By on January 26, 2017

Detroit Three Work Trucks

Earlier this morning, Jack regaled us with a tale of a young man buying himself a loaded regular-cab F-150. Such a beast still exists, often selling at the rate of glacier progression and celebrating birthdays as they loiter on dealer lots. At the other end of the spectrum, rear-drive regular cab base models – with an 8-foot box, natch – ply the roads and work for a living.

How do entry-level trucks from the Detroit Three stack up when compared to each other? Ace of Base breaks them down in alphabetical order with the caveat that, based on price and feature content, there is a clear winner.

2017 Chevy Silverado 1500 W/T

First up: the 2017 Chevy Silverado 1500 WT. Absent of any options, its Monroney shows a price of $27,975. For this sum, buyers will net themselves vinyl floors and a vinyl bench, bringing back childhood memories of peeling sticky legs off the seat during hot summer drives. At least its standard air conditioning will cool down the cab a bit. Manual windows and mirrors are expected at this instant ramen price, but USB and AUX ports for the audio system mean drivers are not limited to staticky terrestrial radio. Its 4.3-liter V6 puts out 285 horsepower with direct injection. Power locks and cruise control are good additions to the base model feature list.

2017 Ford F-150 XL

Next, the 2017 Ford F-150 XL. The Blue Oval sees fit to grant truck shoppers with the choice of vinyl or no-charge cloth bench seating, a sorely under-appreciated option. Some will argue cloth simply soaks up coffee spills and gear-oil stains from the coveralls of its hardworking drivers. I say simply accept the inevitable damage and spring for a secondhand bench to replace the trashed unit at trade time. Air conditioning is along for the ride, as are a tilt wheel and the ability to haul about 5000 pounds. Suggested price? $27,030. Keep in mind, Ford has already shown its 2018 model with a different face and new 3.3-liter V6 base engine. This means dealers are probably more than willing to cut a deal and clear out the suddenly old-hat 2017s.

2017 Ram 1500 Tradesman

Finally, we find the 2017 Ram 1500 Tradesman, the oldest design of the lot. Like the Chevy, Ram forces cheapskate buyers to endure a vinyl bench, but the interior is #blessed with air conditioning and USB/AUX audio ports. Cruise control appears thanks to the magic of economies-of-scale, as it’s no doubt cheaper for Ram to fit a tilt/cruise equipped wheel than to engineer a tilt-only unit for lower trims. The Ram is rated about 150-pounds less than the Ford in terms of towing prowess. But here’s the kicker, though: Ram includes a Class IV hitch and a 7-pin trailer wiring connection at its $26,395 base price.

This makes Ram the winner in the Ace of Base measure … and I’m not just saying that because there’s a much-loved seven-year old Quad Cab Sport sitting in my driveway. With the exception of a vile vinyl bench seat, Ram’s inclusion of a hitch and 7-pin connector right from the factory at the lowest MSRP is an appealing feature combination.

Not every base model has aced it. The ones which have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments. Naturally, feel free to eviscerate our selections.

The models above is shown in American dollars absent of destination charges and incentives. As always, your dealer may sell for less, especially on a base model truck.

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97 Comments on “Ace of Base: Detroit’s Half-Ton Work Trucks...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    Mmmmmmm, 4.3L.

  • avatar
    John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

    I dunno if having a standard hitch makes it a “clear” winner. I guess its nice to be able to take advantage of its lower towing capacity.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N – agreed. Base model reg cab trucks don’t tend to be used for towing. (At least all of the one’s I see).

      • 0 avatar
        mason

        I don’t personally know of any people that buy a truck and don’t use it to tow something with at some point. It baffles me why any truck would ever come sans hitch and brake controller/plug.

        It’s just ludicrous.

        • 0 avatar
          Steve65

          In eight years of owning a one-ton longbed, I’ve towed something twice. In both cases, it was a rented trailer, so if I hadn’t happened to already own the truck we would have simply rented it also.

          Towing abilities have exactly zero weight or relevance in my shopping priorities.

  • avatar
    John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

    I saw plenty of them at a Ford dealer last week. All white, all parked in back.

    Btw, $900 for a 100k service on the 2012 Taurus (non-EcoBoost)? You gotta be joking. And, it costs extra for them to replace the filter in the trans. For that money, are you kidding? The filter (w/gasket) is $16. Seriously, dangerously close to a grand and they can’t spring for a filter? C’mon.

    When I looked at the list of what they would be doing, I found very little that I wouldn’t be able tackle myself. I told them not to worry about setting up an appointment.

    Maybe I’ll let an indy shop do the spark plugs, so if they F up the aluminum heads, they’ll be responsible for the repair.

  • avatar
    Drew8MR

    I try, and not where I live (Coastal OC, where vans seem to be more in demand). Fairly easy to find if you make a trip to farm country though.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    $27K, huh? I remember new Rams being offered for $13K during the depths of the great recession.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    TRUCK SANDWICH!!

    Apologies, the leading picture just seems to scream that.

    $27K for 2WD, a vinyl bench seat, and poverty wheels impresses me not at all. That’s a lot of money. I know it’s also a lot of metal and utility and they’re not quite as spartan as they were a few years ago, but I’m calibrated to what $27K will buy you in the car world.

    Are incentives as proportionally high on these base rigs as the volume selling 4-door cab 4x4s?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      30-mile fetch – factory rebates tend to be seasonal and the dealership’s willingness to deal is also seasonal. Rebates are proportional to vehicle cost. I’ve seen 2-3k off on these. There isn’t the same markup on these trucks as compared to a Platinum.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      I just looked up the no haggle Ford stealership chain here and they have dozens of zero option ’17 XLs for an honest $21,000 before taxes. Being a car dealership, they of course advertise that as $19,xxx with asterisks.

      Chevy and Dodge want to sell trucks too so I can’t imagine that they’re getting away with charging any more than that.

  • avatar
    Jagboi

    It would depend on what you do with the truck if a hitch is important or not. Ditto cruise. If you’re a drywall contractor and only use the truck in the city a hitch and cruise are pretty much useless. If I was in the oilpatch cruise would make a truck a clear winner.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    If it wasn’t for the whole family thing *sigh* I would rock one of these trucks. But are they available with manual transmissions?

    • 0 avatar
      Sloomis

      You and me both. I love bare-bones stripper trucks, my first new car was a bare-bones Ranger – vinyl floor mat and bench, manual, no AC, no power steering, no radio. But lack of a manual trans on these would be a deal breaker for me, and I don’t think one is available anymore for any of them (except for, what, the heavy-duty Ram diesel, right?)

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Ram HD Cummins diesel only truck left with a manual. You want a stick in a fleet spec truck you need to buy a Tacoma, Colorado/Canyon, or Frontier.

        • 0 avatar
          Sloomis

          Yeah, realistically, if I were to ever buy another truck, it would probably be one of those anyway. I don’t know that I could justify a full-sizer, as much as I like ’em.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          You can get fleet spec Cummins Rams. They’re not “common” with a manual, but generally much more available than at least Tacomas. Unless they have discontinued them very recently, you can even get the Chassis cabs with a manual.

      • 0 avatar
        AJ

        I’m all in for any stripper car. Less to go wrong and big deal when the dirt, mud, and road salt get tracked in.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    CallMeDick – find a dealer that caters to industrial clients or find a rural dealership. My local Ford dealer always has a selection of base model reg cabs in stock other than fleet white. The local Chevy/GM and Ram dealer rarely ever carry base trucks. That tends to explain why I see mostly fleet spec F150’s in my region.
    The local Ram dealer likes to carry the Tradesman spec truck with the 5.7. It is a good price for an entry level personal use V8. It’s less than ideal for fleets since fleet drivers are notoriously abusive.

    • 0 avatar
      AJ

      A friend has a work supplied Tradesman with the 5.7, as he has to haul. Impressive enough it gets up to 27 mpg on the highway. However, his work was cheap enough that they did go to the bother of buying it as a 4×2 when the dealer doesn’t otherwise sell ANY. (lol)

  • avatar
    bikegoesbaa

    I’d still go for the Ford or Chevy based on knowledge/expectations of FCA quality.

