By on August 22, 2017

2018 Chevrolet Tahoe RST

It turns out millennials aren’t the freakish alien shape-shifters the media has portrayed them as for the last decade. While still less prone to breeding, poorer than their parents, more educated, and inclined towards city living, they’re human after all.

“Where’s the proof?” you ask?

Recent surveys indicate millennials are, in fact, moving to the suburbs and buying SUVs. But that didn’t stop analysts from being dicks about it. “As more people move out of their parents’ basement — and there’s still quite a few living there — we expect to see continued healthy demand for homes,” explained Svenja Gudell, chief economist for Zillow. “Millennials delayed home ownership, just like they delayed getting married and having kids, but now they’re making very similar decisions to their parents.”

More importantly, home ownership means compulsory sport utility shopping. Large SUV sales have increased 11 percent in the first half of 2017, according to estimates from Ford Motor Company. Meanwhile, midsize family haulers increased by 9 percent and small SUV sales went up by 4 percent. Ford’s market research indicates this could just be the tip of the iceberg. 

“There’s no question people are waiting longer, but people still want to have children,” Erich Merkle, Ford’s U.S. sales analyst, told Bloomberg in an interview. “As long as people have children and those children grow and acquire friendships, it requires more space.”

Assuming millennials do things by the book (instead of engaging in whatever flaky generational stereotypes news outlets like to pretend they prefer), more of them are expected to move into larger SUVs to facilitate family life. Sales of midsize SUVs will grow by 16 percent between now and 2022, while deliveries of vehicles like the Chevrolet Suburban or Mercedes-Benz GLS-Class will jump by 25 percent, according to a forecast by researcher LMC Automotive.

Today, the largest group of midsize and large SUV buyers are between the ages of 35 and 44, Merkle said. However, as Generation X is significantly smaller than the millennial population, the younger population has more buying potential. In fact, if you don’t subscribe to the generational trends nonsense, simply knowing there are more people coming down the pipe ready to start a family is reason enough to expect SUV sales will remain on the rise.

“There’s going to be an extra 25 million people passing into and through the 35-to-44 year old demographic over the next 10 to 15 years,” Merkle said. “That’s going to lead to a gradual increase in the growth of large and midsize SUVs that’s already starting to happen.”

Sales of the Ford Expedition, Chevrolet Tahoe, Chevrolet Suburban, GMC Yukon, and Nissan Armada were all up significantly in 2016. It was the same for most big SUVs sold in America and 2017 is on pace to be even better. In fact, Nissan’s Armada has already sold more units in the first half of this year than it did in all of 2016.

That growth will be further driven by millennials, the oldest of whom have lifted the annual birthrate for women 30 to 34 years of age to the highest level since 1964, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The bottom line is families of all ages typically want SUVs, especially now that minivans are passé. They’re larger, provide easier access to cargo, promote a sense of safety, and are a good way to show up the neighbors who understood owning a Honda Accord was probably all they needed.

“As a sample size of one, I certainly need a lot of space because it’s really tough to travel with a child,” said Zillow’s Gudell, who drives an Audi Q5.

[Image: General Motors]

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72 Comments on “Millennials Are Human After All: Moving to the Suburbs, Buying Large SUVs...”


  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    Whaaaaaa? You mean 35 year olds don’t want to live the same life as a 23 year old?

    It’s amazing how the media treated millenials as if they would never age. Oh look millenials don’t want to buy cars, and want to live downtown and be near cool bars. Aren’t they so different? And because at 23 they act this way, it means they will act this way forever.

    It’s almost as if the MSM lies or something.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      Every generation says this about the next generation. The next generation is always tipping the scale toward the fall of civilization, brainwashed by subversive music/books, too lazy, not as hardworking.

      • 0 avatar
        I_like_stuff

        This was the reverse, It was 26 year old “journalists” writing how totes super awesome all their friends were. Those of us 10-20 years older were just rolling our eyes.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    See, Millenials weren’t just unmotivated, jobless, out-of-touch narcissists they’ve been portrayed as. They simply needed career opportunities to become the employed out-of-touch narcissists of preceding generations, who seem to think that traveling with one kid is “really tough” and requires a $40K midsize luxury SUV.

    Avacado toast be damned. Give’em a job and they’ll fall right in line and spend like the Boomers. Unfortunately, it seems to take far-reaching war and hardship to create a Greatest Generation and we haven’t seen enough of that for quite some time.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Unfortunately, it seems to take far-reaching war and hardship to create a Greatest Generation and we haven’t seen enough of that for quite some time.”

      Gee, it’s as if being the only industrial power who didn’t have its infrastructure bombed into rubble gave us a leg up for a few decades.

      Nah, can’t be that. /s

      the immediate-post-WWII era in this country was a historical anomaly. it’s never coming back, despite what certain gilded windbags promise (and what their “MAGA” chanting supporters desperately wish to believe.)

      Some people (spoiled Boomers) seem to think you can still walk out of high school with a diploma and into an unskilled job which pays enough for you to support a family. Hasn’t been true for quite some time.

      There was a story somewhere I read about a company who came up with an automated pizza machine. It could dose out the proper amount of dough, form it into a perfect circle, apply all of the toppings, and the last step of the conveyor was the oven to bake it and drop it into a box. And people are oohing and aaahing over this technological marvel.

      so once we’ve automated away all of the unskilled/low skill jobs, are old white people still going to be calling millennials (or whatever the following generation is called) “lazy” because they can’t get a job which doesn’t exist?

      • 0 avatar
        tnk479

        “There was a story somewhere I read about a company who came up with an automated pizza machine. It could dose out the proper amount of dough, form it into a perfect circle, apply all of the toppings, and the last step of the conveyor was the oven to bake it and drop it into a box. And people are oohing and aaahing over this technological marvel.”

        Well that’s cute but they won’t be for long as people wake up to the reality that they should not be eating that garbage food engineered for profit and devoid of any nutritional value.

      • 0 avatar
        tnk479

        Correction – sellout politicians that sell tax dollars for votes and turn productive people into cucks. I pay as much in taxes as the average American makes. Who the f*** is Alex Jones? You know what happens when you assume? You make an ass of you and…actually just you.

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      Anybody under 25 has basically known a constant state of war for their sentient life.

      Anybody younger than 17 has literally been in a nation at war for their entire existence.

      And you say we don’t have enough of it yet?

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        you miss his point. we haven’t experienced anything on the scale of WWII since, well, WWII. We came through WWII mostly unscathed (Pearl Harbor aside,) while other industrial countries (England, Germany, France) were at least partially in ruins, and another which was industrializing (Japan) bombed to hell. The “Greatest Generation” and the Boomers benefited from that environment; we were so economically powerful because from 1945 to about 1970 we had practically no competition. We had put production of consumer goods (cars, appliances, etc.) on hold as manufacturers were cranking out military hardware and supplies. Once the war was over, we had:

        – several years of pent-up demand for consumer goods
        – tons of manufacturing capacity ready to make them
        – demand for people to staff those factories
        – thousands of returning servicemen eager to take those jobs (kicking all of the Rosies the Riveters back into the kitchen)
        – economic allies who needed goods and materials from us to rebuild their countries.

        it was a perfect storm which worked to our tremendous advantage. But the rest of the world caught up and in some cases surpassed us, and automation is obsoleting many of the rest of those jobs.

        so no, we can’t go back to who we were in the 1950s. at all. even if we had a large-scale global conflict the scale of WWII, *and* we somehow managed to get through it intact (again,) it still wouldn’t be Leave it to Beaver and white picket fences for us. in WWII we were pretty much unreachable; nukes changed that game.

        • 0 avatar
          tnk479

          Our problems must be purely circumstantial and couldn’t possible be caused by:

          * Baby boomers electing the absolute weakest cucks for politicians that the world has ever seen.
          * Baby boomers having not one ounce of leadership talent to make tough decisions and explain to people why they must be made.
          * Baby boomers running up the national credit card with a debt fueled boom that will ultimately collapse in spectacular failure.

          The baby boomer generation is pathetic. They offer pathetic corporate leadership, pathetic political leadership, and they have raised an entire generation of mostly pathetic children. Baby boomers have brought us endless debt, endless wars, Postmodernism, identity politics, and all they do is make excuses for their failures. We cannot sweep them from power soon enough. The only problem is the generation they raised is worse.

          • 0 avatar
            tnk479

            And just to underscore my point, I stood there in a surreal moment last November at the ballot box with my only two choices being Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton. Words almost cannot describe the level of disgust that I have for that choice. The entire primary process was pathetic. The general election debates and season were pathetic. The so called news media covering it all was pathetic. All we can hope for now is a peaceful revolution that can bring sanity back.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            your use of the word “cucks” means you have nothing of value to say.

            f*** off out of here and go back to funneling Alex Jones’s hog.

        • 0 avatar
          bikegoesbaa

          “you miss his point.”

          I think I get his point.

          He is saying that we are unfortunate that there is not “enough” warfare and hardship in the world, and that it would preferable if there were more of it. Because Greatest Generation.

          This strikes me as:
          (1) oversimplified
          (2) meaningless
          and *especially*
          (3) reprehensible

          WW2 was in many ways the worst thing that ever happened, and was directly responsible for tens of millions of deaths. Anybody who would flippantly want to do it all over again in order to teach these millennials about motivation and hard work is both ignorant of history and bad at cost/benefit analysis.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            “I think I get his point”

            Nope! You don’t. Jim does. You mouthed off before checking to see if you were right, and the entirety of your resulting comment is arrogant blather as a result. Don’t you feel smart now?

            Thanks for playing!

          • 0 avatar
            bikegoesbaa

            “it seems to take far-reaching war and hardship to create a Greatest Generation and we haven’t seen enough of that for quite some time.”

            So this is not you saying that we don’t have “enough” war and hardship?

            If that’s not your point you may want to refrain from casually wishing for more of either in the future.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            …which could be interpreted either as a) it’s been a very long time since our country has experienced a war that required the difficulty and sacrifice necessary to meaningfully shape a generation the way WW2 did, or b) I WANT WAR AND BLOODSHED AND SUFFERING AND I WANT IT NOW!

            You chose the latter and *ran with it*, presumably because your need to lecture somebody exceeded your common sense.

            As long as you’re here, I’m having a hard time letting your first comment go as well. The current wars have required much from the small fraction of this nation serving in the armed forces, but absolutely nothing from the majority of us as we go about rating coffee shops on Yelp, feeding our social media addiction, and doing the 9-5. You think that is comparable to 1930-1945?

          • 0 avatar
            bikegoesbaa

            “You think that is comparable to 1930-1945?”

            No, few things are. My point was that we still have plenty of war. Far too much, actually.

            “it’s been a very long time since our country has experienced a war that required the difficulty and sacrifice necessary to meaningfully shape a generation the way WW2 did”

            I think where we diverge is that you (apparently) view this “meaningful shaping” of the WW2 generation to be desirable and good, and in a large way the source of their supposed virtue and worthiness.

            I disagree entirely, and given the choice would rather have a generation of lazy narcissistic millennials than another round of people who are (inaccurately) convinced that they “saved the world” and take it as their god-given right to exercise military intervention and CIA skulduggery anywhere they see fit.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “I think where we diverge is that you (apparently) view this “meaningful shaping” of the WW2 generation to be desirable and good,”

            no, that’s purely your own invention. I didn’t take it that way, and by his comments that wasn’t what he meant.

            The problem might actually be you. You don’t want to spend the effort arguing against what people actually say, so you lazily argue against what you wish they said.

            we call that a “strawman.”

          • 0 avatar
            Dan

            “I disagree entirely, and given the choice would rather have a generation of lazy narcissistic millennials than another round of people who are (inaccurately) convinced that they “saved the world” and take it as their god-given right to exercise military intervention and CIA skulduggery anywhere they see fit.”

            The last one of those people in the White House was George Bush. The first one.

            The last Congress that had a majority of veterans – not just WW2 veterans, any service, at any time, ever – was elected in 1986.

            The CIA hasn’t had a WW2-era director since Bill Casey. He died 30 years ago.

            30 years of the greatest generation’s replacement by lazy snowflakes later, have jingoism or skullduggery gone anywhere? I maintain that they have not.

            I don’t disagree with you that all of the stomach-turningly helpless of these adult children would be a wholly acceptable price to pay in place of nation building adventures. But that isn’t what’s happened at all. Their failings aren’t an in-place-of.

            They’re an in-addition-to.

