By on April 25, 2017

Repair Auto Mechanic Car Automobile Service

Nothing lasts forever, as Axl Rose once said. After flatlining for a couple of years, during which time car owners — on average — saw no increases in repair costs stemming from “check engine” lights, bills are headed back up.

A study looking at average repair costs in 2016 has found that the price of discovering the cause of that dreaded light rose 2.7 percent between last year and 2015. That brings the average repair bill for this type of garage visit to $398. However, not every region of America took a hit.

In its 2017 Vehicle Health Index study, repair data provider CarMD broke down the tired components that most often sent drivers on a nervous trip to their local service bay last year. Of the approximately 5.3 million repairs logged in its database, the top five culprits happened to be the usual suspects.

Country-wide, the top faulty part was the oxygen sensor, comprising 8 percent of repairs, followed by the pricey catalytic converter at 6.75 percent. Faulty ignition coils and spark plugs came in third at 6.23 percent of mechanic visits, while a loose gas cap was the mystery behind 4.16 percent of “check engine” lights. Non-functioning mass air flow sensors rounded out the top five, at 3.84 percent.

Not surprisingly, 2005 model year vehicles were most likely to have a glowing amber light gnawing a hole in the driver’s stomach. The average age of the afflicted vehicles, 11.9 years, happens to be almost the exact median age of vehicles driving on U.S. roads (11.6 years).

Because of natural variability in the number of vehicles needing certain repairs, the median repair bill fluctuates slightly from year to year, outside of easier to pin down factors like parts and labor. Real estate costs play another role in the final bill. For 2016, average labor costs rose 4.7 percent, while parts saw an inflationary 1.4 percent increase in price.

Drivers in the Northeast saw the largest average bill, at $401. That’s up 6.5 percent over the previous year. The next fastest-growing “check engine” light repair was found in the Midwest, where bills rose 5.7 percent to an average of $385 last year. On a regional basis, that’s still the lowest. The South only saw a 2.9-percent climb, though its bills rang in at $400.

If you’re living west of the Continental Divide, you might be in luck. Average repair bills fell 1.1 percent to $399. Of course, none of this is of any comfort if you inherited someone else’s lemon, or if your long-time vehicle suddenly decided to implode.

Going back in CarMD’s data, it’s interesting to see the drop-off in repair bills following the onset of the recession. In happier times, 2006 to be exact, the average U.S. bill was $422.36. The low point in the past decade occurred in 2011, when average repair costs hit $333.93.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

56 Comments on “Repair Costs on the Upswing After Declining for Two Years...”


  • avatar
    ATLOffroad

    Their data is pretty spot on. I have never had any major issues with my truck until 6 months ago. It just happens to be 12 years old.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    An average of $400 makes me sad. A $20 scanner from Amazon to find the cause of the CEL (or a free check at the auto parts store), a reputable aftermarket sensor from Amazon or RockAuto, and about $20 of tools, and you are good to go replacing your own O2 sensor. (Or MAF sensor, if you are very lucky, and the code actually mentions the thing.)

    I know that not everybody is willing or able to perform major repairs, but an O2 sensor is so minor, it just kills me to see people paying a mechanic (often book-labor hours at dealer rates) for something so easy. (And I wish no mechanic would charge to tighten the gas cap.)

    (And if you have an I4, plugs/coils are easy, albeit usually flagged with just “Cyl. X misfire” and require a little bit of narrowing down before you replace parts.)

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Around my area theres a mechanic who charges $100 just to LOOK at your car, I’m sure the gas caps an extra $50.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Problem with me trying to repair my own car is that I would inevitably break something far more expensive and complicated in the process.

        • 0 avatar
          DearS

          I’ve broken one of my BMWs by fixing them.

          The timing belt on my 525i. It let go 20,000 miles later because a bolt came loose. Bye, bye engine.

          Fixed all kinds of other things I’m proud of though, including that timing belt. Don’t regret any of it.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      It’s statements like these that serve no positive purpose. A $20 code reader is next to worthless for most problems. There are a few tools that work ok for basic engine functions at around $100. At $200 you can ad some basic functions for trans or abs. For any real diagnostic ability you need to spend about $1000. Most shops have multiple different scan tools that cost between $5-10k. In a strange scheme​ to make a profit, they charge you more than a big Mac. Somehow a place that spends $100K+ on equipment, and hires techs that have $20k+ in tools and an expense education, is ripping you off. Go figure.