    Truecar tells me that a reasonable price for a 2016 2wd regular cab F-150 XL with the tow package and 2.7l Ecoboost is ~$24k.

    That seems like a very appealing vehicle for the money, and I don’t even like pickup trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      TwoBelugas

      I have three FCA products(300,1500,2500) and all are so far rock solid. I appreciate people like you staying away to keep the prices down for me.

      • 0 avatar
        bikegoesbaa

        I only do so at the recommendation of my friends who are engineers at FCA or Tier 1 auto suppliers.

        They have both the knowledge base and the insider access to make worthwhile recommendations on these sorts of things.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          I have a friend who runs a shop that works on fleet trucks.

          The Big 3 have nothing between them in terms of reliability, durability, service cost. Get the one you like best, or that has the features you want. It really is that simple.

          I love the great Ford/Chevy/Dodge debate as much as anybody, probably because it reminds me of summers on my uncle’s farm, back in the day. Feel free to argue that one brand will run a million miles on nothing but fuel, and the other two won’t make it out of the dealer’s lot without falling apart.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            It really is easy to make this decision. Line up Chevy, Ford and Ram pickups next to each other. Give your imaginary tiger lots of beer and ask him to use 2 of the 3 as urinals. Whichever truck he does not pee on is your new ride.

          • 0 avatar
            bikegoesbaa

            I don’t claim that one is made of gold and the other two are garbage, but when a senior FCA powertrain engineer tells me “Don’t buy FCA products” I’m inclined to believe him.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            “but when a senior FCA powertrain engineer tells me “Don’t buy FCA products” I’m inclined to believe him.”

            Sounds like FCA needs to find a new senior powertrain engineer.

        • 0 avatar
          TwoBelugas

          “I don’t claim that one is made of gold and the other two are garbage, but when a senior FCA powertrain engineer tells me “Don’t buy FCA products” I’m inclined to believe him.”

          1/2 the people out there will bitch about their work and tell you “dude never buy _____ where I work” to sound like a good friend. You will probably get the exact recommendation about Fords from Ford engineers who saw first hand the disastrous DI implementation that forced the DI 2.0 which ADDS port injection, or about Chevy’s from GM Engineers who saw the whole “key of death” fiasco(My inlaws had a Caddy that did have a terrifying loose ignition key mechanism).

          • 0 avatar
            bikegoesbaa

            Engineers at other OEMs have definitely told me to avoid a particular model/powertrain but I’ve *never* had anybody besides the FCA guys recommend against the entirely of their product line.

            This is confirmed by guys who work at suppliers, who largely view FCA as dirty and cheap by comparison to other OEMs.

      • 0 avatar
        zip94513

        You’d love me too then. My last Dodge had the dreaded death wobble and subsequently became my last Dodge, probably for my lifetime.

        • 0 avatar
          mason

          RE death wobble: you do realize that death wobble is not a Dodge specific trait don’t you? Anything with a solid front axle that utilizes a track bar to center the axle is a candidate.
          Seen as many Fords with death wobble if not more than Dodge. Poor maintenance and oversized tires are more to blame than manufacturer.

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            @Mason

            Shut your trap! Ford death wobbles are like the Bald Eagle clutching a Mare’s Leg while crapping on Fidel Castro! But Dodge death wobbles are anti-American!

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Death wobble is the result of an under-damped system. At the first sign of it, replace your shocks and steering stabilizer, then check the rest of the front end.

            A couple of my buddies suffered through that.

            https://bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/2265118

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Wasn’t there a time not to long ago when a base pick-up was an honest and cheap form of transportation for a blue collar worker or young driver?

    Now even these base models are a the prices given are in the price range of a well appointed mid-size sedan or off-lease entry level luxury vehicle.

  • avatar
    True_Blue

    A lot of these spartan work vehicles will be tax write-offs for business use.

    • 0 avatar
      mike1dog

      A lot of the trucks farmers buy around here that they write off for business use are heavily loaded F-250s which reliably sell in the sixty to eighty thousand dollar range. None of them buy these stripper vehicles.

      • 0 avatar
        True_Blue

        Fleet businesses buy stripper work vehicles all the time. They don’t need towing ratings, they need bed and payload capacity.

        Most of these stripper trucks will never see a trailer – but they’ll get a ladder rack and door signage in under 50 miles.

  • avatar
    mikey

    A truck doesn’t fit into my life right now. If i could find a way to justify it ,I’d have no problem pulling the trigger on that Chevy. A annual application of Krown rust proofing , and you would have 20 years cheap driving.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Um….a basic work truck?

    Aren’t work trucks basic.

    The heading proves 1/2 ton pickups are no longer work trucks to the majority

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      Once upon a time work trucks were basic.

      Then increasing customer expectations and decreasing cost of features changed that.

      Now they are often not basic.

      A lot of them are also used for things beyond work. Sometimes they are even exclusively used for commuting and recreation.

      Cars used to be started with a crank on the front and have inner tubes in the tires. Things change. So what?

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Bikegoesbaa,
        I realise this.

        Most fleet trucks are spartan. They only need to move goods from point A to B.

        To me a work truck is not what 75% drive as empty show ponies. They generally haul one person to and from work……with as many creature comforts you can afford.

        • 0 avatar
          bikegoesbaa

          Again, so what?

          Once upon a time cellular phones were Spartan devices that were generally only used by businesses and entrepreneurs for work purposes.

          Now cell phones handy and feature-rich and get used by regular people for all sorts of casual and recreational things. They also get a lot of work done.

          They’re also dramatically better than the old timey bare-bones phones, even for work users.

          The same largely applies to trucks.

          Today’s “empty show ponies” have capabilities that eclipse those of old farm trucks on their best day.

          Don’t you think that Farmer Fred would not have been happy to drive a 2017 F150 had it been available in 1960 or whatever golden era you are pining for? AC alone would make it worthwhile

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            bikesgobaa,
            Phones have changed. But most phones, the vast majority are for personal and not business use, similar to pickups.

            A far better analogy would of been the use of the office computer and the restraints many businesses place on their use vs the home computer, which represents more entertainment value.

            Home computers are accessorised to the sh!thouse with subs, LED TVs, etc, stuff you will not find in the office or workshop floor.

          • 0 avatar
            bikegoesbaa

            Again, so what?

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Wow!

            So, your points are the only relevant ones?

            So, fncking what!

          • 0 avatar
            bikegoesbaa

            No, but I truly don’t understand where you’re going with your statements. It seems like you’re just pointing out the obvious.

            What further analysis do you have beyond “A-ha! Lots of people use pickup trucks for things besides work.”

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @BAFO – The US, North America actually, is the “land of pickups”, for no good reason. Yes they’re an “American” thing. Australia is a bigger pickup truck “culture” with 95% of pickups used to as “show ponies” down undah!

          See that, I can pull stats out my A$$ too!

          It’s been said over and over, pickups are a sign of “prosperity”. They give us a sense of accomplishment, even before the first scratch or dent, especially *inside* the bed.

          Any outdoor gathering, swapmeet, flea market, trail head, etc, is ‘wall to wall’ pickups.

          The bedsides are the perfect thing to lean on or rest your elbows while talking to friends, or strangers you meet in parking lots, or neighbor coming by to shoot the sh!t, politics, BS, etc.

          Need a place to sit, rest, take a break or eat your lunch, just drop the tailgate, bam! Pickups become “family” like no sedan or coupe, van, or SUV could ever dream of.

          I’ll admit when I bought my ’04 F-150 STX, I didn’t need a pickup, what so ever (75%’er?). I didn’t need any vehicle at all, since I was in my company, work truck 24/7.

          It was just a “show ponie” for dining out, special occasions, dates, etc. I’d average 3K miles a year! In recent months, life changed and I’m running the hell out of it, towing, fully loaded, sometimes both ways, 15 to 20 hour blasts from Colorado to California, (that’s our “Outback”) nonstop, except for fuel and cheeseburgers.

          It always gets a laugh for being such a clean example (garage kept) of an ’04 (every STX option) with ridiculously low miles. Funny I haven’t washed it since early November, (no time, no days off) just clean the windows and go. Laughable, but it still shines/sparkles though the mud and crud!

          And I love looking at well worn, hard life, old pickups. I gotta wonder what stories they could tell. If they could only talk…

          It’s just part of the “Americana”.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            Well put, DM.

            Speaking of Americarna (the show), I’d love to see Ray do a piece on early vintage trucks. The closest thing I recall seeing was when he came across one of Smokey Yunicks old car haulers. It was said they blew up the motor in the truck on the way to a race, pulled their motor out of the stock car and dropped it into the truck and then swapped it back into the car once they got to the track. All in a parking lot with whatever tools they had on the truck.

    • 0 avatar
      OldManPants

      Yes, Virginia, that really *is* BAFO criticizing someone else’s diction.

      We should of recorded that.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      On the subject of “basic”, thanks for your input.

      “The heading proves 1/2 ton pickups are no longer work trucks to the majority”

      The story was about REGULAR cab trucks. Those are almost exclusively work trucks. Old guys and single you guys like them too.

      Everyone else wants 4 doors.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Offroaders like them too. With the shortbeds.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Uh, Lou,
        I do believe pickups come in dual cab. The classification was created by the author.

        If I’m incorrect, then why do the manufacurers and government classify pickup differently?

        So, I’ll delete any entry level vehicle based on floor mats (overstatement on my part, but you get the jist).

        This illustrates to me that this Ace of Base segment has run its course. In other words more and more ambiguity will define a Base Model Vehicle.

        I can do the same and create a “false” classification for any vehicles to prove my point.

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    I’m leaning toward the Silverado despite its 4-6% price premium over the other two trucks. I get the sense it has an edge in product cycle refinement.

    • 0 avatar
      mason

      Believe me, they ALL have their problems. GM is certainly not excluded here. My uses and needs dictate an HD and I’ve got two Rams (Dodge), but if I were in the market for a half ton it would very likely be a Ford (most likely) or a Ram.

  • avatar
    Add Lightness

    If they have fly-by-wire throttles, cruise is a couple wires, a multi-function switch and a few lines of code.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    I’ve always admired the proportions and break-over angles of the 4×4 versions of these short cab regular bed full sizers. They are just handsome rigs and more nimble on trail.

    A base XL F-150 with the 2.7 Ecoboost would be a rocketship and stickers for $32K. That’s getting steep. The one I really want is the GMC Sierra because it always looked slightly and subtly upscale, but that sucker is $37.5K to start with the 4.3L six. Option it up with off-road suspension, a nicer audio system, and the 5.3L V8 and now it’s $41K! Were I single and flush with cash, that would be one of two daily drivers, almost certainly.

    • 0 avatar
      True_Blue

      That’s the rub. Once you start adding 4×4, a decent engine, and perhaps two clamshell doors on a stripper model, it’s almost cheaper to just get the next level up.

      A 2.7TT 4×4 Supercab F150XL (the literal only options I needed) was within $1K of an XLT model with all of those major options, and a lot more.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      And here it is. A beauty, and at a nice discount too.

      http://tinyurl.com/gqhoueo

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      I very much like this truck as well. FX4 package on that wheelbase? Excellent. I’m not interested in reading the Trump 20% article and ensuing thread.

      http://tinyurl.com/jyrulz3

      • 0 avatar
        True_Blue

        That’s astounding. I’ve literally never seen a short-cab XL FX4 before! It’s even the same Ingot Silver as my S-Cab XLT FX4 – kinda disconcerting to see one so short!

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        That is schweet. I’m glad FX4 is a package once again, and not a trim level.

        RCSB (Styleside or Flareside) was the only way to get a regular cab FX4 from ’04-08, and FX4 was also the only way to get a RCSB with the 5.4L V8, I think. XL, STX, and XLT RCSBs were 4.2 or 4.6L only.

        http://images.gtcarlot.com/gtgallery/50635025-640.jpg

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Ain’t it a thing of beauty? I’ve never seen this configuration in the wild and this is only one that came up within 500 miles.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Not to seem ungrateful, as they ‘checked off’ all the right boxes, but left them with open dif’s? I see that all the time, especially since ‘standard’ Traction Control, but still.

          The FX4 forces an E-locker or limited-slip, at least I hope!

  • avatar
    syncro87

    My gut reaction would be to go for the Chevy here, to get the 285hp 4.3L. But I seem to remember a fairly wide spread shaking / shimmy problem reported by a number of Silverado owners. Not sure if they ever got that solved. So I’d probably go Ford or Dodge if it came down to actually buying a work truck, with Ford getting the ultimate nod because we have a pretty good Ford dealer locally, while the Dodge stores have sketchy reputations service-wise.

  • avatar
    Prado

    I can’t tell on the others, but I feel the need to call out Chevy on the fake/doctored picture of the Silverado that they put on their website, like the one copied into this article. It would probably take a 2/4 drop kit to get it to look like the picture.

  • avatar
    zip94513

    A regular cab is all I need but they’re optioned poorly, thus I have to settle for the quad/supercab model.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Make mine a short bed F-150XL with the 2.7 EcoBoost, a cloth bench, and the 101A package that includes windows/locks/cruise.

  • avatar
    Ian Anderson

    Look around enough you can find any of these CPO south of $20K with decent mileage on ’em. I picked up a 2012 Ram 1500 Tradesman HD (it says 1500 on the doors but it rides on the 3/4 ton’s frame and suspension) for $16K out the door last April with 35K on the clock. 5.7 Hemi, roll up windows, manual locks, vinyl interior the whole nine yards.

    Nothing special but with the 3K payload package it rides like a truck and since it’s just me in it 99% of the time it’s perfect. Only thing I’ve got to do is upgrade the radio and throw a mild Flowmaster on it.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    As a comparison a base 2017 Toyota Tundra SR 4×2 Regular Cab 5.7L V8 Long Bed starts at $30,400. No V6 is offered. Power windows and locks are standard as well as a decent Entune audio system with bluetooth. Hummm buy American. It’s made in Indiana. Personally I’d go for the Ford with a short bed. Though a step side version would be neat.

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      It’s made in San Antonio Texas.. But it does have the most American made content.. A stepside would be nice but Ford hasn’t offered one in about ten years

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        Stepsides seem to have faded away. I always liked the Ford Lightning SVT. A nice low, lean performance truck but still usable for work and play. Just not for off or rough roading.

  • avatar
    scrubnick

    And this is where the midsize truck makes sense. Nissan sells a base Frontier King Cab with AC for $19,500 before discounts. If you forgo the AC and everything else, you can get it for about $18,500. I see a lot of them used for auto parts deliveries and other mundane tasks. Thinking of one for myself.

    • 0 avatar
      Jagboi

      All depends on what you need the truck for. Carrying 4×8 sheets of whatever flat in the box? Then only a full size will do. Or as you mentioned, parts delivery truck a smaller one is probably fine. The NAPA’s around here have a fleet of S-10’s for that.

      The machine shop I used to use had a regular cab F350 since they needed the load capacity.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Not ticking the box for the up engine in all of these would be silly. The V8s are starting to show CAFE in their sticker markups (GM $1,200, Ram $1,750, Ford $1,800) but the twin turbo 2.7 gets an extra rebate that makes it almost free and life is too short to drive the base motor.

    The aluminum Ford in 2WD RCSB weighs under 4,200 lbs with the 2.7!

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I wouldn’t buy a Chrysler-anything on a bet, at any price.

    For me, it would be a hard choice between Ford and Chevy.

    My B-i-L has a GMC standard cab, long bed work truck he bought a few years ago, and it is great. It’s comfortable, even with me sitting in the middle with 3 of us in the cab.

    If I were ever in the market for a truck, I would want an extended cab, short bed model, one step up from basic W/T trim (or lack of it), meaning: Dump those ugly, all-black grilles! I would cheerfully accept the chrome surround on the Silverado, if that’s the new face, though.

    I’d have to lean toward the Chevy because I’m a Chevy guy at heart, but I would definitely check out and compare Ford vs. Chevy.

  • avatar

    Every truck that I’ve ever owned was equipped this way, so I’d be inclined to buy another one like that Tradesman (but in red).

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