          • 0 avatar
            FOG

            @bikegoesbaa,

            Don’t know if you are new to this arena, but you should digest what people say before you reply. I would also err on the side of the comments being hyperbolic or sarcastic in order to make a point. It is my experience that although the people attack your writing they are, as a whole, good people. Even though many of them are Canadian.

        • 0 avatar
          SaulTigh

          This. Most people are morons and don’t realize the 15 years of awesome following WWII in the US was a historical aberration.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Nothing like a kid and a mortgage to turn you into your parents.

    That being said, society has made a change, in that the lifestyles of North American urban dwellers are starting to reflect those of Europeans to a much greater degree than any time since the end of WWII.

    Perhaps the suburban, auto based American, Australian, Canadian lifestyle of 1946 to 2010(ish) was the aberration?

    • 0 avatar
      I_like_stuff

      Not really.

      http://realestate.usnews.com/real-estate/articles/why-more-millennials-are-buying-homes-in-the-suburbs

      “A new survey by the National Association of Realtors found that the share of millennials, those born between about 1980 and 2000, buying in an urban or central city areas decreased from 21 percent to 17 percent from 2014 to 2015. Like buyers in other age groups, the majority of millennials bought a detached home in the suburbs.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        A I-Like: It is dependent on the region.

        http://urbantoronto.ca/news/2017/02/2016-census-mapping-torontos-population-growth

        Demonstrates a large increase in the inner city and some outer suburbs and a decrease in the ‘inner suburbs’.

        From the article that you linked: ‘One thing the millennials find more important than their parents did is walkability. “We like to walk around,” Quiroz says. “They’re willing to give up a couple of things so they can be closer to those shops and restaurants.” They also want bike paths, parks and natural areas close by. “People are on this huge health kick,” Bernstein says.’

        Which is almost a denunciation of the post-war suburban car culture/car-centric urban planning model.

        • 0 avatar
          I_like_stuff

          How many of those downtown Toronto condos actually have someone living in them?

          https://betterdwelling.com/city/toronto/toronto-has-over-99000-unoccupied-homes-heres-where-they-are-interactive/

          This is true all over N. America. Many of those hip urban condos/lofts that were built for the super hip millenial buyer are sitting empty. And will be for a long time.

          I’ve been hearing about the death of suburbs for 20 years. And probably will be for the next 50 years. As much as some people would love to have everyone living in Soviet style apartment blocks in an urban center, people keep voting with their feet….they want space and a car.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Thanks for the link, which states that the area with the highest number of unoccupied homes is The City of Vaughan. Which is a separate city north of Toronto and known as an old school suburban, car centric area, with old school planning.

            Sort of supportive of the view that old style suburbs are on their way out?

            And all statistical evidence is that the ‘old suburbs’ are the ones most suffering. Demonstrating perhaps the growing inequality of income, with the affluent living either in the downtown ‘core’ or the ‘exburbs’ (extended outer suburbs) and those with low income living in the areas developed from about 1950 to about 1980.

          • 0 avatar
            Maymar

            Why is it assumed that the only alternatives are suburbia or hip downtown condo/dystopic Soviet apartment block? As it’s been pretty well proven that Millennials would prefer more walkable neighbourhoods, is it not plausible we’d prefer something that doesn’t exist, and have to just weigh what compromises we’re willing to make?

      • 0 avatar
        carlisimo

        We would’ve liked to buy a place in the city (San Francisco), but the suburbs was what we could afford.

        Also, car seats are enormous now. I’m getting a small car to work, but totally understand going big.

    • 0 avatar
      ash78

      People still want space, assuming it’s available and affordable. The “urban chic” thing can be fun for a while, but it wears thin quickly for most people (especially with kids). It’s like aspiring to live in a place where you really just want to go on vacation.

  • avatar
    ash78

    The best part about the last decade of stupid/fake Millenial trends was the whole “Everyone wants to rent overpriced lofts in (insert cute downtown district name here).”

    You can market to people as if they’re not a moving target, but the idea — with dwellings or cars — that an esoteric option will meet their needs for more than 5 years is really, really shortsighted.

    The suburbs work for a lot of people because they’re a decent compromise of everything (sort of like SUVs or Crossovers). Except HOAs. F*ck HOAs. What if we had that for cars? Can you imagine the angry letters all the neo-Nazis would be getting from Sergio right now?

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I most thoroughly enjoyed my time in a rental Yukon SLT last weekend. Much more “special” feeling to be in than any GM in recent memory. Third row stinks and eats up cargo room, and a Z71-style front air dam removal would be ideal, but a hell of a truck on the road. Great interior/dash, awesome motor (5.3 that many in B&B seem to slag), awesome presence on the road IMO. I just these things depreciated more aggressively (or were not so damn expensive in the first place).

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Personally I’m interested in seeing what GMs fuel economy is like when they start using that 10 speed auto they co-developed with Ford. Right now they’re still using 6 and 8 speed autos.

      The B&B (in our quest for “more ltrs equals better”) forget that all GM V8s are pretty good. I wouldn’t kick one out of bed for eating crackers.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      The 5.3 has is its shortcomings, most those can be solved by downloading a new tune via anyone of the various tuner options out there.

    • 0 avatar
      Frylock350

      The Tahoe custom has a 3rd row delete option; maybe if it proves popular GM will spread it around the full-size SUV line.

      I never understood the hate for the 5.3L, its a fantastic engine and represents the best combo of power, economy, and operating costs of anything out there. My 5.3L/6sp/3.42 Silverado will do 0-60 in 6.7 seconds and return 21mpg on a road trip with cruise set a hair below 80mph all using 87 octane fuel. Fill with a tank of E85 can you can cut 0.5s to 60. Maybe everyone drove 3.08 trucks and formed their impression on those? Or the previous non-DI 5.3 with 3.08s?

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    The clapbacks at the digs at millenials were great. Any baby boomers who took pleasure in taking pot shots at the misfortune their generation handed us can go sit on a fire hydrant.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      one of the hallmarks of Boomers is how adeptly they shift the blame for their own actions onto others.

      • 0 avatar
        ash78

        AFAIC, Boomers (and their living parents) should be walking around thanking Gen X/Y every single day as if we took a bullet for them.

        We’ll never get that kind of healthcare or social security in our lives. We’re too busy funding them.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          “We’ll never get that kind of healthcare or social security in our lives. We’re too busy funding them”

          Looking at my Boomer parents entering retirement age aided largely by that and stock market growth since their careers began in earnest since the early 80s and…yup.

          Not that they weren’t reasonably disciplined, but my god were they earning and paying health insurance–and now drawing SS–during the right years.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Read the works of David Foot who is credited with inventing the concept of economics based on demographics.

            The generation born 1930 to 1945, particularly if they were born in the USA, Canada or Australia had it better than any generation in history.

            In Canada, immigration has largely offset the issues associated with low birth rates. But that is taking the easy way out. Improving technology and overall efficiencies could be just as effective.

            However a major problem is that ‘tax’ has in the past few decades, become a bad word. If tax rates for the wealthy and for corporations were at or near the same as in the 1950’s and 1960’s there would not be the same concern over public health, education, etc.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            ” If tax rates for the wealthy and for corporations were at or near the same as in the 1950’s and 1960’s there would not be the same concern over public health, education, etc.”

            ain’t that the truth. These “Make America Great Again” a**holes who have unhealthy fetishes for the 1950s are too stupid to realize how much higher tax rates were back then. The top marginal tax rate after WWII was 90%. Yet somehow, with that level of “punitive” taxation, we still managed to become an economic powerhouse.

            Now I’m supposed to believe that if the Koch brothers have to pay one red cent more in taxes this year all of the “job creators” will pull up stakes and leave.

            f*** off. don’t s*** on my head and expect me to thank you for the hat.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            I like you both.

  • avatar

    Hilarious. Every analyst was just so_so sure the suburbs were finished, and no Millennial was ever going to drive or go shopping or buy anything.

    I think all the surveys they took were only in downtown NYC and Chicago, and perhaps LA, where you’re surely going to get hipster-skewed results.

  • avatar
    Zelgadis

    Okay, am I weird? I would not be caught dead in a garbage can driving anything that can be classified with a “UV” at the end.

    I’m currently in the market for a proper wagon. With that, I get the car-driving experience that is fun, wherein my butt can remain close to the road and I don’t feel like I’m going to tip over most of the time. But who makes a wagon now? Subaru quit. Audi quit. (No, I will not buy one of those stupid jacked-up wagons either.)

    I’m left with the Swedes, a Saab or a Volvo. Because of what? These confusing weirdos who claim to need an ugly, jacked up crackerbox on wheels because “it’s hard to travel with a child?” Since when? My family of four went all the way to Florida in a 1986 Maxima. It’s not hard at all!

    • 0 avatar

      “Okay, am I weird?”
      “I’m currently in the market for a proper wagon.”

      If you’re going to answer your own question…

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “These confusing weirdos”

      if everyone else is buying CUVs, *you’re* the weirdo.

      “My family of four went all the way to Florida in a 1986 Maxima.”

      and no CUV owner gives a s***.

    • 0 avatar
      Nostrathomas

      My family of 6 toured through Italy one summer in a tiny 80s Skoda. My butt never touched cloth the entire trip.

      I too would never be caught dead buying a Crossover, and would never consider anything but a wagon for a family car (have had a Saab and currently on our second Volvo).

      So if you’re weird, at least there’s two of us.

      I’m a Millennial, although just barely as fit into that so-called Oregon Trail generation overlap between Millennial and X.

    • 0 avatar
      ash78

      And you turned out just fine…directing car-related anger at strangers on the internet! :D

      If only your folks had considered one of those crazy Lee Iacocca “mini-vans” you can only imagine how much better things might have turned out.

      (we did it all, from compact sedans to short wheelbase minivans. More space was definitely easier)

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      Yes, you are a weirdo if you like wagons, so thanks for being a member of the WAS (wagon appreciation society).

      Don’t forget the upcoming Buick TourX and the Golf wagon for choices. Plus there’s the C-Max which is either a hatch or a wagon, I’m not quite sure.

      • 0 avatar
        Zelgadis

        Honestly, I’m bitter, so yeah, I reckon an apology is in order if I came across angry. I am angry. I was born in the 70s and grew up in the 80s. The 80s in particular were a glorious period of the Japanese invasion when anyone with any goofy taste would have at least two or three options to choose from.

        Now? Everything is the same. I’ve spent the last six months driving car after car after car. I could not tell you any substantial differences between a Buick, Audi, BMW, Ford, etc. etc. etc. They are all boring. The VWs have a little flavor, but… well, they’re VWs. I used to work for VW and I’ve seen quite enough of how that company functions, thanks.

        I used to live in Japan. Whatever goofy idea you have, they have a car for it. From watching Top Gear, I guess the same for Europe. Here, in North America, anything not the same as everything else just disappears.

        At least there are a few wagons left. I’m hard-pressed to name even a single fastback that’s been sold in the last ten years. Nissan Fairlady, I guess? For the love of all things sacred, whose lame-brained idea was it to make the rear end of the Subaru BR-Z a trunk and not a hatch?

        So, yeah, I’m bitter and sad. I used to like cars. I used to get car magazines. I used to fantasize about this car and that car. This is the only car site I visit now. It’s not fun anymore.

        • 0 avatar
          conundrum

          “Now? Everything is the same. I’ve spent the last six months driving car after car after car. I could not tell you any substantial differences between a Buick, Audi, BMW, Ford, etc. etc. etc. They are all boring.”

          Been on the lookout for four years myself and agree 100%. Boring and perhaps mostly to blame is electric power steering, the tiller of video games. Beset by huge inertia from geared down motors run backwards by road imperfections so it doesn’t actually happen – the result is numb nothingness. I break Baruth’s dictum on repair expenses by holding onto an older 2008 banger because I like the way it drives.

          MB C Class, BMW 3 and 4 series, Accord, TLX, Mazda 6, ATS, both my car-loving brother and I try these modern miracles out and just say eff it. Nothing to make you want to buy. Accord and Mazda6 actually seem the best built, not of the best materials out there maybe interior-wise, but they’re just goddam cars not a piece of living room furniture so who cares. At least the interior bits fit together well due to careful design and continuity, while Toyota seems to have lost that plot and slaps discontinuous bits together, unlike 20 years ago.

          Will probably give up soon and pedal around in that symbol of lost automotive hope, a CUV, fiddling with a poorly designed infotainment system for excitement while experiencing enough electronic nannies emitting false alarms to keep a zombie awake. Which CUV? Does it matter? Another brother runs a CX-5, and if that’s the best handling, the future is drab indeed.

