By on March 24, 2017

2017 Ford Raptor, Image: © 2017 Garrett Martin

2017 Ford F-150 Raptor Supercab

3.5-liter High-Output EcoBoost V6, Port and Direct Fuel Injection (450 hp @ 5,000 rpm; 510 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm)

10-Speed automatic transmission, two-/four-/all- wheel drive

15 city / 18 highway / 16 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

12.5 (Observed, MPG)

Base Price: $50,155

As Tested: $62,060

Prices include $1,295 destination charge.

In the coming years, we will begin driving riding around in the quiet electric embrace of autonomous convenience. We will look back on the 20-teens as a golden age when the last ounces of performance were wrung out of the internal combustion engine and automakers created cars for every conceivable market niche. New and presently unknown products will one day surprise and delight. But let’s stick with the present, which is a special time for auto enthusiasts.

Consider that the 5,600-pound 2017 Raptor is as fast to 60 miles per hour as the 2007 Mustang GT. Forced induction or not, the Raptor labors under a one-ton weight disadvantage, an unknown coefficient of drag penalty, and a 30-percent displacement deficiency versus the original pony car. A decade ago there was not a single stock vehicle available at any price capable of bounding through the desert at freeway speed that was also able to head back to civilization to pick up the kids from school.

Not convinced? In November, Ford raced a Raptor in the Baja 1000 Stock Full class. It got a roll cage, fuel cell, and a few other tweaks. Of almost 250 entries, the Raptor was among 142 rigs that finished the race. And after taking the checkered flag, it returned under its own power to Ford’s Arizona Proving Grounds 400 miles to the north.

The superlatives associated with Raptor are legion. What’s not to like?

2017 Ford Raptor, Image: © 2017 Seth Parks

This Raptor nearly converted me into a criminal. It fueled my desire to shortcut U-turns by banging across medians (thank you, officer Rodriguez for accommodating my boyish enthusiasm), driving through hedges (ok, I didn’t do that), skid turning through intersections (was that a dream?), and generally intimidating my way from point A to point B. Had I driven the Raptor one more day, I surely would’ve become a proper menace. And that was just what it elicited in daily on-road driving.

The Raptor is like an eager puppy constantly straining against its leash. Take it off, and the Raptor will sprint for the nearest patch of dirt, sand, rock, or mud. As joyful as it is on-road, this thing wants to roll around in the muck.

Unmistakable
The Raptor experience begins with its dramatic visual presence. Much like the outgoing truck, the 2017 sits six-inches wider than a standard F-150, which is great for lateral stability both on- and off-road. And this time around, Ford increased the ride height two-inches above the previous Raptor. But for all its elevation and girth, driving a Raptor is not like operating a conventionally lifted F-150.

There are now seven different front-end treatments for the F-150’s 16 trim levels. That’s what you can do when you sell nearly a million units a year. Raptor gets its own front grille, bumper, and lights — and they are all business. Blacked-out headlamps flank a mesh grille with familiar black Ford lettering spanning its four-foot width. The signature inset LEDs remain, as does the prominent and purposeful front skid plate.

2017 Ford Raptor, Image: © 2017 Seth Parks

The subtly redesigned front bumper contributes to a modest increase in approach angle, which moves up to 30 degrees from 29.8 in the outgoing model. It incorporates active upper and lower grille shutters and includes functional hood and fender vents on its way to delivering a 5-percent aerodynamic improvement. If the first-generation Raptor offered a clean incorporation of aftermarket performance parts with a standard F-150, the 2017 looks like the F-150’s native form. I’ll take mine without the $1,075 graphics package. Regardless, the second-generation Raptor is a fully realized vision.

Waiting for your touch
Inside, Raptor gets enough attention to ensure occupants don’t forget where they are, but is otherwise a typical mid- to high-spec F-150. Raptor embroidered logos adorn the seats, and the steering wheel gets magnesium paddle shifters and a colorful stripe of leather at 12 o’clock. An off-road status screen can be called up to indicate wheel deflection, but the stripe is a fun touch.

2017 Ford Raptor Interior, Image: © 2017 Seth Parks

One of my favorite standard features inside this truck is the bank of six overhead mounted upfitter switches. These are great for anyone who wants to install aftermarket lighting, an air compressor, or other tools but does not wish to deface the interior of their $60,000 truck. They are backlit and can be configured to run with or without the ignition on. It’s a clever installation and the switches have a nice positive detent.

It’s the engine, suspension, and body that make the Raptor a Raptor. And for those who want little more, Ford is listening. For $50,155, you can secure all the mechanical goodies in a base Supercab, which has a console between an 8-way power driver’s seat and a manually operated passenger seat. AC, Sync, 110-volt/400-watt Power Inverter, and steering wheel controls are standard. For the purists and more budget-minded, such a Raptor still a Raptor makes.

2017 Ford Raptor Auxiliary Switches, Image: © 2017 Seth Parks

Dealers will not be availing themselves of many base Raptors. Most will be more like our tester, which arrived with Ford’s 802A package ($9,345). Some highlights of this 30-feature package include 10-way heated/cooled front seats, leather, Sync 3, 4.10 front axle with Torsen differential, 360-degree camera (great for parking and navigating technical obstacles), blind spot detection, integrated trailer brake controller, LED box lighting, LED sideview mirror spotlights (a useful touch), memory seats/pedals/mirrors, Intelligent Access, power folding sideview mirrors with turn signals, power tilt/telescoping steering column, Pro Trailer Backup Assist, Sony audio, and voice-activated navigation.

It’s a comfortable, quiet, well-appointed interior.

Replacement for displacement
Not everyone agrees Ford’s decision to drop the Raptor’s 6.2-liter V8 in favor of a high-output 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6 was a good idea. I am not one of them. The 6.2 is an excellent modern performance truck engine, but the 3.5 liter delivers 450 horsepower — 39 more at 500 fewer rpms — than the 6.2. And it makes 510 foot-pounds of torque — 76 more at 1,000 fewer rpms — than the 6.2 liter. Bake these numbers together with the 100-pound lighter engine and almost 300 pounds shed by swapping steel for aluminum, and the result is a 22-percent improvement in torque-to-weight ratio that you can feel behind the wheel. Then there’s the combined fuel economy, which — aided by Raptor’s new 10-speed automatic transmission — improves to 16 miles per gallon versus 13 mpg.

For those concerned about forced induction, remember turbocharging is a mature technology with a lengthy history in commercial and military applications that feature more punishing duty cycles than a Raptor will ever see. Turbochargers are not only robust, they’re reliable. Just get your oil changed on schedule and enjoy the additional power, weight savings, and improved fuel economy.

