By on October 13, 2017

2018 volkswagen jetta gli - image: volkswagenFor the 2018 model year, Volkswagen of America is adopting an entirely different approach to its sports sedan transmission lineup than Honda and Subaru.

Unlike the Honda Civic Si, which is available exclusively with a manual transmission, and unlike the Subaru WRX, which is available with a manual transmission or a continuously variable automatic, the 2018 Volkswagen Jetta GLI will drop the manual transmission option. 

CarsDirect cites the lower-than-GTI manual take rate of only 30 percent as reason for excluding the three-pedal layout. Of course, many cars continue to offer manual shifters despite even lower take rates. The 2018 Kia Rio, Car And Driver reports, will only generate 5 percent of its volume with a manual transmission. That’s on par with industry average. Only 3 percent of Jaguar F-Types are sold with a manual transmission. Only 23 percent of Chevrolet Corvette buyers opt for a manual.

30 percent?

That’s a downright impressive share for manual transmissions.2018 volkswagen jetta gli - Image: volkswagenThe real cause of the Jetta GLI’s solo transmission act for 2018 — the six-speed DSG persists — is the tidying up of Jetta variants in the sixth-generation’s (likely) final model year. Volkswagen eliminated the Jetta Hybrid prior to the 2017 model year. The TDI diesel engine was obviously removed by wrongdoing. The 2018 Volkswagen Jetta GLI will come in one iteration with no options, priced at $30,395. That’s up $580 compared with the 2017 Jetta GLI DSG. It’s also $1,680 more costly than the basic 2017 Jetta GLI.

More importantly, the 2018 Volkswagen Jetta GLI costs $2,880 more than the least costly 2017 Volkswagen Golf GTI DSG, which is the superior sporting car. Volkswagen of America hasn’t released 2018 specifications for the Golf GTI but has confirmed manual availability.

Volkswagen doesn’t release model breakdowns for the Jetta lineup, but based on inventory, the GLI accounts for roughly 14 percent of total Jetta sales. That would work out to around 1,400 monthly U.S. Jetta GLI sales. Volkswagen of America has averaged 1,868 monthly Golf GTI sales in 2017’s first three-quarters.

[Images: Volkswagen]

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars and Instagram.

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84 Comments on “2018 Volkswagen Jetta GLI Kills the Manual Transmission...”


  • avatar
    tallguy130

    Boooooooooooo VW!

    30% is a pretty significant take rate too. I hope they bring it back in the next model iteration. There are still some diehards like me that want the stick. Even more so on a car that try’s to have some sporting pretense.

    While your at it do something about the price. You can’t be 5k above the competitors in your class and still get market share.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      You’re correct, but in fairness, the GLI comes loaded up with every option possible (“letherette”, nav, sunroof, several tech toys, premium sound etc). You can’t order one a “base” one with cloth seats (ala Elantra Sport), so that’s part of the disparity.

      • 0 avatar
        tallguy130

        Any more you can get all that on a sub-20k car and the VW version of those things is hardly any better.

        IMO they really need to get over this “Germans premium” idea and raise the value proposition. Nearly everyone is offering more/same for less.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I drive the “sub-20k” version of this car (’17 S with the 1.4T and manual), and it never fails to put a big, fat grin on my face.

          Try one out sometime. You’ll be very pleasantly surprised.

          • 0 avatar
            CincyDavid

            My ’17 SE 1.4t automatic was out the door for $18395 and I couldn’t be happier…although I will confess that the red stitching in the GLI is pretty snazzy. At $30k + there are lots of really appealing options out there, in the high teens I couldn’t even get a stripped down Civic LX.

          • 0 avatar

            We leased one for $187 a month (in tax happy NY no less) and it is a lot of fun to drive. Truly an “Ace of Base”. Manual, of course.

          • 0 avatar
            tallguy130

            Oh I got a lot of love for the Jetta. It was on my short list when I was car shopping last year and text drove it twice. What killed it for me was no AppleCarPlay and the overwhelming scumminess of the local VW dealers.