        • 0 avatar
          ash78

          I’m with you completely. Everything is homogenized and boring right now. However, I believe we just exited a golden age of cars (without realizing it) and are now on an inevitable march towards mediocrity and sameness.

          I’m starting to think the period from about 2003-2010 was the “sweet spot” with some variety in design, massive amounts of power and efficiency in a single package, and a lot less compromise over things like pedestrian safety, passenger safety, and CAFE (none of which are a bad thing, but taken together they can tend to stifle the product).

          I remember the joy of being a young teen, wondering whether I’d be able to afford an RX-7, 3000GT, or Supra Turbo. Because it was going to be one of those three. Until I learned how far $4.25/hr really went…

          But yeah, a lot of the joy and desire for cars is gone, and it’s not just because I’m pushing 40 and have a couple kids.

          Excuse me while I go search for a Mercedes R63. Because it’s interesting and nobody else seems to be crazy enough to do anything like this anymore.

        • 0 avatar
          SaulTigh

          I’m right there with you, in age and disposition. I’m letting all my car magazines lapse, because I hate pretty much all modern cars. And don’t get me started on the “technology.” I don’t need my phone and my car mating. I need cold air, a decent radio, and power windows. Also a huge motor. I’m a freak, I know.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Although I like the concept of a wagon and have owned multiple including VW Type III and Type IV, Ford (fullsize and Fairmont) and a Honda Wagovan, in reality the original minivan was such a success because it was performed most of the functions required of a wagon, better than a wagon can or could.

    Of course I understand that with its higher centre of gravity and shape like a brick it is not as driveable, but then most wagons weren’t purchased for their driving dynamics.

  • avatar
    shane_the_ee

    All the millennials could never stay in the city: there’s just not enough 3+ bedroom houses. The difference is that the ones who can afford it buy single family homes in the city and the ones who can’t “drive ’til they qualify”. The boomers who could afford it left the cities for the suburbs and the ones who couldn’t afford the suburbs stayed in the cities/inner rings. Note that I am a late gen X-er married to a millennial who left the suburbs for the city once we could afford it. True to stereotype, I ride my bike to work. But don’t let that fool you: we’re planning to purchase a full-size SUV in the next 12-18 months (Z71 Suburban or FX4 Expedition Max). And save your breath: we already own a minivan. The SUV is to go play in the mountains on the weekends (including travel trailer).

    • 0 avatar

      I feel like we’re in similar points in our lives (also a late Gen Xer/xennial married to a millennial).

      Currently in the ‘burbs (Eastside of Seattle) because the commute is a hell of a lot easier. Once we move away from here, we’re more than likely going to move back into the city.

      Also, currently have a 2016 CR-V EX-L AWD and I’m actively looking for another Aerostar.

      • 0 avatar
        shane_the_ee

        You must work on the Eastside. We’re in West Seattle, where the commute is, well, “a hell of a lot easier”.

        • 0 avatar
          Landau Calrissian

          Wife and I (27 and 26) live in Renton and have both recently began working full-time from home. Now that the commute isn’t an issue, we’re heading to Tacoma where we can actually afford a house.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      ‘x-er married to a millenial’.

      What the hell does that mean?

      • 0 avatar
        bikegoesbaa

        I assume it means “Person who is part of the demographic frequently referred to as ‘Generation X’ who is in a a legally, socially, or ritually recognised union with a spouse who is part of the demographic often called ‘Millennials\'”

    • 0 avatar
      Reino

      I totally get this. The late-X/early millenials is kind of stuck between worlds: we have some of the progressive idealism of the younger millenials, but still want the fun toys like campers and boats like the boomers had. Can’t park a travel trailer in the city.

  • avatar
    scott25

    Of course there’s always outliers, such as myself and a few of my friends and acquaintances, millennials who wouldn’t be caught dead living in a city or suburbs. Rural or nothing. Going to a major city once a year is already too much for me.

    And even in the country we’re outliers since our house has two hatchbacks, and will never have a truck in the driveway. Of course I’m the weird one there, my aforementioned friends and acquaintances generally own at least one truck, even if it’s just a Ranger.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Sure Svenja, that tiny VAG product gives you so much space for that whole ONE child. Pathetic.

  • avatar
    walker42

    Duh

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