By on March 2, 2017

2017 Chevrolet Malibu Hybrid – Image: ChevrloletAside from the Volkswagen Passat’s 40-percent year-over-year uptick, every automaker competing in America’s midsize sedan segment suffered from declining volume in February 2017.

The midsize car category tumbled 19 percent, a loss of more than 34,000 sales.

February 2017 marked the twelfth consecutive month of year-over-year declines for midsize car sales in America.


This is the ninth edition of TTAC’s Midsize Sedan Deathwatch. The midsize sedan as we know it — “midsizedus sedanicus” in the original latin — isn’t going anywhere any time soon, but the ongoing sales contraction will result in a reduction of mainstream intermediate sedans in the U.S. market. 

How do we know? It already has.


The Passat’s exceptional year-over-year uptick by no means represents healthy volume for the big Volkswagen. But the bigger story from February’s results was the horrific nosedive performed by Detroit nameplates: one discontinued nameplate, one of the older members of the midsize fleet, the newest member of the midsize fleet, and one semi-premium niche player.

Combined, the Chrysler 200, Chevrolet Malibu and Ford Fusion lost 22,592 sales in February 2017, a frightening 41-percent decline compared with February 2016.

FCA
Naturally, the Chrysler 200 deserves its fair share of the blame. Although formally cancelled at this time last year, production continued into late 2016 in order for a brief 2017 model year. But clearing out remaining 200s has been a tremendously difficult task. Heading into February, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles had more than 17,000 200s in stock. But only 2,194 200s were sold in the U.S. in February 2017. Discounts can’t change the fact that demand never truly existed for Chrysler’s midsize car.

Naturally, the 200 skews the overall picture. But removing the Chrysler from the equation does not alter the overall midsize segment’s rapid decrease in demand. Nor does it change the fact that the 200’s Detroit rivals likewise reported awful February sales figures while continuing their own downward trends.

FoMoCo
February was the eighth consecutive month of decline for the aging Ford Fusion, which has by no means been boosted by the arrival of the Fusion V6 Sport halo model. February also marked the fifth consecutive month in which Fusion sales fell below 20,000 units.

Prior to the current streak, Fusion sales crested the 20K mark in 40 out of 45 months.

Year-over-year, Fusion sales in February slid 35 percent, a loss of nearly 9,000 sales. After averaging 24,000 February Fusion sales over the previous five years, only 16,512 were sold in February 2017, as total Ford division car volume slid 26 percent.

The Fusion isn’t the freshest face on the runway, however. That title belongs, for the moment, to the Chevrolet Malibu. Last year, U.S. Malibu volume grew quickly even as the segment declined thanks to the launch of a well-received ninth-generation model.

GM
It appears increasingly clear that General Motors will not be able to maintain that level of demand. Year-over-year, the first one-sixth of 2017 revealed a 43-percent drop in Malibu sales. In February, Malibu volume fell 42 percent, a 9,012-unit decrease. Malibu inventory has now soared beyond six months supply.

Remember, these are the results for the segment’s recently redesigned model.

Together, the Malibu, the soon-to-be-replaced Buick Regal that we covered earlier today, the discontinued Chrysler 200, and the Ford Fusion that’s now in its fifth model year, traditional Detroit nameplates owned only 22 percent of the midsize sedan market in the United States in February 2017, down from 30 percent in each of the two previous Februarys and 34 percent February 2014.

Three years ago, more than one in three midsize cars sold in America was a Buick, Chevrolet, Chrysler, Dodge, or Ford. Now, barely more than one in five come from those same brands.

Yet while traditional Detroit marques suffered most last month, almost all of the made-in-America “imports” reported fewer sales than in February 2016, as well. The Honda Accord fell 9 percent. Hyundai Sonata volume was down 16 percent for an 11th consecutive month of decline. The Subaru Legacy and Toyota Camry both reported double-digit percentage losses.U.S. midsize car segment market share chart - Image: © The Truth About CarsVW
As for the Volkswagen Passat’s distinct improvement, remember the period from which the Passat is improving. One year ago, the Passat was in the midst of a diesel scandal, and sales had fallen by nearly half from the current Passat’s February peak in 2012. Last month’s Passat sales did increase, year-over-year — Passat sales have grown in four consecutive months — but it was still the second-worst February of the current Passat’s tenure.

Gone are the glory days of 2012 and 2013 when Volkswagen could sell nearly 10,000 Passats in America each month. Over the last four months, Volkswagen of America has averaged fewer than 6,500 Passat sales per month.

Is the Passat the future of Volkswagen in America? Will Volkswagen again decide that building a distinct Passat in North America for North America is worth it in a market gone mad for SUVs?

It’s certainly not a Passat-exclusive line of questioning. Barely one in ten new vehicles sold in the U.S. in February were midsize cars. If sales continue to fall by one-fifth, month after month after month, automakers will lose 425,000 midsize car sales in 2017 after losing more than 250,000 in 2016.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

63 Comments on “Midsize Sedan Deathwatch #9: Detroit’s Participants Tumble At Double Speed In February 2017...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’ve seen a fair number of 2016 Malibus but I think that the local Chevy dealer was blowing them out toward the end of the year.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      New body-style Malibu’s are literally everywhere I go in the Upstate, NY area. My local three dealers have rows of them stacked up in all flavors so it appears there is a slow down even with these. It’s a pretty sad scenario to see this happening.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Honestly I’m mad they got rid of the 2.0T as an option on the 2LT trim level. That’s the one I would have wanted.

        That “Premier” badge on the top trim level is sooooooooo chintzy looking and out of step with the fonts etc being used on the rest of the car.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    shall we summarize all the reasons? (again)

    I’ll throw out sightlines out of most sedans (eg C-pillars).

    If I can’t see out of a car, might as well get a crossover.

    • 0 avatar
      slance66

      The 200 was an abomination in this regard. I rented them on two occasions. Seat too low, belt to high, tiny mirrors and pillars in all the wrong places.

      The Fusion is better, but still feels like a cave.

      I bought a crossover.

    • 0 avatar
      Ivanho

      I agree absolutely on C-pillar blindness in mid-size cars being one major cause of slacking sales. My wife and I bought a 2014 Fusion Hybrid in August 2014, trading in a 2007 Volvo V-70 wagon. The Volvo had wonderful sight lines from the front seat and we did not think much about visibility when test driving the Fusion. I did not drive it then and have not ever except for parking a few times because of personal vision problems and having bone marrow Cancer so I did not realize the C-pillar problem. We were more excited about cutting the huge gas and repair bills of the Volvo. My wife does all the driving and she very quickly began complaining about the obtrusive C-pillars. In fact, despite my glaucoma and cataracts, I can’t tell you how many pedestrian lives I have saved during the past two and a half years by remaining alert in the passenger seat and yelling out PEDESTRIAN
      We are pleased with the Fusion otherwise but won’t buy another because of the C-pillars.

      when someone is crossing the street and the wife doesn’t see them!

      Happens every day! Not only that, she can’t see cars approaching from the left either because of the massive pillar. Sure we’ll be safer in a rollover if we live that long! I rolled my 66 VW in the rain in 67 and only suffered a scratched elbow.

      • 0 avatar
        Ivanho

        Sorry about the mixed up last several lines of my previous post. Did it on my iPhone and could not control the order of the last 5 lines. Went to edit and couldn’t even get to the last 5 lines. Went to iMac and can’t find any edit option so there it is the way it is.

  • avatar
    Higheriq

    With the possible exception of the Ford Fusion Sport and Accord Coupe, there really isn’t anything in the mid-size sedan group that I would consider. There are too many other more compelling choices in other vehicle classes. Everything is either propelled through a CVT, or doesn’t stand out among the group.

  • avatar
    thalter

    I’m noticing a lot of ’16 and ’17 Malibus, but maybe it is just because their DRLs make them look like vampires. I’m not seeing as many of the refreshed 17 Fusions.

    • 0 avatar
      quaquaqua

      Ugh, I know, I really hate those lights on those Malibus.

      I know Cruze sales are down and Impala sales, too, but part of the problem here is that the Malibu just isn’t quite as nice as an Accord or an Optima, especially the interior quality. The Cruze and the Impala are surprisingly competitive in their own class, but the Malibu just isn’t quite there, for some reason.

      Then again, how good a car is normally doesn’t matter when it comes to sales. Look how many more people are buying Altimas now, when they’ve never been less reliable (or cheaply made).

      • 0 avatar
        ponchoman49

        Car and Driver disagrees with you on that front rating the new Malibu ahead of both the Accord and Camry in there most common volume sedan 4 cylinder trims. They do rank the better Accord models at the top choice overall with the Malibu coming third. It’s the volume 1.5T LT Malibu they liked they best overall in the CamCord mashup though.

    • 0 avatar
      PlaysInTraffic

      I have to disagree with seeing them as vampires (if only they looked like something that cool). For one thing, the DRLs are outside the grille.
      Look again, and I think you’ll see the giant mechanical catfish of the road.

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    Strange, but I’ve never had interest in a cute-ute, crossX, SUV, or anything other than sedans ever since I got my licence. My first car in 1991 was a ’78 Volvo 242, but everything since 4 doors and a trunk.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      PRNDLOL… why? just curious. ive always loved the versatility of a hatch. 4 doors (optimally), with a bigass back door that can swallow bikes, TVs, etc. your friend wants empty boxes to move with? BOOM. empty boxes galore!

      sedans have always seemed like the short end of the stick. yes- the old rickety 2 door hatches were for the poors unless they were HAWT hatches, and now wagons have morphed into 5 doors or jacked up 5 door CUVs, aside from a few real wagons.

      but what does a sedan excel at?

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    As David Bowie gloriously sang, “IS IT ANY WONDAHHHH????”

    At the Ford dealership, Fusion leasers are turning their old sedans in for the brand new Escape.

    Likewise, at the Chevy dealership, folks are jumping at the non-rental counter image and better usability of the brand new Equinox over the Malibu. Or possibly going for the green + futuristic Volt, or also new and probably no less usably roomy Cruze; both of which are up 40-70% through February and YTD.

    At Chrysler, dealers are sacrificing chickens and making Sergio voodoo dolls. Which is a real shame, as I still think the 200 is the looker of the group, and solidly competitive with the V6, even at MSRP.

    No matter how you slice it or how hyperbolic you think the term “Midsize Sedan Deathwatch” is, accelerating consecutive declines in a mostly flat market is indicative of a sea change. Channel your inner Jack Baruth all you want… crossovers are a long term force in the market, and we are in the midst of a generational change.

    • 0 avatar
      npaladin2000

      Actually, most Chrysler dealers are also Jeep dealers, and they’re selling plenty of Cherokees, Grand Cherokees, and Durangos instead.

    • 0 avatar
      2drsedanman

      Agreed. Crossovers are going to be the automotive standard for the foreseeable future. I am on either end of this standard with a full size sedan (Avalon) and a Sienna. I can see the appeal of crossovers. But even as big of a Toyota homer as I am, I just could not buy a Rav4. I don’t know if it was the interior, all the plastic cladding, or the way it drove, but it just seemed to feel cheap.

      I think midsize sedan sales will eventually level off, but I suspect we are not near the bottom yet. The new Camry and Accord debuting later this year may help to stop the bleeding.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Current Camcord are in much better shape…. plus in any case while the refresh may help Honda/Toyota, it may exacerbate the problems Ford & GM face in this segment if the volume is zero sum.

        I’m not ready to daily drive an automatic, and I don’t think/hope to never need to daily drive a crossover, but I look forward to eventually having one in the household. As a purely rational all-rounder the concept is pretty sound, and I don’t know that the US will ever see a period in which we have the $$$$ to buy cars purely on style en masse as we did when the long low sedan was popular.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      crossovers are the hatches that hatches should have been, to be honest. for too long they were “cheap” cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The Escape hasn’t been “brand new” since 2013.

    • 0 avatar
      Tumbling-Dice

      “…folks are jumping at the non-rental counter image and better usability of the brand new Equinox…”

      The Equinox is a rental king. How else do they keep selling so goddamn many of these things (besides massive incentives for retail buyers)? It’s in its eighth model year and wasn’t best in class upon debut, so GM has other methods of keeping it sales big.

      • 0 avatar
        ponchoman49

        And what is your proof of this? I have been waiting and waiting to get a rental Equinox and there are literally none at most rental places I have been to including Enterprise and Avis. Any one of the 100’s i see on the road daily are not rentals either. The same goes for the Epsilon Impala. None to be found and if they do have any it’s one that is always rented. Now if I want a Hyundai CUV or sedan they are very plentiful.

