By on August 18, 2017

2017 Lexus ES300h panel gaps - Image: © Timothy CainWe’re auto writers. By our very nature, we’re irritable complainers, apt to harp and carp. Yet while we enjoy a humorous headline, needling readers, and looking far into the future, you’ll more likely find us sharing photos of horrendous automotive disappointments on TTAC’s digital HQ, Slack.

Sometimes the disappointments are obvious and consequently publicized. Departed managing editor Mark Stevenson, for example, profiled a 2015 Ford Edge Titanium’s build issues in late 2015.

Panel gaps are one means of quantifying perceived quality. Industry observers and many customers use perceived quality to make educated guesses about future real quality. If a vehicle appears to be built well, surely it is. If a vehicle appears to be built poorly, how much worse is the quality of assembly under the skin?

2017 Lexus ES panel gap collage - Image: © Timothy CainThis issue quickly became a topic among TTAC’s staff earlier today when associate editor Steph Willems shared a Reddit posting of a Tesla Model X with doors that don’t even come close to lining up. These kinds of images are shared on Twitter all the time. But rarely do we take time to consider the opposite end of the spectrum. Teslas often feature comically poor perceived quality, but how much better are other vehicles?

Fortunately, the manufacturer-supplied test vehicle visiting Prince Edward Island this week is an apt comparison, widely assumed to be among the most reliable vehicles known to mankind. If a Tesla Model X fails to live up to reasonable expectations, how much of a space is there between a Californian EV and a Japanese hybrid such as this Japan-built 2017 Lexus ES300h?2017 Lexus ES panel gaps collage - Images: © Timothy CainIf there’s a car for which consumers expect to see perfection, the Lexus ES is the obvious candidate. It doesn’t sell based on superior performance or engaging dynamics. It’s not the most attractive luxury sedan. It’s not the least expensive luxury sedan. But Lexus manages to sell an average of 65,000 per year because people know exactly what they’re going to get. And if loyal ES buyers were to ever walk up to a next-generation ES in 2018 and see doors that didn’t line up or a misaligned badging or tilted taillamps, concerns about lasting quality would be made obvious in Lexus’ sales reports.

So, is the 2017 Lexus ES300h that TTAC will review next week a prime example of perfect panel gaps and peerless build quality? Or does that right-side taillamp’s trunklid portion appear a nanometer higher than it is on the rear fender?

[Images: © Timothy Cain]

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

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71 Comments on “Enough With the Negatives: What Do the Auto Industry’s Good Panel Gaps Look Like?...”


  • avatar

    *eye twitches*

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Hard to judge exterior panel gaps from small photos, but they’ve avoided one interior faux pas that has been highlighted before on TTAC (Ford Explorer?): misalignment of shared contours and character lines on the dash and door. The dash contours terminate at the doors, so it’s one less conspicuous and fiddly alignment that doesn’t need to be fussed over. Or noticed when it isn’t perfect.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      I think that is why Civic panel gaps are so big…you can’t tell if they are aligned or not they are too far apart. The civic has to be the worse in the business for a brand new model.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      A # of years ago, Edmunds had a long-term Acura tester which had simply horrendous interior panel gaps/misalignments.

      Don’t know how that got by QC.

  • avatar
    matt3319

    Got my panel gap tool out!

    • 0 avatar
      ash78

      That’s a misdemeanor. Felony if there are kids around.

      I’ll never forget reading a review (I think it was the Alfa 4C) on Jalopnik where the reviewer mentioned “panel gaps so big I could f*ck them” in the middle of an otherwise straight-laced review.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    I can’t think of a more useless criteria for judging long term “quality”.
    Saturn was the one make relentlessly trashed for panel gaps and 20 year old Sats are typically some of the best looking cars on the road today.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Saturn’s alignment issues were due to using plastic panels. These are way more sensitive to temperature differences then traditional steel. Thus they had to make the gaps bigger to account for that. I would also guess the molding process likely results in larger tolerances too.

      I was behind a Dodge Charger the other day and the style of their rear tail lights made it very obvious that there was a serious misalignment issue with the trunk. My Dakota has bad visible gaps too. For example at the base of the front passenger door you can see its running down hill. The error appears to be as much as a 1/4″ Also the hood is misaligned badly enough that the driver’s side wiper arm actually hits it in one place. However none of this effects the vehicle’s functionality, it just kind of ugly… and sad.

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-X

      Agree. Quality starts with the customer not having to spend family time in warranty, or family money out of warranty, fixing the mistakes of the Auto Executive Clowns.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Meh, not my definition of quality. I would rather have a car that is beautifully built, a lovely place to spend time in, and drives wonderfully but needs a bit more love and attention than a soulless appliance that never needs anything but brake pads and oil changes.

        Mostly because the reality is that statistically the difference between worst and first in modern cars is so small in any given class as to be largely meaningless. The operator ends up being ends up being a more important factor. I can drive Peugeots and Alfas reliably, my Mother can kill a Prius.

        • 0 avatar
          EMedPA

          I think the entire North American sales force of Alfa Romeo will be knocking at your door soon.

        • 0 avatar
          Detroit-X

          Opinion noted. But thus the problem with talking about “quality.” ‘Quality’ is not universally defined.

          To me, you are talking about attention to detail (beautifully built), and styling (lovely place to spend time in).

          It would be interesting to create a matrix of quality, styling, reliability, words etc. and match those words to typical problems with cars, computers, homes, etc. (Hmm, I could do that while I am in the GM dealership service waiting room for hours and hours.)

          And to those of us who do not wish to wrench on a car to keep an expensive problem-child operating, such “love and attention” quickly goes to hate. To never buying that brand again.

          The internet is full of $2000-4000 repair tales done on vehicles, so this can easily differentiate between first and worst in quality. Repeated problems, engineering mistakes, “they all do that,” which the automakers refuse to take responsibility for. (Like anything that rusts prematurely is a “wear item”, etc. )

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          “I would rather have a car that is beautifully built, a lovely place to spend time in, and drives wonderfully”

          I thought you drove a new BMW????

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        I’d argue quality STARTS with dependability/reliability/longevity of components, then moves up to vehicle dynamics as well as things like fit and finish, then peaks at all of those things with richness of materials and other tactile qualities (how nice buttons press, etc).

        A modern Lexus ES makes it through the first hurdle, does a competent (but not exciting) job of the dynamics, has excellent fit and finish, and has better than average but IMO not stellar richness of materials and tactile qualities (sit in a well preserved early 90s ES then sit in a new ES).

        IMO most “aspirational” German cars sold here in the US, with a particularly low point in the first decade of the 2000s, have failed to clear the first hurdle, making the others irrelevant (to me) in the measure of quality. Doesn’t matter how nice the interior materials are on my Audi when they start coming off in rubberized chunks on my skin, and my timing chain is stretched before 100k necessitating an engine-out repair. An E70 X5 is a nicer performing car than a similar age RX350, but that is academic to most owners when they’re driving around with a dash lit up like a Christmas tree with warning lights and a litany of diagnostic trouble codes when scanned (typically 20 or more when scanned by the time the car is 7-8 years of age and 100k miles or so).

        Something like a fullsize GM in luxo trim presents an interesting “third way.” I’d largely give them the first hurdle cleared (longer term 4L60E longevity on the older trucks notwithstanding), and durability of interior trim has historically also fairly questionable, not sure of the GMT900s are doing better than the GMT800s. Fit and finish? Getting a lot better, I was in a rental K2XX Yukon SLT in Vegas just now and it really impressed, but then the little plastic belt-surround for the third row came off in my wife’s hand when she accidentally gave it a tug, and folding the second row exposes a very sloppy exposed carpet cut line with insulation sticking out. Relatively minor quibbles, everything else was excellent IMO, minimal orange peel in the paint as well. Dynamically the engines have been very strong and satisfying, the modern 6spd transmissions are quite competent. The 5.3 in our rental really hustled and sounded good doing it. Ride/handling? Also increasingly well sorted for such inherently uncouth beasts. Finally, the dash and door cards aside from some remaining hard plastic are nothing short of fantastic IMO, switch gear is excellent as well, on par with anything I’ve recently experienced. If I could get a Yukon with some better offroad chops, that might just be my new dream truck.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Side note, I was not a fan of the Saturn station wagons and I wouldn’t say they were ahead of their time, but they have aged really well.

    • 0 avatar
      TCragg

      Spend any time in a KOA, and you’ll be surprised at how many older Saturn SL/SW you see as “dinghys” towed behind motor homes. Old Saturns can be flat-towed with no modifications.

  • avatar
    ash78

    I don’t like this metric because as time goes on, I increasingly see manufacturers using “artificial” measures like rubber bumper pads in the door jambs to force the closed door to line up correctly. If the alternative is to use a 5# heavier door to prevent slight deformation, I think most manufacturers would choose the rubber bumper.

    Regardless of that, I find the interior to be the more valuable place to look for imperfections. The exterior has to tolerate UV, salt, rain, grit, etc. But the interior is where you spend all your time. Our last new car (2015 Odyssey) has a lower-quality interior than my wife’s old 2003 Saturn L-series, a car that was almost universally panned by critics. In terms of things like “visible plastic molding lines” and “exposed foam” the Honda loses big time. Of course, we didn’t buy it for interior build quality, we just expected a little more. Most buyers revel in mediocrity, so this stuff gets voted for (with dollars) time and time again.

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      Is a heavier door an inherently better solution than a rubber bumper?

      If the door closes evenly, looks good, and is quiet, waterproof, reliable, and safe does the method by which the OEM arrived at this end state matter?

      • 0 avatar
        ash78

        Not really — but the heavier door would convey better “quality” to people in the sense that quality also means “building a product to an extremely detailed specification using high quality materials.”

        Artificial alignment tools could be considered crutches, in that sense. I don’t personally care much, just pointing out the subjectivity here. You can make cars have really small panel gaps, but to what end?

        • 0 avatar
          bikegoesbaa

          Quality also means “building a product to make the best use of money and material” and if a light cheap bumper can do the work of 5# of steel then it may well be a higher quality solution.

          Buy you are correct that the bumper might be visible to the user while the weight of the door is very unlikely to be noticed.

          • 0 avatar
            ash78

            Exactly…in so much of life, there’s an innate human desire to have things that function well and amaze us at the same time. The ability to look down at something on your car, or smartphone, or appliance, and say “How did they do that?” (surprise & delight)

            The opposite is lifting up your new car’s hood to discover a prop rod (not a gas strut) and saying “I thought these disappeared in the 90s.” Or learning your iPhone still has no removable memory in its 7th generation…

            It’s a fine line and every customer base is different in their expectations.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      As for “build quality” was it really build quality or design quality?
      The manufacturing drones can only do so much with the part designs they are presented with.

      • 0 avatar
        ash78

        Great question. “Build quality” is the cliché term, but I agree it’s usually the design. To that end, true build quality almost isn’t even an issue anymore, IMO. The crappiest built car today is like a luxury car from 20 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      baggins

      We’ve got a 2014 Oddy EX. You’re right, the interior is highly spartan and built to a low cost point. But for us 45K miles without a single issue with the car. Not some huge accomplishment in today’s world, but still satisfying.

      Only paid 28.8K for it, and its worth 18-19K now, so that’s nice too.

      It’s a good tool for the job at hand.

  • avatar
    kefkafloyd

    I find the sliver of hood cut on that car very obnoxious. Design the grille or hood in such a way to eliminate that tiny sliver, it looks lazy.

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      I’ve heard other people complain when OEMs design the hood so that it mates with air or headlights/plastic/trim instead of another matching painted surface.

      They claim that this is a lazy way to get out of having proper panel fit, as it’s much easier to get a “close enough” alignment with something that’s obviously not supposed to match.

      • 0 avatar
        kefkafloyd

        It’s OK to allow to mate to a painted surface, but it should not make the front end look stupid in the process. There’s plenty of cars out there with good looking hood cuts on painted surfaces-the Mercedes C-class is a great example of a naturally integrated grille and hood cut. Otherwise, the hood should extend to the grille (or, better yet, be part of the grille).

        I mean, it’s a hood, there’s latch pressure that it’s always working against, as the latch ages it’s going to naturally generate a slightly wider gap than usual. Plus, this car’s hood already buts up against the lights, so that argument is invalid in this case.

    • 0 avatar
      ash78

      I cannot unsee this. It does look sloppy, like the grille was an afterthought.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    The small hood extension on the bumper doesn’t look like a particularly difficult shape to stamp. No crazy draw or anything. Maybe with a longer hood the engineers would have had to push the support beam forward for it to latch securely, and that would have caused other issue with alignment?

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      The plastic must be much cheaper. A decade ago, hoods in general did extend to the grille – when I saw BMW succumb to the cheap route in 2011 with F30 sporting a squarish hood and plastic creeping up to it for that “great” and nasty shutline, you knew all the other penny-pinchers would crowd on board. This Lexus is just one of the copiers. Takes you back to Detroit ’65 when the Big 3 started it – a hood with fender caps and a separate front grille and surrounds. Easy badge engineering.

      • 0 avatar
        Cactuar

        Makes sense, but it’s too bad. The smooth downward curve on the E46 and E39 cars were very nice, all done with a single metal sheet. The OEM’s can’t blame fuel economy or crash requirement for this one, looks like it’s made this way purely for cost reasons.

        • 0 avatar

          I was always impressed by the hood on the e46, and thought somewhere an engineer was happy in his heart they could stamp it that way.

          I read in a road test the change was at the suggestion of the insurance industry, as any significant pop to the front of the car meant “New Hood”. Agreed though the new ones don’t look as good, but the F30 isn’t the e46 or e90 thread is done to death. That I didn’t march out and buy an F30 after driving two, and that I bleed blue and white, says it all…

    • 0 avatar
      smartascii

      I think this actually has to do with pedestrian impact regulations. If the hood comes all the way forward, the metal edge hits first, so the plastic bit is there to soften the blow. It’s still ugly, though.

  • avatar
    alff

    Is this your way of covering for the fact that you shut the trunklid on your golf clubs while the car was under your care?

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Well, the alignment of the passenger side doors are a hot mess. That might be acceptable on a 1997 Pontiac Grand Prix, not a Japanese built Lexus.

  • avatar

    Early 80’s. NY Car Show – Columbus Circle.

    I walk around and look at all the cars. During this era, Mercedes was amazingly better built than almost anything else. You knew why it was twice the price of the fully loaded Grand Prix.

    I go to Honda, and look at the Accord. The panels are as tight as the Mercedes.

    I should have bought stock right there. Of course, I was just a kid…..and today, everything is built that way.

    Today, it is all marketing. An Altima to a 3 series is a small increase in cost of production, but the market price is double or more..

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Trouble is Honda spent all their money on those tight gaps and nothing on rustproofing. Quality in the wrong areas. Volvos had crappy panel gaps, but they rusted about 1/5th as fast. Mercedes had great panel gaps AND good rust-proofing, but you paid for that.

  • avatar
    mike978

    If you look at the chrome trim under the side windows. It is not level from the front door to the rear door.
    At least the rear lights and trunk are aligned. Ford still has issues on the Fusion with this alignment.

    • 0 avatar
      Middle-Aged Miata Man

      I like the current Fusion, but I dare anyone to find a single one since 2013 with properly-aligned doors and fenders. This wouldn’t be so egregious if there weren’t a half-dozen body lines across those panels calling attention to how poorly they match up.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    To be fair, in many cases the panels/closures are designed in such a way that it’s incredibly difficult to make them look consistently aligned. i.e. a variance of 1mm could take it from “lined up” to “WTF.” for example, I saw a couple of ’16 or ’17 Civics where the deck lid didn’t look fully closed.

    http://www.futureautoreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/2017-Honda-Civic-rear.jpg

    but because the cut line for the lid comes down in an angle it magnifies any potential variance in deck lid position. The MKZ has this problem too.

    as opposed to, say, a 2004 Civic:

    cdcssl.ibsrv.net/autodata/images/?IMG=CAB40HOC021D0113.jpg

    See how the panel cut lines for the deck lid are even with the surface? that can often tolerate a couple of mm either way and not stand out as misaligned.

    the most egregious examples were the 2003-2007 Silverado and the Caliber/Compass/Patriot. Those were the ones where the seam/cut line for the hood was on the side of the fender instead of level with the hood itself. and to keep the hood from contacting the fender when it was slammed closed (thus chipping paint) it had to be positioned in such a way that the hood never looked like it was closed properly.

    • 0 avatar
      Cactuar

      Sometimes it’s due to the use of extreme 3D curves on the panel surfaces, when designing the body. It’s very difficult to make a 3D curve appear correct from all viewing angles, especially when it’s accentuated with negative space as a panel gap is.

      When cars were simpler the major curves on the bodywork were mostly 2D with some transition fillets and that was that. Now it’s a mess of tertiary surfaces with sharp edges and panel gaps going in all axes. I *think* BMW’s flame surfacing helped create this design movement. I personally like it, but it can look awkward sometimes.

  • avatar
    Middle-Aged Miata Man

    Design/build quality peaked with 90s Toyotas and Lexuses, and it’s been sliding downhill ever since.

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    Want to see the worst panel gaps in the industry. Go look at a GMC Yukon or Chevy Tahoe.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Nope, new Civic has the biggest!

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I somehow entirely neglected to pay attention to this on the Yukon SLT rental I was just in (see my gushing above), and I wish I had. I will say the paint quality looked excellent compared to the orange-peel heavy stuff I’m seeing a lot of elsewhere on many newer cars (Chryslers in particular).

  • avatar
    raph

    Yeah not gonna even try and defend Ford, they seem have the worst standard in the industry! I swear the crazy eyed dude in the bomber cap & goggles must be the QA guy at the end of the assembly line.

    Love my S550 Mustang but I wouldn’t have had any problem paying an extra 500 bucks for 2nd place in the panel gap contest.

  • avatar
    KOKing

    I don’t know exactly what’s to blame, but various panel/trim gaps on my UK-built F55 Mini are pretty garbage. They’re akin to what I’d expect on a mainstream domestic compact, not a ‘premium’ brand.

  • avatar
    NMGOM

    TTAC: “Enough With the Negatives: What Do the Auto Industry’s Good Panel Gaps Look Like?”

    Who in America really gives a sh-t?
    Does it leak? No? Fine.
    Does it make wind noise? No? Fine.
    Does it open and close properly? Yes? Fine.
    Is the vehicle otherwise well made, reasonably attractive, functional, and reliable? Yes? Fine.

    We’re done.

    Maybe Yurp’s, Aussies, and Canadians have a different view. I frankly don’t care…

    ==========================

  • avatar
    s_a_p

    I had a 2014 Audi A4. The metal creases and panel gaps were freaking perfect. In fact the entire car was totally reliable. I have only one complaint about that car. Routine maintenance costs 4 figures. Sorry but for a 45k car I don’t want to spend a 10th of the sticker price for maintenance.

    Call me a glutton for punishment but I bought a 2015 grand Cherokee Srt and after 26k miles I’ve spent damn near nothing to maintain it. It has also been super reliable. So take that FCA naysayers.

  • avatar
    ganong

    My wife recently switched from a 2013 Lexus ES to a 2017 lime green Hellcat Charger. The other cars in the house include a 2016 GX and 2015 STi(my daily driver). The Dodge has good panel gaps and but does not feel like assembled by plastic surgeons who did not have any fun in college which the lexuses(?Lexi) do/did. This is our first FCA product ever and she choose it over a new C63AMG S, GS-F and a used M5.
    All I am saying is even if the gaps are not plastic surgeon perfect, there can still be great cars.

  • avatar
    darex

    Had a 1st gen Cruze as a rental once. Huge panel gaps inside and out. The dash panels were SHOCKINGLY misaligned. I took pictures, they were so bad!

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    If we’re going to go down the road of throwback car reviews – like the great days of the Jalopnik comment section, where a 13 year old could tell us he hated a car because, when he sat in the back seat at the auto show, he didn’t enjoy the sensation of the simulacrum surface on his bare skin – could you also smash yourself against the hard- and soft-touch plastics? You can use an elbow; that would probably suffice versus a more tender organ, but I don’t know if you’ll be able to tell us if the surface grain texture really does it for you.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Panel gaps are more noticeable on the outside on vehicles with exterior trims. The pictures of the 2015 Ford Edge Titanium in the TTAC posting with the uneven trim magnified the gaps. The Edge would look much better without the chrome trim especially the trim around the windows. Some of the vehicles have added creases that make gaps more noticeable. I don’t mind the gaps as much as the uneven gaps. Simpler designs with cleaner less complex lines look much better with gaps being less noticeable.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    I’m a day late and a dollar short for this commentary, as my Father used to say. He was of the mind that a good pre-delivery inspection always involved panel and door adjustment. He had me doing it at 12 years old at the family Chrysler-AMC store, circa late 50’s to early 70’s. These were not halcyon years for quality, so doing eight hours wasn’t unheard of. Why wouldn’t today’s dealers be held to the same standard? I am sure there is some reimbursement. I guess this is another dead horse I am beating.

    • 0 avatar
      White Shadow

      The last thing I want is for some dealeship monkey to loosen and adjust the bodywork on my new car. This should be done at the assembly factory as part of the QC process.

    • 0 avatar
      BuzzDog

      Back in those days, I’ve heard and seen that the margin on a new car was much higher than it is today, so the dealer could afford to pay someone to adjust doors and panels, for four to eight hours per car.

      These days, I’m not sure how much one could adjust fenders and quarter panels, since they’re welded on.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        “These days, I’m not sure how much one could adjust fenders and quarter panels, since they’re welded on.”

        Front fenders/hood/doors/hatch can all be adjusted on just about any car that I can think of.

        • 0 avatar
          BuzzDog

          Except that I purposely didn’t mention the hood, doors and hatch – you did. Those are, of course, adjustable.

          Back in the days that olddavid is referring to, it wasn’t unheard of for cars to have the rear quarter panels bolted on. And I have seen more than a few front fenders that are welded on. Sure, you can adjust them, at considerable effort.

  • avatar
    Aquineas

    This is very much a big deal to me. I notice uneven panel gaps on cars all the time (and some cars which definitely shouldn’t have any). I do judge the rest of the car by it. My feeling is, if this was missed in the inspection line or if nobody at the factory cared about uneven panel gaps, what else did they not bother with?

    • 0 avatar
      White Shadow

      I agree completely. That said, I own a 2017 Jeep and a 2016 Audi. The Jeep panel gaps and trim are a mess. The Audi looks like it was machined out of a block of steel.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    Having owned a body shop for several years I will say this; many people don’t even notice such things (including paint mismatch between bumper and body) until they have their first accident, and then want to critique the entire repair job. I always wondered why they did not care or notice on a $30k purchase but suddenly were hugely concerned on a $500 bumper replacement.

    I remember the earlier Malibus (2012 maybe) had horrible alignment issues up front, there was a clumsy hood/bumper/fender interface.

  • avatar
    Commando

    Or
    “… does that right-side taillamp’s trunklid portion appear a nanometer higher than it is on the rear fender?”

    Is that the best you can do? Seriously???
    Such hard hitting automotive journalism.

    More Fake News from the Millennial saturated web bloggers.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Where are all you crab apples coming from? If TTAC founder Robert Farago were still here, he’d tell you, “If you don’t like the selection, go to another candy store”, or something like that. (LOL) Seriously, Farago and a couple other former editors have their own web sites. Maybe you should go look for them. We’ll wait.

  • avatar
    baconator

    Right now, Porsche has notably great build quality. Lately I’ve driven a 911 GT3 and a base Cayman, and ridden in two Macans and a Cayenne. All of these had notably even panel gaps and interior pieces that lined up at a ‘how did they do that?’ level. I’m lukewarm about their current lineup, but the level of fit and finish definitely soothes my OCD.

  • avatar
    ser_suress

    well in here (indonesia) people only care about reliability,functionality on car,they dont even care about part quality or even panel gaps


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