By on May 2, 2017

2017 BMW 340i - Image: BMW USA

BMW isn’t known for revolutionary design changes, so it likely won’t be hard to pick the upcoming 3 Series and X3 crossover out of a crowd of domestic and Japanese competitors. Nor will the models’ powerplants see a complete overhaul.

One somewhat surprising claim, given recent events, is that both next-generation models will retain a diesel option in the United States — and a new one, at that.

The claim comes by way of BMW Blog, which cites a Munich source with knowledge of the automaker’s product planning.

Currently, the BMW 328d packs a 180-horsepower diesel four-cylinder, while the X3, which is approved for the same mill, doesn’t currently list it as an option. The Munich source claims both models will receive the updated B47 version of BMW’s diesel family. That engine, also a 2.0-liter, should make 190 hp and 295 lb-ft of torque.

The engine output isn’t the only change in store for the America-bound oil burners. BMW will apparently change the diesel 3 Series’ name to 330d, while the X3 will adopt the xDrive30d moniker.

Even after Volkswagen gave the already low-demand fuel a dirty stigma, BMW forged ahead with plans to bring new diesels to the U.S. The automaker had to wait in an approvals backlog before its 2017 models were approved for sale by the Environmental Protection Agency. A diesel version of the X5 is also sold on the U.S. market.

While there is no firm arrival date for the next-generation 3 Series and X3, media reports claim the sedan should appear next year as a 2019 model, while the X3 will be a 2018 model. Recently, it was revealed the automaker has a 2018 540d in store for America, packing a 3.0-liter straight-six diesel.

[Image: BMW USA]

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41 Comments on “Diesel Engines Remain in Next-Generation BMW 3 Series, X3: Report...”


  • avatar
    CaliCarGuy

    I’m really surprised at these auto companies forging ahead with diesel options in cars and crossovers here in the US. Dieselgate with VW kinda of messed up diesel’s already less than stellar reputation. But these past year or 2 has seen diesel offerings coming from Chevy,Jaguar, Range Rover etc. I wouldnt touch one though but its cool to see them being offered.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @CaliCarGuy
      Outside the US, vastly more were offered

    • 0 avatar
      mason

      Lots of misnomers in the first post here. (Not) surprisingly, OEMs continue to prove TTAC “bestest” and brightest wrong.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @mason
        Getting used to the mistakes. TTAC’s alternate universe is becoming far removed from the real world.

        • 0 avatar
          mason

          The fact is the leg work has been done and diesels are cleaner than ever while capable of legitimately passing emissions. The continued release of new diesel engines is most certainly a result of Obama’s strong arm attempt at a lofty CAFE requirement. One that diesels can obtain easier than current generations of gasoline engines. For some reason, that really pisses people off around here.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Ha look who’s talking, someone in a fantasy land where VW can do no wrong.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    The same road testing that caught VW’s shenanigans gave BMW a passing grade.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @bumpy ii
      In the alternate universe that is the TTAC forums, Diesels are dead and buried, but Automakers got the opposite impressions and are releasing new diesels at a surprising rate

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        So how many years have recently released diesels been in the development pipeline? Has it been two years since the VW scandal? I’m sure it’s even less for diesels getting banned from Euro cities.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          I heard Pickups will be banned from US cities..too big

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “I heard Pickups will be banned from US cities..too big”

            Is that from a reliable source? All pickups? All sizes/lengths? Got links? Or is that just something BAFO said?

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            I heard Australia will be banned from the world..too loony

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          Upgraded older ones and new. Diesels from manufacturers who never made them before.
          Diesels not banned at all, but older engines Diesel and Gas have to be scrapped.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s a health/cancer issue Europe is facing, linked directly to diesel exhaust, not gas engines.

            They could’ve just asked CARB decades ago, but Europe was way too busy subsidizing diesels, diesel fuel and blindly chasing some pie in the sky reduction in CO2 emissions plants need, and total barrels of oil consumed daily.

            How’s it working out for Europe and their citizens? The health care costs have to be staggering!

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Exactly that is why some many Americans are dying from Gas emissions.Nothing done about it

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Yes many Americans are dying, nothing is being done about it, pickups are banned from US cities while pickups are rapidly disappearing… Any other words of wisdom??????????????????????????????????????????

  • avatar
    craiger

    Did the VW problem result in a significantly lower number of people wanting diesel cars in general?

    I’d imagine that most people aren’t aware of the issue, and of those who are, most of them might just have some negative impression of VW in general. Everyone here know that most people don’t know much about cars.

    I haven’t looked at any sales data, I’m just speculating at this point.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @craiger
      Correct about the very little knowledge by people from NA have about Automobiles, compared to anyone living outside.NA
      Diesel avoidance can be traced back to the issues Oldsmobile had with it’s car block diesels, given diesels a bad name generally.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        The Oldsmobile thing was too long ago. But back then diesel cars gave a great return on investment.

        Today it’s mostly about diesel performance and their exceptional torque from a dig, except they’re not for sports cars. Maybe they should be, but the financial advantage or payback is more similar to sunroofs and upgrade stereos/infotainment.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        No RobertRyan, the main problem with diesel cars in the United States is that there is no economic incentive to buy them. Both the diesel engine and the fuel cost more. On top of this, the main supplier of diesel cars, Volkswagen, has a poor reputation for long-term maintenance and repair costs.

        The US consumers that still want diesel engines want them to be as big, loud, and truck-like as possible. The diesel pickup trucks that sell frequently have the suspension modified to make the truck even taller. There is a reason FCA puts a large “Cummins” badge on the side of Ram pickup trucks with that brand of diesel engine. Truck diesel engines would be even more desirable if they still sent some soot out the exhaust pipes under acceleration.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @George B
          Little incentive to buy them here as well. Europe is the big market for diesel cars .
          Australia enormous appetite for diesel pickups and SUV’s

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Even in Australia, diesel sales are losing ground to gassers. Figure VW has done way more damage to the acceptance of diesel cars, than Oldsmobile. But there’s a lot more to it.

            My 1st car was in fact the infamous 5.7 Olds diesel. I made it work and I loved it. Diesel cars made total sense back then. Way simpler than gas engines, extremely cheap/low maintenance, especially if you were used to dealing with a spaghetti factory of vacuum lines, spark plugs/wires/cap/condensor/points/igniter, and everything else timing and emissions related.

            Too many things to go wrong with gas engines back then. Things have totally flipped around!

            There was a time for diesels to really take hold of the US market. That was long ago, and way before the thought of “clean diesels”.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            “Even in Australia, diesel sales are losing ground to gasser”
            And Pickups are rapidly disappearing in the US. Alternative TTAC facts or more correctly a US trolls ” facts”

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “And Pickups are rapidly disappearing in the US…”

            Uh, even if true, I’m not sure what that has to do with the topic. Or ANY topic! But OK, WTF are you talking about?

            Are they getting (illegal or otherwise) alien abducted?

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Yes Mike, its a FACT that everyday, scores of pickups disappear (from dealer lots, but they tend to reappear in people’s driveways).

            But down with North America, nobody there knows anything. Just look at how few vehicles they buy compared to the worlds leader in everything, Australia. That alone tells you how nobody in North America knows anything about cars.

          • 0 avatar
            slap

            “And Pickups are rapidly disappearing in the US.”

            Crackpot Alert!

        • 0 avatar
          mason

          There is no “Cummins” on the side of any truck built within at least the last 7 years, probably longer. There is a capital “C” which I just went out and measured on my ’14 at exactly 2-1/2″ square. If that’s large to you, I’d hate to see your unit of “reference”. FYI, gas model trucks have similar badges. “Triton”, “Hemi”, and “Vortec” may ring a bell for the unbiased.
          I get such a kick out of all these uneducated comments. Do you really think people go buy $60k dollar trucks to pimp around and roll coal? Negative. Because the engines physically aren’t possible of doing it. They go buy a $8-10k dollar truck and mod it (usually incorrectly). No different than the stupid Civics rolling around with 3 ft wings, 20″ wheels and 5″ fart can exhausts.

          You simply can’t lump everybody that buys a vehicle into one category. It just doesn’t work that way.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            It says “Cummins” inside the “C”, doesn’t it?

          • 0 avatar
            CarnotCycle

            “Do you really think people go buy $60k dollar trucks to pimp around and roll coal?”

            Yes indeed they do. I live in semi-rural area, and when I drive our ‘nice’ car on a Friday night there’s at least one brodozer that picks us out of the crowd and makes sure they’re at the stoplight ready to drag.

            Better question is how many people buy $60k+ and up trucks to do real work? Half, maybe? My neighbor’s got a giant diesel Ford crewcab longbox with lift, chipped motor, the works…and he takes a single dirtbike up to the hills about once every couple weeks. Rest the time it is a commuter. I think that describes use-profile for most these rolling Viagra pills.

          • 0 avatar
            Hooligans

            Mason, I don’t wish to argue but I will respectfully disagree based on experience. The Titan XD, for one, displays Cummins on the fender. Where I live and where many others live as well, young men are making foolish financial decisions to ‘Roll Coal’ and generally disturb the peace in pickups that are capable of working far harder than they will ever need to. Street rods, in effect. Expensive, heavy ones.

            I’ve spent years wondering why we couldn’t have small diesels here in the US. In Kuwait and Iraq I’ve seen luxuriously loaded Land Cruisers with turbodiesels and manual transmissions, for example. Why not here?

            Unfortunately, diesels seem to be a polarizing topic. Shouldn’t be..

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Hooligans
            It appears to be a polarizing subject. It is not anywhere else.NA is peculiar in that way

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            @Mason,

            Sure it does. Pickups are bad, people who drive them are bad. All bad. And I know because my neighbor has one and he represents everyone everywhere.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            “Sure it does. Pickups are bad, people who drive them are bad. All bad”
            Well if you think that do not drive one

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            Carnotcycle you didnt mention what your “nice” car is that you drive on Friday nights but your choice to own a car that only gets driven on occasion is no different than your neighbors choice to drive a truck he may not necessarily need. If that’s his only vehicle the argument could be made he’s wasting less resources owning only one vehicle rather than two or three. A truck can be used to haul, tow, plow, take the kids to school, or stock up on groceries for the month. It can be driven in fair weather, crap weather, rain, snow, through mud and ford streams. Meanwhile the guy with the “nice” car that seats two and can barely fit an overnight bag in the back hides out in a garage at the first site of rain and is lucky to see enough miles in a year to justify an oil change mocks his neighbor that chooses to own something useful. Oh the irony. Why is it everytime the “D” word (diesel) gets mentioned on this site it tends to bring the flamers out in full force? How many responsible pickup drivers do you see on the road day in and day out doing what they’re supposed to and using their truck for truck things? Those guys aren’t as fun to bash I guess. Sure there’s plenty of asshats on the road that drive pickups. Same can be said for sports cars and the little rice burner poser wanna be rally cars. The vehicle doesn’t make the personality.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            @ Hooligans my comment was based on the response above – “There is a reason FCA puts a large “Cummins” badge on the side of Ram pickup trucks with that brand of diesel engine.”

            The “C” badge on 4th gen Rams is 2-1/2″ square. Some upper trim models have the “ummins” inside the “C” but most do not. The ones that do are still only 2-1/2″ square. That’s not a large badge in my book considering the amount of real estate on the side of a full sized truck.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Hooligans
    “In Kuwait and Iraq I’ve seen luxuriously loaded Land Cruisers with turbodiesels and manual transmissions, for example. Why not here?”
    From the various US basedTrolls on this : the following answers
    (1) No one really wants them otherwise they would be already selling them
    (2) They do not meet the incredible US safety and emissions requirements
    (3) US already has vehicles that are as good
    (4)Yes they may have the Chicken Tax, but that does not really affect the price( Ha Ha)
    OEM’s pay these Trolls to wander Auto sites.. Funniest was a character the was extolling the fantastic qualities of the Econoline, how much better it was than any European Van. When Ford brought out the Transit, he disappeared.

  • avatar

    Why not ? BMW didn’t play games, and their cars all passed pollution. These cars have been in the pipeline for a long time, and BMW has many markets where a gas car is rare…so it won’t cost them much more to certify them for the US, they are already on a shelf somewhere. In most of Europe, it’s 95% diesel…in Spain close to 100 %.

    Everyone has a short memory. In the time I bought my SUV, 2008, it was 2.50 gas, spiked to $4.50 gas, came back to $3 gas. I would not have replaced my TDi with a CTS unless gas was low, as going from 40 mph to 19 mpg is significant if you do 30k miles per year like I do-but it now costs the same to run the CTS as the TDi when prices were high.

    I see no reason (yes, I know tankers are stacked outside ports, and they even want to park them in the Hudson River near me) why fuel prices won’t spike, and suddenly “Detroit was unprepared again” and “US market all gas guzzlers”…..

    Run gas prices back to $5/gal in the US and there will be a wait list for the d versions, and ADP stickers if higher…..

  • avatar
    TOTitan

    In 2013 I picked a 4 year old CPO BMW 335d with just 34,000 miles for 28K. It now has 97,000 trouble free miles, mostly accumulated on long high speed road trips, a task it does better than anything Ive owned previously. This thing is amazing….0-60 5.5 sec, 1/4 mile 13 sec, mpg @ 100 mph 30, top speed limited 155, unlimited 175. Show me another car at any price point that can match those numbers.

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    Can I get it in a brown wagon with a stick and AWD?

    • 0 avatar
      TOTitan

      The M57 engine is not available with a stick even in Germany. BMW apparently considers it to be too much of a torque monster for a manual setup.

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