2017 Ford Raptor, Image: © 2017 Garrett Martin

On-road ops
Driving a Raptor is like riding a cumulonimbus cloud — dark, dense, and towering. If any vehicle could generate tornadoes, it would be this one. These rigs are not exactly rare on southern California roads; nonetheless, they still turn heads, even when operated with restraint.

Get on the gas and Raptor squats and accelerates with a willing roar and a torrent of thrust. A variety of outlets have measured 0-60 times in the low fives. As compared to contemporary go-fast cars, Raptor is still rapid. But none of these cars, not even the Grand Cherokee SRTs of the world, provide Raptor’s commanding perspective of the road.

No other stock vehicle rides quite like a Raptor. This truck combines the acceleration of a respectable sports sedan with a reinterpreted version of ’90s luxury. It would not be an exaggeration to call the ride plush, but that is part of what it takes to balance trophy-truck-like wheel travel (13.0 inches in front, 13.9 inches in at rear) and everyday practicality. For example, the front end is connected to the rear end, meaning a slight twist of the wheel at highway speed generates an almost immediate but muted tail wag. Whereas in an old Grand Marquis, a three-count was required between steering wheel movement and an exaggerated rear-end swing. Where an old Panther platform car wallowed, Raptor is tight. It soaks up road surface imperfections with ease and passes limited NVH to occupants. It has an utterly unique ride with undeniable charm.

2017 Ford Raptor, Image: © 2017 Garrett Martin

Taking a Raptor into corners at speed may be a harrowing experience for passengers, but it’s great fun for the front left-seater. Upon corner entry, the truck immediately begins to lean. Maintaining momentum into the apex, the truck progressively delivers more and more lean. But the steering is communicative throughout, allowing the committed driver to wait, then mash the throttle to bring the truck authoritatively out of the corner. Yes, you can get the tail out in a dry, paved corner. In more restrained on-road operation, body lean is ever present through corners, yet progressive and well controlled. But restraint is difficult; as they say, power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely.

Home sweet home
Less than three hours from my southern California home exists a unique playground. The Ocotillo Wells State Vehicular Recreation Area offers 85,000 acres of unrestricted off-road bliss. As always, I selected a low-traffic weekday for testing.

Raptor is capable of tackling technical routes and obstacles, but its reason for being is high-speed desert running, and the San Felipe Wash provides the perfect course. This broad, dry wash cut by a millennia of flash flooding runs for miles with lengthy sight-lines and moderate hazards. Its hard-packed sand is topped by intermittent sections of fresh blown sand and boulders up to the size of volleyballs. Its most challenging obstacles are the camouflaged berms created by lesser floods that fail to fill the entire wash. These smaller rains make a dry meandering water course inside the broader wash that create vertical drops — or rises, depending on your direction of travel — up to three feet high. It is the perfect place to let the Raptor fly.

One of several notable improvements to the suspension is the replacement of its capable 2.5-inch-diameter Fox shocks with 3-inch units. These progressive nine-stage Fox internal bypass coil-overs contribute to the truck’s increased wheel travel. They are also provide 44 percent more volume, enabling better heat dissipation, the archenemy of any shock absorber.

2017 Ford Raptor, Image: © 2017 Garrett Martin

Raptor offers a two-speed transfer case working in conjunction with six terrain management settings to optimize traction based on driving surface. Unlike most T-cases, this one supports all-wheel drive through a clutch-based torque-on-demand set up, as well as a mechanical locking system to support traditional 4-High and 4-Low.

The software-based terrain management system is operated through steering-wheel-mounted buttons linked to a sub-screen in the configurable display in center of the instrument cluster. Based on the driver’s selection of Normal, Weather, Mud & Sand, Baja, and Rock Crawl, Raptor will automatically select the appropriate four-wheel drive setting as well as configure the transmission, braking, and stability control to optimize performance. Ford has done an admirable job simplifying its off-road settings, preferable for example to the Toyota Tacoma TRD-Pro Off Road. Raptor also offers three steering settings — Normal, Sport, and Comfort — which offer discernible differences and are worth matching to one’s driving intentions.

How does it all work off-road?

The experience began with a scouting run down the wash at moderate speed in 2WD, steering set to normal, and traction control off. Having re-familiarized myself with the wash and its obstacles, it was time to turn around and bring it back. Retaining the same settings, I hit the wash fast. The truck ripped across the desert. Building confidence with each passing tumble weed, the truck found a rhythm gliding across the occasional whoops and casually sliding through long sweeping corners. But only fear stood between a fun afternoon and me exceeding my capabilities.

What happens when you put it in Baja Mode?

2017 Ford Raptor, Image: © 2017 Garrett Martin

Baja Mode delivers aggressive throttle response and holds gears impossibly long, ensuring the truck operates at the top third of the tach. Traction control is also relaxed and 4-High is automatically selected. Beginning my first run in Baja Mode, I depressed the right pedal and the truck exploded to life, refusing to up-shift prior to red-line. Baja Mode essentially informs its operator that if they are not willing to push it, they will not earn the right to the next gear. Baja Mode heightens the entire experience with violence. Ford should have Baja Mode programmed to automatically disable the stereo to ensure occupants get the full aural experience. But even after all the brutality, I probably didn’t get down the wash much faster than before.

If smiles per mile were used to identify the best off-road setting for this environment, I’d take 2WD with traction control deactivated. Perhaps with a few more iterations, I would have warmed to Baja Mode. But 2WD sans traction nannies made for a more tail-happy experience without the hair-trigger throttle and freakish responsiveness of the shift-averse 10-speed. If you are looking for the setting most likely to induce PTSD, Baja Mode is for you.

2017 Ford Raptor, Image: © 2017 Seth Parks

In memoriam
A base Supercab Raptor opens at $48,325. The Supercab tested here with 802A package ($9,345, detailed above), graphics package ($1,075), Tailgate Step ($375), Tailgate Applique ($495), Technology Package with Adaptive Cruise Control ($1,950), and Spray-In Bedliner ($495) carried a $63,890 MSRP with $1,295 destination charge. Across a 400-mile test cycle, it delivered 12.5 miles per gallon against an EPA rating of 15 mpg city, 18 mpg highway, and 16 mpg combined.

