By on March 21, 2017

2017 Nissan Rogue SL

I was talking with a friend last night, telling him about the Buick LaCrosse tester currently in my stable and describing the declining fortunes of the traditional passenger car market. Full-size cars, especially.

Now, let me tell you about this friend. Ex-military. Practical. Lives in the city but enjoys occasional forays into the bush. Sensible with his money, and prefers products with a natural versatility. Now, guess what he drives? If your answer was anything other than, “A crossover, obviously! Stop wasting my time!” you’d be correct.

This friend seems perfectly contented with his Nissan Rogue. (He’s part of a large club that feels the same way.) Before this, his vehicle of choice was a meticulously maintained Subaru Forester. Before that, a GMC Sonoma, and going back even further, a Volkswagen Jetta. You’ll see a natural progression at work here.

“Why would anyone buy a normal car anymore?” he asked, looking at my generously proportioned sedan which, sadly for Buick, lacked the one feature most car buyers now demand — a cavernous, glass-encased cargo hold in place of a trunk.

He’s right. Buyers want, for the most part, a do-everything vehicle. There’ll always be a market for sports cars, which can be parked right next to that sensible, Monday-through-Friday, take-the-kids-to-soccer vehicle. Still, the market has shifted, and crossovers are king. Pity the poor sedan.

Which brings us to today’s question. In all likelihood, many of you have already decided — some would say “settled” — on a crossover. Others might steadfastly refuse to take this route, be it out of respect for tradition, desire for a more engaging driving experience, or a simple lack of need. But if you had to own one, what would it be?

Out of the plethora of choices on the market today, surely there’s one model that appeals to you just a little more than the others. And we’re not talking SUVs here. If a crossover was the only choice, what car-based cargo carrier most appeals to your personal sensibilities? And, do you think you could be happy with it?

[Image: Nissan]

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133 Comments on “QOTD: Could a Crossover Make You Happy?...”


  • avatar
    davewg

    If by crossover we’re going to include things like the new A4 Allroad and the coming Regal TourX, then probably yes. I don’t really have a desire to drive a typical CUV (Rogue, CX-5 or others of that ilk).

    That said, if you gave me a SQ5 I wouldn’t complain.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    A CUV could make me very happy if, in the near future, I decide to go that route instead of another car. I just have to choose one that “speaks” to me. So far, none do at this point.

    Whether one likes it or not, if you are a two-car family, having a CUV for one vehicle makes all the sense in the world.

    Me? I prefer a nice car, but I can increasingly see myself in either a smaller hatchback or CUV when my Impala bites the dust. This, in addition to the CPO 2015 CR-V we bought last month for Wifey.

    I scratch my head at the future possibility of having both vehicles as CUVs, but who knows?

    Design-wise, the problem I have with cars is that they are smaller in the dimensions that traditional style requires, becoming truncated designs that look fat and stubby. The exceptions, to me, are: Impala, Taurus and Avalon. The La Crosse comes close, same with Malibu and Fusion along with all other mid-sizers.

    Another issue is the coupe styling which makes sedans less practical in almost every way, save, perhaps fuel economy. This is probably the biggest reason why drivers are abandoning sedans. I may be included in that, too, although I’d like to think I’d be perfectly happy with a Malibu, or at least a Cruze hatchback.

    Time will tell.

  • avatar
    arach

    2 years ago I would have said, “HECK NO!!!”

    But then my wife hit me with the second most unthinkable request I could ever imagine: “I want an AWD, Manual transmission, Reliable, Non-Turbo, Kid-Friendly car”.

    This become a challenge. Most Manuals are 2 door. Most AWD Manual 4 doors are turbo. Most manual transmission cars are not kid friendly, and most AWD 4 doors are not reliable. Oh yeah, and we have to be able to afford it.

    Where our journey ended: Porsche Cayenne. It changed my opinion of what a “crossover” is.

    Now someones going to say, “BUT ITS AN SUV” fine. Whatever with your technicalities. Your the same person thats arguing that a stingray corvette is mid-engine. Yeah. Right. Not what anyone actually means.

    So the Cayenne opened my life to the concept that you don’t always have to have COMPROMISES, and you can actually have the best of multiple worlds.

    you see, its as sporty as you can be legally on the road, so its a blast to drive. The manual is tuned incredibly well even for a heavy car. It hits the twisties like a good sports sedan would, and its a pleasure to drive.

    but wait… there’s more!

    It sports AWD and is the most amazing car I’ve ever driven in the snow. My wife feels safe in it (she’s an SCCA race car driver, so take that with a grain of salt), and the kids love riding in the back seat. Its big and roomy, “real world” offroad capable (not jeep-worthy, but like you can drive down roads you can’t with a Ferrari), and incredibly convenient in all angles of life.

    Plus we had an added benefit… It tows like an animal. It can haul our boat and our race car trailer without a problem. We are actually thinking of selling our F350 and use the cayenne instead…. talking about Jack of All Trades!

    So I would have said “no” a few years ago, but once you have some things that turn into Needs instead of wants (room for kids for example), then a crossover (or SUV) can not only make you happy, but can be the best of all worlds… not to mention when we sell the F350, we’ll now have room in our garages for a 911, and well, won’t that make me happy?

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Reliable… Porsche Cayenne?

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      Affordable?

      • 0 avatar
        DearS

        I really Porsche vehicles and engineers but not the company itself and not their profits.

        I’ll make due with a Mazda CX-5 I guess because of my darn principles.

      • 0 avatar
        arach

        I understand Affordability is relative, but we paid $20k for our cayenne and that was within our budget. We didn’t want to spend much more than that, but needed a 4 door, AWD, Manual Transmission Car. Not a lot of other options out there. BMW 5 series suffer real reliability concerns from my research. The Panamera was too pricey for our comfort level and missed the middle seat.

        • 0 avatar
          la834

          The Golf R gives you 4 doors, AWD, a manual, and a hatchback that opens to more room than many small CUVs. If you need something more crossover-y, theres the Golf Alltrack SE

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            “and a hatchback that opens to more room than many small CUVs”

            Any of the compact CUVs short of perhaps the poorly packaged Cherokee absolutely obliterate the Golf in terms of interior/cargo space.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I could own a CUV with the following:
    1. RWD
    2. Naturally-aspirated engine over 3.5L
    3. Isn’t styled like a cute-box Encore

    That said, I’m a Sun Belt – dwelling degenerate bachelor with basically zero cargo hauling needs, no children, and no hip replacements. All the things that people buy CUVs for don’t exist in my life, so I won’t be shopping for one anytime soon.

