By on August 18, 2017

Karen Radley Acura screenshot - Image: Karen Radley Acura websiteIt made perfect sense. In 2009, when Hyundai wanted customers to view its new Genesis luxury sedan as a premium bit of kit, Hyundai did not compare the Genesis to the Sonata. In an early marketing campaign, Hyundai’s voiceover said the Genesis is “as spacious as a Mercedes-Benz S-Class, yet priced like a C-Class.”

When the time came to market the Genesis R-Spec, Hyundai reached way upmarket to compare 0-60 mph times with the Porsche Panamera. Hyundai wasn’t under the mistaken impression that the Genesis would steal thousands of sales from $100,000 Benzes and Porsches. But Hyundai was crafting an image. Hyundai didn’t require you to believe that the Genesis was a viable S-Class alternative — the company just wanted you to understand that this is premium-oriented S-Class-sized sedan at a C-Class-like price.

Long before the Hyundai Genesis tried to cultivate a premium persona, Acura was failing to keep up with Lexus in the quest to be viewed as a true luxury rival for the German establishment. It’s still a problem. So Acura dealers are now just trying to make sure you understand that the Acura TLX is better than the Audi A4 Lexus ES Infiniti Q50 2018 Honda Accord.

It’s not as though the suggestion’s so outlandish. Sharing a foundation with the departing ninth-generation Accord and built at the same Marysville, Ohio, assembly plant, there’s much that unites the duo.

Moreover, it’s not as though the suggestion has never been made before. Consumer Reports discussed the merits of a basic TLX and a loaded Accord in early 2015, pointing to the Accord V6’s quickness but the TLX’s all-wheel drive.

It’s also a question commonly asked by users at DriveAccord and TLXForums, as well. Accord fans wonder whether the facelifted 2018 Acura TLX could lure other Accord lovers away from the new Honda; TLX drivers wonder about the loss of the Honda Accord’s now discontinued V6.

It makes sense to draw comparisons between the TLX and Accord. Critics do. Consumers do. But should Acura?

Its dealers do.

Karen Radley Acura in Woodbridge, Virginia, wants to help you figure whether you should purchase a 2018 Acura TLX or a 2018 Honda Accord. Shockingly, Karen Radley Acura prefers “the sporty styling of the TLX,” the dealer’s website says. As if to clarify the degree to which Karen Radley Acura is biased, the split image shows the facelifted 2018 TLX but the outgoing 2017 Accord.Sunnyside Acura TLX Accord screenshot - Image: Sunnyside Acura screenshotAt Sunnyside Acura in Nashua, New Hampshire, the dealer’s website gives the redesigned Accord no purchase. “Honda is the parent company behind luxury brand Acura, so it should come as no surprise that both the 2018 Acura TLX A-Spec and 2017 Honda Touring offer something special,” Sunnyside writes. That’s right: new TLX, old Accord.

First Acura in Seekonk, Massachusetts, adopts the same approach, but flubs its 2018 TLX imaging, showcasing the older car instead. “In more ways than one, the 2018 Acura TLX marks itself as a leader in the world of the mid-size sedan,” First Acura says. “This is especially true when it’s compared with both its luxury and non-luxury competitors.” How it’s true, but then especially true, when the TLX comparison shifts from all midsize sedans to, er, all midsize sedans is an unknown that will likely never be known. But the midsize sedan with which First Acura compares the 2018 TLX? The 2017 Honda Accord, of course.First Acura Seekonk - Image: First Acura screenshotAcura dealers in Woodbridge, Nashua, and Seekonk surely encounter buyers who cross-shop the TLX and Accord. In fact, we’d argue that it’s wise for potential Acura buyers to drive a 2018 Accord back-to-back with a TLX. But these are the very kind of comparisons that loudly announce to the world that Acura still can’t be taken seriously as a premium brand.

It’s as if Cadillac’s Escalade commercials drew attention to the quality of a GMC Yukon but suggest that you might prefer the Escalade’s premium ambience. Imagine Lamborghini, in a fit of transparency, showcasing just how comparable Audi R8 and Lamborghini Huracán performance specs were before declaring differences such as steering wheel material and seat adjustability.

Dealers, of course, sometimes have objectives that don’t entirely line up with their respective automakers. And a handful of Acura stores won’t be the last outlets to publish unflattering relationships. But for a brand that’s already seen the plebeian 2018 Accord leapfrog its products in terms of technology, Acura doesn’t need anybody to highlight just how much of a Honda its midsize sedan truly is.

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

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78 Comments on “Which Acura TLX Competitor Scares Acura Dealers? Apparently, the 2018 Honda Accord...”


  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    It’s kind of sad to see dealers of a premium brand resorting to pointing out 20hp differences between their sports sedan and the mainstream family car.

    “both the 2018 Acura TLX A-Spec and the 2017 Honda Accord Touring have plenty of pep in their step…accelerating and decelerating as smooth as butta”

    Who the hell is walking into Acura showrooms nowadays if this is how a dealership reaches out to clientele? Of course, it is NH so they may as well spell it the way it’s pronounced. Nashua, incidentally, was originally spelled and prounounced Nashuer.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      It’s hard to fault the dealers when they get no help from the manufacturer. Honda can’t even name the Acura models, giving them the useless alpha-numerics other idiots use, when they used to have the Legend, Integra, and Vigor. The lack of any differentiation other than sheet metal doesn’t help.

      They totally miss the achilles heel of the German lux makers: expensive parts, maintenance, and repair. How about advertising they’re as fun to drive as the Germans’ but will be still on the road when those other cars are in the shop for their $800 “tuneups”?

      • 0 avatar

        I think the Vigor was interesting, but not great.
        Sort of like the Infiniti J30.

        • 0 avatar
          stuntmonkey

          > I think the Vigor was interesting, but not great. Sort of like the Infiniti J30.

          In looks and experience, it was like a bigger version of the 2nd-gen Integra sedan. Great in concept, competent but not ‘legendary.’ I’m of the opinion that anybody who remembers the Vigor as an exceptional car never actually drove it.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            It was more a cut-down 2nd-gen Legend, with the Legend’s weird layout, but without its great build and material quality.

            I have a 2nd-gen Legend. The layout makes it unusually nice to drive for a FWD car, but then again it doesn’t have the usual packaging advantages of FWD.

  • avatar
    ash78

    Can’t they just look at what Toyota has done with the ES vs the Camry for 20+ years? It seems to be working for them pretty well, since both of those cars are everywhere and I rarely hear the comparison made. And honestly a lot of differences in “feel” are hard to put down on a spec sheet.

    I almost feel like the best course of action is to not engage in this “anti-cannibalism” exercise at all. Pretty soon every Bentley dealer will have spec sheets for a train (which I could also afford).

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      “Can’t they just look at what Toyota has done with the ES vs the Camry for 20+ years?”

      Except since 2013, the ES is a gussied up Avalon–not a Camry.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The ES is just an RLX w/o available AWD, a cheaper interior and priced like a compact instead of a mid-sizer.

      A lot of buyers in non-snow belt states don’t need AWD and are accepting of a lesser interior for $16K+ in savings.

      Aside from insipid styling, what has really hurt RLX sales has been Acura’s deluded pricing – pricing the RLX many thousands above the Cadillac XTS and Lincoln Continental (both of which have gotten better reviews).

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    ROFL

    I have been saying this for years.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    What’s next, Buick Dealers talking out full page ads to tell you why the Lacrosse is superior to the Impala?

  • avatar

    These are hilarious, and I highly recommend reading each specifically to note the grammar.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Seems disingenuous to compare the 2018 TLX against 2017 Accord except that the 2018 Accord isn’t really available yet.

