By on February 18, 2017

2017 GMC Sierra Denali 2500HD

In the dark days of the recession, as General Motors was frantically attempting to save itself from the abyss, many thought it odd that the automaker’s GMC division was saved while a storied brand like Pontiac met its executioner. As for Saturn and Hummer, well, let’s just say far fewer tears were spilled over those deaths.

Clearly, GM saw long-term profitability in its carless brand — a prediction that has since panned out. From a low point in 2009, GMC sales doubled to 558,697 units by 2015. However, it isn’t the number of vehicles sold that’s the sweet spot for the automaker — it’s the number of GMCs sold in top-end Denali trim.

At GM’s utility brand, luxury versions of non-luxury vehicles are proving increasingly popular.

According to Motor Authority, Denali-badged vehicles now account for 25 percent of the brand’s sales. Not only does the brand enjoy the higher profits built into the price of a utility vehicle, it also nets the premium markup. No wonder GMC now offers Denali trim across its model range.

The trim first appeared on the flagship Yukon in 1999, but now can be found on lesser midsize Canyon pickups and the Terrain crossover. As such, Denali has become a de facto fourth brand in GM’s utility offerings, slotted above Chevrolet and GMC, and just below Cadillac. Greater profits come from the fact that the trim is just a big ol’ luxury appearance and convenience package, not an off-road package with piles of new hardware.

Two years ago, the trim accounted for 20 percent of the brand’s sales. It’s in GM’s best interests to boost that percentage ever higher.

While the brand plans to pretty much stay the course in the near future, one product mystery remains. GMC wants to muscle into the Jeep Wrangler’s territory with a small off-road SUV, though we’ve seen precious little evidence of it so far. That model could appear for the 2020 model year.

[Image: General Motors]

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112 Comments on “GMC’s Purpose Can Be Boiled Down to One Word – Denali...”


  • avatar
    DenverMike

    As insane as it sounds, GMC loyalists claim they would never own a DAMN Chevy!

    Wut?? But even before counting Denali sales, GMC is pure profits.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      I’d be one of those. GMC is the only GM brand that interests me, and that’s because I like their styling. Always more subtle and classier than Chevy.

      • 0 avatar
        thalter

        Anything you have to describe with the word “classy” by definition is not.

      • 0 avatar
        John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

        @Dave, agreed

        I’d strongly consider a new Sierra, but probably not a Silverado.

        I’ve always liked GMC’S styling and love the historic brand-exclusive products, not limited to the line of V-6 truck engines they had in the 1960s era trucks. They used to have unique models.

        If given the choice, I’d pick the GMC over the Chevy anytime.

    • 0 avatar
      AC

      It’s not completely insane that GMC buyers wouldn’t consider a Chevy, not after watching Chevy’s “Real People, Not Actors” commercials.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        The 1st run of “Real People…” was OK, but they’ve taken it way too far. It was proven, and GM admitted, the kids are real actors though. All of them.

        The funniest one was the kids profiling the dude pictured standing next the Chevy Colorado, saying he’d have a German Shepard for a pet, and the same dude standing next to a boring compact sedan would own a bird.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “As insane as it sounds, GMC loyalists claim they would never own a DAMN Chevy!”

      There is always emotion in every car/truck I buy. If I’m looking at a particular Chevy/GMC PU truck/SUV, I go for the one that looks the best to me. In 2004 I traded a Chevy in on my GMC Sierra HD PU. Hated that Avalanche front end on the Chevy. In 2007, went back to Chevy because I liked the looks of the Tahoe so much better than the Yukon.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    There’s a common sentiment here of, “what use is GM?” Why wasn’t that question asked between 1970 and 1999, when there really was no difference between GMC and Chevy trucks and vans?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Agreed. At least now, they have different body panels.

      • 0 avatar
        John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

        They also have things you can’t get on a Chevy. The Denali is worth the upgrade if your intention is a maxed out GM light truck that isn’t a Cadillac.

        Sure GMC clones Chevys a lot, but none of you have a problem choosing an ES over an Avalon, or an Audi (S3? I dunno) over a Golf R.

        Again, its only a problem when American brands do it. Then, its stupid and idiotic and blablabla
        You know what isn’t stupid? Making profits, which is exactly what GMC division does.

        If you were a car maker and you had the option to spend a little time enhancing a new product with things that would make the mainstream models too expensive for a very healthy return, wouldn’t you do it?

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Turned out to be a good call. GMC has a really solid portfolio, A Yukon Denali is now a worthy contender to a Mercedes E/BMW 5 these days.
    Personally, I say good riddance to Pontiac. With few exceptions (G8, Solstice) they had been for the most part churning out crap since the mid 80s. Worst interiors in the business bar none.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    While Ram has been a stalwart if weakening holdout against this, pedestrian safety consequences for the frontal area of pickups has made me fall out of love with them.

    They almost all look like dumpsters to me now.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      This is the HD model. HD Rams are just as “freight train-y,” at least to me.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        The scary thing about HD’s, is despite ever more crazily sized grills, every single square inch of them, and more, are functional. Utilized for cooling capacity, in order to net the diesel duallies their now required Class something-ever-closer-to-8 tow ratings. The SRWs that most people actually drive, hence run over pedestrians with, are just along for the ride, due to historic lack of differentiation in both marketing, manufacturing and certification.

        I was hoping the double whammy of the “tweener” Nissan on the “capacity” low end, and the even more gargantuan (tall enough to no longer limbo under the Golden Gate bridge, or at least many garage beams….) than before new Superduty on the high, would open up a rift that would grow. But so far, it doesn’t seem Nissan/Cummins has executed well enough to capitalize on their conceptual advantage. While it will likely take a few more years before the Duramax/Powerstroke/(Cummins6.7+?) dually rating oneupmanship makes the daily driven 2500s just too burdened by the needless over engineering required to keep them in sync with their semitrailer towing dually siblings. Even in Texas, Peterbilts are at least a bit awkward for daily driving, after all.

    • 0 avatar
      Master Baiter

      “…pedestrian safety consequences for the frontal area of pickups…”

      As if these are driven around Manhattan…

      I object to the grills merely because they’re ugly.
      .
      .

  • avatar
    AC

    Were this a post on diesel, multiple commenters would transform from car enthusiasts to fleet managers motivated only by cost per mile. They’d quote break even mileage relative to option price, projecting maintenance costs, and quickly dismiss the drivetrain option as completely irrational. I suspect this trim and badge option will not be subjected to the same analysis. However, it should be. The SLT is really nice, and the Denali doesn’t offer a whole lot more once the novelty of retractable steps wears off.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      I know that’s why my uncle bought a fully-loaded SLT instead of a Denali: He didn’t feel like paying an extra $10K for Denali hubcaps. Plus it ended up being used as his work truck for several years.

      But looking at it the other way, I know there are quite a few Yukon Denali buyers (at least in my area) who in a previous era would have bought an Electra 225 over a Cadillac for the same reason they bought the Denali over an Escalade: Just as nice, but not as flashy.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        I lean your uncle’ away – Denali is a little flashy to me; Loaded SLT2 is more subtle.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Among the Range Rover/MB GLS set, for the previous generation, the Yukon Denali was more popular than the Escalade (which was too “blingy” and kinda crass-looking).

        However, the current Escalade (with its classier, more sleek looks) has made inroads.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        The wifey liked the boxy Terrain andni tried to finagle the jump from SLT to Denali but the almost $100/mo jump in lease price was worth the chrome accents, leather embroidered headrests and dual flow shocks. She didn’t like the chrome grill either.

        With the lease up in December she really like the new Acadia as the old was just too large for DINKs and two dogs.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @Rday – When you’re already buying a diesel dually crew cab with power windows, how much more of a leap is Denali or Platinum trim? Shouldn’t they throw that in for free?? It’d be like upgrading to “Floor Mats” on RCSB base stripper.

      And will you marry me instead???

    • 0 avatar
      Eyeflyistheeye

      Fleet manager checking in here. The filter maintenance costs on our Transits have outweighed any possible savings from using diesel over gasoline. The only good thing about that fiasco is that the vans were there before I was.

      Ironically, diesels now work better for private users who can maintain them adequately and give them the precious time they need on the highway to perform filter regen than fleet vehicles where stop-and-go driving from careless drivers, a focus on downtime, downtime, downtime with higher-ups asking “What do you f*cking mean this isn’t covered under warranty?” leads to headaches.

      I’m a prime believer in buying the middlest midgrade trim of a vehicle (e.g. LX, LE, SE, XLT, SR5), but as with ordering a diesel, ordering a recognized/popular luxury package like a Denali can lead to higher resale value and it might be a better value for someone who options their trucks heavily to go for a Denali over a loaded SLT.

      I still remember the Explorer era where people drove “Eddie Bauers” instead of Explorers and people specifically wanted an Eddie Bauer Explorer like some people now would want a Yukon Denali and not just a Yukon. While I love European Fords and Ford’s efforts to be a global company, the Platinum trim on their SUVs has far less resonance than Eddie Bauer ever did and it would be smart of them to resurrect their partnership.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        When I was shopping for an SUV I test drove both and Escalade and Yukon Denali. Preferred the Yukon because it was less flashy. The only real advantage the Escalade had was a nicer dash, but not for $10k more. Ended up getting a deal on a Q7 I couldn’t refuse, but the K2XX Yukon Denali has impressed me so much it’s on the short list for next vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        With the proliferation of crew cab 4X4s in mid-trim to King Ranch/SLT/Denali/Platinum/Longhorn/ect, the last 10+ years, the resale value of basic pickups is taking a steep dive.

        When shopping for a used pickup, unless they’re practically giving it away, I won’t bother looking at anything less than a Lariat crew cab 4X4.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        XLT is closer to the bottom than the top now. Still a nicely equipped truck IMHO, but not top trim like 20 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      AC,
      You raise a good point.

      The anti-diesel fullsize pickup crowd seem to discuss the additional cost of a diesel as a cost per mile burden.

      Yet you never hear any of these guys whine about spending a lot of money on flowery bullsh!t bling.

      If you spend an extra 13k on a pickup unnecessarily and drive it like many claim two or three times a year towing a 200 000lb trailer the pickup becomes very expensive. Just rent one.

      But the reality is 75% of pickups never carry much and tow less. They are pretty car alternatives.

      I know I own one, full of leather (real) and bling.

      Why? Because I can, like the other 75%.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      I agree with the comments of the SLT versus the Denali trim. The SLT is already a nicer truck than I need. I’ve never cared for the exterior styling of the Denail truck anyways. Too much bling for me.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Denali!

    Such luxury…

  • avatar
    Rday

    My fiancee and i have been looking for over a year for a dually diesel to pull a fifthwheel or toyhauler we are buying this year. i drove a denali dually a year ago and then checked out the ford and ram versions even the chevy versions too. the denali was the only truck that rode like a limo and did not bother my fiancee’s back. Tried to check with chevy dealers and they swore that their top of the line model was the same… but it wasn’t as far as ride control goes. So i bought the dually denali in november. It rides like a limo even while it is unloaded. Trailer should make it even better. Only complaint is that it is over 22′ long which makes it hard to park/steer in shopping centers/restaurants. SO I bought a rav4hybrid and that works great. love both but the denali dually is not for using around parking lots where space is limited, narrow and meant for small cars. Do not like the fill tube location for the def fluid. awkward to get to and easy to spill.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      The general cure for the delusion that a diesel dully, even a Denali one, rides like anything but a diesel dully, is embedded in the gas pedal :) Pimp out and isolate the cab of even a dumptruck well enough, and it can be quite limolike as long as it’s sitting still.

      Per my experience, The IFS GMs are 5mph faster at tow speeds (65-70mph) than their live axle competitors, for the same comfort and control on even remotely bumpy or offcamber roads. With the difference increasing as speeds climb.

      But, again as speeds climb, they fall ever further behind even halftons. With proper independently suspended unibodies being in a whole ‘nother league.

    • 0 avatar
      phreshone

      It is worth noting that business owners have been able to take the Section 187 deduction (Hummer Loophole) for Pickups and SUV’s over 6000 lbs GVWR. Which essentially was a 100% deduction in current year up to $45,000 of purchase price. So infinitely more economical to buy a Denali as a luxury car on your company’s account than lease that 7 series. and for that matter, buy a full-sized pickup instead of a small/mid sized pick up even if you do light-duty work (pool cleaning, painting etc). The tax code just got rolled back a bit, hence why we will see more mid-sized pickup offerings in the future.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        You still need to park the HD. A 7 Series is alot more comfortable and logical.

        If you are wanting a 7 Series why would you consider a vehicle almost on par with a dump truck?

        • 0 avatar
          Mandalorian

          Maneuvering a large truck to park really isn’t that hard when one gets used to it. Finding parking spots to fit it in is not a problem outside of major city centers.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Mandalorian,
            My friend here in WA owns a HD Ram in a rural area. Its his daily driver, he’s loves his truck, but complains about parking it.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “My friend here in WA owns a HD Ram in a rural area. Its his daily driver, he’s loves his truck, but complains about parking it.”

            A friend, one……..one……..

            and he has problems parking a HD in a rural setting.

            Maybe he needs to see an optometrist.

            Or perhaps the sample size is a bit small to extrapolate accurate data for use in the general population!

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Hey Al, my friend in lower Manhattan owns an F650 has 6 doors and a truck bed and he says he wishes it was longer so it would be easier to park. He says he’d rather daily drive a Nimitz class carrier. See, your anecdotal BS is just that, BS.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Li’l Al with the big grille,
            I had a Ford HD, yes with a PowerStroke when I was working out of Vegas and it was pathetic for parking.

            You generally needed to park out the back of every parking lot with all the other HDs and RVs.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “when I was working out of Vegas”

            Is that Australian slang for gay bar?

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    The automotive tokens of “success” change with time.

    Nowadays owning a loaded pickup truck is the “I’ve made it” vehicle purchase. Why buy an E class that’s low to the ground and expensive when a loaded Denali can tow the boat and still impress the country club crowds?

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    What a gaudy, over-the-top and even cheap looking, ridiculous f*cking truck.

    Can they fit any more edges, box-outs, chrome, cheap as a$$ looking plastic-chrome (like the Playskoolz looking stuff on the front bumper), a bigger grille, MOAR lights, larger mirrors, a couple more hood scoops, or more gingerbread on this POS?

    Jack it up about another 4.8″ and put 22″ wheels on it with big mud tires, a faux diesel straight pipe, and truck nutz on it, too!

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      I don’t much mind the looks when clean. But after even the shortest of trips, that blunt nose is nothing more than a bug graveyard. With the blood and guts of 100s of critters visually doubled up by the mirror effect of all that Chrome, making the whole front look quite puke inducing.

    • 0 avatar
      Master Baiter

      Yep. Another truck that’s a caricature of itself.
      .
      .

    • 0 avatar
      crtfour

      Even worse is that those wheel covers are plastic.

    • 0 avatar
      dash riprock

      “What a gaudy, over-the-top”

      For six words there I thought you were going to self critique the majority of your posts.

    • 0 avatar
      Tosh

      The customers are asking for “bling-dozers.”

    • 0 avatar
      carguy67

      When square wheels come into fashion they’ll own the market.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      DeadWeight,
      This is what the consumer wants.

      I prefer a genuinely functional look. There are many heavier trucks than HDs that have smaller grilles.

      You can understand my view of wannabe truckies driving hairdresser wagons, which most of these are.

      Its about fashion. Most of these guys probably are latte sippers, wearing brand name underwear with their pants down displaying the huge elastic band with Calvin or what ever on display.

      But, if they can afford one who cares.

      • 0 avatar
        IHateCars

        “…. Most of these guys probably are latte sippers, wearing brand name underwear with their pants down displaying the huge elastic band with Calvin or what ever on display.”

        Now we know what BAFO is eyeing when he’s sipping his latte….not that there’s anything wrong with that.

        Seriously though, in one post you say that you prefer a “functional look” and decry anyone who owns a truck that has bling on it as driving a “hairdresser’s wagon”, then in another post above you say that you own a truck “full of leather and bling”. So are you a latte sipping hairdresser? Makes so much sense now!

        Honestly, I get a mental image of Grandpa Simpson incessantly blathering on when I read your posts now.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Ihatecars,
          Our pickups don’t tend to have bulbous noses with those huge little d!ck grilles.

          That very much a redneck hipster hairdresser thing. A wannabe redneck. If an Aussie has redneck tendencies he doesn’t tend to advertise this to attract other males. We just ain’t like that.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Go commando.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    Apparently the bling key got stuck down when they were ordering that thing.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Seems there is a changing dynamic for automakers with the growing gap between haves and have nots.

    With ATP zooming past $34K and loans beyond 72 months expanding, the have nots are having a harder time buying new and taking more risk to do it.

    The haves on the other hand are seeing salary growing faster than the have nots, and have more disposable income. So murdered out $50K vehicles (or $60K with $10K on the hood if we’re talking luxury trucks, or $70K with $12K on the hood, or $80K with $15K on the hood…) are “affordable,” or at least can be consumed in a lease deal.

    An E-Class, a 5-Series, an XF, an A6/A7, depreciates like a feckin’ rock. Certain luxury SUVs also depreciate like a rock (Cadillac Escalade) but others hold their value well, and a murdered out F150, Silverado, Sierra, or RAM with the right option boxes checked off (big engine and 4WD) hold their values – bigley.

    So you can buy an E-class or 5-series and get gutted by depreciation, or buy the Cowboy Cadillac if you’re a have, carry your Home Depot runs guilt free and have resale value.

    When these hit the used market the upper end of the “have nots” or those who have the priviledge to buy used (see Jack’s story from about 18 months ago) buy them as second owners. The have nots buy them as third and fourth owners.

    You’re seeing this across the board with midsizers and compact cars laden with luxury features, never midsize SUVs. Mazda is circling the wagons by going upscale.

    Yes, you can still buy a Camry LE, Malibu LT1, Corolla LE, Ford Focus, Fusion, etc. etc. etc. in lower trims as a have not and get the new car warranties, but the manufacturers have little interest selling there, no profit.

    HUGE profit in plugging in those safety modules into the existing wiring harness, and huge profits on parts – never mind heated/cooled seats, heated steering wheels, 14-speaker stereos, etc. etc. etc.

    We’re going to see more “mainstream” brands going loaded out and catering to a smaller net group of buyers with fatter wallets.

    Strange times.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @APaGttH – well said.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Thete is an article in today’s US Today on your very comment.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Yup – saw it. The top vehicle choice for those making $250K a year? F-150. For those making $500K a year? F-150.

        Gee, you mean people who make an income approaching the top 1% take into account things like cash on the hood, incentives, depreciation, longevity, and desirability to trade-in or private sale?

        Who would have thought people with money know how to manage…money.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          For $500K annual income I’m buying a small dealership and switching out new-used stuff every six months like Jobs did with his SLKs (granted they were new but you get the idea). If I need a truck I’ll acquire it, but no way am I walking into a dealer and say yes please take my money.

          Additional: Depending on how much I’d like to p!ss away I may build cars too. Diesel Fleetwood RWD, LSx XK8, LSx S90 RWD, 6spd manual Mark VIII, EcoBoost Town Car, manual in Acura RL etc.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          You can’t create wealth by squandering it.

          As in physics, there are two machines. Inclined planes and levers. All machines consist only of these two machines. But, this is a large “but”. Inclined planes will not be viable without levers.

          Creating wealth, ie, investing can only be possible by creating something that doesn’t exist (of value) or capital growth.

          As in physics with inclined planes. Capital growth would never occur without creating something that doesn’t exist.

          Cars or trucks are not investments unless they produce wealth for the owner.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @BAFO – “28-Cars” is having some fun but on the subject of physics, once again, you demonstrate quantum intelligence.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Nothing is an investment unless it produces wealth for the owner, otherwise it is a cost.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Um denverBClou,
            I do believe I was responding to APaGttH.

            Oops! Your usual inane retort directed at me shows you are trolling. papajim.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @BAFO – Thanks for reaffirming my initial comment.

            @APaGttH made ZERO mention of creating wealth. He compared the costs of bling trucks to bling autos and who is most likely to buy a bling truck.

            If I made 250k or 500k a year I’d be driving a full bling MaxCumStroke pickup over any European luxury car.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Hmm, back to grade school BAFO, here are some things to help you get started and maybe get at least a D in physics. http://www.mikids.com/SMachinesWheels.htm
            http://www.mikids.com/SMachinesScrews.htm

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          A F150 Platinum doesn’t look much different than an XLT. You can have your luxury and blend into the background. Many wealthy people don’t want to be “in your face” about it.

          If those 250k or 500k a year types are contractors or project managers then in makes sense from a work perspective too.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    There’s a guy using his head! SLT buyer here (although I didn’t have a choice, since the max towing package is not offered in the Denali trim of the 1500 truck). Other than the all-display screen instrument panel on the Denali (which looks just like the one on the SLT that has physical gauges), I’m hard pressed to remember what other identifying features the Denali has.

    51,000 miles later, there’s no question I’d get more of my $46K of money back selling or trading my 6.2 GMC truck than if a I spent an equivalent amount on a CPO piece of European machinery. Not that I was considering towing my trailer with a Cayenne, X5 or M350 (although some try it).

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      Wait till it’s a 151K miles later then you’ll really be glad you went with a domestic versus a Cayenne, X5 or M350. 180K miles later my ’04 Sierra is still dragging around my 25′ Searay Sundancer and I never worry about it getting me from point A to B. Last thing I want is to be stuck with a dead truck on the side road in a rural area w/my 3 kids & 4 tons of boat behind me.

  • avatar
    mikeg216

    There will be a new gmc “Jimmy” it’s going to be a jeep competitor built on the Canyon chassis 4 doors and diesel or gas Denali trim available 2019

  • avatar
    pacificpom2

    There is no rationalisation for these vehicles being “luxury”. Makes as much sense as a Maybach G Wagen. Some people have to spend their money somewhere other than crack or ice, it’s just a case of “Shut up and take my money!”

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      It’s my money. I suppose I should give it to people to spend on lottery tickets, Red Bull’s, and hand jobs. I’ll take my chrome package, thanks. Buy your own effing Marlboro Reds.

      Mine is a simple XLT by the way, but I like chrome. It doesn’t chip or scratch like painted bumpers and when I hit a deer a month ago I simply got a new chrome bumper and mounts and bolted it on. Same for the grill. Had I had painted bumper and grill this would have been a real pain in the butt.

      And before the self richeous cheese dicks chime in just know I paid more in taxes this year than the MSRP on my chrome laden F150 so you can all shove it.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      pacificpom2 – Many use their trucks for work and therefore spend long hours in the cab of their truck. They view the luxury as the one bit of respite they get from work. I’ve talked to many loggers who say this. Contractors write it off and the extra expense boosts resale.
      Those who use these trucks as toy haulers or RV tow vehicles also tend to spend a large amount of time in the cab.

      No one seems to sweat a loaded up CUV or car.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Lou, what a silly comment, “most use their trucks for work”.

        Have a read of he article in US Today.

        You will see I’m correct and astute with my comments. Listen you might learn.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @BAFO – READ CAREFULLY

          “Many use their trucks for work”

          Next thing you will be saying is that pickups are causing all sorts of problems in Sweden!

        • 0 avatar
          Eyeflyistheeye

          You remind me of Owl from Winnie-the-Pooh. A pompous, self-aggrandizing and unlikable individual who was usually wrong but walked around like he was the smartest guy in the room.

          The only thing we’ve learned from you is that you can’t tell the difference between “most” and “many,” and that you believe there’s a newspaper called “US Today.” Oh, and why if you and Robert are what Aussie sheilas have to deal with in regards to “men”, and I use the term loosely, no wonder they’d rather root a yank.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      Is it really that hard to understand how someone who makes a lot of money and spends a lot of time in their truck would want it to be nice? That might be the only luxury they get to enjoy for weeks at a time while working in remote locations!

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        No. In these hallowed forums you are only allowed to like stupid wagons or rolling hand job mobiles. Trucks are for posers. Now where is my 700hp AWD wagon with leather everything.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “There is no rationalisation for these vehicles being “luxury”. ”

      You kidding me? If I’m spending 10 hours on the road towing my fifth wheel RV I want something nice to sit in and drive. All the hours I’ve spent behind the wheel of my GMC HD in the 13 years I’ve owned it, buying the top level “SLT” trim was money well spent. Bench seat with crank up window and some crappy little radio?? No thanks, made that mistake with my first PU. People that buy these type of trucks today demand nice interiors with all the toys. That’s why manufacturers build them.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        So, I would think any commercial vehicle would be used more than you towing your 5th wheel.