  • avatar
    TheDoctorIsOut

    A big part of Chrysler’s precipitous decline is due to the inconsistency they created with their regular nameplate changes they have inflicted on their sedans over the years. First they were LeBarons until they were replaced by the Cirrus, then the Sebring coupe’s name was spread to the sedans, and then finally the 200. During the same time there was always the Malibu, the Accord, the Camry, and even the Altima consistently in their respective showrooms and the (lazy) mid sized shopper always knew where and what to go for. Even Chrysler’s own 300 as a nameplate has been steady since 1999. As for the sedan market itself dying I blame millenials who reject the forms that their parents drove and nothing says “old man’s car” to most of them like a mid sized sedan.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      No, I don’t think this has anything to do with it at all. As you said, the Malibu has remained consistent over the last couple of decades, and is equally in decline.

      The 200’s death is due to a lot of overlapping factors; the biggest IMO being its generally subprime image and long slogs of uncompetitiveness. The current 200 is probably Chrysler’s first competitive midsizer since the stretched K-cars… the market checked out long ago.

      • 0 avatar
        MLS

        I’d say the JA cars (Cirrus, Stratus, and Breeze) were competitive, and the successor JR cars (Sebring and Stratus) somewhat less so. But things really fell apart with the JR generation (Sebring/200 and Avenger).

        • 0 avatar
          ponchoman49

          The reliability of the 90’s cloud cars was poor but they drove nice enough. The 2.4 was a head gasket popping wonder and an oil leaker though. The 4 speed transmission wasn’t much better. We gave up selling these cars as it was a gamble on what it would come back for a tranny or engine work.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      And to us Boomers, nothing says “old man’s car” like a Buick or wagon (which is what we were schlepped around in as kids.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      to me its about versatility, and the least versatile vehicle around aside from a midside COUPE (coupe deathwatch? already dead.)is a midsize SEDAN. the CRV and RAV4 are tops for a reason… you can actually put stuff in them. same with the scion xB, gen1 and 2.

  • avatar
    MWolf

    I’ve driven the Fusion. I really didn’t mind it. You want terrible visibility? Hop into a Camaro. Yikes!

    I think there’s more than one issue with sedans. Some aren’t aging well, some you can’t see out of, and everyone has an obsession with AWD these days.

    I have an Escape myself. But that’s for a multitude of reasons. I needed some versatile cargo space. A trunk wouldn’t provide it, a truck would be too much. But SUV’s or CUV’s? Just right. It’s a shame. I love sedans, and I would buy one today…if only I had the funds and space for two cars. I’m thinking that sport Fusion sounds nice.

    I had a Malibu a few years back. It was perfectly fine. But I found myself wishing for something with cargo space that wasn’t restricted by a trunk lid.

    • 0 avatar
      Mandalorian

      It’s not just the trunk space with sedans that’s the issue, it’s the trunk OPENING. The average trunk opening these days is practically mailbox sized.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      THIS. trunks suck. it took a couple decades to realize having a big back opening was better in all ways. pretty sure if a lot of us needed more space wed be going for ford transits or nissan equivalents… but thats getting kinda dorky. id rock a white van, and do moving on the side.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    CUVs are handy and very useful for a great many people. No, many people won’t drive a station wagon. No matter if said station wagon is brown, diesel powered, 5 speed and whale foreskin interior. Others won’t drive a minivan. No matter that a Grand Caravan is a hell of a vehicle. Nope, my gf’s 19yo college attending son can bitch the 4-5 times a year he rides in the backseat of my IS-250. There are 5 Enterprise offices within 5 miles of my house. A little bit of coordination takes care of my 2-3 times a year hauling needs. Sedans aren’t dead, they’re just not the “family car” any more. In fact; TTAC needs to ask, “What IS the family car?”

    • 0 avatar
      RS

      “What IS the family car?”

      Currently it’s a SUV with a cramped and hard to get into 3rd seat with little to no storage room behind it when used.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        The 3 rows are pointless. 2 rows or minivans are where its at. Families are getting smaller, not bigger, so the 3rd row is often vestigial at best.

        • 0 avatar
          Corey Lewis

          “The 3 rows are pointless. 2 rows or minivans are where its at.”

          The Highlander, MDX, Pilot, and Lambda triplets do not concur.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            I think most buy them for the “it’s nice to have that third” no intention to use it daily – just like the third row in a box B-body wagon.

            If you have to carry 6 or more people often you don’t want a CUV, you want a van or a BOF beast.

            I’ve used the third row in my Highlander for carrying 5 to a conference that was a 180 mile round trip (the flexible under 30 year old had the 3rd row to herself), for ferrying family around when they come to visit (Grandma got to sit in the second row with my daughter and my wife got the third row to herself), tasks like that are where they shine.

            If you are the Brady Bunch a three row CUV isn’t for you.

        • 0 avatar
          derekson

          Even a family with 2 kids needs a third row if each brings a friend or if Grandma and Grandpa are in town, etc. These cars are a good fit for people who need an occasional third row but don’t need it for the family vacation (2-3 kids can all fit in 2nd row).

      • 0 avatar
        ponchoman49

        This is why I don’t want any current CUV. The rear quarters are small with the tapered off rear hatch and with the rear seat up and passengers there is literally no space left for anything other than a grocery bag. You have to fold down the rear seat to gain any hauling space.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      “What IS the family car?”

      Crew Cab, short bed full size pickup

  • avatar
    tonycd

    I’m old. I’ve been driving a midsize sedan most of the time for the last 25 years, and I have no plans to change. But I agree that at least until gas prices rise, car-based midsize SUVs are the future. VW will quickly see most of its Chattanooga volume go to the Atlas if they do any job at all of marketing it (always a big “if” with them).

    As for the existing crop of midsize sedans, I can speak with authority as a customer of the segment. My two cents:

    •Fusion: Reliability meh, don’t want a turbo.

    •Malibu: GM’s One World sourcing initiative – i.e., “give us components China-cheap or we’ll actually get them from China” – makes me mistrust their long-term reliability too much to buy their cars with my money.

    •200: Orphan FCA product. Yeah, right.

    •Passat: VW with a turbo. What could go wrong? Even so, I’d be tempted at the current fire-sale prices except the dash looks so damn cheap.

    •Camry: Staleness gives it an excuse right now. We’ll see when the new one comes out, which I expect will be very well reviewed.

    •Accord: Same comments as Camry.

    •Legacy: I’m surprised it’s slipped this much in an MMR year. Maybe they blew it by not changing the styling a bit more.

    •Sonata: I don’t know why anyone (of sound credit) would buy one. To me, they sacrificed the one thing they had going last time, the interesting styling inside and out, and the quality upgrades aren’t profound enough to make up for it. (Ditto the Elantra, BTW.)

    •Altima: Wonder why it wasn’t mentioned here. Still a cheap disposable piece of crap, of course, but I wouldn’t be surprised to hear its sales are holding up nicely just because the working class remains so besieged that they can’t qualify for the loan on anything better.

    • 0 avatar
      cdotson

      “car-based midsize SUVs are the future”

      Right up until volume dictates that cars become midsize SUV-based. Then midsize SUV-based cars will become the future.

      Will nobody revive the 1941-style sedans? A thoroughly modernized Packard Clipper would breathe life into car sales again. Something tall enough for windows and wearing hats and upright sides with fat-friendly hip points.

      • 0 avatar
        npaladin2000

        “Will nobody revive the 1941-style sedans? A thoroughly modernized Packard Clipper would breathe life into car sales again. Something tall enough for windows and wearing hats and upright sides with fat-friendly hip points.”

        It’s called a CUV. Maybe you’ve heard of them?

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      Your comments are spot-on to my own thoughts, except that I would gladly take a turbo. And you realize that you can get a Fusion without a turbo?

    • 0 avatar
      TomHend

      tonycd, which mid size do you like? How about the 2016 LaCrosse?

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        Flattered you asked, Tom. Right now, I’d take a long look at a higher-trim Legacy or Accord, or a CPO Avalon or Cadenza (the latter two really are a class up, so I’m kind of cheating).

    • 0 avatar
      tekdemon

      I suspect that when the new Camry comes out the midsize segment is going to turn into even more of a bloodbath than it is right now, because I can’t see anybody in their right mind buying a Malibu over the 2018 Camry that has way more standard features.

      • 0 avatar
        ponchoman49

        That’s interesting considering the new Camry isn’t even out yet and the current one is still using plastic hubcaps and has less features std than the new Malibu. I doubt if Toyota keeps the price similar to that it will have all this extra std equipment.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    Not only are these sedans crampy & blind isolation booths filled with plastic so thick it serves as a further restraint device; they don’t have a hatch!

    Be gone with them.

  • avatar
    slance66

    Can we dispense with the inevitable “CUVs stink” parade and acknowledge what an excellent transportation tool they are for most people? Yes, mostly better than cars or trucks or bloated monster “mini” vans.

    As enthusiasts, do you love them? No. They are the ultimate compromise vehicles. Enthusiast cars, whether Corvettes, M3s, Mx-5s, modified Wranglers or Hellcats, are cars that are mostly terrible as practical vehicles but are fantastic at one thing. Perhaps we should hope for better crossovers, with a more focused purpose, yet some practicality.

  • avatar
    sckid213

    I’ve seen a ton of new Malibus here in LA (not rentals). I saw a black one, black wheels, dark tint, and a black California plate that looked positively Audi-esque! I was dubious when I first saw photos of this current gen, but in person I think it looks great. Almost ’80s-retro in a way I can’t quite put my finger on.

    I agree with the commenter above who said that Chevy dealers are probably blowing these out. I can imagine many folks coming in to buy a Cruze (probably originally with delusions of a Camaro), and leaving with a Malibu which is bigger and better looking for not much more coin.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      Only seeing about 2K off sticker currently. The only time I saw more than that was year end 2016’s

      The Sonata’s have 3K off sticker and the rebate king is Nissan with 4K off sticker.
      http://www.simmons-rockwell.com/nissan?p=1&vehicleModel=Altima

  • avatar
    klossfam

    Station wagons and hatchbacks ALWAYS made more sense when I was growing up in the 70s and early 80s. What is a CUV? A station wagon or hatchback on stilts that has better sight lines and even better utility.

    I’m actually surprised the midsize sedan collapse didn’t happen sooner. I’ve been driving midsize sedan a lot lately as my wife’s Tiguan got hit (2x) and is in the collision shop. She is driving my 2017 Ridgeline.

    Let me tell you, crawling down into a Chevy Malibu et al reminds me why we haven’t had a sedan since 2011. Other than slightly better handling due to the lower center of gravity, why would anyone buy one? Small CUVs especially make a ton of sense. Economical, easy to park, generally very nimble and some haul insane amounts of stuff…

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      Wagons do indeed make sense from a practical standpoint, however they are yesteryear’s minivans: we members of the Boomer generation wouldn’t caught dead in a wagon today because they are what we got schlepped around in as kids. In 43 years of car ownership, I’ve owned vehicles of EVERY body style – except a wagon. And I have no plans to change that anytime soon. Wagons will make a comeback after the Boomers are all gone.

  • avatar
    mike978

    The Mazda 6 was down only 18 or so in February but is up YTD. Goes a little against the narrative.

  • avatar

    America is losing its ability to produce cars.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    My dear sweet jeebus, this is a car blog. No mid range car maker makes a sedan that looks good (donning firesuit) or has a V-8, sweet turbo 6 or jut a generally hot engine. The higher end makers still make sedans that look good (subjective) and have hot engines. Oops, I forgot the 300. Oh to have a Camaro engine in a Malibu or Impala or a Mustang GT engine in the big Ford sedan. Sadly, those days are gone

  • avatar
    Robbie

    GM midsize sedans drive as bad as minivans anyway – so you might as well make them as high as minivans also.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      That may have been true years ago but the current Malibu drives very smooth and refined and better than some of it’s competitors. Years ago during the 1990’s the Dust buster minivans drove just like cars and were praised for that so if the cars drove like that it couldn’t have been that bad. My Lumina’s and Malibu’s from that time drove quite well so I don’t understand your statement.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      For the past couple of generations, GM midsize (and even compacts) have driven/ridden better than the competing models from Toyota and Nissan.

      There’s a reason why the Impala has been widely lauded and has one of the top scores ever given by Consumer Reports; and a lot of the “goodness” from the Impala has filtered down to the new Malibu and Cruze.

  • avatar
    zip94513

    I really like my 2016 Fusion. If I had to buy another mid-size today the 2017 Fusion would be at the top of the list.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Vulpine: Just discovered the movie is available on Amazon.
  • Vulpine: @-Nate: Check some of the streaming services like Netflix or Amazon Prime. If you have access, you might...
  • Vulpine: @Jeff S: Agreed whole-heartedly. I used to really enjoy seeing the new models. Now going to a car show or a...
  • Jeff S: The most important way to protect your car’s paint is to use a good polymer sealant at least once a...
  • CaddyDaddy: HDC, did your Bro head to South Florida for the less taxes and more space, but will continue to vote like...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber