade deals the US is involved in are anything but fair to us.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          threeer,
          It’s a pity there is so much disparity in the US as most will buy the cheapest sh!ttiest toaster, so they can afford milk and bread.

          I do believe there are many Americans who don’t see the masses of poor in the US.

          I think fixing the disparity first is better than worrying about a toaster manufacturer, as most will buy the cheapest toaster available.

          My sister is similar to you. She’s has this “Buy Australian” thing going, but when she was younger with two young kids she bought what she could afford to maximise her standard of living. So, even to her an Aussie made toaster would of been ridiculous.

          Remember 50% of the people in the US probably need money for bread first, rather than a toaster. You are lucky you could spent $60 on a toaster. Me, a $10 toaster makes just as good toast.

        • 0 avatar
          ect

          threeer, it is a myth that treaties like NAFTA or WTO or what was to be TPP are unfair to the US, or that they kill jobs.

          US manufacturing output (in constant dollars) has doubled since NAFTA was signed, even as direct manufacturing employment has fallen by 1/3. The “culprit” is technology, which has been busy destroying un- and low-skilled manufacturing jobs in the same way it destroyed agricultural jobs a century ago.

          Even so, technology has created many more jobs than it has killed, but these are different jobs that require different skills than traditional manufacturing jobs. We live in an economic paradox, where employers have trouble finding the skilled workers they need, while unskilled workers increasingly find that there are no jobs for them.

          Killing trade deals is not going to change this, but only make matters worse.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “it is a myth that treaties like NAFTA or WTO or what was to be TPP are unfair to the US, or that they kill jobs.”

            Hah! That’s not what the past 24 years have shown. Quite the contrary. They were unfair, and they DID kill US jobs. Ask anyone who was outsourced.

            But things are/will be changing now that there is a new Sheriff in DC. Lord! How things are changing for the better.

            No need to gloat union people. Trump is a union guy, looking out for the middle class.

            Don’t blow it UAW. Trump is on your side.

            Trump’s done a lot so far, with only 10 months in office. And he will do a great deal more to change America for the better.

    • 0 avatar
      jimble

      Leftists are hardly pro-NAFTA. On the subject of free trade, leftist populists and rightist populists are hard to tell apart. Centrist liberal Democrats like Hillary Clinton may be for free trade, but leftists are a different animal altogether.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        There are some “true” leftists in the USA but what is typically called “leftist” is “centrist”. Neoliberal ideology is liberal in name only and traditionally has had more proponents on the right. There are ways to protect workers but in the USA anything deemed remotely socialist tends to be viewed as Lucifer’s work.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Lou,
          This is what amazes me about the US. It seems if you believe in higher taxes to pay for a service you need, like road maintenance you are a socialist in the US.

          Another one is gun control. If you believe in better gun control you are a socialist, I’m even talking banishing guns, just implementing better regulations.

          The right wing in the US use socialist loosely, as an offensive attack. I’m just right of centre and I see the benefits of helping others for the economy and not just as a human.

          Yet most of these so called right wingers are the most socialist. They believe all should support them with them contributing nothing towards society.

          The biggest socialist are farmers and manufacturers, they feel they are entitled to subsidies. Maybe the right wingers should really see how much money is pumped into business.

    • 0 avatar
      Guitar man

      If the content regulations increase to 85% the car companies will simply shift production elsewhere. A 25% tariff is peanuts when the Mexican peso has lost 40% this year anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Agreed. But a tariff is still a tariff, the cost passed on to the consumer which will make non-tariff goods made in the US of A more competitive.

        Here’s a pop quiz: why do so many drivers opt to buy cheap Chinese Hankook tires instead of good old American brands like Goodyear, et al.

        Answer: because Hankook tires are cheaper, last longer than American rubber, and ride better.

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    “America’s 1.1 million dealership employees rely on NAFTA to offer customers a wide selection of safe, affordable new cars and trucks,”

    they cut out the second half of this sentence…..”built by Mexican workers making $1.75 an hour.”

    • 0 avatar
      quasimondo

      Don’t worry. Once they kill NAFTA, it’ll be made by Chinese workers that are paid half as much.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Instead of trade barriers how about sanctioning companies and/or countries that exploit the populace for cheep labour and/or avoiding environmental stewardship?

      We forget that it is mostly USA companies that are setting up shop in Mexico, China et al all in the name of shareholder profits.