        Even a base model should offer adequate comfort.

        Be honest, you have the bling, huge truck, 5th wheel, etc because you have the means to afford it.

        Its a want, like my pickup.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @BARFO – it all depends on who is paying for the truck. Virtually everyone I know that has a truck for work i.e. logging or construction that is bought and paid for by their OWN money has a more luxury oriented truck. They all cite comfort and that extra comfort is worth it!
          Everyone I know with an EMPLOYER provided truck gets stuck with fleet spec vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Lou your right on the money! Contractors buy strippers when they aren’t the ones driving them.

            I worked at a towing company years back and all the 1 ton cab/chassis wreckers were ordered by the owner with the top level trim and every creature comfort you get in it at the time. When you spent 12-14 hours doing calls on a busy winter day you can bet the comfort was appreciated.

            BAFO I don’t own a fifth wheel RV but was using that as a point that many people spend long days behind the wheel of their trucks. They want comfortable supportive seats and other amenities to make the trip more comfortable. The money you spend up front you get mostly back when you trade or sell. Of course nothing but food, shelter, clothing is a need.

            My 13 year old truck is hardly “Blingy”!………….LOL
            Pretty sedate compared to the new ones.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Carlson Fan,
            Unless you go out and buy aftermarket seats you will find most seats in a model are the same except for the covering and maybe electrics.

            Most any base model truck has good connectivity for business and listening via Bluetooth to your mp3 music. They have power windows and AC as well.

            People lease/buy upmarket trims because they can afford them. Even then half of the tax write off pickups don’t work as trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Unless you go out and buy aftermarket seats you will find most seats in a model are the same except for the covering and maybe electrics.”

            ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

            My brother-in-law has 2009 Platinum SuperCrew. I have a 2010 F150 XLT SuperCrew. His seats are NOTHING like mine. I’ve been in FX4’s with leather seats and they are NOTHING like mine.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “Unless you go out and buy aftermarket seats you will find most seats in a model are the same except for the covering and maybe electrics.”

            Well duh!!!! The “electrics” are what make them more comfortable. You do realize you get more adjustments than just distance from the steering wheel/pedals and the angle of the seat back don’t you? I suspect not or you would have never said something so ridiculous. The “electrics” give you infinite adjustment versus the next “click” so that alone is a plus and more comfortable in addition to the lumbar support ect.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    Good day sirs

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    I SAID GOOD Day!

  • avatar
    Spartan

    I own a 2016 Yukon XL Denali. I bought it over the Suburban because you can’t get a Suburban with the 6.2L V8 and the 5.3L feels anemic in comparison.

    I didn’t buy the Escalade because the Denali XL and ESV have the same drivetrain and suspension setup (6.2L 8AT and Mag Ride. I saw no reason to spend the extra $ for the Escalade ESV.

    Denali is why GMC exists. I’m fine with that. I like the styling.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Is it just me, or has GM actually LEARNED a few things since the recession and bankruptcy? They are focusing on transaction prices, not market share; quality, not quantity, and reducing fleet sales. They’re trying to get out of Europe, which will only get more unpredictable as the UK leaves (and if/when more countries leave) the EU, where they’ve never made money. They’re still a strong contender in China. Every new model is a vast improvement over the previous ones, with actual effort put into the interiors and exteriors. And after a generation or so of overweight (if solid) models, those models’ replacements were put on diets. They’ve beaten the Model 3 to market with the Bolt. Heck, they’re even trying to pick up the US clean diesel ball VW dropped…and they’re presumably NOT lying about the emissions.

  • avatar
    Caboose

    The strongest use case for the Denali trim are the ‘Burb & ‘Hoe… erm… Yukon XL & Yukon Denali.

    On those big family SUVs, the Denali trim is more than just “a big ol’ appearance and trim package”. It’s also the cheapest way into the big engine. The 6.2 make those big trucks capable of getting up to speed in Interstate traffic.

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