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        Actually you can get an ELM 327 interface box for 12 bucks and free apps for smartphone to read OBD codes and some sensor data. Then hit the internet for help with diagnosis. Sure not every problem is easy to diagnose, but for high volume cars, most common problems are well understood.

        Go to Rockauto for parts catalogs, then grab the part numbers and check on Amazon and eBay too. All three are good sources in my experience. Generally all 3 beat Autozone and O’Reilly on price.

        My local NAPA store has three counter guys who are in their 50s and really understand vehicles, not like the high school kids at Autozone and O’Reilly. So on tough problems I’ve found the NAPA knowhow to be a valuable resource too.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        As someone who pays the bills at the best shop in my region, I can tell you that the internet is not an asset for the typical do-it-yourselfer. Admittedly, I live in a very liberal hamlet. Perhaps more representative parts of the country are far smarter. OTOH, the people who try to fix their own cars around here merely create expensive non-learning experiences for themselves. ALL-DATA and Identifix aren’t free. Nor are worthwhile diagnostic tools. Good techs are almost priceless, but I write them checks that put them in the top 10% of wage earners in the country.

        I write checks for taxes no member of ANTIFA knows exist, and I’ve got lumpen bureaucrats salivating for the day we go out of business whose job descriptions involve things you’ll never hear of until you try to open a business, like the guy whose taxpayer-funded job it is to obsess about what would happen if a water main were to break and all of your faucets were to turn into vacuums, and for some reason they were submerged in buckets of industrial waste. When some entitled nimrod complains about my hourly rate, I tell him about how we have to mop our parking lot when a car comes in with a fluid leak, since there are POS public ‘servants’ who spend their time trying to catch us letting anything run off of our property into the ground water. It’s fun to point out statist’s duplicity in getting fleeced on car repairs in this academic dystopia, because it is the only brush with reason most of our customers will encounter in their loathsome lives.

        • 0 avatar
          focus-ed

          ELM327, Torque Pro (not just codes but also actual scan data) and and diagnostics time not measured in 75$/h is the advantage of DIY-er. It’s either simple to figure out or coplex enough that shop’s bill will be beyond acceptable (and being billed for arbitrary hoours does not help). I only have limited experienced with troubleshooting but all I can say is that I’d payed 2 shops before fixing the stuff myself (pesky misfire). Not only the expense but also parts that did not have to touched were moved and engine bay was liberally washed (pin the search for short) that surely promoted rust on brake lines. Oh, and the fool that claimed to know how to drive stick (test drive that proved nothing even though the issue was fairly obvious) forgot to release ebrake and burned my rear drums. Neither shop was a tree shade mechanic. I’d rather do it myself unless I have no equipment.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          Speaking of loathsome lives, I’m left wondering how happy a person can really be whose sole apparent reason for coming here is to insult others. If you have an excess of bile, perhaps reducing production of it would be easier than exporting the surplus.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Is there any subject matter at all that doesn’t make you foam about “liberals?” Like, anything?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            He is rather liberal with his loathing!

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Is there anything that liberals don’t diminish by their existence?

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            If it weren’t for “liberals”, there wouldn’t be support for the EPA, where the “check engine” light originated. This “light” has generated a crapload of business for shops that otherwise would be Midas franchises (doing 99 bucks an axle brake jobs).

            Yes, pollution prevention is GOOD BUSINESS.

            Liberal Derangement Syndrome.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            The rod up Toddy-boy’s arse has a rod up its arse.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        I can’t help but think of an old adage I once heard. “O2 sensors don’t die, they are murdered.”

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        Whatever. I have diagnosed many issues and successfully repaired them with a code scanner. Not always, but more than often enough to make it and any special tools I got worthwhile.

        Furthermore I have had many shops with there expensive stuff plug in and throw parts at it and shoot me the bill. Again, not always.

        Here is the thing, as cars have become more “complex” I think they have gotten easier to diagnose. The parts have gotten more expensive but I’d rather diagnose an issue on my Ecoboost than the carbed 302 my 68 had.

        • 0 avatar
          MBella

          There’s nothing wrong with doing repairs yourself. The problem comes when you suggest that a shop is ripping you off when they charge significantly more than doing it yourself. Businesses have expenses that have to be figured into your bill. It’s no different than a pizza place charging $10 for a pizza that costs $1.25 to make.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      A $20 scanner doesn’t tell you the cause of a check engine light. Why do you think so many auto parts chains will read codes for free? It’s because they hope once they tell you the code, you’ll spend a ton of money shotgunning parts onto your car to try to make it go away.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      The time I fixed my BMW 325i by using a cheap code reader became a who-dunnit mystery. The check engine light would come on intermittently. Engine was running great, no issues with driving at all.

      Code reader: Lean Engine Code – left bank

      Replaced the upper and lower intake, which had some tears in the rubber. Very obvious and not so easy fix given the cramped conditions of the car. That didn’t fix the problem.

      And on I went – replacing the DISA seal. Nope. The oil dipstick seals(!). Nope. Tried cleaning the MAF, which I thought was getting old and tired. And then eventually replaced the MAF. That didn’t fix the problem either.

      One final try! It turned out to be the DISA flap, which wasn’t opening all the way at higher RPM levels.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    jess buy kah don’t break! ha ha!!!!

  • avatar
    deanst

    I just got a check engine warning yesterday. A $40 scanner seems to indicate a faulty vapour canister purge valve – a GM part costing about $200, or $100 on amazon, and looking like it costs about $5 to make. For now I cleared the code and await further developments!

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Gotta wonder how many mechanics diagnosis this stuff correctly, if you’re lucky you can fix O2 codes with fresh plugs, isnt always the cat.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      It can be any number of issues. Cats, vacuum leaks, mass airflow issues, etc… Of course a $20 code reader will tell you everything, and a shop charging $400 is ripping you off when they had to perform some actual diag on your vehicle with tools that cost a significant investment.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        “Of course a $20 code reader will tell you everything, and a shop charging $400 is ripping you off when they had to perform some actual diag on your vehicle with tools that cost a significant investment.”

        Not sure if sarcastic or not…

        $20 code reader will tell you a generic generic “bank lean” or “out of range” on the O2 sensor, but like you said it could be any number of things like vacuum leaks, cats, etc causing it. I agree that the proliferation of cheap scanners is awesome, but they are not the end all be all. There’s a reason why professional traveling diagnosticians like my brother are so well employed, they’re the guys the shops themselves turn to once they’re stumped. And it goes way beyond the equipment at that point (which runs into the thousands, not hundreds of dollars). I know my brother’s favorite tool is the basic test light.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        Yeah, so because it might be something requiring a special tool I shouldn’t even try and just fork over my money to a shop when in my experience it is less than half the time that I need said special tool, I can often buy that tool for less than paying a shop to use it, and many times the shop has gotten diagnostics wrong in my experience.

        I’m not discounting the need for a good shop as there are times it is impractical for diy repairs, but suggesting a person with a scanner will always do more harm and never get it right is stupid and wasteful for anyone with half a brain.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        I actually have a list of “shop only” repairs, AC being one as I’ll sooner pay a shop $100 than drop $80 on canned AC junk with cheap guages.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      A friend of mine paid Honda more than a thousand dollars to replace a catalytic convertor on his Civic Hybrid. That didn’t solve his CEL problem. It turned out that he had never changed his air filter in more than 200K miles. He showed it to me – it looked like it had been coated in road tar.
      He didn’t know the first thing about basic maintenance, and assumed that if it ran well, everything was fine. That was a very expensive lesson for him. And I’m sure he’s not the only one who just puts in gas and keeps on driving, then pays for an expensive misdiagnosis.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I’d be willing to bet that a lot of those plugged cats are the result of other less expensive issues that were left unrepaired (ignoring a CEL for a rich condition caused by any number of issues, pcv issues)

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Finding a good mechanic with the full array of diagnostics gear can help, but not always.

      Autozone also has been known to use their OBDII readers and tell the owner what is wrong. Sometimes they’re wrong too.

      Even so, even dealers have been known to misdiagnose problems. One might say the O2 sensor is bad. Another might say it is the Cat that’s plugged. Another mechanic might conclude it’s a combination of fault codes that causes the Service Engine Soon light to come on.

      Brings to mind the time when my best friend went to get his Amana Radarange repaired. One said it’s the Magnetron! Big bucks! Another said it was a sensor. Lots of labor involved!

      When he finally took it apart himself and used my Huntron Tracker 2000 to check the components, it turned out to be a $2 diode. Got one at Radio Shack.

      My 2006 F150 was that way. One failure usually led to another failure or an unintended complication. Sometimes it’s like a dog chasing its own tail.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        You’d be surprised how rudimentary some OEM dealership diagnostic capabilities are. Anyone worth their salt will typically leave due to low pay and start their own indie place. It literally boils down to following a flow chart in the factory service manual and chucking parts at it.

        Key word being “good mechanic.” All of the Snap on Veruses in the world won’t help if the diagnostician cannot think critically. There’s a whole slew of really awesome diagnosticians on youtube: ScannerDanner based out of Pittsburgh, Eric O. of South Main Auto in Avoca NY, Keith of New Level Auto working out of Staten Island, and my own brother “Motoyam82” working out of State College PA. Just fascinating stuff and really satisfying to watch the quality of work and sleuthing.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        Here’s the problem- the code (or codes) won’t tell you what is wrong. They tell you where the problem is. It’s like going to the doctor because your shoulder hurts. The pain is your “check engine” light. You need to pay a doctor to figure out *why* your shoulder hurts.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Yeah, I understand both of you guys but the spirit and intent of this article as I interpret it is to bring to light the high average cost of getting auto-repair work done.

          Most people don’t have that kind of spare change laying around, since most all of their income is obligated in some way or another.

          There’s a saying, “A technician is only as good as his spare parts bin” but by having to “chuck parts at it” that drives up the cost tremendously.

          And that’s not counting the extra labor.

  • avatar

    I carry a code scanner in the glove box. It has helped me diagnose igntion coils, throttle position sensors, and with the help of forums, hard to find tears in intake hoses.

    The CTS goes bug nuts with lights “SERVICE STABILITRAK SOON” “ENGINE POWER REDUCED”. “TRACTION CONTROL OFF” Read codes, shut off, see if they come back. If the codes cluster, you can get an idea what is wrong. You learn that a throttle sensor can cause a stabilitrak light…even though the codes are “idle setting not found” and later “incorrect voltages” The cause turns out to be the contacts in the TP sensor are broken. The alternate is to call a flatbed, which gets you into the new car dealer lots, lots faster. For the record, I paid a normally good mech to not find the TP sensor = Stabilitrak warning issue.

    I can only imagine the financial terror if I took parts of my 100k plus motor pool to a mechanic every time the low information CE light comes on. You learn fast not to stress for any non flashing DE light…you certainty don’t call AAA.

    If you buy a car with an enthusiast following, you can diagnose the ten most common “they all do that” problems and fix them, usually pretty cheaply….

  • avatar
    Jacob

    I gotta say that the repair bills for car repairs in the US are horrendous. I got rid of many perfectly functioning 10-year oldish cars simply because of the horrendous repair estimates. For example, how much does it cost to replace shocks and struts with springs on all four corners on an American car? I have seen quotes of around two thousand USD or more in independent shops or chains like Firestone, and that’s using third-party Chinese parts that last very little time. And when your old Ford or Mercury is already worth this much (or less as a trade in), it just isn’t worth to be putting so much money into it.

    I have been given a 550USD quote to replace a water pump in a vehicle where it is mounted on top of the engine (very easy to reach and replace yourself with a plain wrench). When I asked “why so expensive?”, I have been told “It’s because of tight packaging, things are difficult to reach in these cars”. The shops are basically treating people for idiots today (later, I replaced the pump myself very quickly with a new one hundred dollar pump).

    As far as the spark plug replacement costs go, these things can be VERY difficult and expensive to replace. You’d be surprised how difficult it can be to reach the rear bank plugs on the transversely mounted V6 engines. (And in general, if you have an old car with such engine, you’d be surprised how hard it can be to reach other trivial components). In a lot of cases, taking off the engine’s lower intake is the only way to go, which is really entertaining because you need to disconnect like a dozen of electrical plugs, and dozens of bolts in specific order, replace gaskets, then put everything back in reverse order. I never got this job done without forgetting to plug at least one tube or a wire socket resulting in a variety of unrelated error codes.

    • 0 avatar
      Halftruth

      I have also noticed that jobs are priced from a book (not sure what the name of it is) and many mechanics base their service based on what this good book says. 5 hours and it takes 90 min? Oh well, that’s how the cookie bounces. A coon’s age ago, I used to repair consumer electronics. A guy comes in with a broken VCR. Turns out it was a belt. Was fixed in ten or so minutes and cost 95 dollars. “95 dollars for a damn belt!?! I could’ve done it myself!” Maybe, but he didn’t. My then boss would later say he paid for the “knowledge” of our shop knowing how to fix it. I can see both sides but in the auto biz, there is too much hackery and price gougery.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “Book time” isn’t just a bunch of numbers pulled out of thin air. if some shop did a 5 hour job in 90 minutes, I’d probably ask if they wouldn’t mind doing it again, the right way.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          “if some shop did a 5 hour job in 90 minutes, I’d probably ask if they wouldn’t mind doing it again, the right way.”

          That’s not really right. There are many ‘tricks of the trade’ for certain jobs where mechanics have figured out more efficient ways at getting at certain components that the factory specified a particular sequence of disassembly of getting at.

          I’ll give you an example: lower intake gaskets on a GM3800. Seasoned mechanics can bang this job out pretty quickly by undoing the upper intake manifold but leaving all of the vac hoses connected and just flipping it back to gain access to the lower intake manifold and troublesome gasket. The customer is not at all getting a shoddy repair or getting cheated, mechanics have just figured out how to be efficient. Other times the factory has just been overly cautious on the time estimate, and someone who’s done that job 100+ times has things down to muscle memory at that point and can really fly along.

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            This is correct. Especially modern labor times are nowhere near as generous as Jim stated. The tech will likely loose the first time he does a job, and then start making up time as he does the job more frequently.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    The issue for me isn’t a car that’s expensive to repair; it’s a car that breaks often. That was the deal-breaker with the X5, which was under warranty and cost me very little out-of-pocket. It just got annoying to make visits to the BMW Service Center part of my normal shuffle.

    Maybe I’ll try again with another Bimmer—because I believe that one to have been cursed—but probably not for a while.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “because I believe that one to have been cursed”

      Frankly it sounds like a pretty standard E70 ownership experience.

    • 0 avatar
      DearS

      I’m taking a break from BMWs also. Not the worst cars, but they do need a bit more TLC than I care to give with my busy schedule. Loving and hating the reliability of my somewhat boring Honda. It gives me no mechanical excuses for replacing it.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        “Loving and hating the reliability of my somewhat boring Honda. It gives me no mechanical excuses for replacing it.”

        That was my ’12 Civic LX to a tee. Perfectly reliable, efficient, surprisingly comfortable. But elicited zero emotion, failed the classic “turn around to catch another glimpse as I’m walking away” test. That’s not to say I’d ever consider jumping into a Bimmer as a solution to that “problem.”

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Yeah, when you know the names of the service writer’s family, it’s time to get another car.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      I’ve only ever owned Japanese cars, save for 1 American and 1 German.

      Out of the Japanese cars, I’ve paid a grand total of $900 for repairs over 18 years of driving them. I don’t do my own repairs, though I do my own maintenance. The last thing that broke that required paying somebody was to replace a wiring harness for the tail light in a 10-year-old Outback. And I got out for around $200 parts + labor. Our cars usually get replaced between 10-15 years of age mostly out of boredom or feature upgrade need.

  • avatar
    carsofchaos

    Back about 8 years ago, before I knew much about cars, my blinkers stopped working on my 2000 Cherokee Sport. Took it to a well-known repair chain in town, let’s call it M***s (you can probably figure it out). Was told that the flasher relay needed to be replaced, that it was a “big, complicated job to do” and that it would be $400 plus tax. Being unemployed at the time, and not having an extra $400, I took my Jeep and went home. Jumped on the old interwebs and looked up replacing a flasher relay on a 2000 Jeep Cherokee Sport. $10 part, remove small panel from lower part of the dash with 2 screws to get access to said flasher relay, unplug old flasher relay, plug in new flasher relay, replace panel.
    I was done in 10 minutes and out $10. Needless to say, never went back to good old King M***s.
    About a year later the heat stopped working in the same Jeep. I still knew little about cars. I took it to the repair facility at a large retail chain store, let’s call it S***s. I was told by the mechanics that the radiator was bad an needed to be replaced, a $600 repair all said and done. Picked up the Jeep 12 hours later, drove 5 minutes, and the heat stopped working. Beyond frustrated, I took it to a buddy of mine who flushed the radiator which was clogged up with silt. After that heat worked fine. As best we could tell, S***s had never even replaced the radiator.
    Nowdays I do 90% of work on my vehicles myself, and what I don’t do I have a mechanic who runs an independent shop I’ve used for 5 years do the work. I don’t know if the buffoonery I experienced at the big retail chains is just indicative of the big retail chains or not (I’ve also had rip off experiences at S*S Tire, and probably others that I’m just forgetting about), but the #1 thing I would say to anyone is take some time educating yourself about your car, repairs, costs, etc. In a country where all of us have 2+ vehicles, you need to have the ability to know when the mechanic says “it’s your Johnson rod Mr. Costanza” that they are full of s**t.

    • 0 avatar
      Felix Hoenikker

      Carso….
      The business model of dealer repair shops and repair chains pays the service writers on a percentage of the dollar value of the business they generate; not on how efficiently they do the work. The incentive is to maximize the bleed to the customer for each transaction. This works as long as the customers are ignorant and compliant. That is, it works until it doesn’t.
      I found this out the hard way over 20 years ago. Now if a car is out of warranty, I take it to a trusted indie mechanic if I can’t or don’t want to DIY it. I’m very happy with the shop I now use for non warranty work.

  • avatar
    bikegoesbaa

    A car is the second most expensive thing many people will ever buy, and the most dangerous object in an average person’s life.

    Given the proliferation of free information available online; I don’t have a whole lot of sympathy for people who remain willfully ignorant of the basic maintenance and diagnostics of a machine they own.

    If my garbage disposal cost $30k and had a decent chance of killing me if something went wrong, I’d be pretty motivated to understand the fundamentals of how to care for and repair it too.

  • avatar
    another_VW_fanboy

    Having worked in aftermarket auto parts for a time, I can understand the rise in repair costs to a point. To retain a licensed, trained tech(s) is expensive, and cars are much more complicated. Aftermarket parts however are mostly astonishingly cheap Chinese junk. It’s amazing how awful some of them are. Were not talking performance parts but the regular stuff you need to keep your car going. So along with the rising cost of auto maintenance and decline of quality in parts I chose to lease my vehicles to avoid the maintenance aspect all together. The peace of mind is worth the affordable payment.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      agreed, it’s become a real minefield, particularly when even known good brands start to outsource to China. Not saying all Chinese stuff is inherently bad, but the fact that quality can be so variable depending on how much attention was paid to QC on that particular day makes me leery of anything coming out of there. Having said all that, there’s still good stuff out there. When you do a lot of DIY stuff, you also become much more aware of the wildly variable cost of replacement parts across brands and even models. I can buy OEM Motorcraft front shocks for $30 for my very old school twin-i beam ranger. OEM front struts for my Mac-strut ES300 were 6x as expensive, generic Camry-spec aftermarket pieces were more reasonable but still more than 2-3x the cost of Ranger stuff. No springs to compress or anything either, just bolt everything in both front and rear.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • sgeffe: Wow!!
  • sgeffe: The A/G-Bodies weren’t well-protected against rust. (Neither were the later A- (Ciera, Celebrity) or...
  • SuperCarEnthusiast: Elon Musk has built Ebay, Paypal, SpaceX and a couple of less known companies already! He has two...
  • Robotdawn: Saw one of these at the Hyundai dealership parked out front. For kicks I parked my Cruze hatch next to it...
  • sgeffe: I actually saw an ad for Krown someplace in the Detroit area. AFAIK, there’s none in Ohio..not sure about...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States