There may have been a couple close calls, but nobody was injured as a result of my week with the Raptor. And although I generally find endearing qualities in the vehicles I test, this one was different. When Ford collected it from the curb in front of my house, a little piece of me went with it. Is it perfect? Of course not, but I cannot help thinking we can now see the development summit even though this rig will one day be surpassed as the ultimate stock off-road truck. It’s not very far in the distance. And that’s a little sad.

[Images: © 2017 Garrett Martin]

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135 Comments on “2017 Ford F-150 Raptor Review – Apex Predator...”


  • avatar
    energetik9

    I’m not a truck guy, and big lifted trucks always strike me as a bit, well, comical, if not completely useless in the urban environment. But…all that being said, I like this truck :)

  • avatar
    Hummer

    This one blends into the background way more than the outgoing model. The 1st gen raptor attracts a lot of attention because of its massive presence, this truck has completely lost that. I’ve found myself completely overlook this truck and to later notice that this was the new Raptor. Underwhelming. So on that ground they’ve already lost wow factor in favor of the Camaros “cartoon” factor. Not a great long term solution imo.
    The second major failing of this truck is the sound, clearly they have added a light exhaust. It’s horrible, not like Ford ranger horrible, but like 1996 civic horrible. I cannot believe they allowed that out of the factory. I was embarrassed just to be walking past it.

    • 0 avatar
      srh

      I’ve not seen enough “in the wild” to comment on the road presence, but as an owner of a Gen1, I’ll say that based on the Gen2s I’ve seen at dealerships, it has every bit the presence of the Gen1.

      I’m not really an exhaust noise fetishist, though I understand those do exist. But again from what I’ve heard on teh youtubes, the Gen2 sounds just fine.

      Once the Gen2 is available for under MSRP, it’ll find a spot next to the Focus RS in my garage.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        I always notice 1st gens they command the road like no other half ton, but I find the 2nd to blend in more like a sticker package.
        I wouldn’t consider myself a exhaustphile so to speak but I cannot stand a bad exhaust thats in your face.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Doh! A T T E N T I O N. I suggest you start there.

          Missed your morning coffee?

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            And? Is attention in anyway synonymous with bad?

            When you make large purchases do you make an effort to take into account what others will think of your purchase? There’s a word for people that live life without being proud of anything they do.

            Nothing you have said against this makes sense, by your logic the first people that bought automobiles were attention hungry because in your mind they were acting too good to be on a Horse or donkey.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Hummer,
      I agree with you. The primary function of this truck is to gain attention. That’s why many only see speed humps as the biggest obstacles in their life.

      This is a pity. But if most were used off road, sales would be small.

      A diesel version would improve this truck immensely.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        You agree with what?

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Hummer,
          Read my above comment directed at you. Then read your comment.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            gte,
            I don’t view my comments as teeth gnashing.

            I’m pressenting the real truth behind these vehicles.

            The are nice, but I would not consider one because of the limitations they pose as an off roader.

            The reality is beyond hooning in the desert they are of limited value.

            I love V8 Supercars. But they are one show performers as well. I would not own one.

            Here we are talking a road registered one show pony in the Raptor. Not much of a pickup, road car and limited 4×4 that is great in the desert.

            I even believe in a Ranger Raptor for Australia. So, I do see the value of this vehicle for Ford, but less so for the average Raptor owner.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        I don’t get your teeth gnashing about this Big Al, you’ve already made 5 comments (and growing) on this article alone along the vein of “people will mostly buy these for show.” So what? Let it go! The more of these get bought and gently driven, the better chance I have at snagging a clean used one at a good price and then putting it through its paces. Same thing has happened to just about every 4Runner, Land Cruiser, Tacoma, Bronco, Cherokee, Wrangler Unlimited, etc sold in the US going back decades. Most people don’t take a $50k+ (or even 25 or 30k) brand new vehicle off the lot and sink it up to the door handles in mud or put “desert pinstripes” on them.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Big Al from Oz – have you anything original to say?

        Any of these specialized vehicles whether they be Wrangler Rubicon, Power Wagon, GT350R, ZL1 etc. all owe their existence to the appearance buyer BECAUSE the hardcore enthusiast market isn’t big enough to warrant a car company to build them unless they charge Ferrari or Veyron prices.

        How hard is that to understand?

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          So is my wheelbarrow, it’s a specialised limited use vehicle.

          The fact remains, how many are used to their limits? Even many that use them in the desert don’t test the vehicles.

          My fully blinged pickup falls into the same category. I’m one of the very few to use my vehicle as I do, like the few Raptor owners.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            It doesn’t matter that most people do not use their vehicles to their limits.

            If that was a purchase criteria we’d all be driving Nissan Versa’s or be on mass transit.

            “My fully blinged pickup falls into the same category.”

            On another thread you said it was base model.

            Wow…… you are full of it!

          • 0 avatar
            OldManPants

            “On another thread you said it was base model.”

            BEEAH!

    • 0 avatar
      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

      Cover up the Ford logos with your finger. Better?

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Doesn’t prevent me from hearing the horrible fart can exhaust.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @HUmmer – I’m not a fan of the V6 turbo sound stock or worse with aftermarket exhaust. I had an EB3.5 F150 supercrew 4×4 as a loaner when my truck was in the body shop. The EB 3.5 is an impressive motor. I’d have no problem buying one based on performance characteristics of the engine.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I definately don’t disagree with the power and outright fantastic design, but it’s in the wrong vehicle, and the stock exhaust should do its best to quite that motor down not make it louder.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Quiet*

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          Meh, I am going to put exhaust cutouts on mine so I can open them up from time to time and maybe hear the turbos (maybe a Roush intake too when the warranty goes bye bye). They built these to hide the fact that they are turbos. Uncorked they may not sound like a v8 but they arent bad either.

    • 0 avatar
      mpzz

      Three questions:
      Are?
      You?
      Blind?

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    An absolutely unapologetic beast and technical tour-de-force. I love it. Hopefully it will be possible to find a used one in a few years without a cracked frame to buy after some massive depreciation (what’s resale like on older Raptors?).

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      So far, they seem to be holding their value except for the early 5.4 models. I wouldn’t count on massive depreciation.

      • 0 avatar
        srh

        Indeed. I bought my Gen1 6.2L Raptor in 2013 for $54K. Sold it 18 months later with 24,000 miles on it (and some mild paint blemishes) for $50K. And that was to a used car dealer. If I’d been willing to spend the effort to sell private party I may have recouped most of that $54K.

        I’m not convinced that the Gen2 will hold their value as well; the Gen1 appeals to those for whom a truck must have a V8. And it has the SVT badge with its attendant limited production while, if Ford is to be believed, they’ll build as many Gen2s as are demanded (though they’re off to a slow start so far…).

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Shoot. The Ram Rebel offers an ersatz version of the Raptor experience at a much lower pricepoint, I was seeing barely used 1 year old low mileage Hemi examples (why they made it with the Pentastar is beyond me) going for $35k or so. But the air suspension alone on the Ram raises questions in my mind. Toyota’s TRD-Pro is likewise nowhere as hardcore and can be found in the low 40s new, with the bonus of that Iforce v8 sounding glorious through the extra TRD dual exhaust, but that’s within spitting distance of a Raptor’s $48k base price. Frankly, I personally would probably best be served by a lightly used F150 Supercrew with the FX4 package optional rear diff lock and calling it good at that.

        Oh well…. *drives off in $1700 Ranger*

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          Oh, how’s the Ranger doing for you?

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Let’s be honest who here doesn’t have extensive time behind a Ranger?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Only 24K effectively certified miles on mine. I’m the second owner and the mileage was certified on the original title at transfer.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Eh the honeymoon period is over I think, that clean “rust-free” body (cosmetically from the outside) actually has a completely rotted away body mount up by the radiator core support on the passenger side. Not really a problem as the frame is solid and there isn’t too much weight in that corner of the truck. So basically inconsequential but unpleasant. But the beauty of an old truck is that I should be able to just weld on a piece of sheet metal to support that corner at my brother’s place and not worry whether it’s been “properly” repaired. A generic chinese replacement radiator core support can be bought for $64, but the labor to dissassemble the front end, drill out the spot welds on the old support and then welding in the new one doesn’t really seem worth it.

            Other than that I have a laundry list of items to attend to, but again nothing dramatic/expensive or anything that prevents me from commuting in it every day. I love driving it, it’s a much more fun and engaging experience than any other car I’ve owned or driven in the past few years. Reminds me a bit of old Russian machinery in a way.

        • 0 avatar
          srh

          From what I can see, the Rebel is little more than a cosmetic upgrade to the regular Ram 1500, no? Nothing like a Raptor.

          The Power Wagon is more akin to the Raptor, in that it’s a massively upgraded spec as well, though the two target different markets.

          The appeal of the Raptor, to me, is that it’s one of the nicest driving pickups on-road, with amazing off-road capability, at what is actually only a moderate price penalty over a similarly equipped non-Raptor F-150.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            “is little more than a cosmetic upgrade to the regular Ram 1500, no? Nothing like a Raptor.”

            It’s more than cosmetics, it’s the “light upgrades” category with a reworked suspension, factory all-terrain tires, and skid plates that includes stuff like Toyota’s TRD-Pros and Chevy’s Z71 “Trailboss.” Which themselves are just a set of fancy shocks and further uprated tires away from the more standard TRD-Offroad and Z71 packages.

            So you’re right, nowhere as purposely re-engineered. But for probably the majority of buyers, the effect is much the same, at a much lower cost.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            The problem with the Ram Rebel just like all of the “air ride” Ram 1500’s is that the truck turns into a pogo stick when one sets the ride to off-road mode. I’ve also read that some off-road magazines have overheated the Ram suspension off-road.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @dal20402 – I find it amazing that the EPA mpg numbers for this truck are basically the same as my 5.4 Supercrew F150. If one considers the tire size and aggressive tread pattern along with lift, width, low gear ratio and HP, this is truly an impressive beast.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Shouldn’t be too hard. The people who would buy something like this new don’t have much overlap with the people who bounce their trucks off stumps most weekends. The latter tend to buy and mod ’80s trucks, pound them apart for a year or two, then repeat.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      You’ll have to wait for the frame to rust before it cracks. A Tacoma will getcha there faster.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        “You’ll have to wait for the frame to rust before it cracks”

        I’m referring to the yahoos jumping these things and generally using them more or less as ford intended (sort of). There were some law suits as I recall of unhappy Baja 1000-reenactors that were upset that Ford dealers were denying them warranty replacement of the frame.

        No need for knee-jerk fanboy-ism.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          I don’t know about fanboy-ism, you’re our resident Toyota Guy. Nor do I know if Ford “intended them” for suspension/spring “mods” even if “catching a little air” was implied in the Raptor’s design/marketing program.

          The lawsuits were frivolous, no different than owners cranking up the boost of turbo cars/trucks, then sniveling all over the internet over subsequent engine damage.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Let’s review:

            I make a joke about people jumping raptors and ensuing frame damage (of course the lawsuits are frivolous).

            You feel the need to defend the Raptor over a good natured joke and bring up Tacoma frame rust issues out of the blue.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Mine was a good natured joke too. Yours is the standard “knee-jerk” joke, whenever Raptors are mentioned.

            It wasn’t “out of the blue”. Tacoma frames are actually “cracking”. Raptor frames were “bent”, in those incidents/cases.

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            These are very cool trucks, don’t get me wrong and have a legendary presence with internet car guys, but in real-life they tend to be a bit more pedestrian.

            I think to some people it has essentially become the top-trim F150 rather than a specialist off-roader, similar to AMG being the top trim Mercedes instead of a performance variant. They’re pretty common around where I live, and for the most part get used just like regular pickup trucks. For instance, I saw one in traffic today with a load of ladders in the bed.

            When you think about it though if the choice is between a King Ranch/Platinum trim and a Raptor the price is about the same, but the Raptor does a FAR better job of keeping its value. It makes sense.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            DenverMike,
            I’m not a Toyota fan, but I do see better value in a 79 Series V8 diesel over a Raptor.

            In reality, when the Raptor self destructs in hard off roading the 79 Series will still be moving and most likely towing the Raptor.

            The Raptor makes a great desert runner. But you’ll need plenty of gas stations nearby to fuel the EcoThirst.

            Now a Lion diesel Raptor with some load capability were available that would be the second best Ford pickup available.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – We don’t traverse amazing distances when on “Safari”, nor do you!

            In 4Lo, and 1-2 miles an hour, what kind of “range” were you expecting from a Diesel like what’s in the 79-series?

            Those trucks are so stinkin’ ancient (1984 chassis/platform debut, still current), they’re best adapted for the 3rd World and Australia.

            But what WOULD “self destruct”, is a 79-series trying to keep up with a 100 mph Raptor, Ballz to the Wall, across the desert floor, letting it all hang out.

            “Crawling along” is *OK* too…

            The 79’s “SUV” (short) wheelbase is great for some things on/off road , and not so great for others.