            Four square games, no talking numbers over the phone or online, generally crappy in the negotiating process. I had to give up on two different dealers. Shame really.

            At the end of the day I still got a lot more with my Elantra Sport for less money and a much better experience.

        • 0 avatar
          Fordson

          You can find a premium sound system the equal of the highly-regarded Fender-branded system in the GLI, in a sub-$20 car?

          Yeah – I don’t think so.

      • 0 avatar
        nels0300

        You can’t order an Elantra Sport with cloth seats either. The “base” version has leather, xenons, heated seats, sunroof, blind spot / cross traffic alert standard.

      • 0 avatar
        rreichar

        Exactly right. We own a 2017 GLI DSG and a 2017 GTI SE. To get comparable equipment in the GTI you’d have to buy the Autobahn which is well over 30K. We paid less than 25K for the GLI and 27K for the GTI with less equipment.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      I was with you until this:

      “The real cause of the Jetta GLI’s solo transmission act for 2018 — the six-speed DSG persists — is the tidying up of Jetta variants in the sixth-generation’s (likely) final model year.”

      With a 30% take rate, I bet that the manual transmission option will be back for the Mk7 Jetta.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’d be shocked if the GLI model even carries over after the redesigned Jetta comes out. This model just feels like an unloved stepchild to me.

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      I hope they keep it. There is some competition in the compact sedan segment –
      Civic Si, WRX, Elantra Sport. You might even stretch and include the Mazda 3 2.5L in that segment.

    • 0 avatar
      rreichar

      I have a 2017 GTI and my wife has a 2017 GLI. I REALLY like the GLI and if there had been a MK7 GLI I’d have gone for that. The GLI feels less front heavy to me and it has a ton of room in the back seat and trunk compared to the GTI. The GTI is more fun to drive because it feels so rock solid. I assume a MQB based GLI would be similar.

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    The war on fun driving continues.
    :-)

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I know a few will come here to say “who cares DSG so AWESOME!”

    Yeah until it has to be serviced.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    I wonder what the real transaction prices are on the GLI…at $25k it becomes a heck of a lot more appealing than it would be at $30k. My dealer isn’t budging on price on ’17 Sportwagens or Alltracks, beyond a $1000 rebate that’s floating around out there. I was trying to get out from under a ’16 CRV that my wife hates…

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      TrueCar will give you a general indication of what the real prices are. I can tell you in my area, dealer prices for GLI manuals were nowhere near $30k when I was shopping in March.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Why do people want expensive, Mexican-made car that uses Premium gasoline from the manufacturer who first, used thousands of concentration camp prisoners and second, poisoned our planet? And whose name is tightly related to A.H? These are only some things we know. But what we do not?

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        Wow there’s so much wrong with this post I don’t really know where to start. But I bet a month’s pay no one working at VW today had anything to do with concentration camps 75 years ago.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          You’re right. Because they are Mexicans. I am talking of VW timeline. Now, the first step they should of taken to dissociate themselves from… is to drop name VW. Instead, after the war they brought Nazi award winning manager from Opel. Interestingly, he couldn’t work on US-related enterprise because of that. But we didn’t care to hire others, especially those related to rocketry and nukes. This is wow!

        • 0 avatar
          bking12762

          S2K Chris-You are dead on. My Jewish family members now drive Porsche and Mercedes. And Henry Ford wasn’t exactly a Jewish sympathizer…

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “My Jewish family members now drive Porsche …”

            Traitors

          • 0 avatar
            bking12762

            Wow! Traitors eh? Apparently you are trolling. That is very weak…

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            I am not trolling. I have relative who bought BMW and I told him all I think about that considering his family’s passed.

          • 0 avatar
            bking12762

            That’s precisely what you are doing. Your comments have been duly noted.

          • 0 avatar
            Advance_92

            “My Jewish family members now drive Porsche and Mercedes.”
            At least some of them have made amends, then.

          • 0 avatar
            bking12762

            Advance_92-When I was younger I didn’t understand how Jews could purchase anything Teutonic. Now that my hair is “chrome” colored and some modicum of wisdom is creeping into my brain, I get their perspective on a couple of different counts. First, there is the economics of the matter. Whomever gives the best value gets the dollar. Second, I think many Jews wanted to get on with their lives. They put what happened behind them and prospered. Other groups of people may be wise to do the same. I’ve heard it said many times from relatives…”I forgive but I don’t forget”.

      • 0 avatar
        LeMansteve

        Based on your criteria, how do you enable yourself to buy any products at all? You are reaching quite far. If you go back far enough, any company or country could be tied to some kind of grossly unethical behavior.

        Why buy a Ford? Henry Ford was an anti-semite!
        Why buy a BMW? The Quandts were Nazis!
        Why buy Kleenex? Kimberly-Clark uses phenoxyethanol in their baby wipes!
        Why buy from Wal Mart? Their predatory pricing and poor treatment of employees are a disgrace!

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          I work with an organization started by a Holocaust survivor which still amazingly employs on a part-time basis other survivors. Until a few years ago, vehicles manufactured by German companies (VW, Porsche, Audi and Mercedes) were neither allowed to be company vehicles or parked on the front company parking lots (restricted to the rear lots).

          I can fully empathize with this.

          As a consequence there were many Jaguars and Lexus (Lexi?) in the front lots.

          But then I also had a high school teacher who had been a prisoner of the Japanese in WWII and who physically was unable to be in a small room or left alone in a room with a person of Japanese descent.

          • 0 avatar
            Fordson

            Because the Rape of Nanking and the Bataan Death March and the signing of the Tripartate Pact did not directly impact Jews, he was OK with Lexus?

          • 0 avatar
            W210Driver

            I am curious. Do they drive Ford or GM products?

            Henry Ford was a known Anti-Semite who was awarded some kind of honorary decoration from the Nazi German government due to his outspoken Anti-Semitism.

            GM maintained a business relationship with Opel during the war. In fact the Allies could easily fix left behind Opel Blitz trucks because the parts were interchangeable with other GM-produced war machinery!

            The Japanese arrested Jews in occupied Asian countries. They didn’t outright murder them, but they were arrested and often mistreated. Furthermore the Japanese were allies of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. Although the Japanese were not involved directly in the Holocaust, one could argue that their support for Nazi Germany and tying up Allied forces in the Pacific gave the Nazis time to eliminate more Jews.

            I can understand how a Holocaust survivor or their families may not wish to buy the product of a country which subjugated their people to unspeakable horrors. At the same time I feel these people need to be aware that American companies also had clandestine dealings with Nazi Germany and even supported their war effort.

            Lastly, I am not Jewish, but my father was. He loved his 240D W123.

        • 0 avatar
          jpolicke

          Why buy Japanese or Italian? They were allied with the nazis. Why buy Korean? They collaborated with the Japanese. The approved list keeps getting shorter.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          LeMansteve,

          I am not telling you do limit yourself from buying these.

          ” If you go back far enough…”

          See, the problem is that no one in America experienced what it is like when Nazi soldiers enter your town on BMWs, Opels, VWs, MBs. Once you do, you will tell your grandchildren, “don’t buy this…”

          I like German stuff. I like Glock (A.H. was Austrian). But Glock wasn’t used in WWII.

          Elie Wiesel. Night.

      • 0 avatar
        vehic1

        Do you mean to tell me that you’re faulting the CAR company and its present-day employees – for the actions of A.H., LONG ago? Do you fault the actions of the other German and Japanese, etc., companies – who didn’t exactly close up shop when Japan allied with Germany, back in the day. And – even Henry Ford was known to be a Nazi sympathizer.
        And – other companies have played fast and loose with safety recalls – exploding Ford Pintos, rollover Explorers, hokey C-Max mileage claims, Toyota unintended acceleration, inadequate testing of Takata airbags before contracting to install in various mfr.s vehicles, and FAR greater diesel pollution from largely unregulated trucks.
        Seems to be a double standard – to single out VW for fault, and allowing all others a pass on their transgressions.

      • 0 avatar
        rreichar

        And I don’t know of any current VWs that require premium fuel. We own a GTI and GLI and they both require only 87 octane. You know WW2 ended 72 years ago. None of those people who did that work for VW now.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Ok, you’re partially correct. Since 2016 many VWs started to recommend Regular gasoline. I missed that. … What, the war has ended? Also partially correct. Russia and Japan have not signed anything yet. So, technically, they are still at war, which BTW was declared by USSR.

    • 0 avatar
      mittencuh

      I got my ’17 DSG GLI for $24,835.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      I’ve been looking at these for a few months. I got an OTD quote of $23,500 for a no option GLI manual. Most of the options are dealer options anyway and I made them find one they hadn’t messed with yet.

      I actually got a call from one of the dealers I test drove about a week ago letting me know they were killing the manual and that I should come get one while I still could.

      I’ve ultimately decided against the GLI.

    • 0 avatar
      rreichar

      We bought a 2017 GLI DSG for well under 25K. Had I been willing to drive an hour away I found a similar car for $22,500. I wanted to stay local though.

  • avatar
    Sceptic

    $30K is too expensive for this Mexico built car. I’ve seen basic manual 2017 GLI advertised at under $20K earlier this year.

  • avatar
    nels0300

    Wow, that’s too bad. 30% isn’t good enough?

    I tested one of these in 2014 (basically the same car as the 2018) and I really liked it, would’ve bought it if I wasn’t so scared of VW. Could’ve bought brand new for $22K.

    Now they’re $30K and no manual. GTFO VW.

  • avatar
    Skulltula House

    long time lurker, first time poster, this has pushed me over the edge to comment

    as a lover of the original A1 GLI (dd an 84), it’s sad that this is what the GLI has become. they should just kill the name again as they did with the A3 and just call it GLX

    the original GLI was a true driver’s car meant to go touring on the autobahn. In the US, at least, it was manual only, no cruise control. i believe it had only 5 options: cassette radio, or radio prep, sunroof, AC, metallic paint. makes searching for one in the classifieds great, never have to worry if it’s an auto when you come across one

    yes, you can blame me for not buying a new GLI as part of the reason for this, but that’s because even with a manual, it became a bloated, neutered lump rather than the original taut touring car it was conceived as, but it’s still sad to see it come to this

  • avatar
    slavuta

    VW will have to explain this 30% conspiracy. Personally, I don’t care. I have many reasons not to buy VW, period. But if I was open to it… Long live Mazda!

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    I cross shopped a GLI with a Mazda6 Touring in March. The GLI was appealing to me because the back seat is larger than the Golf/GTI. Important when dealing with two car seats, one rear-facing, and a tall wife in the passenger seat.

    The GLI was a surprisingly nice little car and very well equipped, except for the all-black interior, old chassis and obsolete 2.0T. Having dealt with a B5.5 Passat in the past, I just couldn’t pull the trigger on another turbo VW product.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      And what did you get? I wend with Mazda6 partially because other cars I liked had turbos. For me, the simpler the better, even if 0-60 a second slower.

      • 0 avatar
        LeMansteve

        I got the 6.

        Compared to the GLI, the 6 won on price, design and styling. The car feels more mature than the Jetta, and in some areas more refined. It does not have the nice turbo punch, but from my perspective that’s about the only thing it lacks compared to the GLI.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          We are brothers-in-cars. You have same thinking. So, lets say, GLI goes 6sec and ‘6 goes 7.6sec. Now, this is all variable because many these times are AT times. MT times are vary from driver to driver.

          6’ feels bigger than 3 but when you drive it, it feels smaller than its size. And it is Accord-big. I went through some curves where I know how ‘3 behaves, my new ‘6 does as well. Great car. This week average mpg (computer) is 32. We’ll see at the pump. Regular gas too. Only annoying thing is, when on the long light I want to turn off the engine, it goes into “off” position instead of “accessory”. I believe AT ‘6 can go back. If I use blue tooth, I lose connection until push button again. Other preferences would be – different MT gearing and I want a hand brake back!

          • 0 avatar
            LeMansteve

            0-60 is almost meaningless. It’s the in-gear, low RPM acceleration where the turbo GLI really shines. The steering and handling on the 6 really is outstanding.

            I don’t mind the electric e-brake. It’s small and integrates cleanly. I like how it disengages automatically when starting off, even with manual.

            The proximity key range is too short. Mazda Connect takes way too long to load. I agree, there needs to be a way to skip from Run to Accessory mode. The engine is coarse and lumpy in power delivery.

            MPG is inline with EPA estimates but still isn’t great. My average is 29mpg over 7,000 miles. Best trip ever was 31.5mpg on a 80% highway trip. I expect more from a 2.5L naturally aspirated 4 cylinder in 2017.

            Still, no buyers remorse. For my needs, the 6 is a great all around choice.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          I will not complain about powertrain in ‘6 because I drove Accord Sport and see no problem vs. e-Brake cuts you off snow times fun! And in combination with start button, you [I think] no longer able to start your car with dead battery. Yea – I had to do it few times in my ‘3.

          For the mpg, my ‘3 on the same drive returned around 30mpg. Again, so far this is just computer numbers. I will measure at pump. No doubt, could be more efficient. But would you give up some efficiency for fun? Obviously – you would. So do I. My bro claims 40 mpg in his new Accord. He says, he is ecstatic about it. But I was in the back seat of his car when curve met hump and it felt very unsettled. This is where Mazda is amazing, every time

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    The sweet spot was the now discontinued(I think), Jetta 1.8T sport, sportier ,lower susp., leatherette, MT, , 87 octane, available HID, basically all one needs. An APR flash away from GTI performance, in a 4dr that’s not ugly (like Civic SI sedan)

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      A flash away from being a GTI, but doesn’t that put it equally far away from a GTI that’s been flashed? Why not just get the GTI, with all the things that make it better, and not void your warranty?

  • avatar
    TW5

    Fahrvergnügen is about the only thing keeping VW alive at this point. It’s hard to believe a company that still attracts drivers would be silly enough to axe the manual transmission, but we are talking about Volkswagen. No one thought they’d be dumb enough to risk their diesel market by cheating the regulations.

  • avatar
    stuki

    Sliding ever further down the road to irrelevance….

    It’s only for the US though. Hardly a major VW market regardless of transmission.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    The current Jetta is an embrassment.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Why? I like it

    • 0 avatar
      vehic1

      If it ’embrasses’ you, then buy a Civic – perhaps you like that over-the-top teeny-boy-racer styling.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        “perhaps you like that over-the-top teeny-boy-racer styling.”

        Or reliability.

        Has VW extended that nice new 6 yr warranty to anything other than the Atlas or Tiguan?

      • 0 avatar
        pmirp1

        vehic1, Jetta and cars in its class are not suitable for my place in life. I am way past choosing that kind of car. But for those who are looking for a small compact, Civic is the tops. A Hyundai Elantra is also tons better than this old generation Jetta.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I don’t think the Jetta is an embarrassment at all. Volkswagen added a lot of the de-contented features back, like the independent rear suspension. They also killed the antiquated 2.slow and replaced it with the superior 1.4-liter TSI that was already in use on the Hybrid variant. The standard 5-speed manual for the 1.4 is short one gear compared to competitors, but the gears are well-spaced enough that a 6th would be unnecessary. And the 1.8-liter TSI in higher trims is sublime.

      The standard 2017 Jetta S has a reverse camera, a touch-screen infotainment system, Bluetooth, cruise control, color-keyed wing mirrors and LED DRLs. It may seem a little stale compared to the sharper-looking Cruze, Civic and Elantra (and the origins of the Mk.6 platform may be 12 years old), but it feels solid and Germanic, and the linear styling has aged well. If the 1.4T and 1.8T hold up, the Jetta is a keeper sort of car.

      And best of all, VW is practically giving Jettas right now.

      Now if you were talking about the 2011-2014 Jetta, I’d have to agree. That car zigged when the market zagged; when competitors like Ford (2012- Focus), Chevrolet (Cruze) and Dodge (Dart) really stepped their game up, VW chose to take what was a semi-premium compact car and turn it into the budget option. But the basic foundations of the car were good and they’ve improved upon it over the years. I’d buy one.

      • 0 avatar
        bking12762

        In Phoenix 2017 Jetta’s are being advertised @ $13,860 with an MSRP of $20,135. That has got to be one of the lowest priced new cars available in the US.

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        That’s why I drive an Audi. I ain’t buying no car from those VW Nazis!

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        I’m curious—what makes you think the 1.4T and the 1.8T are better than the 2.0T?

      • 0 avatar
        pmirp1

        Kyree, those things you mention as features after initial horrible intro, are lipstick on a pig. They are mostly available on any vehicle nowadays.
        It is a old platform. That went backward a full step before even VW realized it was so far behind Koreans, Cruse and Focus and Japanese, it has to make some fixes. It has hollow sounding material, cheap feeling interior that is put to shame by a Korean. It has plastic (pleather) interior that in the south where I live, sticks to your body and makes you sweaty 9 months of the year. They don’t even have leather as an option because even VW doesn’t take it serious. And now the subject of this article.

        This is the third world country car that America doesn’t deserve. An embarrassment. I remember the couple generations ago VR6 GLI. That car was a legit VW. This is only for lowest credit score challenged customers that need a vehicle, but we all know VW is desperate for customers of any kind after diesel. And no manual on a supposed performance Jetta. Right, an embarrassment it is

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I mean, a new Jetta is probably due within the next 12 months. It’s pretty normal to see automakers pare down underperforming variants as a model is phased out or transitioned into a redesign.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    GTI is superior in every aspect.
    Not too many reasons to buy a VW, GTI is a reason, GTI with DSG, only if you must.

  • avatar
    KevinC

    Where’s the new MQB-based replacement? I read a while back from multiple sources that it was coming to the US by the end of this year. Now they’re gonna stick with this ancient platform for yet another year? Jeez, the Golf has been on MQB since 2014 in Europe, 2015 here. VW needs to quit being this way, it’s been going on forever.

    30% take rate is VERY high, so it seems silly to discontinue the manual. For all the exec shuffling that’s been done over the last decade, they still manage to find guys to make head-scratcher decisions on stuff like this. So out of touch with their customers.

  • avatar
    reoff

    I bought a 2017 GLI Manual a little over a month ago. I don’t think it is a third world car or an embarrassment. I didn’t buy it because I have a terrible credit score or because I couldn’t afford something else. I also don’t think a car has to be on a brand new platform to be worth owning. A good car is made up of more than just enthusiast level driving dynamics. I didn’t want to pay a premium for a Golf GTI. They are lovely cars, but I want a sedan and rear leg room. I am more concerned about the fact that the GLI is great to drive every day. I’m not going to carve up the mountain roads of the midwest because there aren’t any. The Jetta handles great and I like the understated styling much more than that of the swooping asian competitors. I also like the feel of the car. Fuel economy is better than I expected it to be and the price I paid for the car was very attractive. Mine was $24,500. I really didn’t find anythign else I could get in a manual that competed with this car. Needless to say, I’m very happy with my Jetta.


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