  • avatar
    DarronS

    I just bought a 2014 BMW X1 because it drives better than the new X1. CUVs are far more practical than sedans for my needs, and for anyone who carries more than groceries or luggage for two on trips. If I hadn’t found the 2014 X1 with the equipment I wanted I probably would have ordered a new Mini Clubman JCW. It isn’t a CUV but a station wagon is dang near as practical.

  • avatar

    As a design exercise, I would like to see this at one of the shows:

    a mid- to full-sized sedan with a molded aero front end. It would have straight, upright, traditional styling that stands out like a late-Seventies GM B car. It would have more interior and trunk room, be built off the same platform as a mid-sized SUV, and be a platform for hybrid/electric and trad powertrains.

    If the proportions were right, do you think that might revive interest?

  • avatar
    threeer

    It is what it is. The market has spoken…loudly. I drive a 2014 Escape S. It isn’t fancy, or “fun” in the traditional sense. However, it hauls my adopted 11-year old’s dog show stuff (to include the dog) and is reasonably comfortable and economical while doing so. That is as long as we don’t have the wife going along. Then, the Escape is about one size too small and we wind up borrowing my sister’s 2011 Explorer. Plus, if we ever decide we want to haul a camper (going to hotels each month gets expensive, and it isn’t always easy finding a place that accepts pets), we can’t tow much of anything with the Escape.

    Interesting side note…I just picked up a 2003 Taurus Wagon with only 59k on it for my oldest son and his new bride. While I’ve not yet done a measurement comparison of interior capacity, from just eyeballing it, I’d say the Taurus likely holds every bit as much (if not more) than does the Escape. But nobody wants a wagon, so I picked it up for $4000 and it looks like it came off of the showroom floor. *Almost* tempted to give the son my Escape and keep the wagon…:)

  • avatar
    redapple

    Why not go CUV?
    Roads are clogged. You cannot ‘drive!’
    Coppers everywhere.
    A ticket will cost you $1000 all in. (raised insurance rates, etc…)
    Get your joys – off road in the slow lane. Get 90% of the fun without a tricked out wrangler. Stay on reasonable forest roads.
    During the work week, do the bumper to bumper conga in a seat thats higher than the plebs.
    Higher hip point. Easier in and out for all. (backseater will love it too!!!!!)
    Lowes run- now i have room for all the stuff.

    Shall i go on?

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    For my household, sure. For my personal daily driver, no. I just bought my 8th car- a G37S- and of the 8 cars I’ve had,

    – 7 were sedans, 1 was a sports car
    – 7 were stickshift
    – 5 got lowering modifications (coilovers or springs + shocks), and I’m planning to make it 6 with the G

    I kart, I sim race, I ride a motorcycle… for me, dynamics matter. As good as crossovers can get sedans built off the same platforms will always be better. FFS, coming out of my lowered Civic, the G feels like a crossover. It’s killing me.

  • avatar
    Daniel J

    Pretty much, no. Most don’t handle like cars. Even our CX-5 doesn’t handle like a true sedan. For the same money, I can get a midsized car with more legroom. Ideally, a wagon would be preferable. But no one really makes true midsized wagons anymore that isn’t premium or luxury.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Well, was a Sedan EVER really the most practical choice? For me, it’s always been a question of Station Wagon, Hatchback, or Crossover. The sedan never really made sense to me at all.

    Really, a crossover isn’t a bad choice for most people. They don’t handle as good as a car, sure, but they handle good enough for how most normal people drive their cars.

    Is a crossover likely to set your heart alight with driving excitement? Well, compared to a sporty little car, no. But if your car is transportation, there’s a lot worse choices you could make.

    Speaking for myself, I just traded in my ’04 1.8T M/T Passat Wagon (169k of pretty reliable miles) for a ’17 CR-V. If I could have gotten an Accord or Mazda 6 Wagon, that’s probably what I would have gotten, but I can’t, so I chose a crossover.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      I really struggle to think of any task a sedan does better than a wagon/hatchback body style. Taking fresh fish home from the fish market, that’s one. Perhaps the interior of a sedan, being less voluminous, would heat and cool to a comfortable temperature quicker? That’s about it. Turn the question around, and there’s so many things a hatch/wagon/CUV can do better. And it also hauls four or five people, just about as well as a sedan. Yes, I could have that new washing machine delivered, but I’m a self-reliant type of guy- sop whenever I want to use my car as a compact box truck, it’s ready.

      There’s a long-standing prejudice against hatches in the USA, if nowhere else. Maybe it was the generation of lousy Pintos and Omnis that spoiled the concept. My first hatchback was a Golf GTI, so those bad memories mean nothing to me. Anyhow, it’s time to move on.

      The other factor in classifying a CUV is how raised it is. A tall vehicle can still have plenty of power; over 200 HP is common in the segment now. The Mazda CX-5 shares its family’s reputation for handling. My Tiguan is high, stiff and sporty (though the seats aren’t).

      If sedans survive, as I think they will, it will be at the top of the market. As an elite statement of the non-working class – “I have everything delivered and installed for me, even groceries.”

      • 0 avatar
        la834

        “There’s a long-standing prejudice against hatches in the USA, if nowhere else. Maybe it was the generation of lousy Pintos and Omnis that spoiled the concept. My first hatchback was a Golf GTI, so those bad memories mean nothing to me. ”

        That was true 20 years ago. It’s not true anymore. At one point the Golf was one of only two 5-door hatchbacks sold in the States (the other was a Saab). Today the Golf has eight C-segment 5-door hatchback competitors, and that’s not even including outliers like the Prius. There are plenty of smaller hatches like the Fit and Fiesta. And most tellingly, there are luxury hatchbacks – sometimes two of them – from Audi, BMW, Tesla, and Porsche. Some of those run into six-figure prices. There can be no doubt, in America, the hatch is back.

        • 0 avatar
          John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

          I know, right? I made this point the other day, someone was complaining that there are no hatches in the USDM because #amerikahatezhatchez. There isn’t a player in the small car market without one, so far as I know. Usually, more than one, like Fiesta and Focus; Spark, Sonic and now Cruze; Fit and Civic, Yaris and Corolla iM.

          As I type that, I realized that Dodge doesn’t have a hatch, but since the Dart has sold about as well as Bibles in a brothel house, and has been discontinued, I’d hardly call them a “player in the small car market” anyway. Besides, if you want an FCA hatch, Fiat dealers would love to sell you a 500 (or two, or three, oh hell just take them all!).

  • avatar

    Five years ago, my wife wanted something with AWD and a third row seat that could fit adults. She was dead set against a minivan and that led us to the Chevy Traverse.

    Five years later, it’s been a good vehicle. It hauls both our kids and their friends, and is comfortable for making a 3000 mile round trip from KC to Tampa twice a year. It will also haul 4×6 sheets of plywood or 8 foot boards with the hatch shut and up to 20 bags of mulch.

    But am I happy with it? I’m happy with it’s capabilities and my wife loves it, so in this case, if my wife is happy, I’m happy.

  • avatar
    ant

    We got rid of our 2012 TSX (stick), and got a CRV instead. In EXL trim, it cost the same. Due to the fact that the TSX needed premium fuel, costs are equal at the gas pump.

    The CRV is so much easier to get in and out of. And the hatch configuration is more user friendly with much more cargo space. We wouldn’t go back to the sedan.

    Now that Honda has added CVT, Turbo, and DI, to the CRV we would not buy another one.

    My choice would be a Hybrid Rav4, but my wife thinks they are ugly. She also wants something bigger. I wouldn’t even be able to get her to test drive a 4runner either (too ugly).

    We’d both like a MDX, but I don’t like the price tag.

    We’d probably look pretty close at a highlander (Hybrid), also pilot, and we’d test drive a v6 murano to see how that car is from the drivers seat.

    I don’t see us getting anything but crossovers from here on out, and I wish one was available with a manual transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      roverv8i

      Just to clarify, a 2012 TSX does not require premium fuel (referring to the 4 cylinder) it is recommended. I have found no discernible difference using regular (mostly Costco Gas). Premium did not give a noticeable increase in fuel economy for the price increase, no pinging, and no noticeable power difference. Maybe you can find a difference on the dragstrip but with no more power and torque than the 2.4 has you can’t feel it in daily driving. Mine is a 5 speed auto, so the manual may wake it up enough to make a difference.

  • avatar
    John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

    Well, the crossover I like most is no longer in production: Honda Element.

    That said, if I found myself with kids or something, I could be happy with a family truckster like a Ford Flex.

    Nissan Rouge or Pathfinder? Toyota Highlander? Ford Explorer? No. Just…no. They’re all just an indistinguishable crossover blob to me. I drove a Highlander Limited yesterday, it was awful. No way I would be happy in it.

    I guess the Element and Flex get a pass because they stand out from the crowd. And my dream Element has a manual/AWD.

    I kinda like how the Jeep Renegade looks. The upcoming Ford EcoSport looks interesting. I (think I) would choose them over a plain and basic small car like a Fiesta sedan or something like that.

    • 0 avatar
      Wacko

      when i was 7 passenger car shopping, I wanted the flex. but my wife hated the boxy looks. we went to try one, and i wasn’t impressed with the interior. we tried the pathfinder, cause i wanted to cross it off the list and keep the wife happy.
      but even it looks super generic, I really enjoyed the interior and the layout.
      was also really impressed with the CVT.
      so we own a 2014 pathfinder SL tech. no complaints yet. better than average mpgs too….

      • 0 avatar
        John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

        Well if it works for you, more power to you.

        The CVT alone would have me running away. Some can do CVTs right. Nissan isn’t one of them. I much prefer the 6 speed auto found in the Flex. Its the one in my parent’s 2012 Taurus and I think it does well.

        I’m glad you’re happy with your choice. I genuinely mean that. :)

    • 0 avatar
      greatpaper

      I second the Honda Element. Aside from a couple bang-ups of my own doing ,my ’04 Ex AWD (190k miles) has never failed to start, never left me sitting, never got stuck in snow or mud., Hauls a ton of stuff ( I like stuff) , has never needed other than routine maintenance, and gets 22-26 Mpg if I drive sanely or if I hot rod it. Fits my large American buttocks comfortably . also , I religiously wash it once yearly. What’ s not to like? Honda- bring back the element.

      • 0 avatar
        John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

        That’s awesome. Glad you’re has been good to you.

        I love its funky looks, the utilitarian interior, and the AWD/manual availability.

        I found one I wanted on eBay, it was a manual AWD in like new condition. Lets just say for the money it went for, quite a few things in my life would have to change for me to be able to pick one up. Haha

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      “And my dream Element has a manual/AWD.”

      That was mine…until I signed it over to my soon-to-be-ex-wife yesterday. I’ll miss it, it had it’s faults(not a great highway cruiser) but is a fine little truckster. Vaya con Dios amigo.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “I drove a Highlander Limited yesterday, it was awful. No way I would be happy in it.”
      @John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N – what was it that made you hate it? I’m curious since my wife thinks she’d like to buy a Highlander.

      • 0 avatar
        John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

        Lou,

        Well it feels soggy to drive. They’ve had it at the dealer for steering issues, and it still doesn’t feel right. It was better than before when it seemed very reluctant to return to center.

        But, it is the quality that really put me off. Trim that doesn’t fit, cheap painted plastic that is already flaking, the hollow noise you hear when shutting a door.

        If you had suddenly gone blind and heard someone close a door on it, you’d be forgiven for thinking it was a 1989 Escort instead if a late model, fully loaded Toyota.

        I took some pictures of the glaring build quality issues I found, I was thinking if writing a review.

        I thought I’d start my own series called “Retail Detail Review”.
        I’ll do one when I get a vehicle to detail. I usually pick up the vehicle from the customer’s house and then take it back when I’m done, so I do have some driving experience in them. Mostly, though, it would be about things I experienced while covering every square inch of the body and interior, save for the undercarriage (I do wheel wells and engine bays, though).

  • avatar
    bunkie

    Here’s a question (putting aside any questions of driving dynamics): Do you mind riding in the cargo compartment? Or do you prefer that your stuff have its own separate compartment?

    If yes, a sedan (or pickup with a covered bed) is the way to go. If no, you have plenty of options (SUV, CUV, Minivan).

    • 0 avatar
      spreadsheet monkey

      This need for a separate cargo compartment is a weirdly American thing. What kind of cargo are you carrying? Live snakes?

      • 0 avatar
        scott25

        Indians are all about trunks also.

        • 0 avatar
          John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

          Well that is because hatches are so common in India, having a sedan instead makes you look classy, like “yes, I chose the more impractical style because I can.”

          Its really that “the sedan is the new coupe” thing. Its not as practical as a crossover or minivan, but someone who really cares about the way it looks and drives more than how many people/how much cargo it can carry would choose an Accord over a CRV or a Fusion over an Escape.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        I’ve never felt comfortable with only a roll-cover to hide my stuff when parked. Having a trunk makes it much less obvious that there might be something of value in the cargo compartment.

        • 0 avatar
          John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

          That’s a good point, but with tinted glass, that is less of an issue. That Highlander I did yesterday was pretty dark on the rear and rear/side glass, you’d have to cup your eyes and press against the glass to make out anything.

        • 0 avatar
          Wheatridger

          There might be something of value in a sedan’s trunk, too. And it’s not like none of those have ever been broken into. At least you have the option of leaving the hatch uncovered when parking in a bad neighborhood, to show you don’t have anything to steal. Might save you a broken window.

          Your kind of logic seems to belong to the era when some hatchbacks had no cargo cover, and anything you put there was visible.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        In addition to the smells, dirty things that go better in a trunk there is the theft factor, what people can’t see they won’t steal and unless they see you put things in the trunk they have no idea anything is there.

        The bigger thing to me is the passenger safety factor. Get in a wreck in your station wagon with cargo piled high or even not piled that high and those things can end up on the occupants.

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          This is an important point. The stuff in the back of a CUV isn’t restrained by very much.

          A few years back I remember seeing video footage of a traffic stop in Malibu. Some young guys had their surfboards in their CUV. The Officer pointed out that, should experience rapid deceleration, the pointy ends of the surfboards would be travelling at a high velocity right at their heads.

          When I fly solo, I place my flight bag on the passenger seat and use the seatbelt (looped through the handles) to hold it tight to the seat so that it won’t jam the controls in case of turbulence.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @spreadsheet monkey – a separate cargo compartment is nice if you happen to carry anything malodourous or volatile.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I like the separate cargo compartment on a sedan. It keeps any smells (outdoor or gym gear) or noises out of the passenger compartment. But the question is if the sedan compartment is large enough. (See today’s Ask Jack, in which Jack helps me contemplate this exact question!)

      • 0 avatar
        John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

        Dal, you knew the answer before you asked that question.
        Lol what color will your MKT be?

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          No, I’m honestly undecided. But any color of MKT is fine as long as it’s not black, which looks like a livery car, or that horrendous light beige (which is the lighter of *two* available beiges). Honestly it seems like more than half the non-livery MKTs out there are pearl white.

          • 0 avatar
            John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

            It just felt like to me that you had pretty well decided but needed some validation.

            Really, I had pretty well decided the Kia Amanti was the livery car for me before I brought it up here. I mean, yes I value input which is why I asked, but it was pretty well decided, unless I got a good reason not to.

            Turns out that the funding I thought was in place for it went away due to a family emergency. I’m not upset one bit, it turned out fine. I will find another way, or something else entirely.

            For what its worth, I think your reasoning is sound, and I believe you’re on the right track.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Sorry to hear about the family emergency. Your attitude is really excellent; I hope you get good results to match.

            A hard-loaded 2014 MKT (red, natch) just appeared in the inventory of a Ford dealer about an hour’s drive from Seattle. Overpriced, but If it’s still around this weekend, I might go down there and check it out.

          • 0 avatar
            John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

            Which Ford dealer? I know some of them. I subscribed to this thread to get your replies.

            Thanks, I appreciate what you said. I know there is something I can do, and I’m going to keep trying until I find it. Haha

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Korum Ford Lincoln in Puyallup, WA. I called their internet sales manager and it sounds to me like they’ll get to a reasonable price, provided the car is in excellent condition (it’s impossible to tell from their low-res pictures).

          • 0 avatar
            John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

            Don’t have any experience with them.

            I will say this: Avoid Harris Ford-Lincoln like you’d avoid a head-on collision if you could. The results would be similar if not avoided.

            I know you won’t be slumming it at pot lots (cheap car lots, BHPH some), but if it happens to come up in the future, stay outta Tacoma. They love to roll back odometers, they’ll lie to their own grandmother, and have no issue whatsoever charging over book for a car about to self-destruct.

            I know you’re smarter than the average car buyer, but it is worth mentioning.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            @Dal, did you look at the original window sticker? That car is an import and is specifically noted as a Canadian spec and “not being intended for sale or registration in the US”. Which means it is likely that Ford won’t honor and remaining factory warranty, nor is it likely eligible to be CPO.

            The pictures are pretty bad and the idiot snapping them didn’t even pay attention to the fact that the display was still in metric mode.

            Note with a Canadian car the default on a reboot will be metric. Not normally a problem as it should only show up if the battery is disconnected more than momentarily.

            If you do get it and want to disable the DRLs it can likely be done with the extended license of FORScan which I’d highly recommend if you do get it.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            A Canadian-spec vehicle should be OK in the US (with original and CPO warranty coverage) if imported correctly by an owner who moved or as a used vehicle. The disclaimers on the window sticker are intended to prevent the vehicle from being sold new in the US.

            From Lincoln of Canada’s New Car Warranty:

            “The New Vehicle Limited Warranty described in this booklet applies to your vehicle if:
            – It was originally sold or leased by a Ford of Canada dealer; and
            – Is registered/licensed and operated in Canada **or the United States.**”

            With that said I would obviously pay extra attention to the title, the vehicle history, and the CPO paperwork. I like DRLs so that’s not an issue.

            Looking at the pictures, the car has some potential cosmetic issues, although it’s hard to tell given the picture quality and the classic PNW lighting. Certainly the dealer’s price is quite a bit too high, but they seemed very willing to move on it. And those stupid deflectors have to go.

          • 0 avatar
            John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

            Agreed. When I worked for a now defunct dealership in Everett, we had used Canadian market cars in our service bay all the time. Mostly “program” (rentals) Taurus. There was no selecting Metric or standard then, we swapped instrument clusters on cars that were going on our lot.

            I was most interested by the fact that 2000+ Taurus replacement speedometer was in 10 mph increments rather than 20 as were standard on the 4th gen Taurus.

            I noticed because I’ve never liked a speedometer in increments of 20 (as in 20 40 60 80 etc).

            My 1994 Aerostar Sport was Canadian spec.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            I know in the past Ford, unlike most other automakers, has honored the warranty on Canadian spec vehicles, but they did not have disclaimers that the vehicle wasn’t intended to be sold or registered in the US on the sticker. So just be careful.

            There are a lot of cars imported from Canada in the PNW and in fact there is an auction yard in Kent that only sells Canadian vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

      “Do you mind riding in the cargo compartment?”

      Well, once I was really drunk, so I let my friend drive my 1990 Festiva to the store. He and three friends jumped in, and be damned if I was going to be the only one who didn’t go, so I opened the hatch and jumped in the cargo area.

      It was not comfortable. I do not recommend it.

      I also don’t recommend handing your keys to someone who’s probably as drunk as you are. I only realized this later when he decided to do a parking brake slide/burn out. In my defense, I didn’t know, or didn’t realize, he was drinking beforehand.

      (I know this wasn’t your point, but the door was open for the story, so I decided to go for it. Lol)

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    If it meant no monthly payments? yes. Otherwise, NO!

  • avatar
    Maymar

    I don’t like sitting up high – not even just for the internet hooning dab of oppo’ stuff that has limited real world application. It just also amplifies the body motions, or forces a stiffer ride than needed to compensate. Kia Soul is about the limit of tallness I’m willing to tolerate short of minivans.

    Given that I’m not old, have stubby legs, and have yet to find anywhere I wanted to go i couldn’t get with a regular car, crossovers have nothing to offer me, and I’d like to continue to have the opportunity to buy something that suits my reasonable needs.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      Makes sense to me. That’s why it’s s shame we don’t have more wagons to choose from.

      Most cars are too low. Most CUVs are to high. Where’s the happy medium. Subarus, probably. But they have other issues.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    If I really had to pick a crossover, it’d be a Subaru for the ground clearance and somewhat passable offroad chops. A Cherokee Trailhawk or Renegade Trailhawk have the offroad angle covered pretty well, but fall very short in terms of utility (cargo capacity). Having said that, you can’t fake the funk. I had a blast exploring some powerline trails and the acreage behind our rental cabin in rural Kentucky this past weekend in my old 4Runner, now rolling on meaty General Grabber AT2 all terrain tires (think BFG KO tread pattern). Any flavor of crossover including a Subaru would have gotten crossed up and had its bumpers torn off. I also can’t imagine my dogs and belongings fitting as well or as comfortably in an Outback or Forester as well as they do in the 4Runner with its massive cargo area (45 cu ft, rolldown tailgate glass). I will admit, a stick shift Forester would have been fun on the tight and twisty paved back roads and the section of gravel that we did, certainly more so than my lumbering SUV. Also, a Forester would have been fun to challenge the trail on the back acreage where the 4Runner simply makes things a bit too easy. But offroading can be a bit binary: “too easy” in a serious 4wd can turn into “impossible” when you lose a few key capabilities (all terrain tire traction and reasonable articulation in the case of the soggy back acreage trail, approach angle and articulation in the power line trail case).

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Other than a square profile that likes to wander in pavement ruts, I love the General Grabber AT2’s on my F150. Mind you , I have “E” rated 10 ply’s.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    For me CUV wise it has to be a EOL Ford Flex. 2020 is my year. I currently drive a CX9 and would have bought a Flex 8 years ago if not for the dealer not wanted to budge on price.
    However be that as it may I would prefer a sedan. I know my choice of a Q70L with V8 is not everyone’s cup of tea however I have an affinity for them. They are luxed, and quiet and pretty quick and with the L good backseat space. I can get a 2016 Q70L V8 with 10k miles on it for less than 50k.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    I wouldn’t say “happy” so much as less miserable while being terrified.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I already own something that would satisfy nearly all the definitions of a crossover.
    My Legacy GT wagon actually exceeds most crossover minimum requirements. It has a full cargo area unencumbered by “coupe” dimensions. It has AWD. It has a turbo 4 cylinder engine. Before I lowered it, it had about what most new crossovers have regarding ground clearance.

    The only things missing are – lack of visibility due to high sills and low roof, a claustrophobic cabin, infotainment.

    I get that some like them and some don’t. I happen to not need one so it doesn’t enter my interests.

  • avatar
    ArialATOMV8

    Practically, if I was stuck with a crossover for every single aspect, It would have to be German (with the exception of the British Jaguar F-Pace). Ze Germans know how to make a typical family car, fun to drive.

    The other week, my father had a X3 XDrive25i as his loaner and, shockingly, it handled like a German Saloon. Best of all, when you put your foot down, the performance kicks in.

    Unfortunately, the one I priced was a X3 XDrive35i (starts off at $47,950) and I added the Dynamic Assistance, Dynamic Handling, Lighting package, ACC Stop and Go Driving Assistant, Technology Package, Rear manual side window shades and best of all, the MSport trim all for the price of $62,845

    Yeah, basically for a sporty CUV, it puts a good dent in your wallet.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Sure, I could “live” with one. The Lexus NX200 appeals to me. But it’d have to have the kind of performance capability I want, at a non-inflated price. And that means I’d choose a sedan, every time.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    We have a 2000 Durango (1st Gen BoF with 190k miles), a base 2014 3.6l Avenger and a base 2013 Rogue. Guess which gets driven the least? The Nissan. It is utter crap. It was given to us and that was maybe too much but the deal was we had to keep it if it was given to us. Maybe the upper ranged models are better. My boss has a mid-range and likes hers.

    Anyway, no a crossover doesn’t give us any more people space than a mid-sized sedan. It doesn’t get better mileage even with the small 4 pot engine and CVT. It has better cargo space for those few times we need it, but not much better. It rides worse, rattles more. The Bluetooth integration sucks in this case compared to the FCA vehicle. We don’t get 12″ of snow at a time often, and if we do we wait for the plows. It doesn’t get around really any better than the car in anything less than that, especially if you have decent tires. The Durango is RWD and does better with the Blizzaks than the other vehicles.

    If I wanted a practical all in one vehicle I would get a minivan. It has better people space, better cargo space, better . If I needed blizzard capabilities I would get a Wrangler Unlimited. Or a Unimog Doka.

  • avatar
    e30gator

    I recently bought a Buick Enclave to accompany my old BMW Z3 in the driveway. Love it.

    I’d honestly prefer sedans if I was able to live in a place where spirited driving was a realistic proposition. But at least here in Sarasota, with an ever-increasing amount of traffic and congested roads, a big, comfortable, and safe vehicle is what’s most practical for my family. There’s simply nowhere left around here to open a car up anyway.

    My wife’s Aura (bought new in ’09) was a great family car in theory until we realized that leaning in and out of the thing to get kids and car seats in place was destroying our backs.

    Then we bought a minivan and I thought I had found happiness with a Nissan Quest. I liked it for what it was and it served us well. The reason it was replaced wit ha CUV is because most of the new ones don’t come across as a safe choice if one pays attention to small overlap scores. Pricey too.

    Finally, with all the dudebros driving their raised Superduty trucks like they’re qualifying for the Daytona 500, I feel safer in a higher vehicle so that my kids aren’t eye level to the mudflaps on a brodozer.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    There are crossovers I like. I really liked my X5, when it worked. I also like the XC90, the Touareg, the CX-5 and CX-9, and the new Range Rover Velar, among others.

    But I do not like the Rogue.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      I’m in the process of buying a used Acura RDX as my daughter’s first car. She wants a camping-friendly AWD CUV and more-than-car clearance, and I insisted on electronic stability control since she’ll be driving in Denver and Seattle, in rain and snow. Turns out that the RDX is one of the cheapest compact CUV options that offers this, for thousands less than the Subaru she originally wanted. The Acura’s running costs will be higher, but that’s not what I worry about with my only child’s first car.

      On the test drive, the turbo RDX ran like a GTI on elevator shoes. It was a sensible height, not high, not low. If I ever got tired of my GTI, and if gas got even cheaper, I’d consider one of these myself.

  • avatar
    BlueEr03

    We are going through this decision now. We have a Elantra GT, which satisfies the space requirement, but it is a manual and my wife can’t figure it out. We have narrowed down the choices to the Sportage (fun styling, a lot of features), Santa Fe Sport (Also a lot of features, bigger, not so fun styling), the CX-5(waiting on the 2017, wife didn’t approve of the interior of the 16.5), and possibly the Niro if I can ever see one in person.

    I wanted to like the Tiguan but it is so damn old. If it had the interior and engine of the Golf it would be a different story. The Escape was pretty meh, but it was with the smaller ecoboost engine. And the only thing the Rogue had going for it was the price.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Currently we are looking at the Santa Fe Sport (great incentives), Nissan Rogue (again offered a ‘deal’) or like you if we can actually drive/see one a Kia Niro.

      Have had a great experience with our current Kia. Just worried about the longterm costs of the Niro? Does anyone have any comments or advise regarding that???????

      Given unlimited money and control over production my ‘preferred’ choices would be an XC-90 and a Caravan that was not built from parts sourced/designed by FCA.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      The Tiguan’s an interesting car. Sales started slow, but they’ve become common here in Denver. Credit the car’s persistent eight-year run, plus the demise of the TDI Sportwagen.

      The base model Tiguan has always been a VW’s best deal- a roomy German-made turbo for Golf money. Our loaded SEL cost too much but includes wonderful features. It matters none to me that it’s an old design. It has the engine of a Kk V GTI, which nobody complained about. Thirty mpg is in reach on a highway trip. But I wish we had shopped low-mileage Q5s instead, for better comfort, a lower driving position and style.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    In over 40 years of vehicle ownership and more vehicles than I care to remember (closing on to 100?), we had sedans as the only vehicles in our driveway for a total of about 3 years. And that was during the PLC craze of the mid 70’s.

    Prior to that at least one wagon. After that hatchbacks or wagons. Then mini-vans. Two tries at SUV’s, a Jeep Grand Cherokee which ate 2 transmissions and an Explorer which was too small for me to fit into comfortably with a winter coat on. A few sedans as second or third vehicles but always at least one minivan, wagon or hatch as the primary people hauler.

    Living in Canada there are a number of reasons why sedans do not work: i) you cannot fit a hockey stick into the trunk, ii) you cannot fit a hockey net into the trunk, iii) you cannot fit adult skis into the trunk, iv) the new(er) sedans do not have enough ground clearance or greenhouse space to be practical and finally v) the higher height of an SUV is much more practical at the drive-through at Tim’s.

    The minivan is still a more practical solution. With a Miata or similar in the garage.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Arthur Dailey – other than as a self-indulgent play toy, there aren’t any new cars out their that really catch my interest. I’ve always been into motorcycles so I’d go down that path before buying a car that sat in the carport for 5-6 months of the year.

  • avatar
    prisoners

    Yep. My buddy generously loaned me his Lexus RX300 while my Acura coupe was in for body damage repair (NOT my fault). After three weeks of commuting in a tall, AWD, very comfortable and quiet cocoon I felt quite relaxed and content. Chicago traffic is not manual transmission friendly, and my Acura..that I’ve owned for 13 years and have taken exceptional care of..has now been hit three times by inattentive drivers. My next daily driver will be something that I’m not passionate about, and therefore won’t upset me too much when the inevitable happens again.
    It will be much like my buddy’s Lexus: comfortable, relaxing, reliable, competent, and probably boring.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    I am a car guy we have a pilot in the house and I debated taking that when i traded in my TDI wagon but could not make the switch, i drive about 30,ooo miles a year and like a car better for that, I agree with the sedan not being a great fit for most folks , the TDI wagon gave me the space of a CUV without the trade off’s, if I had to go the CUV raid I guess a MDX or V60 maybe but I doubt it, so cars for me for at least the next ten years.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Never. If I have kids I’ll get a 4 door pickup with a bed cover.

  • avatar
    Thorshammer_gp

    If I was forced to replace my Impreza hatchback with a crossover, I’d absolutely be OK with a Forester (of any generation) or a current Escape. Aside from that, I’m firmly in the sedan/hatchback camp.

  • avatar
    quickson

    This is the situation I’ve found myself in… the realization that sooner rather than later, my wife and I will BOTH be driving crossovers.

    My wife, in real estate, often has to transport marketing materials (including gargantuan yard signs). I have a manual-everything Ford Ranger which can do that job (and many more), but she can’t drive it, it isn’t comfortable, the single cab is limited, and it’s not exactly something she can be seen in.

    However, I do USE my truck in that weekend-warrior handyman level… Rock and sand and 2x4s, fish tank supplies, etc. Nothing gratuitous (off-roading or towing), but frequent. So I need that versatility. And admittedly, the Ranger ain’t exactly the best for daily driving comfort (and I’m getting older).

    The problem is most CUVs are cut too short. Even as they’ve gotten bigger, they lack the length that I like to have for things. This is where the jacked up wagon makes more sense, and why I’ve all but settled on an Outback. AWD isn’t a necessity for what I do, but the ride height is good for new construction and gravel roads (which are prevalent in our life in Texas).

    But my wife, she LIKES CUVs, so she’ll probably end up with your requisite CX-Ravoguscon unless she decides to go upmarket for clientele. Then I’LL stare into our garage and shake my head at being a two-crossover family.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “she decides to go upmarket for clientele”

      She should, avoid the unwashed masses.

      “Then I’LL stare into our garage and shake my head at being a two-crossover family.”

      No my friend, you will keep your Ranger and then add something ridiculous for yourself. Because you can.

      • 0 avatar
        quickson

        This has been a consideration, but I don’t want to put a bunch of miles on whatever vehicle we consider for her. Basically, my vehicle becomes the “do-everything” vehicle, road trips and daily driving, and hers is mostly for her business and errands on days where I’m at the office.

        The problem now is that I drive very infrequently, just to my office a few days a week. It’s 50 miles away and nearly the entire drive takes place at 70+ mph. Her Fusion puts on 30k miles a year. We can’t have the same system if/when we move her to something nicer. It’s just not a great use of resources for us.

        The upmarket here is a little tricky in terms of being conservative enough for all clientele. Admittedly, these probably reflect some of my own biases.

        Hyundai, Kia – they make great cars, but perception is still not great with your average conservative Texan, for whatever reason. I’d definitely get one for my EVERYTHING car, but visibility and style of both the Sportage and the Tucson aren’t my thing.

        Ford, Chevy, Jeep/Dodge, Mazda, Nissan, etc. – get every option available and most of your clients will be fine. You’ll foster a perception of a person who likes nice things but doesn’t care about brand image. They get into my wife’s Fusion now and say “this is a NICE car”, with a bit of surprise, despite the fact that even the highest trim on Ford is middling quality.

        Lexus, Infiniti, Acura – Luxury enough to impress people without them thinking you’re trying too hard. People generally see this as the “smart luxury” group.

        BMW/Volvo – somewhere in between. Don’t have the reliability reputation of the above, but they don’t seem to have the image reputation that they had when I was growing up.

        Mercedes, Jaguar, Porsche, Range Rover – certain clientele will be turned off by it, thinking you’re trying too hard. You get a Quicken loan lead for someone looking under $200k, and you risk alienating them. I know she’d take a Porsche, though… as would I. I just don’t think either one of us would put up with it for long.

        Personally, I’d want to move her to the step starting with the Japanese luxury brands up to BMW. I’m sure she can be convinced on a test drive that she wants something above a Rogue, but she’ll get what she wants. She makes 4x what I do, anyway.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          And the answer to your question is Buick. American nameplate, a ‘near’ luxury interior and ride. Yet not so ostentatious as to be trying too hard.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Screams rental car.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            ‘jkross’ the spectres of Alfred Sloan and Harley Earl might pay you a visit due to that comment.

            Buick was a synonym for educated professionals who wanted to ride in luxury without resorting to the in your face ostentation of a Cadillac.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Thanks for the lengthy postback. I’m not up on the tax advantages for RE agents but if she cant deduct mileage or payments for her job, this strikes me as lease, drive, repeat or buy/trade at X miles/Y interval.

          Leasing to me it is the new Volvo XC90 every 24 mo, buy, Lex RX350 or whatever its called now (really creative, Lex GX460). I’m not big on post 2008 Acura (although good choice), Buick post 2010 no way, Infiniti maybe but it doesn’t feel the same as a Lex to me.

          I wouldn’t touch zee Germans as I find them too ostentatious and obnoxious for a younger/newer agent (no Gotta Look Kardashian from my agent, I fired a pretty one who fit in this category – legally blonde and all). Those brands feel very cougarish to me. Jag/RR too loud as well, almost as bad as an Escalade on 24s. Mainstream brands are a no to me, she’s trying to appear young and finding some success so those older rich folk want to deal with her and want to choose her over other more experienced agents.

          You drive more infrequently but you’re driving far which sounds like a decent job for that Ranger. If you’re only driving 4-5K a year I don’t feel like you’re in a new car territory, to me it feels like beater or low miles lease (but I am leaning heavy toward beater).

          I for many years practice the two car strategy (primary/secondary). When one is out of commission I drive the other, and i rotate between them during my low-mile work week. Since 2010 the primary has been my 08 GP and 2014 the 02 SL2, with the secondary previously being my 98 SL2 beater. If your Ranger runs well and is not slowly succumbing to frame rot, Ranger and something ridiculous as secondary. Corvette? Mustang? Jag? Olds Ninety Eight? Volvo wagon? Saab something? Acura Legend? BMW E46 3 series?

          @Arthur Dailey

          I agree but I think this is no longer true.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          If she is a realtor and is dealing with “average conservative Texan” clientele then the most obvious choice would be a Suburban/Tahoe or Expedition/EL or full sized pickup i.e. F150 Platinum or King Ranch, GM Denali, Chevy HighCountry, Ram LongHorn or Limited.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Could a Crossover Make You Happy?”

    Unpossible.

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    “Out of the plethora of choices on the market today, surely there’s one model that appeals to you just a little more than the others.”

    There isn’t.

    “And we’re not talking SUVs here. If a crossover was the only choice, what car-based cargo carrier most appeals to your personal sensibilities?”

    If I HAD to get a CUV, whatever is cheapest. I guess that’s the Jeep Renegade Sport right now.

    “And, do you think you could be happy with it?”

    No, henceforth the cheapest one. If I HAD to get a car that I would be miserable in why would I pay extra for the ‘privilege’ to do so?

  • avatar
    Ermel

    I’ve long since decided to never buy a sedan again. So I had hatchbacks, a convertible, vans, and wagons. Great handling isn’t all that important to me. My aging (and aching) back could do with something a little higher.

    So yes, obviously, a CUV isn’t out of the question. If only there were any whose looks I could stomach. (Well, this side of a Porsche Macan or Mercedes GLE coupé, neither of which I’d want to be seen dead in for other reasons than their quite agreeable design.)

    Probably, once they’ll arrive in my car age bracket, I’m going to be found in some cross-ified, but otherwise rather conservatively styled wagon instead. Audi allroad, VW cross, Skoda scout, you name it. Or maybe one of those cute little French crossover thingies like the Citroen C4 Cactus. Til then, I’ll trundle on with Citroen hydropneumatic cars … at least the height to soothe my back when exiting is there on request :-)

  • avatar
    npaladin2000

    I’m heading out to look at a Cherokee today. The idea of getting a car that’s good in snow, has heated seats, cooled seats, a heated steering wheel, wiper de-icers, adaptive cruise, etc etc etc for around $35k with all the incentives makes me very happy. :)

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      What makes a CUV good in snow? As with sedans, it’s how it’s equipped. CUVs do have one advantage in deeper snow, their higher ride height does help. An AWD sedan with good winter tires will handle any situation except for deep snow as well as any CUV. My sister dumped her FWD SRX with stock rubber after getting stuck. A 328ix with snows is the replacement.

      Another consideration with CUVs, is the higher center of gravity is a liability, particularly should you slide off the road onto an embankment, it affords a smaller margin for error and, given that most people have no idea how to react, almost ensures a rollover.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I’ll wait for the Lotus SUV before I decide. But generally no, I just want something a bit different from the masses.

  • avatar
    ixim

    Equinox. Comes with an irresistible accessory – Big discounts.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    Crucifixion before Crossovers.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    No “crossover” was ever powered by the LORD therefore they are the work of He Who Shall Not Be Named.

  • avatar
    cls12vg30

    My six-speed turbo Renegade makes me very happy, and has been doing so for 47,000 miles now.

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    I don’t think I’d get one to make me happy, because I can have two cars – one of which can be a better-to-drive sedan, and one can be an SUV. There’s a price premium there over the smaller ones, though they have less utility than larger or BOF options. If it’s a secondary driver, I might as well get something large.

    It’s why I ended up with a Tahoe instead of a CR-V or the like.

  • avatar
    RobbieAZ

    I would not be happy with a CUV as my daily driver. But if I was forced to get one it would have to be a Macan, which my wife currently has and loves. I’ve been pretty impressed with it but still prefer my sedan.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Attention KMart shoppers, I just read that there’s a 239 day supply of Buick passenger cars on dealers’ lots, about 4x ideal. “The all-new recently introduced 2017 Buick LaCrosse tops the list with a whopping 330 day supply of sedans.

    Rounding out the list are the Buick Cascada (298 day supply), Buick Verano (234 day supply) and the Buick Regal (222 day supply). Previous reports peg GM to have a 105-day supply of vehicles on average; a 60-day supply is deemed healthy in the industry.”
    http://gmauthority.com/blog/2017/03/chevrolet-camaro-corvette-and-buick-sedans-absolutely-stagnant-on-dealer-lots/#ixzz4bzC2aC96

    Seems now’s the time to step down to a Buick.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    The only two crossovers I would consider would be the Mazda CX-5 and new Jeep Compass. The Mazda will likely have the most fun to drive chassis, but the Jeep offers a very unique combo – you can get it with a manual, it’s not a stripper, and it can still tow. I’d have to see if the Mazda’s better chassis offsets the Jeeps manual. But no, unless I was using the Jeeps only legit unique capability (towing), I would not be happy at all. I despise these vehicles.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Been nothing but happy with my Q7. Way better value for money than a similarly equipped 5-Series/E-Class/A6. Drives better than a lot of sedans.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    I’m in two (or a few!) minds about this.

    If you want a CUV to emulate next gen thinking then that’s a shrunken Tesla Model X w/ conventional doors or even sliding doors.

    Say at least 200 mile range close to 4,000lb and 7 seat and say $35k and you got it done.

    You cant do that?

    How about an Outlander PHEV but give me say 100 miles of range and a turbo 1.6 four Atkinson or Miller and that would do.

    Still no good?

    How about a something like a Mazda CX5 with a turbo 2.5 or better engine w/ an RWD bias, perahaps 6 spd manual or paddle shift, well under 4,000lb and make it drive like some real zoom zoom. Make highway onramps great again.

  • avatar
    NMGOM

    “QOTD: Could a Crossover Make You Happy?”

    This QOTD is silly. Or I must be on the wrong website.

    For me, sedans bit the dust years ago. They no longer matter. It’s obvious.

    Life starts with CUV’s; then SUV’s; then holy and righteous Pickup Trucks.
    The only thing now that could make me happy is the upcoming Ram Rebel TRX Pickup Truck:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TEXXWpyI9w

    Everything else is, well, just so much wasted metal… (^_^)…

    ==============================

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Why not just go straight to the pickup?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      The problem with Ram’s “air ride” is that if you actually engage it to gain ground clearance, the truck rides like a pogo stick. I’ve read several tests where this has been a complaint. I’ve also read about the system overheating if you actually drive the truck aggressively off-highway.
      If one wants a Ram with off-road credibility go straight to the Power Wagon. That is basically the only vehicle on a FCA lot that I’d spend my own money to own.

  • avatar
    azmtbkr81

    Could a crossover make me happy? No. But if my choices were a free crossover or taking the bus I would choose a Dodge Durango, RWD with a V8.

    Still, I don’t think I could ever develop any sort of attachment to it; it would remain an unwashed, door-dinged appliance that received Supertech oil changes and FRAM filters.

  • avatar
    Pete Zaitcev

    Well, the problem is the lack of the low gear really. So I guess a Renegade it is. It has 1:20 total with 9sp and 1:18.43 with manual and optional 4.438 final drive. _If_ the idiots at BMW sold an X3 or X6 with a 2-speed t-case, I’d give them a good look, even at their obscene prices. But the best they can muster is 1:13, which is just ridiculous.

    2015 Forester has 1:15.335 and 2016 (XV) Crosstrek has 1:15.754 (both with manuals). It’s just not enough.

    What I ideally would like is something like Grand Vitara. It had 1:24.845 in low. But they don’t sell those anymore. Also, it was car-like, but not car-based.

    Grand Cherokee is too large. And it’s very, very remotely a car (if we look all the way back to an ancient E-klasse).

  • avatar
    la834

    I’d be fine with several of the more carlike crossovers if only they offered manual transmissions, preferably with FWD (and not just in the stripped-down model). I don’t need AWD where I live and it would only be of major benefit maybe 5 days a year.

    • 0 avatar
      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

      Well, the Honda HR-V, the Kia Soul, and the Jeep Renegade offer a manual. I believe others do too, but those are the ones I know off the top of my head. Not sure what level of equipment is offered on their manual trans models.

      • 0 avatar
        tjh8402

        The Jeep Renegade and new Jeep Compass offer a manual in the midline trim levels with most of the nice equipment and paired with 2wd. The Fiat 500 X also offers a manual, but only in the base trim. The Forrester base model has a manual, but that’s only AWD. Volkswagen will offer a manual on the AllTrak Golf , which I would call a crossover, although that is also AWD only. I would also called the mini countryman a crossover, and it has an available manual across all trim lines, but I’m not sure if it’s available with front wheel drive.

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  • spookiness: I would love a compact wagon with a blue interior, but not 18k for a Crapalier. I do give credit to GM J-...

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