By on May 12, 2017

2014 Nissan Quest - Image: Nissan“The Nissan Quest has been discontinued for the U.S. marketplace.”
– Nissan Sr. Manager, Product Communications, Dan Passe

TTAC has been tracking the Nissan Quest’s failure in the U.S. marketplace for some time. Just ahead of Christmas last year, when it appeared as though the Quest was surely dead in the water, Nissan confirmed that there would in fact be a 2017 Quest.

But when tipped off by an industry insider last February, we noticed that Nissan was reporting higher-than-normal Quest sales despite lacking any meaningful inventory. That’s right — the 2017 Nissan Quest was essentially a fleet-only vehicle.

Most of us stopped tracking the story. After all, it’s a minivan, and a long-ignored minivan, in a market where buyers are currently turning away from minivan in droves. TTAC’s Corey Lewis didn’t quit, however. Like a dog with a bone, Corey discovered that the Quest was missing from NissanUSA.com. Under the Minivans & Vans section, there’s no minivan. We asked Nissan, not for the first time, whether the Quest is dead.

The Nissan Quest is dead. Gone. Expired. Terminated.

If you want one, a handful remain on dealer lots. Cars.com’s inventory includes 41 new Nissan Quests, 25 of which are 2016 models; none of which are 2017s.

But more likely than not, you don’t want. The Quest, particularly since IIHS small overlap crash tests revealed frightening results, simply isn’t that appealing in a segment dominated by FCA, Toyota, and Honda. Even in 2012, the fourth-generation Quest’s best year, only 3 percent of the minivans sold in America were Nissans. When overall minivan volume fell 4 percent the next year, Quest sales plunged 30 percent to only 12,874 units.

Nissan has only reported 79,349 Quest sales since the fourth-gen model arrived in 2011. That’s about the number of Grand Caravans Dodge sells every seven months.

Besides the obvious — the Quest’s lack of popularity — we asked Nissan to clarify why the automaker quit America’s minivan game. Other than clarifying that the Quest was definitely discontinued, Nissan declined to comment further.

Nissan won’t be giving up on the van game entirely. Through the first one-third of 2017, 8.5 percent of the commercial vans sold in America were Nissans: 5,990 full-size NVs and 6,192 small NV200s. The NV is a bit player in the full-size commercial van arena; the NV200 is America’s second-best-selling small commercial van.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

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50 Comments on “It’s Official: The Nissan Quest Is Dead, Discontinued, Defunct, Cancelled...”


  • avatar
    JimZ

    Fertig! Verfallen! Verlumpt! Verblunget! Verkackt!

  • avatar
    jh26036

    News to me they still even made this thing up until last year.

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      Just saw one last week, rental gold no tint whatsoever and hubcaps.. Looked horrible

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        I wouldn’t mind a base model to use for Uber purposes, but they’re not a good value. Not only that, but I really don’t want anything (that isn’t a Hybrid) with a CVT.

        I like the rear styling, maybe I’d upgrade the front with some Elgrand stuff, lol. But, unless they start going for Altima S money, I don’t see it happening.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          @JohnT – Isn’t the resale terrible though? I’d think that a just off rental fleet model from one of the major players could be had for peanuts.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Good point. I was looking at new for financing reasons, but a preowned could be reasonable.

            However…

            Minivan with warranty but also with a CVT = probably a bad idea.

            Used Minivan with a CVT = sex with a “popular” hooker with no rubber.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Edmunds said the fourth gen drove best-in-class. But the musical chairs part wasn’t up to standard.

    • 0 avatar
      quaquaqua

      Uh it may have had the cushiest ride, but it has the worst handling. I guess it depends on your definition of “drove the best”, but to me, that sounds like it drove the worst.

      • 0 avatar
        newenthusiast

        Its a family vehicle. Soft riding is a positive. Crisper handling compromises that. Most minivan drivers would prefer cushy, no? They would complain if it came with hard-as-a-rock performance run flat tires and they could feel everything on the road through the steering wheel.

        • 0 avatar
          NN

          We have a 2013 Quest, and also a 2014 Ford Transit Connect, so both the softest-riding and worst handling (Quest) and hardest riding & best handling (Transit Connect) van on the market, IMO. Yin/Yang. On a long family road trip, you definitely want the Quest, but yes, it does handle like a bowl of pudding. On a windy two-lane, the Transit Connect will surprise you and be almost fun.

          Sad to see the Quest go, it was the most unique and last JDM minivan. We really like ours, at 75k+ miles now, no mechanical issues to report, however standard maintenance costs at Nissan dealers is atrocious ($500 CVT fluid change at 50k miles) and the infotainment system screen goes out on us from time to time.

  • avatar
    Opus

    He’s not dead! He’s pining!!
    Michael Palin, circa 1970
    (fixed)

  • avatar
    fishiftstick

    No no it’s not dead, it’s … it’s restin’! Remarkable van, the Nissan Quest, idn’it, ay?

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    These were just too weird, pricey, and the base trim interior was garbage. The 3rd row didn’t fold into the floor (odyssey has had that since 1999) and it only sat 7. The cvt didn’t help either.

    • 0 avatar
      Joss

      The CVT doesn’t seem to hurt the NV 200. Which kinda surprises me. The only real 200 issue seems to be with the small wheels and tire wear & replacement choices.

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        The CVT is also in the QX60 (nee JX35/Pathfinder) which is certainly heavier, and burdened with AWD.

        • 0 avatar
          Joss

          Juke NIsmo RS no 2017 inventory. NISMO yes RS no. Despite beng listed on the site.

        • 0 avatar
          newenthusiast

          You can get a QX60 in a FWD drive configuration. I drove one last week.

          It’s the base spec (probably only found in rental fleets). It did return remarkable highway mpg for a near full size vehicle on the highway, and it was quiet. But not really competitive in its class for the price. Or as practical as the Quest.

          As for the Quest: of all the vehicles I’ve rented in the last several years on family trips, the Quest’s rear visibility was the best. It was a near half-glass box on wheels. If you wanted nothing else out of a minivan but space and fuel efficiency, then Nissan had what you wanted.

          Is Nissan out of this class now? Or is some variant of the NV200 going to configured like the Transit Connect as its replacement?

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      “The 3rd row didn’t fold into the floor (odyssey has had that since 1999)”

      I looked at a Quest a little while back, and noticed the same thing. So I measured the hatch opening height. I then went home and measured my Odyssey hatch opening height.

      The Quest hatch opening was TEN INCHES SHORTER than the Odyssey–all because of that third row folding.

      That’s some very, very serious shortcoming right there.

      • 0 avatar
        walker42

        Yeah but in our friends’ Quest they keep a lot of stuff in the rear underfloor cargo hold like I do in the trunk of my car. They never have to empty that to fold down the 3rd row. In the Odyssey you force the 3rd row down that hold, after you empty it, then pull the seat back up when you’re done. The 3rd row folds flat at the touch of a button in the Quest. 2nd row folds the same way. In the other minivans you have to hand carry out the 2nd row seats, if you want an unobstructed hauling space. Someone said the Odyssey 3rd row headroom is poor, there’s plenty in the Quest. It comes down to which tradeoffs you prefer. They picked the Quest for its styling and premium drive and found out about the better seats (for them) later. Theirs is white pearl with the larger alloy wheels and it looks great. Not sure who said used Quests are cheap, prices seem high to us.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Old Man: I’m not dead!
    Cart-master: ‘Ere! ‘E says ‘e’s not dead!
    Man: Yes he is.
    Old Man: I’m not!
    Cart-master: ‘E isn’t?
    Man: Well… he will be soon– he’s very ill…
    Old Man: I’m getting better!
    Man: No you’re not, you’ll be stone dead in a moment.
    Cart-master: I can’t take ‘im like that! It’s against regulations!
    Old Man: I don’t want to go on the cart….
    Man: Oh, don’t be such a baby.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    My local Nissan dealer is using one as a dealer shuttle. I think that’s the only one on the lot.

    • 0 avatar
      jimbo1126

      That’s what happened with our VW dealer and their only Eurovan in the 1990s!

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      We had a base model Villager as our shuttle van when the 01 Windstar took a $#it for the last time.

      I think we had one base, one Sport, and one Estate. The Estate sold quickly, next was the Sport (my personal favorite), and the base model languished on the lot forever until it was finally pressed into service to replace the Windstar.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Even the out-of-date Leaf has been outselling the Quest.

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    I guess they’ll push customers to the Pathfinder which is on the same D-Platform as the Quest.

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    Nissan was ACTIN’ SUSPICIOUS.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    So if I am on a great adventure for a ride. I can go on an odyssey but no longer on a quest or a voyage(r) Life in my town and country will never be the same.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Sadly, your Grand Caravan to Sedona and Pacifica will have to be made in a CUV.

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        Make the next Journey a special one.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          On that note, what if the next Journey was rebadged Alfa CUV (can’t spell/remember the name at the moment) built in the US with a Pentastar and an 8spd ZF? Sounds great to me. Domestic Chrysler electronics are only 80% as bad as Italians, and if its cheap, we may have a winner winner chicken dinner.

          • 0 avatar
            punkybrewstershubby aka Troy D.

            The Journey is a joke. NVH is terrible and the interior fit and finish is laughable. Now our ’04 Taurus wagon DOHC, we still love it at 180k!

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          For fans of these as pertaining to “C-pillars from the Gremlin:”

          I had to Juke around, and all who observed me doing so said that I indeed have no Soul!

  • avatar
    Eyeflyistheeye

    Nissan should have just went full JDM weirdo and sold the Elgrand Highway Star here.

  • avatar
    GermanReliabilityMyth

    Nissan, you rotten so and so.

    As that annoying song goes, “You’re gonna miss me when I’m gone…” I’ll have to make sure the wife and I take good care of our odd-duck-collector-piece. I thought it was a great minivan before this article came out and I still feel the same way.

    We’ll just be sure to keep it away from any small overlaps.

    P.S. CVTs are the future, they’re good (usually), get used to it.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      The CVT is your future repair headache.

      • 0 avatar
        GermanReliabilityMyth

        Call me crazy, but I feel if it’s serviced on schedule (ATF changes every 30k IIRC) or earlier and not abused for towing, there’s no reason to believe it shouldn’t last longer than I wish to keep it. Jatco had some serious teething issues with their transmissions, but the heavier ones mated to the V6s, as I understand it, were better overall. Further, quality improved over 2013. And to be frank, I’m 99% sure that the traditional automatic transmissions bolted up in pretty much every minivan are the transmissions from their V6 platform mate (i.e. Sienna -> Camry w/1MZFE). Those were overburdened with the higher GVWR and noodle heads thinking that they were trucks and could tow whatever they wanted with ’em.

        Call me crazy, but I think I’ll be fine. Or at least as fine as I would be with any other minivan.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          I will agree that virtually any FWD minivan has likely trans issues, but I keep seeing newer Nissan cars with bad CVTs, its a known issue that first of all, Nissan’s CVTs are terrible in performance, but also in reliability.

          I don’t like any current minivan. The Pacifica looks the best, but reliability is a huge question mark. Toyota’s refreshed Sienna looks like an evil overgrown kitchen appliance. It wasn’t pretty before, now its just down right revolting. Honda would probably be my choice among FWD mainstream minivans. But even it is not appealing to me, just less repulsive than the Toyota and likely more reliable than the Chrysler.

          Honestly, I think if I had a family big enough to need a van, I’d just get a full-size Transit, medium roof, short or medium length, and the standard V-6 would be fine. Maybe not as refined as, say, the Honda, but I am okay with that. It’ll do the job.

  • avatar
    BrentinWA

    Wait…. you mean they have made some of these since 2012? I had no idea!

  • avatar
    punkybrewstershubby aka Troy D.

    My wife and I transport our family of 5 in our ’11 Quest SV and love it. It doesn’t have that boring look like the Sienna and it doesn’t suffer from having to see yourself coming and going 5 times a day like you do in the Odyssey.

    Sure, they sell more, but drive a Quest and you’ll NEVER bother with an FCA. Seriously? Around these parts an FCA van driver is either over 75 years old or WT, that’s stigma for ya…

    We are sitting at 172k on ours and after installing a new CVT at 165k we still love it. The covered cargo hold is perfect and the AC and cabin comfort is better than the Sienna and 3rd row headroom in the Odyssey is a big negative.

    And the 3.5 with 260hp goes to 6k on full accel and you are at 85mph in a flash.

    We are going to find an off lease ’16 soon and make that a stablemate to our ’11.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    “Quest” is too good a name to drop forever. I hope they have the sense to re-introduce it after a decent interval, when everyone has forgotten the van. They might have to change it slightly – call it the Re-Quest or something.


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