By on June 8, 2017

2017 Genesis G90 - Image: Genesis Motors

Genesis Motors is soon to complete its first year on the U.S. market.

Through the first ten months of its run as Hyundai’s luxury spin-off, 15,254 copies of the Genesis G80 and Genesis G90 have been sold. That’s 15,254 buyers who all moved over from other auto brands. There was no other way — no repeat business, no C-Class to E-Class to S-Class-style chain reaction.

More of those buyers moved over from the Hyundai brand than anywhere else. That makes sense. The Genesis G80 is essentially a second-generation Hyundai Genesis sedan. The Genesis G90 is a second-generation replacement for the Hyundai Equus. Hyundai buyers are trading in and trading up.

But when it comes to earning conquests from luxury rivals, Genesis Motors does so most often at the expense of Genesis’ forerunner, the last brand to do what Genesis wants to do.

Lexus.

30 percent of Genesis G80 and G90 conquests come from the Lexus brand, according to Wards Auto. That’s double the number Genesis has grabbed from BMW, the next-most-often conquested brand, and nearly triple the number of conquests Genesis has gleaned from Cadillac and Mercedes-Benz.

“We don’t think that people are going to turn the switch and suddenly forget about other brands and flock to us,” Genesis Motors general manager Erwin Raphael told Wards. But if Genesis can attract the attention of buyers, “a decent percentage of them will choose us and that will be enough for us to be very successful,” Raphael says.

2017 Genesis G80 - Image: Genesis Motors

Success, by Genesis’ measurement, isn’t the same as success for Lexus or Mercedes-Benz or BMW. Even if the forthcoming G70 sedan doubles the brand’s volume, Genesis will still be selling only 40,000 cars per year in the United States.

Mercedes-Benz USA sells nearly 27,000 cars and SUVs per month.

No, building a luxury brand from scratch will take time. Indeed, it will take more time than it ought to because Genesis is way behind the SUV/crossover trend. Based on this year’s New York International Auto Show GV80 concept, Genesis’ first production utility vehicle is still two years away.

For the time being, Genesis is fighting for a small slice of an increasingly small pie. Overall premium brand car sales are down 4 percent this year.

2017 Genesis GV80 Concept - Image: Genesis Motors

Acura, Audi, Cadillac, Infiniti, Jaguar Land Rover, Lincoln, Porsche, Volvo, and indeed Lexus all sell more SUVs/crossovers than cars. U.S. sales of premium brand SUVs/crossovers are up 6 percent in early 2017, claiming 57 percent of the overall premium market, up from 54 percent in the first five months of 2016.

Yet it is in that shrinking car sector where Genesis intends to initially make a name for itself, operating out of tailored corners of Hyundai showrooms. Perhaps too many Hyundai showrooms.

Incidentally, coinciding with Genesis Motors’ theft of sales from luxury brand rivals is a 29-percent decline in sales of Lexus passenger cars. No premium brand is losing car sales faster this year.

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

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81 Comments on “Where Is Hyundai’s Genesis Brand Getting Its Buyers From? Genesis’ Spiritual Predecessor...”


  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Do they/will they have standalone dealers? They’d better.

    One of the reasons the previous model didn’t do so well is that people did not want to buy a $50,000 car right next to a guy with nothing down and a 580 FICO score, trying to buy a stripped-out Accent.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      They don’t have a large enough lineup or footprint to warrant it yet. They do have a segregated area of the showroom, at least in our local dealer.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      That’s a common misconception (that the previous model didn’t do so well).

      The Hyundai branded Genesis sedan sold better than the A6, GS, CTS, Q70 and XF.

      In fact, the Genesis G80 (in part due to its higher price and in part due to the decline in sedan sales) has yet to match the best sales year for the Hyundai Genesis.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Denver

      LOL. That is literally true. When I bought my Genesis, that was exactly who was at the next desk. The conversation where they tried to sell them key replacement insurance and tire insurance and windshield insurance and all sorts of worthless crap when they could barely afford the car to begin with was hilarious.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I am very surprised by this.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’m not. Think of the original LS400 – it was a value-priced alternative to more expensive cars. Ditto for the current Genesis lineup. A lot of those LS400 owners are older now, but won’t pop for $80-90,000 for the current model.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        But this is smacks in the face of the additional value proposition that Lexus brings to the table – namely bulletproof reliability consistently year after year after year after year.

        Genesis must have one Hell of a value prop to get spawning salmon to change the stream they swim up.

        • 0 avatar
          Truckducken

          True, Lexii are a compelling value proposition. But I think what we are seeing here is at least in part a consequence of the absurd buttfugliness of modern Lexus products. They’re certainly off my list until they come to their senses; I prefer understatement. Looks like I am not alone.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          This isn’t an issue when you trade in every 3-4 years. This car is probably as likely as any European car to be mostly trouble-free in that time frame.

          Lexus has become extremely complicated, they aren’t the golden-age-of-Toyota-on-steroids any more. Its kind of a crap shoot anyway, but again, not a problem for people who need a new car every few years to keep the neighbors jealous (they think).

          So far, Genesis cars are not clones of cheaper Hyundai cars, ironically since they used to BE Hyundai cars. But, a G80 isn’t a Sonata with 3″ of wheel base, padded dash, a different grill and a standard 6 cylinder. They have that setting themselves apart from their Hyundai brethren.

          Those who know that they used to be sold as Hyundai branded cars also know they were nothing like other Hyundais.

          Some people buy the latest car hoping to start a trend or to prove how they forge their own path or whatever. Since there is a predator grill lurking around every upper-middle-class corner, some try the new brand to be different.

          Honestly, I see nothing wrong with that. They’re probably getting a much better value, and the car is good enough for them.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            The Genesis sedans (including the upcoming G70) are all based on a dedicated RWD platform.

            Lexus sedan sales are increasingly reliant on the FWD ES (and overall sales on FWD-based crossovers).

        • 0 avatar
          notwhoithink

          “namely bulletproof reliability consistently year after year after year after year.”

          I’m sure that the Genesis models are more than reliable enough to get your through a three year lease. The real question is whether they will be reliable enough to be a good value CPO.

        • 0 avatar
          Train

          Here are a couple of fun facts, one for each of the Genesis models. In the most recent ALG residual value study, Genesis G80 was first in segment, significantly ahead of BMW, GS and E-Class, respectively. And, AutoPacific today named G90 the top vehicle in its annual Vehicle Satisfaction Award survey with not only the top score in this year’s survey but the highest score ever. Smart shoppers are noticing things like this during their research and it’s leading many of them to consider and perhaps buy a Genesis product. At least, that’s what I think…

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Not surprised at all – as noted from the beginning (upon the launch of the Genesis sedan) that saw the biggest declines in sales of the GS and M.

          The Japanese lux brands have been able to garner sales mostly on the value equation, so when a new player arrives which can outdo them on that point, not surprising that a good chunk of those buyers would be open to it.

          As for BMW, seems like they are either owners who just got frustrated with their BMWs spending so much time in the shop or don’t want to pay what BMW is charging for a well-equipped V8 or a turbo 6 (these buyers aren’t the type to drive a turbo 4).

      • 0 avatar
        mikeg216

        But the ls 400 beat Mercedes and BMW at their own game. The Lexus brand caught the world flat footed and took off.. All based on rock solid quality. 30 years later there are no bad cars.. No lemons.. No cars with fist sized rust holes after 5 years. If you buy a car today and follow the manufacturer guidelines, your vehicle of choice will go at least 250,000 miles. You can’t beat the Germans on luxury and you aren’t going to beat Lexus on quality.. Where is genesis supposed to compete. Other than catering to Koreans and Chinese in the United States I don’t see where they’ll find success.. I don’t care how good it is I’m never buying an $80,000 hyundai.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          ” I don’t care how good it is I’m never buying an $80,000 hyundai.”

          Lol, and there goes your argument. The car can’t win. It can be the best car out there, but that doesn’t matter. Its the N A M E that matters, to you. That’s all. And that’s pretty narrow minded.

          I’m not saying Genesis is the best luxury car going, not in the least, but you are automatically biased against it because of where it comes from. I think if the product is good, they have every right to exist and be an option to those in the market. Call me crazy, but I happen to think competition is a good thing, and the more choices (and thereby more avenues explored by each manufacturer), the better for all.

          These aren’t rebadged Sonatas. If they were, or some [email protected]$$ attempt like the XG/Amanti, you would have a point. They are on dedicated platforms, not shared with mainstream Hyundais. They are not just “$80k Hyundais” in the sense that they are overpriced versions of pedestrian economy cars, with lots of lipstick.

          Cynical ignoramus in 1989:
          “I don’t care how good [Lexus] is I’m never buying a $30,000 toyota. The only people who will buy them are Asians who don’t know any better.”

          Yeah! And who would invest in Microsoft? My money is on K-Mart. Tried and true. Nothing could change that.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Um, the vast majority of Genesis owners/buyers are white.

          Asian-Americans (whether they be Chinese, Korean, etc.) tend to buy German for luxury and Honda or Toyota for mainstream.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Right. Thank you bd2.

            See what stereotyping based on bias or bigotry gets a person? A big fat nothing.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Doesn’t hurt that numerous reviewers (including Alex Dykes) have stated that the V8 G80 reminds them of the LS400.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      I’m not. Lexus has always been a conservative brand, but the latest models all look like angry Transformers. Some buyers don’t like that.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Add the fact that some buyers don’t like trading in their V8 for a V6 either, or paying thousands more for the newer model than they paid for the older trade in. My experience with people who can afford anything is that dollars still matter to them.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    I grew up in Boca Raton, and was just down there for a long weekend a couple months ago. I think everyone here knows that southern palm beach county is known for their consumption of luxury vehicles – Lincolns and Cadillacs twenty years ago, and Lexus and BMW for the last 10-15.

    The last two times I went down to visit, I was shocked at the sheer number of Genesis and Equus that I saw down there. I believe they have nearly supplanted the Town Car/Deville market.

    When you think about who is buying them ie a retiree who wants something quiet, comfortable, and dependable it makes sense; the fact that it is affordable is a bonus. Given the significant Jewish population down there, the fact that the Hyundai isn’t tied to an Axis Power probably helps as well.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      LOL…Jewish folks, by and large, don’t care about driving German cars. I say that as a Jewish guy and current VW owner.

      We do care about good Chinese food, though. In fact, if you own a Chinese joint, and want to make a mint, open up on Easter Sunday and Christmas Day, and advertise that in the local Jewish paper. #profit

      • 0 avatar

        It was once an issue, particularly with the brand that started out as making the KDF-wagen.

        Ironically, I think the fact that many Jews wouldn’t drive Ford products due to Henry’s infamous bigotries may have led to affluent Jews moving to the German luxury brands, starting in the late 1970s. While some affluent Jews switched from GM brands to Lincolns as that brand surged in the late ’60s and early ’70s (perhaps due to Henry Ford II’s efforts to reach out to the Jewish community, efforts that I believe to have been genuine and not primarily motivated by business reasons, the Deuce was a Judeophile), by the late 1970s, malaise had set into American cars and the Benzes then were built very well, with a lot of technically advanced engineering.

        I’ve owned a couple of VWs, and worked with a few German nationals when I was at DuPont. I use German embroidery thread in my shop because it’s the best there is. I’m working closely with Seydel, located in Klingenthal, on my electric harmonica project, which will be introduced next month at the summer NAMM show in Nashville. If it’s a success I plan on traveling to Germany to personally thank their chief engineer, Karl Pucholt, for inventing steel harmonica reeds, which make my own invention possible.

        I figure most of the really dedicated Nazis got righteously killed during WWII. While Jew-hatred is an unending existential reality and is at least as much a part of European culture as racism is in America, most of that nonsense is coming from elsewhere in the world than Germany.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I’d say Germany learned its lesson when a) it ended up a smoking heap of rubble, and b) more than half of it ended up occupied by the Soviets, who were every bit as awful as the Nazis.

          And I totally stand by the Chinese food comment. Want to meet some nice Jewish folks? Show up to a Chinese joint on Christmas Day.

        • 0 avatar
          cgjeep

          Funny my mom retired down to a golf Community in North Carolina. A few years ago I rented a CMAX to drive down there. Was really impressed with it and was showing it to her neighbors telling them how good it was. They were Jewish and stated that they would never buy a Ford because of Henry Ford and his hatred of Jews. The were a two Mercedes family.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        @freedmike

        Like I said, grew up in Boca. Not all Jewish folks do, but there are enough that care that it matters. I had some friends in high school in the around the 00s who’s parent’s wouldn’t, rotated through Caddys and Jags instead.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          I thought it was a Greatest Generation thing, per Estelle Costanza:

          Frank and Estelle sit in the living room as George walks in from the front
          door.

          GEORGE: (pointing outside) Why is there a Cadillac parked in front of the
          house?

          FRANK: That’s your mother’s new car.

          GEORGE: You bought that?

          FRANK: It’s a Coupe de Elegance.

          ESTELLE: Your father wanted a Mercedes, but I won’t ride in a German car.

      • 0 avatar
        Sceptic

        Lots of old Jewish bigots out there… Younger generation does not care and buys German for prestige, or just to spite their parents…

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          I ping pong on my view of old Jews’ perspective on this – if they grew up or were born just after WWII and their reality was the holocaust, is it really bigotry to not want to drive German cars? I’d say no, their experience and proximity to the holocaust drove their attitude.

          Not really that different from how SE countries fear a militarized Japan.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      Allow me to throw in another perspective on this argument:

      Back in the 1960’s, when my father was a Chevrolet dealer in Johnstown, PA (75 miles east of Pittsburgh, a shot and a beer coal and steel town), we lived in the wealthy suburbs west of the city. Where the entire Jewish population (much larger than the black population) lived.

      In the mid/late 1960’s, Mercedes-Benz cars were beginning to be common in the area. The nearest dealer was Indiana, PA; a college town 35 miles northwest of Johnstown (Indiana University of Pennsylvania). Invariably, the owners of these Mercedes were: 1. Jewish, and 2. Previously Cadillac owners.

      My father could not understand how an ethnic group could wholeheartedly buy cars from the same people who were trying to exterminate them 20 years earlier.

      Dad left the Chevrolet business in 1965. In 1966, Volkswagen of America approached him, offering him a newly starting franchise in Indiana, PA. As in, let’s sell Volkswagens in a liberal college town in the 60’s.

      After serious deliberation, he turned them down. Why? Because these were the same folks who were trying to kill him at Monte Cassino in 1944.

      Jews wholeheartedly buying German luxury cars is hardly a new phenomenon. It existed in my incredibly conservative home town fifty years ago.

      • 0 avatar
        I_like_stuff

        I grew up in a neighborhood that was 30-40% Jewish. Plenty of MBs around and I too wondered how any Jewish person could buy a German car, when their parents/grandparents were being exterminated by the parents/grandparents of the people now making the cars.

        I mean yea at some point in history you need to move on from these things. But it seemed like 40 years wasn’t nearly enough time. Especially when there were so many survivors still alive.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Doesn’t surprise me one bit. Lexus made its’ bones selling cheaper alternatives to Mercedes, and I’d guess a lot of its’ buyers are still buying by the pound. But Lexus’ per-pound price is up. Makes all kinds of sense.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      It’s not just Lexus being undercut, but Toyota having been really slow in upgrading the powertrains.

      For instance, the G90 not only has a more powerful NA V8 under its hood, it also beat the LS to the punch with a TTV6.

  • avatar
    newenthusiast

    This makes sense. The 2 Genesis vehicles I have seen have a handsome, premium look, if a bit conservative. Lexus’ design style of the past several years has been…polarizing, to put it mildly.

    I have no idea what they ride or drive like personally, but reviews say that just as Lexus went after what Mercedes did, and what Lincoln and Cadillac were trying to do at the time (quiet, comfortable ride, lots of features, very little sporting pretense), Genesis is going after what Lexus used to do. Those types of customers still exist.

    If the value to feature ratio is right, then I can see why buyers would go this route.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I agree.

      That is one reason why I believe Lincoln could pull off a range topper above Continental. RWD, focus on room, ride and quietness, more of that new conservative and elegant styling started with the Conti concept. It is much preferable trying to stand out with outrageous “bold” styling (their previous split grille, Acura’s previous giant chrome beak, Lexus current front end).

      The new Town Car could be a hit in China at least, and perhaps here, though big sedans are falling out of favor. Perhaps a CUV version to replace MKT.

  • avatar
    Jaeger

    I think it speaks well of the brand that 30% of their first year buyers were previously driving a Lexus. I know that when I was shopping for a premium sedan it ultimately came down to a two horse race between the 2015 Genesis Sedan (essentially a Genesis G80) and the Lexus GS.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Nope.

      30% of their *conquest purchases* were from Lexus drivers.

      The linked article sadly doesn’t say what the percentage or total of conquests was; if we assume “mostly Hyundai” means 60%, that means Lexus is 30% of 40% of 15,000.

      About 1,800 conversions from Lexus, then.

      Nothing to sneeze at (over 10% of sales, and Lexus is their natural target).

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Figure that most of the Hyundai buyers coming from previous Genesis and Equus owners who have upgraded to the newer models.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Right, and hasn’t that always been the point if creating a luxury brand? Giving your customers somewhere to go when their finances take your mainstream cars out of the question.

          “Well, I loved my Hondas, but I’m ready for a luxury car. Oh, Acura. Duh.”

          Lol

  • avatar
    nels0300

    While Lexus has the reputation for bullet-proof reliability, I’m sure the Genesis 10 year / 100K powertrain warranty is one thing that may be comforting to a nervous Lexus owner.

    That has to be the most generous warranty out of any luxury brand.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      The CPO Genesis warranty is pretty generous as well.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        CPO is functionally identical IIRC – my mom has a certified hyundai and has the whole 10y/100k. OTOH, we have a non-certified one (only one available in the white/brown color combo when we were shopping), and you still get the 5y/60k bumper to bumper portion, just not the extra powertrain part. Even still it’s a pretty solid deal.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’m still holding out a *tiny* sliver of hope for either a V8 version of the G70 or a V8 G80 sport.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    The planet doesn’t need another luxury car brand. Genesis can only break out if it gives more for a bit less. (hp and/or reliabilty and/or silence and/or tech and/or top-tier interiors)

    And not having a SUV ready at roll-out was a big whiff.

    Look at the headwinds Jaguar still has despite its best line-up ever (US sales-wise v. Lexus and the Germans) .

    this isn’t 1989 when there was a big gap in the market for Lexus to pry open. And once you make a first impression (good or bad), it’s hard to shake it off.

    And Genesis’ first impression is: it’s a perfectly decent car to own—for someone who isn’t me.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      And the proof of your contention is that they’re stealing sales from Lexus.

      Oh my, you guys crack me up.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      “Give more for less.”

      That’s exactly what Lexus, Infiniti and Acura did when they launched and what they still do today (to varying degrees).

      While it would have been nice to have had a crossover ready, most automakers don’t have a rash of models coming out at the same time.

      There was no ideal time to launch the Genesis brand, so might as well launch it when the Equus replacement was ready.

      As for Jaguar, they made the same mistake that Cadillac made with its RWD sedans (in particular, the ATS and CTS) – overly focused on driving dynamics which meant a lightweight platform at the expense of passenger space and interior appointment.

      YTD sales

      G90 – 1,916
      LS – 1,555
      XJ – 1,168

      G80 – 6,390
      GS – 2,907
      XF – 1,984

      So Genesis (8,306) is handily outselling Lexus (4,462) – should change some when the new LS arrives, but would have scoffed at Genesis ever beating Lexus in sales within segments.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      As to your first paragraph, they are. You get a ~300hp V6 5/E/A6 competitor with real leather for the same money that the competition is giving you a 3/C/A4 with a 240hp I4t with pleather. And it as quiet or quieter than the 5/E/A6 at the same time.

      I will say the lack of an SUV was a mistake, but just rebadging a Santa Fe would have been a mistake, and Hyundai already had a full line of CUVs, so I’ll give them a pass on that initially.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Hyundai has 2 crossovers in development with the 1st one due next year and the other, in the following year.

        Thought that they should have planned for 3 and there might be another that is fuel cell or PHEV/EV.

        So while it would have been nice to have those out sooner, only have so many engineers to go around (this year was the G80 Sport with the G70 to launch later this year) and besides, also need to stagger the models (as don’t want the entire lineup to age at the same time).

        With the new 3 Series BMW will have redone its core sedan lineup and has its entire crossover lineup due for replacements in addition to adding the X7.

      • 0 avatar
        andres33

        I don’t know of any Audi A4’s with pleather. All Audi’s have leather I believe. Also, you get 252 HP from the I4T at Audi. Keep in mind these AWD Audi’s go for about $45,000, if you skimp out and get a 2WD car you can get it for $35K or so (admittedly they detune the 2.0 to get 27/37 mileage) but less power.

  • avatar

    Tune to any FM station to hear Billy Fucillo oscillate between heavy breathing and bloviating over ‘A HUUUUUGE LOTTA DEEZ K900S FOR LEASESES’ to see why you absolutely NEED a standalone store to peddle Genesis cars.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Still have never seen a K900 or a Cadenza in the wild and there are a fair number of Kia dealers in the Albuquerque/Santa Fe metro area. I can’t drive from Tohatchi to Gallup (26 miles of highway) without seeing a Sorento or Sportage.

      The first generation Hyundai Azera however is showing up in the hands of the sorts of people who used to buy Lesabres after the first owners traded them on a brand new one.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        to be fair the K900 is so generic I don’t know that I’d even notice one out on the road.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        There’s a guy in my parking garage who has a new Cadenza. It’s a really sharp car. The only thing holding it back is the badge. I saw a K900 in downtown DC a few weeks ago. That is a big car, makes the more common Town Cars look like cheap toys.

        Too bad about the Azera. That’s a good looking car too, and a nice ride (from the back seat, at least). There was, however, at least one completely forgettable generation before the most recent car.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        A Cadenza was driving aggressively around when I was on the coast yesterday. Swerving in and out, rode the turn lane up to the end and cut off another car.

        I actually like the K900. I just wish it had a real name. I don’t mind it being a Kia, though I wouldn’t buy it new even if I could afford it. I might would consider one down the road used, they are a bit anonymous, yes, but I find them handsome.

        Hate to hijack the thread, but I wanted to update my Uber car exploration.

        I went by a Ford dealer yesterday to see a C-Max (I haven’t driven one yet). They didn’t have one! I looked at all the independent used car lots in the area, along with the other new car brand’s used lots, nothing. No C-Max to be had in that town.

        I know they’re at dealerships on the coast, but I had to pick someone up and take her home right away, so I didn’t have time to go test drive a car then.

        The one I found isn’t exactly close, but its a 2016 C-Max SEL Hybrid with 30k miles, Ford Certified, $15.5k. Opinons?

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          John I’d say overall the rideshare game is a tough one to be in, and to buy a $15k+ car with the main motivator being to use it for work, the money proposition becomes even worse. You’re really far in the hole at the outset. I’d almost argue some sort of delivery driving or driving a delivery car for a parts place makes more sense (although you’d lose the flexible hours which are a big draw). I’d say if you’re dead set on ride share work, consider buying a cheaper used car with a rock solid reputation that gets reasonable MPG, is easy/cheap to service, and is reasonably comfortable (and has a nice clean interior/exterior) to help with passenger satisfaction. Now that’s quite a tall order.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            I appreciate that.

            I looked at what I could reasonably afford to pay cash for (though as explained elsewhere, I don’t have it on hand right now anyway). The cars I liked and would work well were getting to the age/mileage that I’m worried about them mechanically.

            I can drive a 234k mile Taurus when its just me, I can deal with the issues it has, I can limp it home if something fails, I’m used to that stuff. Its fine for me, and really the car hasn’t asked for all that much, but my point is, I can nurse and old, well-worn car.

            But, I’m not willing to do that with a vehicle I’m being paid to drive people around in.

            Thanks to my ex boyfriend, my credit is once again damaged after I had just finally started making headway in repairing it after my medical issues put me out of work.

            Buying a car and financing it would help to build my credit. I can also depend on the car for a long time without worries of unexpected repairs (the C-Max has a 100k powertrain warranty, as does the Soul).

            I don’t mind the idea of financing a car in order to get work with it. Its certainly better than what I’ve got going now, which are a few car details and repair jobs that don’t amount to squat.

            I don’t want to finance more than $15k, and I do not want to finance something older. The C-Max is a 2016 with 30k, that’s about as old as I want to go. I could also choose from several sedans in that price range. The ones that appeal to me are Fusion 2.5L S model, Taurus, Accord and maybe Impala.

            Really, though, the C-Max is far better suited to this job.

            I also figure I can use it for other jobs. Up in Washington, you make good money as a licensed canibus transport. Its required to be in a cage, but if the C-Max’s rear seats where removed, it would have plenty of room for all that.

            I have tried to get a job driving as you suggested. There is nothing close enough that I could do. I keep looking, but they pay minimum wage and are usually located 45 or more minutes away. Hard to make even gas money doing that part time.

            I am not physically able to do a full time job. The doctors have actually told me I should’nt work at all, but Social Security Administration feels differently.

            This is why ride sharing (though uber or Lyft) is appealing. I can work when I am able to, I can go out on a Friday night (around the casinos, nightclubs, college campuses, etc) and make the whole month’s car payment.

            If I’m in pain and I already have this month’s payments (car, insurance) in the bank, I don’t have to call a boss and explain to him why I can’t come in. I HATE doing that! and so do they. The solution is to be my own boss, work when I’m able.

            I love the C-Max in the picture, I can’t wait to drive it. I might not be able to swing it, but I’m trying to do something. God help me, I’m just trying something.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Gtem
            I had a lengthy reply but it isn’t showing up.

            If it isn’t here later, I guess I’ll try again.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Its not worth it. Nevermind.

    • 0 avatar
      cdnsfan27

      Billy is hilarious and so is Caroline, he just bought the Nissan dealership in Clearwater. I work at a Jaguar dealership and every Genesis and Equus we have seen was so underwater you needed scuba gear to get them out. The customers are shocked that their sound financial decision of paying less for a luxury car with more features for less money didn’t pan out. The market has spoken.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      I haven’t thought of Billy Fucillo since I left Fort Drum. Yes, the most obnoxious car ads of anywhere I lived. He was incidentally the last one using Tom Park as his pitchman as I recall. He too was once a staple wherever the military sent me.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    After test driving a last gen Genesis 3.8 and either test driving or riding in many of its competitors (5 series, E class) I totally get it. If not for the lazy, recalcitrant transmission, I would have bought one over my G37S. For $40-50K, it’s more luxurious and has better driving dynamics than a 3 series by a surprising margin. When the G is done I will definitely give the current gen a look, though it’s gonna have to be the 5.0 as it looks like the 3.8 got totally neutered.

  • avatar
    Edsel Maserati

    Let’s have some discussion about the price. I’ve seen G80s in the low 50s, and the G90 for around 70k. That undercuts the Lexus LS460 by, what, 15K?
    And the Genesis does not have the 2018 Lexus’ spectacularly ugly grill, which I figure will move even more folks to the Genesis dealership.

    The Genesis (at the least the two Hyundai Genesis models I’ve driven in anger) are far better sorted out than, say, the Lincoln Continental. which would be another price leader Big Important Looking Car.

    The Genesis does not scream “WALL STREET BONUS” with the same volume that the German cars do. But, jeez, look at the price differential.

  • avatar
    vent-L-8

    Not for nothing but Lexus designs have been becoming more and more polarizing while the Genesis offers some very traditional lines for a luxury sedan.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I think this is a direct result of where the cars are marketed. Genesis will always have to satisfy the South Korean market first, and those people are very conservative. That’s why the new Sonata is so toned down compared to the last one. They’re also not big fans of color, so expect lots of gray-scale.

      Lexus is trying to break into the nouveau riche of China. Like most people new to having money, they want something flashy and tacky. Lexus is here to fit the bill.

      • 0 avatar
        PSUMBA

        Toyota has publicly stated that it has styled its vehicles with the Chinese market in mind. 4x as many people in an ascending market is more attractive … right?!?!

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    99% of the time a Genesis sedan is being “driven” by an unaware, ignorant, somewhat rich Asian American. Both hands frozen at 11 and 1 position and looking only straight ahead. It is their way of showing they buy the highest priced Korean Krap and are proud of it! When they discover the car has no resale value they go get another one!
    On Bill Maher’s team!
    Make GMC Motorhomes Great Again!

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Gee, can you be any more RACIST (much less being WRONG)?

      • 0 avatar
        JEFFSHADOW

        The proper term is ACTUALIST. You may opt to redefine it for your own purpose, probably being politically correct and weak.
        Not me, Not now, Not ever.
        You drive on the southern California freeways and experience Little Hong Kong and get back to me on your findings. . .
        How about a photo of a 4 foot Asian female driver with her head at the steering wheel rim, white gloves on both hands, dark glasses on the dash so she can watch through them, newspapers folded over the windows to keep the sun out, etc.
        At least she wasn’t driving an American car!
        Make Chrysler Turbine Great Again!

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          No, based on the derogatory terms you use, YOU are a RACIST.

          And nice to make stupid, gross generalizations.

          Recent Asian immigrants and/or expats (which you seem to be describing) are quite different from Asian-Americans – who tend to be like educated, white Americans who live on the coasts when it comes to their choice in autos.

          And those Asian immigrants and/or expats, themselves can differ quite widely based on their socio-economic status.

          As for the typical Genesis owner, that would be a WHITE male.

          The article which Tim Cain refers to lays it all out:

          “Buyers largely are white, male, college-educated and older than 50, with median household incomes touching $145,000…”

          Geeze, even when it is SPELLED-out for you, you still can’t but help resort to your racist tirade.

          But then again, making up BS and pulling stuff out of your arse (in stark contrast to the FACTS) is typical of your type.

          • 0 avatar
            cimarron typeR

            +1 , in KC burbs I see a lot of Genesis drivers who are 50-60y/o Caucasians going or coming from the golf club based on their attire.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I know a proud Korean-American guy who proudly drives his Kia K900 accompanied by his Korean canine (Jindo) while packing his Kahr K9 to an underground Korean “restaurant” in Hamtramck for genuine charcoal grilled canine – Gaegogi (개고기).

    Even he admits that he should have bought an Audi like David Chang (was given to do that commercial), and that Koreans have a mental block when it comes to designing suspension systems.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      ” mental block when it comes to designing suspension systems.”

      Going off of my recent Elantra, Sonata, and Optima rentals this year (all ’16 or ’17 cars I presume), I’d say the Koreans have turned a corner. Gotta update your vitriolic memes there DW.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        While I can’t speak to the Elantra, the last Sonata (a 2016 rental) I was stuck with had the timeless Korean characteristic of not knowing what to do in response to pavement irregularities in real time, and an Optima I was a passenger in with barely 20,000 miles on it felt like something Japanese with over 200,000 miles on it (in terms of suspension “tightness”).

        My vitriol sill never know any boundaries, for I’m a realist remarking on reality, and reality deserves far more vitriol than even I can marshal on even my worst days.

        Happy, shiny people are ensnared by marketing, prescription medication commercials with surf boarding through fields of wheat, and shiny, new baubles having no real, inherent and/or lasting value.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Well I suppose we must be driving different cars then! If you asked me even 2 years ago I’d agree whole-heartedly. I’ve had some pretty unpleasant Souls, Fortes, and a loosey-goose ’14 Sonata. But my ’16 Sonata SE rental was excellent, same for the Optima, same for the Elantra. All felt buttoned down but never harsh. I’m no hot-shoe driver to assess handling at the limit, but all were utterly competent and comfortable for the class that they’re in.

  • avatar
    ZCD2.7T

    I haven’t driven either the G80 or G90, but have inspected each closely.

    G80 isn’t that convincing, IMO. It’s “nice”, but not nice enough to make me want one.

    G90’s interior is stunning – truly impressive. Exterior is “meh”. So again, not nice enough for a conquest sale from this Audi owner.

    Now, if they offered an AWD G80 with more power and some sporting intent, then maybe…

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      You mean like the G80 Sport with the 3.3T?

      Reviews indicate that it isn’t really particularly sport-tuned, but it is a step up from the standard configurations in that department.

  • avatar
    tekdemon

    lol, so they’ve sold 15,000 over ten months…of which the majority were sold to Hyundai buyers to begin with. Then of the minority sold to actual conquests, 30% of that number was to Lexus buyers. After all these divisions and subtractions I get the feeling that less than one person per major metro actually becomes a conquest sale each month, lol.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Except, most of those “Hyundai” buyers being owners of the Genesis and Equus – who were already “conquest” buyers.

      Sure, there are some owners of loaded Sonatas or Azera who have climbed the income ladder and are ready for a nicer vehicle, but that’s no different from Camry or Avalon owners moving up to Lexus.

      YTD, the G80 and G90 are doing almost double in sales what the GS and LS are doing.

      Those former Lexus buyers went somewhere.

  • avatar
    Reino

    It’s very obvious why Genesis is converting Lexus buyers. Look at the top photo of that elegant, stately executive saloon. Now look at a current Lexus. The Genesis is the modern evolution of the original LS400 in more ways than a new LS.

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