      Ironically, “right to work” types in the USA tend to be the ones that are anti-globalism or anti-free trade.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Lou,
        It well and good for those on TTAC who put forward complaints that “they don’t have the same pay, standards and regulations as the US”. But what they fail to state is we (all modern economies, inculding Australia) were in the same boat as them once upon a time.

        These same people who use the excuse as I mentioned above are the same selfish ones who complain about competition from modern nations.

        These types of selfish individuals use the excuse “Why aren’t they like us” ie, industrial relations, etc and yet whine when a country of similar standards out compete.

        I think the problem is with these selfish types is they consider themselves above and beyond others (countries) and are sh!t scared that someone will or might have more then them.

        So, to the selfish ingrates, why do you complain that “They are not like us” then complain when they do or want to become more like “us” that you don’t like the competition?

        Selfish we are, at the expense of ourselves.

    • 0 avatar
      srh

      “built by Mexican workers making $1.75 an hour.””

      And why exactly is this a /bad/ thing?

  • avatar
    Hummer

    It seems really hard for anyone to show evidence of NAFTAs positive impact without pointing out the massive problems that have resulted.*** I was still in my teens at the time it was put in place, but between that time and the time I was able to buy beer, no less than half of my parents friends had lost jobs in manufacturing. The town I grew up in was a major textiles hub, every single one of them including Collins & Aikman were either shuttered or moved over seas. It takes a special kind of stupid to say NAFTAs benefits outweigh its severe faults. I can’t imagine the devastation that TPP would have made.
    *** This article is the perfect example of lip service without any evidence supporting the Alphabet council of America for Pro America Americans in support of their patriotic American Americanness.

    • 0 avatar
      I_like_stuff

      All your friends’ parents are deplorable non-persons. I’ll bet they’re such hicks, they’ve never had a $15 avocado toast sandwich and they probably own guns and go to church and do all sorts of other icky activities like that. I’ll bet some of them don’t even hate America.

      Whether they work or live/die is irrelevant. Very smart people in NYC, SF and DC, with degrees in poli-sci keep telling me this.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Anectdotally, I’ve seen many individuals lose jobs in timber harvesting, saw milling, and pulp production. Add to that list, construction, steel fabrication etc.

        Why?

        Automation/technology has done much more to reduce the workforce.

        It is well documented.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Anecdotally increased government regulation can be found responsible for several of the lost trades you’ve listed.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Anecdotally increased government regulation can be found responsible for several of the lost trades you’ve listed.”

            WTF?

            I did not mention lost trades.

            Government regulation in the forest industry {at least in BC where I live} creates jobs.

            Regulations mean that you have to replant the trees that you cut, roads have to meet appropriate standards, safety and environmental standards need to be followed.

            It takes less people to mow the forest down without any safety or environmental consideration.

            Please explain your point especially in relation to forestry.

            Unless you have a PhD in Forest Resource Management, I seriously doubt you are going to talk over my head.

            As far as lost trades, I’m sure government regulation killed the buggy whip industry!

    • 0 avatar
      Stevo

      Manufacturing payroll peaked in the late 70’s and has trended downward since. It took a dive after 2001, as the offshoring really took hold. NAFTA probably wasn’t the largest driver there. Not saying that it didn’t impact many communities, because it did, but there are plenty of factors that have been shifting industrial employment for decades.
      Nothing is bringing back the post WW2 boom where the US enjoyed massive advantages over any other competitor and most any (white, male) person could get a factory job that provided a good wage. I really doubt erecting barriers at our borders will help when the economy is now driven by services.

    • 0 avatar
      jimble

      Most American textile imports come from China and other Asian countries. Mexico only accounts for about 5%. You can’t blame NAFTA for most of the job losses in that industry.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      How many tech jobs have been created in Charlotte/Atlanta after those textile jobs went away? Data Entry jobs don’t pay that well but neither did unskilled factory jobs.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Textiles paid extremely good money to those living in small towns, 50-60k a year in 1995 was a good living when the average home price for the area was $80-120k, and a new American Fullsize was $25k.

        Data tech jobs come and go, while many of those textile plants had been in the area for well over a 100 years. You further drive my point by pointing out all of these low end tech jobs center in big cities where the cost to live the same life you would in a small town is easily quadruple.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Hummer,
          You need to factor in technological advances in textiles as well.

          OECD economies are far more effective in producing certain textiles, that is massive quantities of textiles.

          Where we fail is in value adding with these textiles.

          Much research has been carried out concerning manufacturing textiles into consumer products like shirts, pants, etc. What was found working with textiles uses parts of our brains that computers have yet to master. For example, our minds can visualise a piece of cloth half scrumpled up into a piece of cut cloth to use in a part of a garment.

          One article I read discussed the actual cutting of the cloth and how the human mind again was fair quicker and more accurate in visualising and manipulating information in the fabrication of cloth.

          Actually fast food industry is similar, with how the mind works and how we see a piece of meat cooking. Computers are yet to reach the level of manipulating tiny pieces of data like our minds can to produce a value added product.

          That’s why I think it’s ironic that the worst paid jobs in the world are fast food, textiles etc, when in fact most of the better paying jobs are easier to use AI and robotics.

          Maybe many of our so called middle class jobs are not a valuable as we once thought.

  • avatar
    ra_pro

    With drumpf, it seems to me, a lot better tactic is to urge him to do the opposite of what you want him to do. One of his basic instincts and he only lives of instincts as he has no such thing as a mind, is to do the opposite.

    • 0 avatar
      I_like_stuff

      “Phillips then asked the students what they thought about Sanders’ plan (really Trump’s plan) compared to Trump’s tax reform — which they had no clue about before being interviewed:

      “I think it was pretty good,” one student said. “Definitely better than whatever Trump is proposing, I would make that leap right there.”

      Students were stunned to learn that the plan they loved so much was actually Trump’s plan.

      “It could be a policy of giving me ice cream, but if it’s Trump I’m going to be like, ‘what’s in that ice cream?\'” one student said.

      http://www.dailywire.com/news/22571/watch-college-students-love-trumps-tax-plan-%E2%80%93-when-ryan-saavedra

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @ra_pro – just tell #moronpotus that Obama was anti-NAFTA and hates Mexicans.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        I like stuff,
        The only problem with your “evidence” is its written by a known right wing organisation.

        Evidence;
        “Led by the incomparable Ben Shapiro, The Daily Wire is a hard-hitting, irreverent news and commentary site for a new generation of conservatives.”

        Your evidence has been made what it is, FAKE.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Burn NAFTA ***and*** GATT 1994 revisions.

    We don’t need no water let the motherf***er burn.

    Burn motherf***er, burn.

    wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Agreement_on_Tariffs_and_Trade

  • avatar
    el scotto

    The Big 3 build their most profitable vehicles in the USA/Canada. Some production would be shifted around if NAFTA is cancelled. Import quotas? The Japanese just built US plants. Across automotive industry, automation has led to increased productivity and less need for employees. The MAGA/My Home Town is Dying crowds don’t want to recognize that fact.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Let’s not pretend automation is new, we’ve used machines and technology to increase production for over 100 years. Automation isn’t something that suddenly happened in the last 20 years. How much of your clothes are made in the US vs 25 years ago? I have to search long and hard for clothes that are made in this country.

      If automation was the reason for lost jobs then why isn’t manufacturing coming back to the US? Since labor is the most expensive part of manufacturing and as you say automation is the reason these jobs no longer exist, explain why clothes aren’t mass produced in the US? Shipping clothes across the Pacific Ocean isn’t free.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      el scotto,
      The most profitable vehicle manufactured in the US have a raft of measures to stimulate their sales, the problem is these stimulants are not offered to other vehicles. Is this the best option in the longer term.

      A classic example is pickup truck production, in which the Big 3 are totally reliant on their profits. (Now, prior to any redneck Trump, far right or left leaning UAW dude makes a comment, my position is I like full size pickups, but not at the expense of fair trade.)

      The US vehicle sector has more fragility than many realise. The Big 3 are reliant on massive protection in the form of the chicken tax. This tax combined with other controls has now made near on impossible to remove them. The industry is reliant of protection and handouts, like the corn farmers or the US dairy farmers. Many European nations are similar.

      An economy must be flexible enough for change, too many regulations and a protectionist stance reduce this, along with competitiveness and progress.

  • avatar
    NMGOM

    Matt Posky: “It’s pathos, pure and simple, is but not without supporting facts. For example, the collation makes mention that the United States produced one million more cars in 2016 than it did in 1993, the year before NAFTA took effect.”

    Supporting Fact, eh? Some “fact”. What % of that increase came from inherently more efficient production methods, and what % came from NAFTA?

    ==================

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      NMGOM,
      The change in manufacturing tech is global. This where the US needs to compete more.

      People who think manufacturing should be middle class jobs should look at the agri industry. Agriculture used to represent a huge part of a nations work force, now its only a tiny percentage with massive productivity gains. Manufacturing is heading the same way.

      Numbers of people employed will reduce substantially in manufacturing with large productivity gains.

      The US is no longer in such a dominant position, like any other country.

      The whinners must realise change is underway and robotics and AI is taking far more jobs than the Chinese and Mexicans. China has lost 30 million manufacturing jobs in the past 10 years.

      Globalisation is here to stay and again the US will not dictate terms of trade as easily as it once had.

      So, compete.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I will support the American auto industry, when they deserve it.

    But sorry I’m not gonna jump in here. They’re against cheap labor, lax environmental standards, lax safety standards, and importing for no tariff? Shocker. Huge shocker.

    Tariffs to offset slave wages, pollution standards, and safety standards. Let’s compete on a level playing field.

    So in this instance, the auto industry can go **** themselves.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Jerome10,
      The Europeans said the same of the US in the late 19th and early 20th Century.

      Now you’ve “made it” why not allow others? Or are you going to adopt the European stance?

  • avatar
    ra_pro

    There is indisputable scientific evidence that overall, macro-economically speaking, trade is a win-win situation for a country. This is just a basic economic fact that has been established over the centuries. The whole world is overall a lot better off now than it was 50-100 years ago when trade was difficult and dangerous. This is a positive statistic that hides a serious downside to trade especially when practiced at this level which is essentially global nowadays. In manufacturing trade hurts high-wage countries, that is primarily developed countries, but is a boon to developing countries and if done properly and a on huge scale it can lift the biggest country in the world from virtually 19-th century poor agrarian fiefdom to an economic superpower in just a few decades 30-40 years. Industrial countries are not poorer than they were before China embarked on its industrialization but a lot of the citizens in these industrial countries are actually poorer. I remember in the eighties all economists basically believed that the disruption would only be temporary for the industrial workers in the west as they would just naturally migrate to available jobs that there is plenty of in the service sector. And indeed many of these workers did migrate to service jobs but not the good service jobs the bottom ones. It’s simple to understand why this happened, the workers didn’t have skills and more importantly many just couldn’t upgrade their education and skills to the required skills such as those in IT. If all your life you worked manually, its very hard to become an office worker, well paid office worker, few people have the means to do such a radical change in their lives. This is the fallacy of the economic predictions that said that automotive working class will just switch to being IT professionals, designers, health-care workers and so on. Now we finally understand that this very idea is just ridiculous statistically speaking. Instead the solution that has been adopted in the west and especially in the US and Canada to fill the job vacancies for which domestic work force is not qualified by massive immigration into these countries. This immigration has been happening for 25-30 and is on a scale where each basically imports 1% or more of its population a year, almost all of it from Asia. My question is why do US and Canadian governments prefer to import foreign skilled workers instead of training their own. I am sure that at least in part, this is cheaper than managing your education system to make sure it produces workers with skills required by the business. In North America it doesn’t seem like governments care very much whether the jobs are filled by imported foreigners while a lot of its own citizens end up living in poverty. This is completely different from Europe where governments mange the up-and-coming workforce in such a way that the jobs can be filled by its own citizens rather than by importing foreigners. Germany also needs to import workers but in contrast to NA they mostly need low-skill, low wage, they train their own software engineers.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      ra_pro,
      A well considered comment. There is so much information I’ll only touch on a couple of your comments.

      1. Immigration is good for an economy. Immigrants save a country money in education and health straight up, which is expensive. Most immigrants are “work” ready. Immigrants also contribute taxes which can be spent on our rapidly aging population.

      2. Immigrants bring new ideas (and tasty food) for innovation in industry. They also bring diversity.

      3. The Europeans have had immigration for centuries. Even Eastern Europe as of the past 30 years has contributed to the greater good of the EU.

      • 0 avatar
        ra_pro

        I am not against immigration, I think all your points stand I am against immigration as a way to plug in huge workforce holes created by government neglect. I work in IT I see everyday how US and Canadian governments use easy immigration policies to cover their incompetence in managing the workforce.

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