By on October 31, 2016

Ah, fall. The leaves have changed and are dropping to the ground below. Football is in full swing. Your kids get free candy just by walking around the neighborhood (and you can eat it after they go to bed). And another new model year of vehicles is taking over parking lot space at the local car stores.

But it’s a bit chilly. The leaves are slippery when wet. Baseball season has almost ended. And you’re suffering from a bellyache because ten bags of Skittles was just one too many. All is not well, particularly for the new vehicle nameplates that head off into the Hallowe’en darkness to meet the automotive Grim Reaper. (Or is that just Lee Iacocca?)

These are all the vehicles we’re losing after the 2016 model year.

DEAD

2016 Cadillac ELR, Image: Cadillac

CADILLAC ELR
Hilariously overpriced, this platform partner of the first-generation Chevrolet Volt launched not long after the all-electric Tesla Model S. But without the Tesla’s sporting credentials, the ELR, seemingly behind the times, was a plug-in hybrid that only attracted 2,863 U.S. buyers. There are months in which Tesla produces more Model S sales than that.

2014 Dodge Dart GT, Image: FCA

DODGE DART
“How important is this car to Chrysler,” 60 Minutes’ Steve Croft asked FCA boss Sergio Marchionne. “Um,” Marchionne said, “If you’re a serious carmaker and you can’t make it in this segment, you’re doomed.” By that standard, FCA is either not serious or FCA is doomed. The Dodge Dart is dead after attracting roughly 315,000 U.S. buyers through the end of 2016’s third-quarter, a 53-month period. American Honda sold 335,384 Civics last year.

2015 Dodge Viper SRT, Image: FCA

DODGE VIPER
To understand the degree to which the Viper was competing in a narrow niche within a niche sports car market, consider the Chevrolet Corvette. Fewer than 14,000 Vipers have been sold in America since 2002, a near 15-year span. Chevrolet sold nearly 15,000 Corvettes in the U.S. in the first six months of 2016. Dodge quickly sold its limited run of MY2017 Vipers this past summer.

2011 Honda CR-Z EX, Image: American Honda

HONDA CR-Z
A CR-X successor? Hardly. Not sufficiently efficient to adequately wear its hybrid tag, not widely perceived to be attractive, not terribly sporty, yet Honda still managed to sell 11,330 copies of the CR-Z in 2011, the CR-Zs first full year. CR-Z volume plunged 63 percent the following year and never recovered. Only 3,073 CR-Zs were sold in the U.S. last year, a period in which Hyundai sold 24,245 Velosters.

2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe, Image: Hyundai

HYUNDAI GENESIS COUPE
The Genesis Coupe is certain to return, but it won’t come back as a Hyundai. As part of the new Genesis brand’s expansion, this car’s “replacement” will come in the form of a higher-end coupe with a loftier price tag. Hyundai’s Genesis, coupe and sedan included, produced 240,000 sales between 2008 and the end of 2016’s third-quarter.

2011 Scion tC, Image: Toyota

SCION tC
With the death of the Scion brand came the arrival of new Toyota models, but not the tC. The Scion FR-S becomes the Toyota 86, the Mazda 2-based Scion iA becomes the Toyota Yaris iA, and the Corolla-related Scion iM becomes the Toyota Corolla iM. Still, after it generated nearly 430,000 U.S. sales between 2004 and 2016 — and suffering a 79-percent loss in volume between 2006 and 2015 — the tC is not migrating to the Toyota department. It’s dead.

2007 Scion xB Family, Image: Toyota

SCION xB
Along with its tC coupe sibling, the Scion xB dies after the 2016 model year. The first-generation xB continues to symbolize Scion at its best, but the replacement was deemed largely undesirable by the U.S. market. Nearly 170,000 xBs were sold during the four-year period between 2003 and 2006; only 226,000 in the nearly ten years since.

2015 Volkswagen Eos Final Edition, Image: Volkswagen of America

VOLKSWAGEN EOS
The Volkswagen Eos received a stay of execution from its U.S. overlords after the 2015 model year. There will be no such stay after the 2016 model year. The Eos is dead, having not generated a sale since May. All-time, Volkswagen of America reported 67,585 Eos sales, nearly 40 percent of which occurred in 2007 and 2008.

REINCARNATED

2015 Cadillac SRX, Image: Cadillac

CADILLAC SRX
The Cadillac SRX was Cadillac’s best-selling model. So they killed it. And reconstituted it. Repeal and replace is the term used in political circles. Although the first-generation three-row SRX wasn’t tremendously popular, Cadillac SRX sales jumped 152 percent in 2010 with the launch of a more mainstream crossover. Cadillac then proceeded to sell more than 50,000 SRXs per year in the U.S. until last year, when nearly 70,000 were sold. The XT5 began its takeover in April.

2013 Chrysler Town and Country S

CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY
The Town & Country’s death was really just a generational reset. While its Dodge twin, the Grand Caravan, continues for the time being, the Town & Country was replaced by — strangely enough — the Pacifica, a nameplate previously used for an underwhelming crossover. The Town & Country was America’s best-selling minivan in 2014 as sales rose to a seven-year high.

2012 Hyundai Equus, Image: Hyundai

HYUNDAI EQUUS
Through the end of September, Hyundai had reported a measly 17,983 total Equus sales since the end of 2010. The Equus isn’t really dead; Hyundai just decided to release the next-generation model under an all-luxury brand strategy. The new Equus is the Genesis G90. U.S. sales of the G90 began in September.

2015 Hyundai Genesis, Image: Hyundai

HYUNDAI GENESIS SEDAN
Like its larger Equus sibling, the Genesis sedan didn’t wither on the vine. Hyundai has moved the Genesis to the Genesis brand. It’s now the G80, the first 2,698 copies of which were sold in August and September. The Hyundai Genesis fought partway through a second generation before Hyundai built on its relative success to launch a separate luxury brand.

2013 Lincoln MKS, Image: Lincoln

LINCOLN MKS
U.S. sales of the Lincoln MKS were in a state of perpetual decline. After peaking in its first full year of 2009 with 17,174 sales, MKS volume decreased in 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014, and 2015, when Lincoln sold only 6,877 copies. In a sense, the newest Lincoln is the direct replacement for the MKS, just with an old name we all know so well: Continental.

Volvo S80, Image: Volvo

VOLVO S80
After a nearly two-decade run as Volvo’s flagship car across two generations, the Volvo S80 is done. In its place, Volvo has launched the S90, a sedan tasked with establishing Volvo in a segment where the S80 simply couldn’t compete. Volvo USA hasn’t sold S80s in five-digit numbers since 2008. Fewer than 2,000 were sold in each of the last three calendar years.

2016 Volvo XC70, Image: Volvo

VOLVO XC70
In fellowship with the launch of the S80-replacing Volvo S90, Volvo is also bringing to North America new wagons to replace the long-running XC70: the V90 and V90 Cross Country. Though something of a success in its younger years — Volvo sold nearly 20,000 XC70s in 2002 — Volvo has averaged little more than 5,000 annual U.S. XC70 sales in the last half-decade.

DYING

2016 Buick Verano Turbo

BUICK VERANO
In the U.S., the Verano was Buick’s entry-level sedan. But as Buick migrates to a more crossover-centric lineup, importing the Chinese-built Envision from the country where Buick does the bulk of its business, the introduction of a second-generation Verano in North America was deemed pointless. Verano volume fell from more than 40,000 units in 2012, 2013, and 2014 to fewer than 32,000 in calendar year 2015. Expect a brief 2017 run, but no more.

2017 Chrysler 200C Platinum

CHRYSLER 200
A dreadful reliability reputation, criticism from its parent company’s boss regarding design errors, built-in discrimination against the marque’s car efforts: very little was working in the Chrysler 200’s favour when the car launched in 2014. After moving up the sales charts thanks to early incentivization, the market’s true demand for the 200 was made known late last year and early this year when sales plunged by half between November and February, year-over-year. While its smaller Dodge Dart cousin fades away after 2016, expect some 2017 Chrysler 200s before FCA euthanizes America’s (former) best-selling FCA passenger car.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

57 Comments on “Dead and Gone: These Are The New Vehicles We Lost In 2016 [Video]...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    When I saw there was a video, I wanted it to be of Tim, and in the popular stupid Facebook video style!

    The kind where you hold up a series of pieces of paper with things written on them, while making some soppy face because apparently your voice doesn’t work and computer graphics don’t exist.

    Black marker on paper: Here are the cars we lost in 2016…

    *Holds up photo of Eos.*

  • avatar
    NoID

    The only one I’ll miss personally is the Dart, because I was going to lease one in 2017. Now I need to further the viscious cycle of CUVs replacing cars by leasing the only other vehicle that meets the appropriate intersection of fuel economy (high), price (sofa king low), and capability (4 doors), which is the Jeep Renegade Sport.

    Sorry to be part of the problem, gents, but here we are.

    I will miss the Viper professionally because it’s existence has been the highlight of my job. I will cherish every moment I spent in that car…

    I will miss the 200 corporately because I’m obligated to, and because it leaves another hole in our lineup that will be filled with CUVs and further the death spiral of the midsize car segment.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “By that standard, FCA is either not serious or FCA is doomed.”

    FCA isn’t serious, I’m not sure its doomed just yet.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    Sadly, the Mercury Turnpike Cruiser is also (still) dead.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      That was a fantastically overwrought car, and I love them.

      Moar chrome!
      And fins!
      And detail!

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The Church demands MOAR chrome, fins, wheel skirts, opera lights, and sail panels.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          It was just glorious.

          https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B38ULhHiIa2IV0tSb0FzdHpPX2c?usp=sharing

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Don’t forget the 1959 Oldsmobile 98, there was a chrome laden barge that every member of the church should miss.

            http://www.auctionsamerica.com/images/lots/AS14/AS14_r1061_01.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh the Olds owner opted for the Continental package there.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Can you imagine those on the lot in 1958 at Gustafson Oldsmobile?

            “Those continental kits mean better traction in the winter, with all that extra weight hangin’ off the back, don’t cha know?”

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Trying to park/reverse such a monstrosity must have caused so many parking lot wham bams.

          • 0 avatar
            dukeisduke

            And the ’59 Olds 98 had the wheelcovers that covered the entire wheel, including the rim, and were held on with steel spring clips, with rubber anti-rattle bumpers.

            http://www.kingoftheroad.net/59olds/album/source/59olds129.html

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        I was actually making a reference to Car & Driver. I don’t know when they stopped, but years ago in their annual “New Cars” article they’d run down the changes (if any) for each model in a brand’s line-up. Two things were certain when they came to Mercury:

        1) they would lament the ongoing lack of a “de Sade” package for the Grand Marquis, and
        2) they would list the Turnpike Cruiser and note that it was still dead.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    The Dodge Dart.

    A complete whiff. An unmitigated disaster.

    I’d love to know the true sunk cost FCA had to swallow to admit this mistake and shut production down. It would be astronomical if they hadn’t been able to draw from existing euro parts and dies.

    • 0 avatar
      Car Guy

      Yep, lackluster. The interior on the one I drove wasn’t that bad (it was fully loaded with leather) but the more mass market trims didn’t look like anything special, even in the compact car space.

      It could have been a contender with a hatch and hotter engine on par with the WRX or Focus ST.

      Oh well they did nothing to fix the sinking ship on that one……..

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        I had high hopes for the Dart. When it came out there were a bunch of favorable reviews. A bit of Italian brio in a decent compact that was not a penalty box and make people forget about the Caliber. Plus price wise it was competitive. I could see finding a leftover GT or Limited with the 2.4 Tigershark if I was in the market for a compact.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          Yes, I wonder how the Dart is with the 2.4. I had the idea that the Dart GT with that engine would be a flippin’ rocket, because hey, 2.4 liters in a compact car.

          But I’ve been driving a 200 the past couple of weeks, which is basically a taffy-pulled Dart—it’s just a few inches bigger in each direction. And the 200 with that engine is not only “not fast,” it has terrible idle shake…and it turns out idle speed is set by the computer and can’t be adjusted manually. If you can get the car with idle stop-start to avoid the shaking, and paddle shifters to override the unpleasant 9-speed autobox, then maybe…

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So how many of the Dead and Dying are their still clogging up the dealer lots? That would be a nice post for folks searching for cars dealers might be a little more desperate to get rid of.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      I’ve thought about grabbing a MY16 xB to replace my MY08 xB. But lets be honest, that design withered on the vine. I love my car but it’s definitely behind the times now given the current tech we now have. Unless they were willing to eat 3-4K off the price and they won’t….I actually called a few dealers and they’re all steadfast on selling at 17-18K still. I’m going to wait till summer of ’17 and see if they again are so stiff, there are bound to be a few still new xBs hanging around then. If not, I’m going to a Ford Transit Connect. I like bringing my trike with me to the park and the extra room helps.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The xB people don’t seem to care for the final revision, I want to say it has something to do with less interior room vs the initial model.

        • 0 avatar
          Xeranar

          I feel the cult of xB shunned it because it became a very plain CUV. It’s still extremely maneuverable but it did lack the ultra-low floor that the original did. I feel the only issue was having the doughnut at all, it’s sad to admit but it would have been a better design to leave it out all together.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Why was the xD such a sales disaster? I’ve never even seen one up close, but on paper it seemed like a sound combination of Corolla mechanicals and a practical body design. 2,625 lb curb weight makes it positively light by 1.8 liter car standards of the past decade too.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            I say they should have replaced the original xB with the redesigned model that was sold in Japan as the Toyota bB 2nd gen.

            They could have also introduced the fatter, uglier replacement we did get under another nameplate. Maybe xC? Adding AWD to the “xC” would’ve turned it into a winner.

            As it turns out, the Kia Soul is about the best replacement for the original xB.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    The revised 2016 ELR would have been pretty appealing at $40k after tax credits. Unfortunately, even after the price cut, it was almost $20k more than that.

    I wonder if we’ll see another retractable hardtop convertible with a multi-piece glass roof. If you haven’t experienced it, the Eos’s roof is really cool, even though the rest of the car is just a much heavier and less practical Golf.

    I wonder who will take over the “pile ’em high, sell ’em cheap” niche of the 200 and its FCA predecessors? There is definitely an audience out there for a sedan that has midsize interior room below $20k, even if it’s junk.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      The SL550 currently has a glass roof that’s in two bits. Does that count?

      youtube.com/watch?v=QsMUV8Rqy9g

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Fair point (and Magic Sky Control is really cool). The difference with the Eos is that the front panel can open independently, like a big pano sunroof. In a place (here) where you have 1000 differing degrees of dark/cool/vaguely damp/drizzly/raining, being able to have any combination of sunroof (glass or solid when closed), top, and pillarless windows is pretty cool.

        At the right price (which would also account for DSG maintenance cost) I’d love to have a used Eos, but they have a devoted following and are surprisingly expensive. For what they cost there are better cars available, neat roof or not.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I didn’t realize the Eos had a separate sunroof that way, that’s interesting. I’d like to have an SL at some point, they just retain value way too well :(.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      I think the problem with the ELR is that the price they set made it look like little more than a cynical ploy to more quickly earn back the Volt’s development costs.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        Only to a sophisticate. To us grunts it just seemed like a stupid-expensive little crampy car with a Caddy badge. Grunts who made good just sniggered and bought Escalades.

    • 0 avatar
      Car Guy

      “I wonder who will take over the “pile ’em high, sell ’em cheap” niche of the 200 and its FCA predecessors?” Remains to be seen if the industry has enough discipline to moderate production or go back to ~ 10 years ago with full tilt production and pile cash on the hood to move metal. I think we are headed into the next recession as 2016 sales look to be flat and starting to trend down. So if a pump and dump plan is in anybody’s playbook it will come soon……

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      Trouble is the 200 doesn’t really have midsize interior room either, not for the folks in back. If they’re tall, they will graze their heads on the ceiling despite the very low bench, and the front seats are mounted so low they can’t tuck their toes underneath.

      The weird thing is that despite the very long list of things that are wrong with the 200 (we haven’t even gotten to the jouncy ride and impact noise), I really like it. It’s almost absurdly pretty, it’s got a wonderful soft leather wheel and a responsive chassis, the controls are nice to use, it’s quite cheap to buy and they’ll lend you free money from here to eternity to do it, you don’t have to pay a ton more to get it with a good stereo (very important for me)…and if you ARE willing to pay more for it, you can get it with God’s personal linen leather interior, a Pentastar V6, and adaptive cruise. If someone wants to make me an insane deal on one equipped like THAT, I’m listening…but I’m pretty sure the deals will be on the shaky 2.4 liter strippers only.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I don’t fill up my TSX wagon very often, and I kind of liked the TC. Would of saved some money and I would be more inclined to put Android Auto in it.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Henceforth, I will refer to it as EEELR.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I am wondering, what would happen if Toyota pulled out their blue prints for the original xB and started making it?

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      It’s amazing how Kia took that market and ran with it by making an updated xB rather than an upsized xB.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      side impact was bad on the first gen XB.

      Second was amazingly good getting hit on the side (found out by first hand experience!).

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      It wasn’t size it was price. Every damn time we have this conversation here people talk about how it was a size bigger that ruined it when it was price. A bare bones MSRP xB with auto was 18K, the same Soul with auto was just over 16K. Never mind that the starting price of a Soul was 13K to 17K for the xB. It was always price and then probably the most effective marketing campaign in the last decade for cars, maybe even in the last 30 years for cars.

      The xB was focus grouped and people wanted a bigger car. Had the Kia Soul not shown up on a platform size smaller at a severe discount (pure pricing vs. haggle monsters over at Kia) and hadn’t faced the hamster commercial machine we would probably be talking about how Scion folded but the xB got turned into a Toyota.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Not just price, but looks. The second-gen xB totally lost the funkiness of the first one and looked like a Camry panel van (which it more or less was). The Soul captured it, at least a bit.

        • 0 avatar
          Xeranar

          Well, the original xB and the Gen 2 were totally different cars. The Gen 2 (which I own and love) was literally a Corolla panel van, it was mainly sold to businesses and families in Japan. It was a cheap entry point into the burgeoning CUV market that the RAV4 had already abandoned and the Highlander cost too much to enter.

          It’s still a place that is empty by Toyota’s own making. They do not make a Yaris or Corolla-based crossover and it seems like a weird missed opportunity. The xB & xD were both home market sub-compact CUVs (or compact CUVs) where the RAV4 was a high ground clearance SUV still. It’s also almost 10K more than a Soul & 7K more than xB. It’s hard to know what Toyota’s plans are besides sell to markets that seem to hold the gold but it leaves Kia free to eat up an entire market by itself.

  • avatar
    Higheriq

    And Chrysler just announced 84 months @ 0% on all 200s to clear them out. Such a deal. Such a mediocre car.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Toyota’s ‘brand management’ of the tC seems pretty poor. They were incredibly popular with some of the youngest and most female new car buyers for years. They probably should have tried harder to keep those buyers interested.

  • avatar
    brn

    A lot of good cars on that list. Two shitty ones, but good otherwise.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    The car model fallout can’t happen fast enough. Keep going, OEMs – all the way to the bottom and see what survives.

    Too many models, too many sets of parts, too few buyers. What’s wrong with this picture?

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Art Vandelay: Why stop there. Why not our own Stalin? That’s a leader you really look up to, right? Jesus man,...
  • Art Vandelay: So you support the guy that chooses to let a dude who was literally caught on camera jerking off in...
  • Oberkanone: Camry is excellent value. Brand new under $23K *discounted and spending more allows choices from AWD,...
  • NormSV650: Or RAV4 Prime alternative for the price.
  • Art Vandelay: Jo Jorgensen is a PHD and a professor at Clemson. She has no sexual assault allegations and nothing...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber