By on April 27, 2017

1984 GMC Jimmy Gypsy Street Coupe, Image via Craigslist

Those of you who are regulars of the Rare Rides series will no doubt remember the thrashing we gave another similar-era Jimmy a while back. And if you’re not regulars of Rare Rides, then you’re doing TTAC incorrectly and your life is a shambles. Fix it!

Anyway, this Jimmy here is a custom vehicle, a one-off General Motors’ idea that didn’t make it to production. So come along now as we explore the rare wonder of the Gypsy Street Coupe.

That’s right, the full name for this is the GMC S-15 Jimmy Gypsy Street Coupe. Found here on Craigslist, it’s actually for sale by its owner in Boise, which is in Idaho. That’s sort of in the middle part of the United States, south of Canada.

1984 GMC Jimmy Gypsy Street Coupe, Image via 67-72chevytrucks.com

I’ve only been able to find one ad clipping, which looks like it was meant for dealers. I’ve hurt my eyes zooming in on this so you don’t have to. Here are the special features of this “Traffic Builder.”

First, the exterior: It has silver-colored rocker panel extensions, two-tone stripes, and a raised hood.

1984 GMC Jimmy Gypsy Street Coupe, Image via Craigslist

The hood is one of the more interesting features, as according to the brochure image, these STREET COUPE letters are cast, rather than decals, “to add a touch of class.” And we all know when you specifically call out something as having class, it definitely does.

1984 GMC Jimmy Gypsy Street Coupe, Image via Craigslist

There’s also a unique, wrap-around rear spoiler, which follows the C-pillar across the roof and down the other side. I think that’s my favorite feature here, if I have to pick just one.

1984 GMC Jimmy Gypsy Street Coupe, Image via Craigslist

Moving on to the interior, passengers are presented with this rainbow Gypsy logo on the glove box. Once they pry their eyes from the lid, they’ll also see the special cloth seats, to “travel luxuriously to sports events, or errands about town.” Formal occasions are also in the mix, and you’ll understand why when you look just below here.

1984 GMC Jimmy Gypsy Street Coupe, Image via Craigslist

Think of your significant other in their formal wear, examining the comfortable passenger seat. They’ll see the word “truck” repeated over and over, and will certainly not think twice about plopping their bum right next to you. You get the feeling GM really thought of everything for this special edition.

1984 GMC Jimmy Gypsy Street Coupe, Image via Craigslist

The back seats carry on the sporting and stylish motif, and look unused in this 33-year-old vehicle.

1984 GMC Jimmy Gypsy Street Coupe, Image via Craigslist

The exterior shows some signs of wear (it does have 103,000 miles), but unlike the old Jimmy that was the subject of our other Rare Rides, the owner of this one is only asking $4,000.

1984 GMC Jimmy Gypsy Street Coupe, Image via Craigslist

Seems like a reasonable enough price for a rare piece of custom, not-meant-to-be General Motors history.

[Images via Craigslist]

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44 Comments on “Rare Rides: One-of-One 1984 GMC Gypsy Street Coupe Is on the Move...”


  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Quick, who’s the ’80s TV character most suited for this fine ride?
    1) “Faceman” from “The A-Team”
    2) “Hawk” from “Airwolf”
    3) “MANIMAL”
    4) TJ Hooker

    Winner gets a six pack of Bartles and Jaymes wine coolers.

  • avatar
    statikboy

    Wait, no mention of the fancy looking zippered (P?)leather pouches under the back seat arm rests? Were they standard Jimmy fare? And if not, what are they?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      If I recall correctly, those were optional on Jimmys and Blazers of the day, which had no rear armrests. That back seat was very narrow, too.

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      Standard as armrest.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      My brother-in-law, a pretty well-to-do pulmonologist (lung doctor for you great unwashed) bought an ’84 4wd S-10 Blazer, red and silver, with a red interior, when he came out of residency, and it had the pouches. Seeing what a piece of junk his was, between the 2.8 V6 and the THM200R4 transmission, the pouches were best suited to holding the cash you had to hand over to the service department, to keep one running.

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      At the time they were new…good places for little white baggies of coke.

      With their present owners, good places for un-packaged meth rocks.

      “You found what? That ain’t mine, man…”

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Pray tell, what powers this Chariot of the Gods?

    The 3/4 of a SBC 4.3 ltr V6 or the woefully out of its element 2.8 ltr V6?

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      Probably 2.8, I don’t think 4.3 was available in 1984 in these trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Quick wikipedia search – 4.3 V6 introduced 1985 model year.

        The 2.8 is a dog in these suckers and for a while in the 90s GM was replacing tired 2.8s in S10/S15 and the S10 Blazer/S15 Jimmy with the fuel injected 3.1 ltr V6.

        It made a world of difference. Dad had a 2 door 4×4 S10 Blazer 2.8 assigned to him, the poor thing could barely get out of its own way – especially if towing a small trailer with a garden tractor on it. When the 2.8 was due for a rebuild the local GM dealer talked Dad’s boss into doing the 3.1 swap. Made a world of difference.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Beat me to it PrincpalDan.

        • 0 avatar
          CobraJet

          The 2.8 was terrible in these things. My company had several of these in 83 and 84. I rode with a co-worker in Florida from the east coast back to Tampa. On perfectly flat land at 75 mph the auto transmission could not stay in overdrive with the cruise set. It would lose speed and downshift into 3rd constantly. I remember the seats were very under padded or something. I could not ride more than an hour without getting out and resting my behind.

        • 0 avatar
          gearhead77

          I was trying to go by memory, I didn’t know the 4.3 appeared that early in this series. I’m thinking the early 90’s when it became VORTEC’d and picked up some power maybe?

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        The 2.8, complete with its intake gasket leaks (coolant in the oil, anyone?) and other problems.

  • avatar
    zoomzoomfan

    Nifty.

    It’s a shame it doesn’t have its original wheels, though. Those are the same wheels that my ’95 S10 has. They look sort of out of place here.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      My thought too. How about some American Racing Equipment “Star” wheels? Actually, gold “wagon wheels” would fit the character better, but most anything from the ARE Heritage series would work. The original GM Ralleye (Rally?) wheels are the best choice, gotta be some of them out there.

    • 0 avatar

      BAM! I wondered when someone was going to address the 90s wheels.

      $3000 TOPS.

      BTW the 4.3 first appeared in the S-10s for the 1988 model year. It came with the Astro Van for ’85; the full-size pickups got it for ’85 as well.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Seeing the Gypsy name, this would be a fitting ride for the Gabor sisters.

    Olivaaaaaaaaah!

  • avatar
    Hummer

    First why is it 4WD if it’s marketed as a boulevard cruiser? Especially if it’s truly a one off? Second what’s with the hideous gen 2 rims.

  • avatar
    jh26036

    Needs original radio and wheels. Crack pipe.

  • avatar
    Willyam

    There is a thing that strikes me as odd, and I’m curious for any of the B & B who are younger than this truck…what is your impression of older classic/outdated/so-ugly-it’s-cool 80’s cars?

    I remember 60’s cars during the 80’s, with their Kangaroo-leather (Mercury) or nasty vinyl upholsteries, cardboard door cards, and bakelite plastic parts in the interior.

    They had a particular smell tinged with oil and smoke and raw fuel, as well as a rumble or agricultural feel (V8 or I6 or even VW). They felt solid, even when worn out.

    I get in an 80’s F-body (one of my former dream cars) and I’m amazed by the plastic toy quality of everything, with the stickers and brittle plastic even for heavily-used buttons. Nothing held up. Press on the console or dash and it might just shatter. These S-10’s/Jimmy’s were really cool when new, but look no better than Star Wars toys at the flea market.

    How do you see them, having grown up on Japanese-invasion quality?

  • avatar
    JMII

    More pics of the red 350Z next to it please.

  • avatar
    Chi-One

    I don’t think Idaho is in the middle of the US.

  • avatar
    Salzigtal

    The color scheme on the glove box seems more Leslie Jordan or Charles Nelson Reilly.

  • avatar
    chaseme7412

    This vehicle is not one of one. I personally have seen 3 out in the world and a blue one on the TV Show “Riptide”. My mom owned one from December ‘83 to June ‘95 and I actually still have the dealer invoice sheet for it and several pictures. I have been searching for a while to find out the build history of this vehicle. We lived near Oakland and saw a black one there, our which was red and the third one which was a 4X4 version of our red one. I never understood how a “street couple” like the one shown in this article could be a 4X4. I did want to buy it off my mother when she traded it in and put in a fresh 4.3L instead of that 2.8L, but I never got a chance.

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