    Acura has AWD and the V6. Honda has a better looking all new Accord and offers manuals. I noticed that recent TTAC articles tout Infiniti’s sales success this year but Infiniti does it, like Nissan, w/ discounting and Infiniti leads the pack in brutal depreciation. Infiniti is a discount luxury brand.

    The Accord is more important to Honda and that’s where I’d go especially since I use dedicated snows.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Same thing happened in reverse in Europe, when Skoda dealers started advertising that the new Skoda models shared the same chassis and drivetrain as more expensive VWs and Audis. Drove VW management nuts as they tried to discourage the practice, but you can’t blame the dealers they just want to move the cars they are told to sell by the manufacturer who doesn’t always put as much effort into brand differentiation as they should.

  • avatar
    dwford

    All of the mainstream automakers have this problem. With tech options being cheap to deploy, the differentiating options between the regular car and the luxury branded car (which are built on the same platform and use many of the same mechanicals), it makes less and less sense for people to spend the extra money. For brands like Acura, Lincoln, Buick, the prestige just isn’t there to command the extra money for what is, in reality, a tarted up mid priced model. At least Cadillac has it’s own RWD chassis, as does Infiniti and Lexus. So there is more differentiation.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      These 11 Cars Embarrassingly Lose Half Their Value in Three Years
      https://www.thestreet.com/slideshow/14247792/1/these-cars-lose-half-their-value-in-three-years.html

      Cadillac is actually the worst w/ depreciation, one of the few worse than Infiniti.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Maybe my memory if off, but isn’t ISeeCars.com (who this link cites) Doug DeMuro’s?

      • 0 avatar
        Coopdeville

        I thought the industry average was like 54% depreciation in 3 years. Have the numbers changed or is this clickbait?

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          The difference between worst and first really isn’t much. And it’s probably nothing if you look at ATP rather than MSRP. The cars that are the depreciation queens in a class are also the ones that get the most money on the hood, as a general rule.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Residual value is calculated from MSRP and not ATP – so, doesn’t take into account the “savings” a buyer can get up front at initial purchase.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Exactly my point. Depreciation figures are largely meaningless for that reason. The cars with the big depreciation numbers are typically discounted the most too. The cars with the best depreciation are generally those that are not discounted as much.

            It’s yet another case where the difference from worst to first is largely meaningless.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Yeah, was agreeing with ya.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Most cars only have 60% residuals at 3-years mark. Unlike Acura or Lexus, Cadillac and Buick are well discounted with around $10,000 on the hood depending on model. That $10K on a $50K car is 20%. A wise buyer is laughing to the bank buying at that discount.

        Besides those residuals are established by the banks, not car people. So someone is making a killing.

      • 0 avatar
        arach

        @Thornmark –

        That is a BS Article. It compares MSRP to Value after 3 years.

        Why is this BS? BMW for example, lists 48% depreciation in 3 years, with an average price of 33,474. However, BMW barely discounts its vehicles.

        On the contrary, no one would walk into a Cadillac dealership and pay ANYTHING CLOSE to MSRP, because MSRP is a known inflated number on domestics.

        The Cadillac CTS then lists 51.4% depreciation in 3 years, with an average price of $27,537.

        For 2013, The BMW MSRP is $47,800 while the Cadillac CTS is $39,095

        I used 2013 numbers because in order to get the 3 year depreciation, you’d have to compare 2013 sales to 2017 resales.

        The math changes when you compare average transaction prices. Cadillac’s non-negotiation list price is 5-10% below MSRP (before negotiation), which accounts for about 20% of its supposed depreciation.

        Then the BMW 5 series on the contrary, doesn’t discount the vehicle averages only 2% discount.

        When coupling actual transaction prices, the cadillac only depreciates 38.4% below its new sales price while the BMW depreciates a whopping 45%.

        Food for thought.

    • 0 avatar
      Compaq Deskpro

      I’m surprised to Doug and watch his stuff the day it hits. He’s both entertaining and educational. I’ve always thought 2000’s era Maserati Quattroporte’s were stunning gorgeous luxury cars, I didn’t know they were actually terrible.

      • 0 avatar

        That’s the video I watched. The hyper, spazzy nature is more than I can bear.

        “Here’s how a $20,000 Maserati Quattroporte can make you look rich”

        I expect more than that from auto journalism. I expect more than extolling the virtue of perceived wealth based upon Burger King drive-thru employees.

        • 0 avatar
          maui_zaui

          I actually like his videos too and enjoy the low-budget format. His stuff is mostly entertainment for me, especially since he covers cars most people have forgotten about (e.g. the Quattroporte). His videos about warranty repairs on the Carmax Range Rover were probably my favorite. If I want detailed car reviews, then I’ll hit up Alex Dyke’s Youtube channel.

        • 0 avatar
          Cactuar

          Auto journalism? He’s an entertainer. Adjust your expectations, turn off brain and watch away. Just like Top Gear.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          You are making the mistake of thinking that Doug DeMuro is a journalist. He is not, he is an entertainer. He’s just a comedian who likes cars. Even the “buff books” as Jack likes to call them, are 90% entertainment and 10% journalism on a good day. This site might rise to 50/50, but it is mostly the commentary that is entertaining…

          Personally, I think DeMuro is just an idiot, but a lot of people do seem to find him funny.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        2009 and later Quattroportes were much better than the earlier ones.

        I personally don’t find Doug educational or entertaining.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Later Quattroportes get some interior bits from the Chrysler/Dodge parts bin.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I know this not an example of badge engineering, but if you look at the side by side, it looks pretty close.

    The marque made sense in its inception, JDM spec in North America, but now Honda seems to have moved much of its R&D to North America and what’s JDM today seems to be what comes out of this market.

    If Honda is not going to really try, then fold Acura; the brand has simply become a Legend.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Except if you want AWD and a naturally asperated V6.

  • avatar
    Coopdeville

    These feel like dealer attempts to sort out their customers before they come through the door; a result of salespeople getting fed up with the quality of their ups and demanding management do something about it.

    Chad Getslaidalot walks on the lot, knows nothing about cars nor does he care, but thinks Acuras look slightly cooler than BMWs. He couldn’t be bothered to do any real research. His friend said something about how Acuras are just Hondas, and so he asks “Are Acura and Honda related? Why are Acuras better than Hondas?” He checks his tinder matches eight times on his iPhone 12 during the answer. Boom, sale.

    Mark Asperger* walks onto the lot with 7 spreadsheets downloaded into his android device which detail the metallurgical and engineering processes involved in the production of the Accord’s and TLX’s sheet metal. Asks the suddenly incredibly weary salesperson, “Do you want to try to explain to me why Honda thinks they can charge so much more for the TLX when they mass produce the sheet metal in the same factory in Timbuktu and only separate the process after stamping in Wichita? Will you explain in-depth the engineering differences between the two vehicles that substantiate this price difference? Because let me tell you, I think Honda is just overcharging for a fancier version of the Accord and only stupid people pay more. Now tell me why I want to buy the Acura or I’m leaving, and no you can’t have my name or information for your database so that you can sell it to robocallers.” Weary salesperson stomps in to management and demands something be done about these people.

    *Names, vehicles, and details have been changed, but this is based on real events.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    It really only makes sense to buy the Acura over the Honda in a couple scenarios:

    1. You are buying something you can’t get in a Honda (AWD, V6) and really want.

    2. You really want the Acura experience for things like loaner cars and (very very slightly) better dealer ambiance and longer warranty.

    Otherwise I can’t in good faith say it makes sense to buy a TLX.

    It does make my OCD itch when people compare a stripped Accord Sport with an AWD Advance TLX and say the Accord is better, though; people who want all the stuff in a loaded TLX aren’t going to be happy in a stripped Accord and vice versa.

    • 0 avatar
      bking12762

      S2K-#3. If you want a transmission with a cog…

    • 0 avatar
      dmoan

      Here are my reasons:

      1. It is cheaper to lease Acura/Lexus (in same cases) than mid-high end trims of Toyota/Nissan/Honda because of higher residual values. For example for me mid-high end CRV cost way more to lease than similarly equipped RDX and not to mention latter has V-6.
      2. Honda dealerships typically seem little more sleazy in my area compared to Acura dealerships which had far better customer experience.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I think the TLX looks a good bit better than the last Accord, and worlds better than the new one. I can’t own a car I don’t enjoy looking at, so it would have to be the TLX or nothing.

      As closely related as these cars are I think their markets don’t overlap…. just like the markets for the highest selling luxury car (Lexus ES) don’t really overlap with that of its progenitor. Someone who wants something nicer than an Accord but doesn’t want to spend $60K for a midsize sedan with heated seats and Bluetooth is the target market.

  • avatar
    matt3319

    I would choose the Accord Touring over the TLX hands down.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I still like the TLX more than the Accord… especially the 2018. But I’m curious to sees what people think would help that doesn’t involve a RWD platform actual buyers couldn’t care less about.

    The 1g Genesis sedan imparted a sense of occasion that was intoxicating. Drive wheels were irrelevant. Acura needs to capture that in a bottle. Less tech, more insulation, high quality materials and focus on design. They need a Continental, not an ATS

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Really, you thought the 1st Gen Genesis felt special? How? Serious question.

      Having had a dozen or so as rentals (Hertz had truckloads of them), they just seemed incredibly cheap to me. Like it was perfectly obvious why they cost so little. I feel the same way about Infiniti’s too. Discount knock-off luxury. The auto equivalent of a fake Gucci bag. Lexus at least feel like they are worth the price, I just don’t care for what they are selling (same with Audi, actually). Toyota and Audi managed to do their luxury lines correctly.

      I’ve never gotten the point of the TLX – it looks like an Accord, and it drives like an Accord. When it was the TL it literally WAS an Accord, just the one the rest of the world got. They should just sell the Accord with a V6 and AWD for the idiots who feel they “need” such and call it a day. The rest of the Acura sedan line is even more pointless.

      Lexus seems to have the semi-premium mushmobile luxury sedan market sewn up. Most of the buyers for that sort of thing have died off.

      • 0 avatar
        Sketch

        The TL was always a US Accord. It was the TSX that was a rest-of-the-world Accord.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Genesis definitely felt more special than a similarly priced 3 series. The interior materials were better, the design was better, the refinement levels were significantly better. Within the span of about 1 month, my wife and I drove an E60, F30, the aforementioned Genesis, and my G37. Of the 4 cars, my automotive civilian wife said the Genesis was the most luxurious by far. I think the age of the E60 dinged it, but I think the Genesis convincingly edged it. Only real let down was the cheapo infotainment graphics.

        Now I imagine a current 5 or E class would trounce it, but those cost 1.5-2x as much similarly equipped.

        Not sure why someone who “needs” an Accord with a V6 + AWD is an idiot, but someone who “wants” something like an M235i is…. well, you, who I presume isn’t an idiot? What’s wrong with not wanting to spend $50-60K to get a quasi luxury experience and equipment that’s standard in a Civic EX-L?

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          I suspect the difference in our opinions is that you are looking at toys and space per dollar, and I care far more about how it drives, with not much need for lounge space and I don’t care about toys. I find both generations of Genesis to be nothing special to drive at all – the ride and handling are very unresolved. Just a big floaty boat of a thing. I’d never compare one to a 3-series, just a completely different sort of car. It’s like a Korean Buick or a really bad Lexus.

          Interestingly, this weeks rentals were a new A4 in Denver thanks to SilverCar, and now a Hertz Q50 in Charlotte for the weekend – in Columbia SC for the eclipse with a friend. The A4 is a really nice car, but Audi’s ergonomics and I just don’t get along at all. That shifter needs to be banned, at least twice muscle memory had me do the normal thing to put an automatic in park, which puts this in reverse. Foot off the brake and it starts backing up! At least you can still get one with a stick. And Android Auto with MMI is a disaster. The built-in NAV s fine, but I would just as soon use my familiar phone. I really find the A4, 3-series, and C-class to all be great cars overall. I just like the way BMW fits me the best of the three.

          The Q50 is just a little odd. The steering is just as bad as the reviews say – light and not accurate, kind of all over the place. But it does get better the faster you go. It is weirdly narrow. Skinny console and I still feel super cramped, my shoulder is hard into the B-pillar. Nowhere to put anything, which is something I rarely complain about. I must say the new Nissan V6 sounds good! I hated the old one. But it sure doesn’t feel like 300hp – this is badged 3.0t so I assume that is what it has. The ergonomics are also a hot mess of multiple terrible touch UIs and a twiddle knob too. And super aggravatingly, the displays don’t go dark enough at night, and if you choose display off, the lower console display goes dark completely, but the giant upper one’s backlight stays on! The ride is flinty and thumpy. I think my knock-off Gucci purse analogy still stands compared to the Germans – Nissan just doesn’t sweat the details in the same way. It’s nice enough for the price, and not bad, but it isn’t great either.

          • 0 avatar

            @krhodes

            There’s no way to check (that I know of) but the active Digital Suspension option on the Q50 and Q60 absolutely makes a difference in the ride.

            Q50 400 RS with that suspension, I found rode nicely and handled bumps with ease.

            Q60 base model 2.0t rode like absolute crap. The Digital Suspension is not available on that model.

          • 0 avatar

            I guess I got lucky with my early production Q50 rental. Hydraulic Steering and nice v6. Only the lack of seat memory was an issue, but that was a fake upsell-likewise the huge nav screen, almost wasted if you didn’t have nav…but the car was pretty good.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            The V6 was nice enough, it just didn’t feel like 300hp to me. It went well enough once it got going, and it sounded MUCH better than the V6 in the old G-cars. The steering was pretty awful until you got up to 75 or so, then it was OK. My main complaint inside is that it is too busy. Too many screens and different materials. Very Tokyo-by-night. It certainly wasn’t a bad car at all, but the Audi A4 I had turned in that morning was a whole lot nicer for actually less money (at MSRP anyway). Even if the 2.0T doesn’t sound as nice as the V6 (I could not care less, turn the stereo up a notch). The gas mileage of the Infiniti did not impress – 24mpg going down at 75mph or so. The Audi did over 30 at higher speeds even with AWD. Going back was a stop and go nightmare, 4hrs+ to make 101 miles. Nearly missed our flights.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          As for V6 AWD Accords. I don’t see the point in sticking a big engine in a car that just is not intended to be sporting in any way at all. An Accord is meant to be a comfortable, relatively inexpensive family car. Start ladling in the crap and you are soon within spitting distance of much nicer cars. My feelings on AWD are pretty well known here – pointless in something used exclusively on pavement, until you get to the point that you need it to get the power to the ground, in which case my solution would be less power.

          An M235i is an unapologetically impractical sporting coupe. It is exactly what it is with no pretense of being anything else. Basically, a German Mustang. A fun toy and nothing more. Once mine had to work for a living it got traded in on a GTI, which is fun AND practical. A great third car, a lousy only car.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Buyers DO care about which wheels drive the vehicle.

      Hence, the FWD-drive sedans being priced ONE (RLX, XTS, Continental, S90), if not TWO (ES) segments down.

      • 0 avatar

        Agreed. RWD always moves me a tick up. All other things being equal, the RWD will take over FWD. AWD is a car dependent choice. Engine in front, driving rear wheels. Maybe I’m old, but no one really applauded when the FWD cars became mainstream.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          I agree with this very much. I long said that I drove Saabs because they were 80% as good as BMWs for a lot lower price (new and even more so used). But if you can swing the extra that last 20% is totally worth it.

          I wouldn’t want a RWD non-sporting smaller car though. FWD just pays too many dividends in space efficiency and price. Just don’t try to put too much power through those front wheels and it is all good. A RWD Camry would be even worse.

  • avatar
    Tennessee_Speed

    In 1990 & 1991 I bought two Acura Legends, one each for my wife and I. In this time period there was a tremendous difference between the Legend and the Accord. Different chassis, engines, transmissions, unibody, suspensions, etc. The cars were premium, almost to the level of Lexus at the time. Then parent Honda decided to save a lot of development money and use many common structural features for the Acura (then TL) with the Accord.
    Acura has to spend the funds to create a completely different vehicle from the Accord to be successful. An advanced form of badge engineering will not lead to a successful Acura return to sales improvements.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      “In 1990 & 1991 I bought two Acura Legends, one each for my wife and I.”

      “…my wife and me.” Not “my wife and I”.

      Consider: “I bought two Legends, one for my wife and one for me.”

      Me. It happened to my wife and me.

      On the other hand, “my wife and I bought Legends.” I bought. Not “me bought”.

      Also consider: “she bought a Legend for me.” Or “she bought me a Legend.” Notice that it’s not “she bought a Legend for I.”

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Although it may be grammatically correct “Wife and me” does not flow well, I could see why he chose it. I may have said “myself and wife” or some variation.

        • 0 avatar
          White Shadow

          That’s only because we hear it said wrong so often. The worst thing is when you hear people on reality TV say, “…it was John and I’s favorite restaurant.”

          I gotta stop watching reality TV before I turn into an idiot. It might already be too late.

  • avatar
    Wardak75

    The manufacturer has no one but themselves to blame. For years they sold the same north American Acura Integra under the badge of Honda in Europe. Unlike Nissan/Infinity and Toyota/Lexus, Honda really failed to indistinguishably separate the two brands.

  • avatar

    I lived through the era. Acura had the potential to be a BMW with reliability. The honda name, history. The first Integras. The next thing they needed was a real RWD platform….

    Never saw it, still MIA 20 years later, and guys who wear Leisure Suits do the design, and Marketing is done by the guys passed over by Mercedes and the Big 2. Or is it the other way around ?

    RWD sport sedan with AWD variant.
    Small sports car. Think Miata. I hear they did this once……
    A top shelf sports car, a company your size is expected to. VW, etc has like a hundred of them. You did this once, and I have seen two NSX new gen, one on the street, one at a dealer for highest bid. Good, now the one UNDER 120k.

    So sad to see Honda “miss it by this much”.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    I don’t know why anyone buys the TLX. The interior materials and design are worst in class. The infotainment system is worst in class. The driving experience is thoroughly mediocre and bland. The styling is completely blah.

    BUT BUT BUT… reliability!!!!!! Somebody hasn’t been paying attention lately. Acura’s reliability is now just as crappy as every other aspect of its cars. Audi, yes AUDI stomps Acura into the ground on reliability, and they’ve been doing it for years. It’s not a “fluke.” Acuras are no longer especially reliable, they’re now thoroughly average, slightly worse than BMW. Yes, you read that correctly. So the reasons to buy an Acura went form 1 to 0.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Acura is pitiful.

      Pitiful is an understatement.

      I’d rank Acura as the most deeply fallen of any auto brand in terms of the merits of their vehicles relative to what they used to be, in lack of differentiation from kissing cousin Honda (which, sadly, has also taken a tumble jn terms of its #1 calling card, reliability, in recent years), and in just having blase, overpriced, vanilla vehicles having fewest redeeming virtues at their price point.

  • avatar
    bd2

    The upcoming Genesis G70 and Kia Stinger should be giving Acura a lot of concern when it comes to the TLX.

    For about the same price, can get RWD/AWD, option for more power and better handling.

    Upon launch of the RLX, Acura touted it as having 7 Series-like rear passenger space for the price of a 5 Series.


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