            They gotta be very top-heavy, tippy though!

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            As one who has experience with and lusts after the 70 series, I don’t think these 2 are on the same planet. First off, apples to apples. Can you still plop a 1FZ-FE in a 70 series? If so that will get you similar FE to a Raptor without all the speed and with the bonus of being assembled out of 250 dollar parts. Every offing last one of them it seemed. I mean I had like 500 bucks in power steering hoses.

            Size wise this compares to the big Land Cruiser, not the 70 series. I don’t know what number because I stopped caring when we didn’t get the 105 series rig…we only got the IFS 100 series. So, care to compare fuel economy between a Raptor and a modern gas powered Land Cruiser? My 80 series got 12 stock. They have managed to squeeze 13 city, 15 highway out of them now and you can get in one for 84 grand. I know it wasn’t your intent, but I’d say the Raptor compares pretty favorably to the USDM Land Cruiser. Besides, I don’t see them being cross shopped.

  • avatar
    CaddyDaddy

    ……..in 3-2-1: My Tacoma, my FJ, My Land Cruiser, my 70, my 80 series blah, blah, blah. The Raptor is the Donald Trump of all land based transportation vechiles. Read, see it, hear it and weep. MAGA!

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I’m as big of a 4×4 Toyota-phile as you’ll ever meet and I love this thing. Would a much more primitive LC70 do better in a locale where it was really put to hard work for several decades and maintained on a shoestring budget in a place with no infrastructure or dealer support? Of course. But that’s not what this Raptor is about.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Mandalorian
      Agreed more style than substance. Some people like that sort of thing., bit like a stretched Hummer Limousine, but not as outrageous

  • avatar
    ajla

    I still want a V8. I don’t care if the Ecoboost runs down a Z06, gets 19 MPG, and all mechanicals are personally guaranteed by Denis Leary.

    Also the new one sounds like an Impreza (skip to 47 seconds).

    https://youtu.be/FzzcSQyfTa4

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      Yep.

      I can see why Ford did what they did there, the halo car needs to bear some resemblance to the ones that people with budgets have to settle for, but the Ecoboosts sound like crap and putting an exhaust on them makes them sound like loud crap.

      Nothing would make me happier automotively speaking than Trump sacking the entire EPA so the V8s come back. I don’t want a Raptor but if Ford put the 6.2 in a XLT I’d trade up for one tomorrow.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    My urban-dwelling, constantly parking-challenged self and an 86-inch-wide Raptor would go together about as well as Cheddar and pizza. And it seems to attract douchebag drivers. But I love that Ford makes it. It’s a great piece of engineering.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      Parking a regular 80-inch-wide truck in city sized spaces already means going to the back of the lot, at least if you’d like room to open the doors afterwards, and once you’ve done that then another couple inches of fender flare are immaterial.

      And Cheddar on pizza is no good at all but Swiss is so good that it ought to be the default.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    I’m not a truck guy but man, what a cool truck. Looks great and has great capability. IMO trucks lend themselves better to sporty variants than chromed-out KingCountry versions.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    First impression: Too Big! Worse, the photos tend to exaggerate it’s already too large size.

    Second impression: A waste of money; grossly overpriced for a pickup truck. My old Ranger cost less than this rig’s fuel economy in thousands of dollars.

    Third impression: Too thirsty. That thing’s highway economy is lower than my old Ranger’s city economy.

    Conclusion: I’ll never own one willingly. If one is given to me, I’d sell it or trade it for something else.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      You’re not it’s target demo? That’s a SHOCKER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Honestly, I’m surprised that ANYONE fits this thing’s target demographic. It’s useless as a truck, it’s useless as a family vehicle and it’s useless as anything BUT a toy.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Not that I care for it but what’s the purpose of you even being here? You don’t even have a reasonable argument, if your incapable of safely driving something bigger than a smart car maybe it’s time you had your license revoked? Can it tow? Yes. Can it haul people? Yes. Can it drive one 80lb women on a 100 mile round trip to her part time job at a gym? Yes.
          I just destroyed your entire argument. By using my brain.

          You know the target demographic? Anyone who can afford the vehicle and decides they “WANT” it.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Hummer,
            Most who buy Raptors are chasing A T T E N T I O N. You made this inference.

            If you are chasing 6 second zero to 60 times there are multiple vehicle that are far superior at this. If you want utility, again there are far better offerings. If you want handling ….. If you want to off road you’ll find the Raptor would not be the best choice either.

            This is mainly sold as an accessory, like a necklace.

            It does have off road creed, but the majority used are not the best choice a person makes for a car.

            Most Raptors use is better filled by far cheaper options.

            But, like I say, “it’s your money”. But this doesn’t alter how the average Raptor lives its life.

            This is The Truth About Raptors.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            So, Raptor owners are after attention.

            So are Mercedes owners. So are Corvette owners. Hell, so are Prius owners.

            They’re all just after a different sort of attention. And I don’t see you calling them out for it.

            Try a little “live and let live.”

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @FreedMike:
            • Mercedes is the Chevrolet of Germany.
            • I will agree with Corvette.
            • I do not agree with Prius, though at one time it was true.

            Prius owners drive Prius today because it gets nearly double the fuel mileage of any other ICE vehicle on the road outside of other hybrids and betters most of them. Back when fuel prices were ridiculously high, Prius owners were paying half as much for their gasoline to travel the same distance; it was and is a practical vehicle. I, personally, don’t like it but I also don’t pan it because it is practical. It’s practically priced as well, at far less than a Raptor.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Yes FreedMike. They seek more than most. Everyone craves for some attention, it’s the amount that makes the difference.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “chasing A T T E N T I O N”

            That would explain the drivel that keeps pouring out of BAFO’s pie hole.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          Target demographic? I should be the antithesis of that. I’m not into big, raw, brash. And it certainly would not be an automotive interpretation of my worldview….yet I more than like it. I’d be lying if I didn’t see the appeal, and if I was a 2%, I think I would buy one for the fleet. This truck is a win, no matter what engine is in it. I’m ok with turbo…if moving forward with technology does not come with a downside, why the hell not.

          Good job, Ford. Ignore the naysayers.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          The Extended cab makes it basically useless as a family vehicle. The crewcab Raptor has a 1,200 lb cargo rating. To put that number in perspective, the 2017 coil spring PowerWagon is 1,500lbs.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            To put that number into perspective an H2 has a 2200 lb payload.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Hummer – I was posting a counterpoint to his argument.
            I did not know that the H2 was rated for 2,200 lbs. That makes sense since it was built upon a 3/4 ton chassis.
            The Hummer does prove my earlier point about the need for appearance buyers to buy these products. The Hummer died because it was no longer a cool vehicle for the urban dweller. Hardcore enthusiasts like yourself don’t constitute a large enough demographic to support such a product.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Your correct, and my honest opinion on it is that I’m glad that it died before it became what Jeep is now. I’d love to toss a brand new H2 through the woods but it would be embarrassing for the brand to pull up to a new H5 that looked like the Renegade.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Vulpine
          You forgot to add very slow Off Road, when not running on a flat desert landscape. There ticked all the boxes

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @RobertRyan – “You forgot to add very slow Off Road”

            Every test I’ve read said that the Raptor does very well at crawling.

            The fact that it is as wide as a one ton dually is its major limitation.

            Guys like BAFO act like no one takes that sort of thing into consideration when buying a truck. If I was driving exclusively on very narrow trails, I wouldn’t be in a full sized pickup. I’d be on a dirt bike of quad.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Lou,
            It’s to large and has trouble carrying a load.

            Put your family in the Raptor and you’ll have trouble fitting in a packed lunch.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @BAFo – “It’s to large and has trouble carrying a load.”

            The SuperCrew Raptor has a 1,200 lb payload. That is okay for a “sport” truck.

            Does anyone buy a Ferrari 488 GTB then complain about a lack of capacity or room for the family?

            This is where your whole argument falls apart.

            It isn’t designed to carry a heavy load or tow heavy. Buy an F450 if that is what you want to do.

            “Put your family in the Raptor and you’ll have trouble fitting in a packed lunch.”

            Actually no.

            Put your family in *a small truck* and you’ll have trouble fitting in a packed lunch.

            CORRECTED IT FOR NORTH AMERICAN STANDARDS.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Vulpine,
      Even if the EcoThirst gives 12.5mpg this truck is one of the handfull of decent 4×4 pickups.

      The only limitation is size, which limits the Raptor off road.

      Ford has done a great job in making an attractive mall cruiser.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Its size limits the Raptor on-road as well, especially in small towns and metropolitan centers.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          I drive 83 inches of American Steel on a semi-daily basis. I have been through Gettysburg, Lancaster, a little Philly, DC, Richmond, down south to New Orleans, Ft Lauderdale, Savannah, Charleston, out West to Nashville, (&Bonaroo) up North west to Cincinnati, Sandusky (Cedar Point). Through probably 75/100 counties in NC and most of the Corresponding small towns and roads all in this truck.

          I’ve backed out of one situation, and it barely even counts because two long bed crew cab trucks decided to diagonally park at the same spot on the left and right of a parking lot drive.

          Definition of a Non-issue.

          As far as off-road, If you come across two trees your incapable of fitting in between, go to the left or the right. Your in a desert runner, which means your probably in a desert or a vast area of open land. Ask yourself you the f put those trees there and move along.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “Its size limits the Raptor on-road as well”

          Um………well………….duh…….

          As Hummer has pointed out, if it don’t fit, don’t go there.

          I’ve been in places almost too tight for a dirt bike, does that mean anything bigger than a bike is a waste?

          If I applied your logic, the answer would be yes.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Lou, it handles like sh!t on road.

            Be real. This vehicle is great for Ford. Ford has done well.

            It can off road, but it sucks fuel, can’t carry enough for a weeks outing. To me there are too many cons outweighing the pros.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – Where do you find all these dense jungles in Australia?? Ya heard of The Great Outback? It’s sorta like a “desert” but bigger.

            I’m not convinced you’ve ever left the pavement anyway.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Actually, Big Al from Oz did not live far from one. You would have seen it in the ” Thin Red Line” and recently in the movie about a Religious objector
            Who rescued soldiers rather than than fight. In both cases it was supposed to be the Solomon Islands
            https://refractionsfilm.wordpress.com/2013/04/14/the-thin-red-line-1998/

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “it handles like sh!t on road”

            “No other stock vehicle rides quite like a Raptor. This truck combines the acceleration of a respectable sports sedan with a reinterpreted version of ’90s luxury. It would not be an exaggeration to call the ride plush, but that is part of what it takes to balance trophy-truck-like wheel travel (13.0 inches in front, 13.9 inches in at rear) and everyday practicality.”

            Pick Up Trucks. Com

            “To put it simply, the F-150 Raptor dominated. Sure, its trailering capabilities are a class below the other trucks in this Challenge, but this menacing pickup is the sports car of off-roading. It dominated low-speed trails and higher-speed loose dirt roads, plus it exhibited surprising civility on the road and had a long list of creature comforts.”

            “As good as it was off-road — where it was excellent — the Raptor was also surprisingly comfortable and docile on pavement. There was some noticeable body roll, which is to be expected in a suspension that’s set up in this manner, but it wasn’t enough to turn me off to it — it still felt in control.”
            ………………………………………..
            I can run through a bunch of other tests, they all say the same thing.

            It is a pickup. How many pickups out their are stellar on the road?
            13.0 inches in front, 13.9 inches in at rear.
            How many vehicles out there that are street legal that have that kind of wheel travel?

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Actually DenverMike I’m living in Washington State.

            I drive vehicles from around the world. I have “tested” more vehicles in the last few months than most will drive in a couple of decades.

            I off road in many places around the world.

            It amazes me people like yourself who have never travelled and experienced what some have have this Wikipedia understanding.

            You can garner as much sh!t off the net you want. Until you can touch, feel and live these experiences your comments are of little value.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            No one cares if you’ve been to Timbuktu. It’s clear you have no off road experience.

            Yes my off road adventures are “limited” to the US and Baja, but I’ve been stuck in mud, sand, snow, rocks, logs. Or a flat tire, broken part, etc.

            There’s a couple times where we could’ve died from heat exposure or froze to death. No exaggeration. You improvise or whatever it takes. You pound a stick into a punctured sidewall. You figure it out.

            You, BAFO, need to stay on the tour bus. We’ll all be better off.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Lou_BC
        “The SuperCrew Raptor has a 1,200 lb payload. That is okay for a “sport” truck.”
        That maybe OK in NA, but with a couple of heavy adults, what would be left , would be pretty tiny here.
        Still the Raptor is basically an answer to a question, no one has asked here.
        Unlike Big Al from Oz, a Ranger Raptor would be a more hardcore Off Roader to me. Not really a copy of the Raptor

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @RobertRyan – “Still the Raptor is basically an answer to a question, no one has asked here.”

          I don’t want to sound like some of the other dudes on this site……….. BUT…….. it wasn’t built for Australia.

          I’m sure that if Ford wanted to build an Australian Raptor it would be based upon the Ranger.
          BTW, even in Ranger trim, it would loose a large amount of cargo ratings.

          You make springs stiff enough to be able to carry a load and you loose ability to quickly compress. That also increases rebound forces after the spring has compressed.

          Standard payload for most SuperCrew F150’s is 1,800 lbs. A loss of 600 lbs. occurred due to the race biased suspension.
          A Power Wagon is rated for 1,500 lbs once they went to coils. The leaf spring PW was 1,800 lbs. A stock Ram 2500 4×4 is 3,200 lbs (lowest rating). Part of that loss is the weight of the winch and skid plates. Still, it looses close to 1/2 its payload on the altar of suspension compliance.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Lou_BC
            Yes it is a NA specific vehicle. As I said the only ” Raptor” I could foresee being done by Ford is a more hardcore Off Road Ranger for here and outside NA
            A Landcruiser 70 as a “Ute” has a 2,600lb payload. Anything larger is like a length of string as you have everything up to MDT’s mainly used as extreme Off Road Tankers and fire fighting vehicles

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Lou,
            As you stated the Raptor is specialised. This is what makes it unattractive. It might be able to jump sand dunes. If I was after a vehicle to race through the desert, I would consider a Raptor, but my expectations are the Raptor would need to fulfill additional roles.

            Load, vehicle size and mpg limitations is its down fall.

            Like all vehicles, once it becomes very specialised the specialisation detracts from the vehicles performance in other areas.

            As I mentioned a 79 Series is a far better off road option. It can go and do whatever a Raptor can. The 79 Series is not the best on road performer around as well.

            I also believe a well designed Wrangler pickup with a diesel will be a better vehicle to own.

            Whenever a Frod product is mentioned your Ford tinted glasses come out.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            RobertRyan,
            Ford would need it to be priced competitively against after market suppliers.

            Currently in Australia trim level changes are superficial in most instances with pickups. The lowest trim model 4×4 generally has all the traction, stability, trailer sway, locking/limited slip diffs, etc that the highest trim model has. So you don’t need to invest thousands in an off road package to have an off roader 4×4 like the US.

            This leaves suspension mods as the biggest alteration required to boost off road performance. This is relatively cheap. Change tyres and for a few grand you can turn a 4×4 pickup into a very capable off roader, with factory reliability.

            TRD failed in Australia due to the cost of performance improvements off road could not match cheaper and better aftermarket systems.

            This would be a challenge for Ford. But I think a 2.7 EcoThirst could help.

            With MB coming out with 260hp and 440ftlb 4x4s, Ford, Toyota, Nissan and VW need to address the new Aussie ute market. We need fast utes to replace the Falcon and Commodore utes.

            If you have noticed I left out Izuzu Dmax, Colorado, BT50, Triton. These are not good enough to challenge the better performers.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “It can go and do whatever a Raptor can”

            Sure thing there BAFO. The Raptor and a 1983 designed station-wagon (big Land Cruiser) turned into a regular-cab pickup (79 series). Same thing!!!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “A Landcruiser 70 as a “Ute” has a 2,600lb payload.”

            “You make springs stiff enough to be able to carry a load and you loose ability to quickly compress. That also increases rebound forces after the spring has compressed.”

            What part of this you or Big Al can’t comprehend?

            The Raptor is designed to travel rough terrain at a higher rate of speed than other 4×4’s.

            That means the suspension has to be able to “travel” through its range of motion rather quickly but in a controlled fashion.

            Stiff load bearing springs does NOT allow that to happen.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            @AussieAl…Why are we discussing the Raptor to the 70 series when the 200 series exists. The 70 size wise is closer to the Ranger. Yes, it is better in technical terrain because of its size. I too have driven a ton of them and it is primitive, but I love them. Still, the Raptor is closer in size to the 200 series which also sucks in anything technical because it is the size of a whale and when powered by gas, sucks down fuel.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            L’il Al,
            There is no 200 Series pickups.

            A 79 Series is really a midsize.

            The only advantage I see in the Raptor is a greater speed on some open tracks. Other than that it is equal to or worse off road.

            The 200 Series is a greater compromise geared more to on road performance to a 79 Series.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Lou_BC
          Basically you summed up why it is a non event here .Dune or desert running is a very low priority. Carting a load over rough terrain is
          A sort of road version of a Stadium Pickup

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @RobertRyan – “A sort of road version of a Stadium Pickup”

            Exactly.

            You get it, BAFO doesn’t.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I hate it too… but Ford has done it right – this thing is awesome. Even my wife knows what a Raptor is and respects it. Its like the Veryon of trucks. Completely mental, off its rocker, however if I lived in the desert southwest region I could see the appeal of having a toy like this.

      Question about the AUX switches in the overhead console, is there a relay junction or fuse box that make these switches plug-n-play? I assume so, if not getting wiring up there would be a pain.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I’d actually go with the old GMC Syclone or F150 Lightning being the Veyrons of trucks. You can’t jump sand dunes in a Veyron, after all.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @JMII – I think that you still have to run the appropriate wires and relays to the switches. I do like the idea. Ford has it as an option on HD’s. I’m looking at installing off-road lights and there isn’t much area to put a switch and have it look sanitary.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Nope the relays are already there and wired up. Ford leaves the blunt cut ends (with adhesive lined heat shrink) where they are accessible under dash and/or hood, depending on the model. In other application the up-fitter switches have two that are set up as key on only power and two that are set up always hot.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Big Al from Oz
        “It can go and do whatever a Raptor can.” Can do a lot more than a Raptor, would be correct

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “It can go and do whatever a Raptor can”

          An old XR100 Honda can go basically any place a KTM 250 EXC-F can go. One can just “do it” faster and more comfortably.

          My ’84 Ranger can go most places a Raptor can go. It just means it will take me 2 hours longer to do it.

          A Chevy Spark can go any place that a Corvette can go and do more stuff than a Corvette.

          SO, WHAT’S YOUR POINT?

          It is designed to “go off-road” faster than standard 4×4’s.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Lou_BC
            More a cultural thing. Why? , lifted Pickups etc?
            We see them as work vehicles first, maybe fun contraptions
            But just to run around a desert at full pace… Lost me there

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Lou,
            A KTM is another very specialised vehicle, similar to a Raptor in that respect.

            The difference between the ‘vette and Spark is more significant than the Raptor to the 79 Series.

            Maybe a Chev SS to the ‘vette is a better and fairer comparison. Not the overstating comparison you made.

            Both the ‘vette and SS are comparable as they are performance orientated vehicles (the Raptor and 79 Series are 4×4 orientated). Similar size, etc.

            But one offers better day to day or “cross country” comfort (the SS).

            Do I like a ‘vette? Yes. Would I buy one if I need a car? No. I would buy a SS.

            The Raptor is a pretty truck, it looks awesome, like a ‘vette, but in the off road world is as useful as a ‘vette for daily life.

            The Raptor is mainly used as a hairdresser wagon. But if people want it and Ford makes them it’s good.

            I have stated the Raptor is good in the desert.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @BAFO – you have some odd fixation with “hairdressers”.
            Perhaps someone needs to come out of the closet!

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          RobertRyan,
          This comment ties into Lou’s and most all other comments regarding the Raptor.

          The Raptor gives those driving them through a shopping mall some primal urge of satisfaction.

          As the title suggests “apex predator” awaiting to prounce a Prius or Leaf at the lights or the parking spot in front of the hairdressers.

          Many want one. Not to off road, as most who own these would be scared to drive on the shoulder.

          As good as these are, most are wank wagons with wankers at the wheel.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “most are wank wagons with wankers at the wheel.”

            and that from your own personal experience! (You, as a wank)

            The point is, as Robert Ryan has said, “A sort of road version of a Stadium Pickup”

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      First impression: You may not be the target audience for this vehicle.

      Second impression: As a lover of all things 4-cylinder, 30+ mpg, “small footprint” etc blah blah blah I’m not the target audience either.

      Third impression: So why do I want one so badly?

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        You tell me, Dave. To be quite honest, I hate the looks of the thing. That fake ‘big rig’ nose just exaggerates its size and I simply hate the design of the front clip. That’s not even mentioning the relatively flimsy construction.

        My wife just happened to see a newer-model Ram pickup today and she said, “I actually like the looks of that Dodge.” I agree. The Ram is the best looking full-sized truck today, simply because it doesn’t try to be so imposing. I’d like to see them bring something out that’s a bit smaller… like 25% smaller.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Check it again. The grill is about the same sqft as the others, except the Tundra has them all beat.

          Looks are subjective, but size is also relative. If you’re in a Fiat all day, it has feel imposing in your rear-view mirror, or difficult to drive without hopping curbs, front and rear. But that’s YOU!

          I’m in an F-550 conversion all day and my F-150 seems like a cute Ute. I whip it in-N-out of parking structures and drive-thru’s like it’s a darn CUV!

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            How many pickups is that now, you own??

            22? And you live in a 2 bedroom apartment in Winnepeg. WTF?? And you’ve been to Espange over 3 dozen times and think there is a large full size Spanish pickup market.

            Remember you were caught out on TTAC a few times.

            Man, you dribble nonsense.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            I only have a few pickups, not like the old days. Yes I buy and sell them, as I said before. Getting a ’91 Dually crew tomorrow. $500, been parked for 10+ years, burnt paint, bad tires, etc. Nice fixer, but since just a RWD, I’ll scrap it for parts I need to ‘perfect’ a low miles, ’91 “Limo”, crew, 4X4 dually, “show truck”. I’ll sell the excess parts.

            Too much fun sometimes!

            Either way, the Raptor is an absolute HIT for Ford. Hundreds of videos with owners, reviewers, enthusiasts enjoying the HELL out of them!

            But is there a bigger Motor Sports for “full stock” or “showroom” class pickups than desert racing, rally, including Dakar, Mint 400, Baja 1000, etc?

            You ever exit a corner on a 4-wheel-drift??

            Hate all you want, but it just confirms you and your sidekick aren’t enthusiasts of *any sort*, involving motor sports…………………….Enjoy your EXTREME lack of choices!

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Imposing, DM? Maybe some people are frightened by them, I just think they’re ugly. The Ram has the best looking grill of all full-sizers while the Colorado has the best looking mid-sized grill.

            And your description of the way you drive it is exactly WHY they’re so dangerous; that size and power makes some people drive like they own the road and don’t want to share it with anyone. It’s a psychological addiction that can and will eventually end up in somebody’s injury or even fatality.

            More single-vehicle crashes involving pickup trucks end up in fatality than any other type of vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            If you think I’m a menace in the drive-thru, ya need to RUN when I’m powering through nacho chalupas!!!!!!!!!!!!

            Don’t be afraid of Monsters. Trucks are a more dangerous place to be in, in a crash, than cars by far. But why constantly live in fear?

            Are you ever a pedestrian? Ride a bike? Don’t do it!!!!

  • avatar
    carguy

    This would be the only truck in my dream garage.
    Bravo Ford – what an amazing piece of engineering.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do believe the Raptor highlights the need for a mini me Ranger Raptor.

    For the global market a 2.7 EcoThirst and 3.2 diesel are a necessity.

    There would be a large enough global “shopping mall” market for the posers.

    Ford should tap this easy cash.

  • avatar
    Nellakwah

    Legit question – would you be able to get a discount on these, or would a buyer pay closer to MSRP? I ask because I know there are large discounts on most pick up trucks, but wasn’t sure if this was rare enough for dealers to stand firm on price.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    “In the coming years, we will begin driving riding around in the quiet electric embrace of autonomous convenience.”

    Dreamers and wishful thinkers. It isn’t going to happen, ever, unless we all ride on wires installed on highways, and that is the only place something like that may occur. Try to find someone to pay for it.

    As for the opening photo, not many of us will be reduced to driving on sand dunes, either, unless we really go out of our way to try to ruin a very expensive vehicle.

  • avatar
    4drSedan

    The Me I wish I was owns the following toys;

    – BMW R 1200 GS Adventure
    – Beechcraft Baron
    – This truck

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    Junk. I would much rather have a base model Chevy Silverado or F150. Especially the Silverado.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    @BAFO/RYAN – It’s specialized, so is rock crawling and mudding, but you’ll never see a “turnkey” type of either of those from a major/global car make. Nor is desert running, pre-race running “type” or trucks anything new, nor unpopular, anywhere there’s pickups and an aftermarket, including Australia.

    But stating the 79 series and Raptor are purdy much the same thing ’cause “4X4”, is a goofy oversimplification, but normal for you two goofs.


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  • EAF: Agree with you Vulpine. I would remove the spark plugs, pour some oil in the cylinders, and attempt to free up...

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