By on June 6, 2017

2017 Mazda 3 5-door – Image: Mazda

About three weeks ago, my Question Of The Day focused on public statements about Mazda’s future plans. The statements came from the CEO of Mazda North America, as reported in an article by Tim Cain. Many of you responded and agreed with the assertions and opinions I put forth, while some were brave enough to disagree. By and large, it was a fairly productive conversation, with over 150 replies in the comments.

Now that some time has passed and the comments have largely ceased, I can fulfill a request made by commenter slow_poke: a summation of your top recommendations, in our first Mazda QOTD FU (follow-up). Let’s see what you had to say.

We’re going to breeze past the opinions I put forth in the QOTD article to focus solely on your suggestions. Below are the most popular suggestions, per my very scientific methodology: I reviewed all comments on the article and counted the mentions of each general suggestion. Each suggestion mention counted as a point, as did any supporting comment that replied to the base comment. Below are the results, reflecting any suggestion with four or more points.

Without further ado, here are your six ideas to Make Mazda Great Again.

2016 Mazda CX-9 2.5-liter SkyActiv Turbo Engine, Image: Mazda

Winner: Upmarket turbo 4-cylinder, 15 points

The people of TTAC believe Mazdas are down on power and engine options. The most common suggestion is to add the 2.5T engine from the CX-9 across the line, especially to the 6 sedan.

Picoscope NVH diagnosis tool, Image: Twitter

Second place: NVH fixes, 9 points

Responses indicate that while Mazda has addressed some of its NVH issues since 2016, offerings are still not class competitive with the likes of Hyundai, Kia, and other Japanese manufacturers.

Cory Fairbanks Mazda Dealership

Third place: Dealer quality, 8 points

TTAC readers would suggest a flight to quality is necessary for the dealers. Bad service experiences, sleazy salespeople, and aggressive tactics in the F&I office were all mentioned. Nothing drives a potential customer away faster than a poor dealer.

Mazda Retail Revolution Center. (09/29/05)

Fourth place: Dealer quantity, 8 points

It would appear Mazda needs to increase its dealership coverage if its to increase market share. There are large geographical areas not covered by the current Mazda dealer network, which is another great way to lose sales. You can’t buy a car if there’s nobody to sell it to you.

Mazda BT-50, Image: Mazda Australia

Honorable mention: Compact truck, 4 points

A few people would like to see the global Mazda BT-50 truck make its way to North America, and go up against the established names in the market.

Mazda In Abandoned Dealership in Switzerland

Honorable mention: Don’t bother, 4 points

Some believe Mazda is destined to stay a bit player in North America. Comments indicated there’s no point in attempting a larger share of the North American market: competition is too high on these shores, and Mazda’s bread and butter is sales in other places.

The rest of the responses did not warrant inclusion, as they were too few and far between. But there you have it, exactly what TTAC readers think Mazda should do to earn their votes.

[Image via Mazda, Twitter, Imgur]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

74 Comments on “QOTD FU: Your Suggestions for the Future of Mazda...”


  • avatar
    FreedMike

    No one mentioned the crappy Chase lease program?

    That’s the *only* reason a 3 didn’t end up in my parking slot last year.

    (And I agree 100% on the engine point, but for the record, I shopped two Mazda stores here in Denver, and both were decent to work with.)

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      What’s so crappy about it?

      • 0 avatar
        noorct

        Wildly noncompetitive lease rates.
        Chase is part of the problem (no captive bank means no depressing money factor to move metal).
        Residual is another problem (5-15 pts off Honda or Toyota for equivalent vehicles over 3/36k leases)

        Having been in the market recently, the 3 was about $50-100 a month off a civic for similar trims (on a lease of 150-250 a month), off by a little more than that on Accord vs. 6 and off by $200 a month on Pilot vs. CX-9. You really have to want the car to commit to that.

        It’s not as glaring if you’re going to buy and hold for a decade. But I’d still argue residual matters because life happens (what if you need to sell it?). I’d rather be right side up in year 2 than not…

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          This.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          They can’t discount themselves into greatness like Toyondassan

        • 0 avatar
          SPPPP

          If you want to fix the lease rates, be part of the solution. Start talking up Mazda and writing hit pieces against the Honda Civic and Toyota Corolla. Once people don’t want to pay near-new prices for an average quality used Civic, the lease rates for those cars will increase. And then there will be parity.

          • 0 avatar
            Detroit-Iron

            @SPPPP

            I like the Miata as much as the next Jalopnik commenter, but why would that be anyone other than a Mazda fiduciary’s responsibility? I don’t have a sticker of Calvin pissing on anyone, the car builders are big boys, if they can’t take care of their brand then they were not long for this world anyway.

          • 0 avatar
            SPPPP

            @Detroit-Iron:

            No, it’s not really our responsibility, nor is it something we can fix. My point is that it’s not necessarily something Mazda can even fix.

            A big reason that Toyotas and Hondas are cheap to lease is that many people really like to buy used Toyotas and Hondas, and are willing to pay extra for them. So the off-lease cars have more value, and the makers can cut lease prices to get more market share.

            It’s easy to say you want better brand image, but people have their preferences and opinions, and they aren’t always easy to change.

        • 0 avatar
          Lex

          So much This. My gf was in the market following the end of her lease on a 3 and the offers were nuts. The rates for a new one were so silly, it was appalling. How bad? Enough for a lifelong Mazda fanatic to quit the brand entirely and jump into a better spec’d Civic touring. They need to get their collective heads out of their rear bits.

          After this trip, it was very very clear why the brand as a whole had stagnated. What use is a great driver experience without a comparable service to sell you the car

    • 0 avatar
      tallguy130

      Yep, this is a major reason I’m not in one now.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Follow-up wasn’t the first thing that came to mind when I read FU.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    May be, Mazda9 would fix the situation. I was recently in dealer for service and tested Mazda6 back seat. It was wider than Elantra, for example. But leg room was similar. May be, Americans simply need a bigger car? Where I live, Mazdas are everywhere. Considering lack of Dealers, I believe that is the biggest issue. My brother told me that he doesn’t consider Mazda because he does service only at dealer and there are none anywhere near his place. In truth, he has one 12 miles away, which is closer than my Mazda dealer by 5 miles. But Honda is just 2 miles away from him.

  • avatar
    Wacko

    The Rust Problems, and bad dealers is what made me not become a Mazda repeat buyer.
    Dealer tells me to talk to mazda canada about my problems, and Mazda Canada told me to talk to my dealer!

    • 0 avatar
      hamish42

      I agree with the rust. I live in Toronto, which uses incredible amounts of salt. My Mazda rusted out to the point of being unsafe in 3 1/2 years despite having had the dealer “rustproof” it when we bought it. Mazda Canada would do nothing, and the dealer’s service manager actually said “they all do that”. So, I will never buy a dissolving Mazda again, and neither will anyone I can influence. Losing the rear suspension to rust in 3 1/2 years, 63K kilometers (40K miles +/-) is totally unacceptable.

    • 0 avatar
      carlisimo

      They changed something in 2008 – any newer Mazdas with rust problems would be worth hearing about.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    1. Suck less.
    2. Get sold to a more relevant company. Too many brands, and the industry needs to consolidate.
    3. Stop engine development to become more of a coachworks company and put motor R&D monies into improving platforms, interiors etc.

    or just skip to the end

    3. Pull out of the USDM as you only sell one product which matters.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I like point no.1

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      3. Buy engines in bulk from Honda. They already have everything you need.

    • 0 avatar
      hpycamper

      Disagree with consolidation. We don’t need less choice. How does this direction of thought get traction so often here? Isn’t this an enthusiast site?

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        Model line consolidation worked out great for the Cimarron!

      • 0 avatar
        darex

        Agree 100%. I really dislike the tone of these articles. It’s a tragedy [for US] what happened to Suzuki. Why wish the same on MINI, Mazda, & Mitsubishi? Why does it irk so many so much that they are still sold in our market? One can only imagine that in their world, only Camrys and Accords are sold, all of which are beige. Good thing nobody in charge is listening!

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I can’t speak for others, but for me personally if you build the same beige BS as more reputable players, I don’t want you to continue to exist in USDM. Mini is at least different, but aside from MX-5 does Mazda or Mitusbushi sell anything I can’t buy from GM/Ford/Chryco/Toyota/Honda/NIssan, or if they do, is it superior?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I agree with you but this is unfortunately a realty of the industry at present.

        “Consolidation, as Carlos Ghosn defines it, is already happening in the global automotive industry and will continue to occur as product development, regulatory and technology costs continue to escalate.

        Ghosn, CEO of the Renault-Nissan Alliance, said the best way for automakers to reduce development costs is to work together through partnerships. Ghosn spoke Tuesday night in Detroit at Automotive News World Congress, an industry conference.

        Ghosn’s view contrasts with that of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles CEO Sergio Marchionne, who is best known for suggesting that the Auburn Hills automaker should merge with General Motors.”

        http://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/detroit-auto-show/2016/01/12/nissan-ceo-ghosn-auto-industry-consolidation-here/78424866/

        “TOKYO — Nissan Motor CEO Carlos Ghosn grabbed the media spotlight in 2016 as a major force driving consolidation in the auto industry.

        Last year was the industry’s most “eventful” year since 1998, said Takaki Nakanishi, president of Nakanishi Research Institute, which follows the industry.

        In 1998, Daimler and Chrysler merged in a groundbreaking deal, while Toyota Motor acquired a majority stake in Daihatsu Motor.

        In 2016, Nissan took the scandal-wracked Mitsubishi Motors under its wing, while Toyota and Suzuki Motor began talks over a possible partnership.

        After a year of consolidation many analysts see a realignment of suppliers coming, with Ghosn acting as a key player. In another strategic move last year, the Nissan chief decided to sell Calsonic Kansei, a major supplier and subsidiary of the automaker.”

        http://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Companies/Ghosn-triggering-new-round-of-industry-consolidation

        • 0 avatar
          Steve Biro

          Partnerships are one thing. Real consolidation is another. Co-development of platforms, engine families and transmissions is fine. So is joint parts procurement. But consolidation down to five players in the industry? Things will be even more boring than they are now… and ultimately kill the auto industry as we know it. Those five players will be cranking out invisible transportation lozenges that people won’t even own. More likely they’ll subscribe to their use and not care one whit about them.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Excluding European marques, There are eight independent players in USDM other than Mazda: GM, Ford, Chryco, Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Subaru, Hyundai/Kia.

            “Those five players will be cranking out invisible transportation lozenges that people won’t even own.”

            This is already happening.

          • 0 avatar
            duffman13

            I’m all for partnerships. In this case, expanding the FCA/Mazda partnership beyond the Fiata is the obvious answer. Mazda already makes a competent b and c segment sedan. Throw a different front and rear clip with some FCA switchgear into the 3 and 6 and call it a day. Hell, it they really wanted they could use their own engines like they do in the 124.

            This gives Mazda better economies of scale on the platforms due to volume and gets FCA functional competitors in segments they lack any penetration into. I don’t see why they’re not trying this already.

  • avatar
    Silent Ricochet

    I agree with most of these points. I like Mazda and their philosophy about being I guess “driver’s cars” but their dealerships and their vehicles need some serious work.

    Before I bought my Focus, I really wanted to check out a Mazda 3. I went to two different dealerships and got the same lackluster experience: Sleazy salesmen, poor selection, and after all that and saying I was going to shop elsewhere, they tried to force me to sign for a car they were desperate to get rid of from last model year. It was a base model Mazda 3. How To Chase Away A Customer 101. Went down to the Ford Dealership and snagged a Focus.

    Recently, said Focus was involved in a relatively low speed crash in my driveway. Someone reversed into my parked car at like 10 mph with their F150. I spent nearly two weeks driving a rental car. Guess what I picked? A 2016 Mazda 3. By the end of the two weeks I was so sick of the car I couldn’t wait to get my Focus back. It was loud in every way possible. You could hear rain drops hitting the trunk, the wiper motors were extremely loud, road noise was awful, etc. The engine sounds like a 1.6L from a bad video game, it wasn’t fast by any stretch of the imagination, the steering was numb, and the gas mileage was on-par with my Focus despite having the SkyACTIV drivetrain. The interior was also a hard plasticky mess and overall just had a feeling of cheapness. There were good things about the car like the infotainment system, the ride, the handling, and the seats were decent, but my point here is that the Mazda 3 costs more than my Focus and I’d argue (as would all of my friends who rode in this car over those two weeks) that the Focus, which was 3 years older, was a better car in almost every way.

    So, they have some work to be done for sure. Refinement being the most important issue for me. And PLEASE give them more power. I’m all for some turbo-fours being stuffed under the nose of these things. I’m still rooting for you Mazda!

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Agreed. Although I haven’t driven the current Mazda6, I drove the previous generation as a rental.

      I turned down a Camry, Altima and a Grand Caravan for the 6, thinking it would be the best driving car and the one I’d most likely buy of the 3. I came away thinkng there was no way I would buy one, and the main reasons being the same ones you named.

      It felt cheap. It sounded cheap. It drove cheap. I have come to expect that from Nissan, but the fact that Mazda was so far behind blew me away.

      Again, this was the previous Mazda6, NOT the current generation.

      When I rented a first gen Mazda3 back in the day, I loved it. It was extremely fun to drive, and I did not notice it feeling all that cheap for what it was. All I remember was thinking “why do people buy the Corolla when this exists?”

      At the time, it was on the newer Focus platform, while we were stuck with a facelifted first gen. The way that 3 drove was incredibly well, it really got me excited about Mazdas and talking about them to my friends. From a rental! That is why I chose the Mazda6 a few years later. It was the opposite experience.

      I went to a Mazda dealer while I had that rental 3 to test drive a manual 3 hatch. The salesman was rude and off-putting. I made an excuse and got the hell out of there. I never even sat in the car I was there to look at. Its like his goal was to get people to leave the lot asap in the car they drove in with.

      I did recommend the 3 to my cousin back then (during the first gen) when she said she wanted a car with good MPG but wasn’t a penalty box, and she bought it. She was happy with it, but went back to an SUV (Yukon) when gas prices fell to reasonable levels.

      Speaking of such, I don’t get the logic of trading in cars when gas prices fluctuate. The money she paid out on the car could not possibly have been made up for by the fuel savings over her previous vehicle (which was a smaller V-6 Toyota truck, the last Tacoma before they went midsize). I can see buying an older car for cash to commute in while parking the SUV, like a 1990s Accord. But buying a new car to get a few more MPGs didn’t make sense, especially given her 12 mile commute.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Cheap-feeling is really the core of it. I have rented the newest Mazda 6, and it drove well, but the Accord and Passat feel a lot more solid and substantial.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      One of the things about Mazda is they have a huge swing from poverty spec to grand touring, and it is immediately apparent.

      I personally own a mid-level 2010 = 2.5 with cloth seats, but leather steering wheel and shit knob. The difference between mine and a base 2.0 is staggering – they even have a cheaper grade of fabric they use on the base models, where I find the fabric in ours to be rather nice. The 2.0 skyactiv wasn’t anything to write home about either.

      My in-laws recently bought a CX-5 GT and it was similar, especially checking them out at the auto show. Everything on the base that could be cheaped out on was – going from that to their new purchase was like two completely different vehicles.

      I know other brands have huge content swings, but I don’t think it ever feels as blatant as it does on Mazdas.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Interesting that this topic came up again. My boss was just at the local Mazda dealership and was interested in a MX-5. He has plenty of disposable income and was attempting to make a cash deal on a brand new model. The dealership pretty much refused to make an acceptable (lower cost) deal because he wasn’t financing through Mazda’s credit arm and wanted to pay cash for the entire purchase. So he walked. And he’s usually a long-term, return customer. Seems with a lack of sales overall, a dealership would want a reasonable sale. Then again, maybe cash is no longer king when it comes to car purchases…nah, that’s not right because when he went to purchase his new Q7, he stroked a check for the entire amount and the Audi dealership nearly fell all over themselves to make the deal.

    • 0 avatar
      deanst

      I had a similar experience at a GM dealer. Took out a loan to get a bigger discount, and paid it off the next week.

      • 0 avatar
        noorct

        Deanst knows where it’s at. Take the 0.9 percent financing and pay it off before the first month is up. Get the benefit of the bonus cash with financing (Sometimes up to $2000 on a given car/brand), plus the dealer gets a commission that gives them anywhere from a couple hundred to couple thousand they can then split with you.

        I’ve never understood the aversion to doing this. It’s like getting free money and the impact to credit score is minimal. I guess unless you’re buying a house at the same time, but then you have to explain where cash went so it ends up being six of one half a dozen of another on paperwork…

    • 0 avatar
      Blackcloud_9

      On most cars, especially import cars a lot of the dealers income is now coming through the F&I office. No financing, less money for the dealer.
      Now, I think the dealership is a fool to throw away (almost) any deal. But gone are the days of when a cash offer could get you a sizable discount.

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        But like noorct said, that’s easy to work around. Get the best OTD price you can by financing, and make your first payment the full amount of the loan. It’s not the end of the world if you have to pay a bank 40 or 50 dollars interest one time. Cash buyers can be so stubborn instead of using the system to their advantage.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          And maybe his time is too valuable to be spent chasing down a bank loan. One more thing to worry about. Just take my money, and let’s get this over with. Shouldn’t be that hard.

          • 0 avatar
            kvndoom

            For all the cars I’ve ever financed, my only experience has been bank loans chasing me down, not vice versa.

            Walking out without a car is a bigger waste of time than getting a loan approved. Sheesh that takes what, 10 minutes these days? Then you still have no car and still have to go to another dealership who may or may not give you a good deal as a cash buyer. We all know the rules of the game; bigger discounts and incentives if you finance. So if someone doesn’t want to play by the rules, even if it’s a guaranteed win, then shame on them.

  • avatar
    deanst

    dont really understand the preoccupation with dealers, but perhaps it’s because I basically buy over the Internet, pay with cash, and only go back to the dealer for recalls or warranty claims. If you’re in a city with over 100,000 people (like most of US and Canada) aren’t you pretty much have assured of having a dealer? I can walk to my nearest Honda, Chrysler or Hyundai dealer, but it really doesn’t matter to me – I just go to the independent garage next to them for most of my car maintenance needs.

    Fancy dealerships are strange to me, unless you are selling luxury cars. The biggest FCA dealer in Canada is run out of a 2 car showroom – I can respect that attention to low costs.

    http://canada.autonews.com/article/20160627/CANADA/160629871/how-the-smallest-fca-dealer-became-the-biggest-by-using-brains-over

    • 0 avatar
      Alfisti

      Thank you, i thought it was just me.

      Everyone always banging on about dealers, I just NEVER use them unless it’s a recall, there is zero need as indy mechanics are better and cheaper.

      I don’t get it.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        @deanst

        I shop the same way you are, but you still have to account for the general population. I don’t need a place where my wife can get her nails done while she waits, but I’d like something that has good service loaner availability. That said, there is still plenty of hurry up and wait buying a car even if you do all of the legwork ahead of time. I’d prefer to do it in a waiting area with decent snacks and comfy chairs if I had the choice.

        That said, my spidey sense goes up if you have a dealer that looks like the last time it was renovated was the 1980s – there’s probably a reason you’re not able to put money into your facility. Unless you’re a Mitsubishi or FCA dealer – then I already know why.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    R we doing this again?

  • avatar
    JT

    I missed the original discussion but fully agree with the first two points. I bought a new Mazda3 Touring in mid-Feb. There’s a lot about the car that I love — its over the road manners make it a superior touring/travel car and it’s much more comfortable than my previous Civic Si.
    But it’s underpowered, as I hear other Mazda products are. I’m not sure the turbo is the answer but more under foot certainly is. Also, the car is noisy inside, and that surprised me as a new owner. It’s most noticeable at hiway speeds and can become annoying if not unpleasant.

    I must disagree with the dealer quality complaints; speaking only for myself, my dealer experience was exceptional and the purchase was fair and straightforward. With my many years of dealer experience (mostly service dept.), I went in armed for any trick that might come…and nothing happened. No jive, no hustle, no BS; I was stunned! I was treated well, questions were answered properly and the trade in price was fair.

    Also, I agree that Mazda could knock it out of the park with a small, well done pickup. It may be that they don’t see that part of the market as useful but there is the need.

    Perhaps Mazda is content as a niche player, similar to SAAB in years past. But many years ago, so was Subaru and look at them now. I think Mazda can rise up the tree if they choose to.

  • avatar
    whitworth

    I went to a Mazda dealership literally yesterday, and the experience was so awful I thought it was a prank. It was like the people I worked with were special needs, and I’m not exaggerating. Also just did a horrible job of having any inventory, and what they had there was filthy. Nothing like wanting to buy a new car and it looks like its been abandoned.

    I’m really not big on “dealer experience” as far as a car purchase I just sort of assume all dealerships are usually unpleasant. But that alone really did make me think twice about buying a Mazda. What’s odd is the parent owner actually runs a really great operation with their other brands.

    The actual model I drove, the Mazda6, had positives and negatives. The biggest negative was it was just trying too hard to be a “4 door Miata” and I really don’t think that’s what most midsize sedan buyers are looking for. Jut felt too raw and rough for something to commute to work in.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    The truck suggestion I don’t get, seems like another case of enthusiasts demanding a car they have no intentions of buying.

    NVH, engine noise, this I agree with. Over rough roads I honestly prefer my cop-spec Crown Vic over their CX-3. I road in a newish example and felt about every bump in the road, cramped space in back too.

    Don’t they still make center consoles optional on some models?

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      I agree. The only people interested in that truck would be purchasing it used, 7 years down the road. Without the volume of being paired with the Ranger, a small truck from Mazda makes no sense.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Not a truck guy, so what am I missing here? Wouldn’t a Mazda truck imported from Mexico be attractive to the same people buying Colorados and Tacomas?

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Not a truck guy, so what am I missing here? Wouldn’t a Mazda truck imported from Mexico be attractive to the same people buying Colorados and Tacomas?

  • avatar
    nels0300

    Better corrosion warranty, more power, and better build quality from their new Mexican plant would’ve gotten me into my 5th Mazda. (626 turbo, Protege, 3, and 6). I know, I’m a glutton for rust punishment.

    I drove a 2017 2.0L Mazda3 hatch while shopping for cars recently and found the interior smelled like coolant, the carpet in the rear hatch was wrinkled, and it was noisy.

    Drove an Elantra Sport and as a Mazda fan, I felt bad for Mazda. For $18.5K, there is no Mazda3 that is competitive. Car and Driver doesn’t know what they’re talking about. Whatever handling dynamic advantage C&D claims the Mazda3 has (I can’t tell) is totally wiped out by the better build quality, warranty, power, price, features, NVH and looks of the Elantra.

  • avatar
    DearS

    Introduce a CX7 again. This market wants it, probably.

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    “…Mazda’s bread and butter is sales in other places”

    Makes me wonder how they would do if they could sell some of the vehicles for those “other places” here.

    Have owned an 04 ‘6 and an 08 ‘3. Would have loved to keep them longer than I did. Didn’t buy out the lease on the 6 because we went down to one car and the 3 got traded up to a larger vehicle.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I test-drove a 3 hatch. I was pretty impressed by it, EXCEPT…

    The touchscreen “infotainment” interface looks like a cheap Android tablet that Tony glued to the dash on his Trans Am.

    It looks like a flimsy, tacky afterthought, like Mazda couldn’t be bothered to properly integrate it in to the dashboard.

    I remain unconvinced that it would hold up well against the 145F interior temperatures we get in Las Vegas as well.

  • avatar
    mazdaman323

    Mazda needs to go rear wheel drive, and pick up where BMW left off in the early 2000’s. They need something to actually differentiate themselves from other cars in the market. I wish Mazda and Subaru would merge. Subaru can continue with their current course and Mazda can use the platforms with the longitudinal engine layout for rwd sports sedans (awd optional of course).

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      You should check out a Miata sometime, not many car companies offer a basic RWD convertible.

      • 0 avatar
        mazdaman323

        I’ve had 2 miatas, a 99 and an 09. Great cars while I was single, but not so practical with a family. I don’t really see the point in buying a 3 or 6 over a competing Honda. I’m talking about a rwd Mazda 3 or 6. I’m not some kind of rwd nut, I’ve had more fwd vehicles than rwd, I just think there’s a market out there for rwd based sports sedans outside the premium segment. I think they wasted their money by building a new Miata, they could have developed a rwd platform that slots between the 3/cx-5 and the 6/cx-9, and had 2 products, say a mazda4/cx-6 or something. Must have the 2.5 turbo as an option though!

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      RWD strategy requires an informed public in warm climates. This consumer based doesn’t exist. American car consumers are not particularly discerning regarding driving dynamics, and the South is not sport sedan land. It’s truck land.

  • avatar
    darex

    What I dislike about Mazda:

    Just like VW, they’re always crying, “We so poor! We so poor!”

    In VW’s case, it’s b.s.; in Mazda’s case, perhaps it’s true, but either way, that’s no way to sell a car, nor is it confidence-inspiring.

    Both companies also have the tendency to make promises they don’t keep.

    Best to avoid them entirely.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I’ve talked about my experience with the 3i rental I had a few times. I liked the car. It was probably as nice inside as my G37. But that engine. Jesus Christ. Mazda needs to turbocharge its whole lineup today.

  • avatar
    slow_poke

    woohoo!!!

    Corey thanks for the Follow up! It’s nice to see the consolidation of the comments. Now we just need to send this to Dave Coleman and see if he has any sway.

    It does seem like Mazda doesn’t follow the market in terms of HP. Seems like Toyota is pretty good about adding HP and leather (and basically nothing else) to upgrade / add life to their aging platforms…

  • avatar
    TW5

    Do a SWOT analysis of Subaru and you’ll get the correct answer in 5 minutes.

    It’s still one of the hottest selling brands in the US due to AWD, tree-hugging branding, and affordability. It also has the worst engine portfolio for cost-effectiveness and fuel-efficiency. Subarus also have bipolar reliability with seemingly equal numbers of great stories and horror stories.

    Build “Subarus” with SkyActiv inline engines, and develop/license the mild-hybrid technology necessary to achieve CAFE standards (since Congress doesn’t seem capable of reforming anything important right now). Mazdas will sell like hotcakes.

  • avatar
    readallover

    I have a very simple solution to help Mazda sell thousands more Mazda 6`s: Make sure your dealers have more than 3 or 4 cars on the lot. I am shopping for one here in British Columbia and it is same story at every dealership. Each dealer has only a few 6`s on their lot. They are almost entirely GT`s that sticker for over $38,000 canadian. Every dealer had the same tale to tell – all the lower priced GX and GS models are usually sold before they reach the dealership and Mazda will not give them anymore than that.

    • 0 avatar
      Daniel J

      This is a big problem here with our dealership too. They have a ton of CX-5’s, quite a few 3’s, but only a handful of 6’s. Its either a base model that is silver or black, or a GT that is red with a very high sticker price.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • ToolGuy: “much better than the horror show that the Camaro is now” Will no one rise to defend the...
  • tankinbeans: I have pretty much the perfect spec in my car today. Finally pulled the trigger on a Mazda3 Turbo. Must...
  • tankinbeans: I briefly paid for a subscription to Sirius 10 years ago, but have the same problem with Sirius as I do...
  • Ol Shel: So, you just made sh!t up, and want people to believe it’s a fact. You sound like the jacka$$ at the...
  • nrd515: I agree with most of your list, with a few exceptions: I don’t drive enough miles to really care about...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber