By on October 17, 2016

Chrysler 300 SRT-8

Friends and roamin’ countrymen, lend me your ears! The Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk is on the way. It might not be in dealer order books quite yet, but it’s been spotted all over the place. As a business proposition, you can’t beat it; the first Grand Cherokee SRT-8 was a very satisfying automobile, and the current one is even better. Sure, every SRT Grand Cherokee ever built is a kind of ironic statement on the idiocy of the modern consumer, who is willing to pay extra money to get less room and worse handling as long as he can sit six inches higher than his neighbor, but adding the Hellcat engine to it makes it perfectly ironic. It’s the combination of added-then-removed off-road capability and an engine that is simply too powerful to use fully unless you are willing to go full-sociopath on your fellow motorists. Nothing could be more American, nothing could be more THE_CURRENT_YEAR. I accept the existence of the Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk and urge you to do the same.

But as long as we’re expanding the availability of what is probably the Greatest American V8 in History, shouldn’t we also take a moment to give it a home that is both appropriate and respectful of Chrysler tradition? That’s right: I’m talkin’ ’bout a 300C Hellcat.


2012 Chrysler 300C SRT8 Rear Quarter, Image: © 2012 Michael Karesh/The Truth About Cars

The original Chrysler V8 was designed to a standard almost unthinkable at the time: 100,000 miles without major engine service. It was standard equipment in the 1951 New Yorker and Imperial. At the time, speed and power were considered luxury goods — buying a cheap car generally meant you were buying a slow car. The only manufacturer to buck that trend was Ford with its 1932 flathead V8, but development of that engine didn’t keep up with the times and the Chrysler Hemi made about almost 70-percent more power than the 1951 flathead Ford.

I think the toughest thing for younger automotive enthusiasts to understand about mid-20th-century motoring is that there were limits on how fast the cars could go besides the numbers on a white-and-black sign. Chuck Berry can explain it to you: cars would overheat in regular driving, they had trouble getting up steep hills or keeping their brakes cool on the way back down those hills, they didn’t like hot weather or long idle times. Having a Chrysler Hemi in the ’50s meant you could zip up the Tejon Pass in the summer while the straight-sixes all around you strained to maintain 45 miles per hour. Power was the ultimate luxury; it gave you the luxury of choice, of freedom, of speed.

Today, power is still a luxury. It means you can sit at a stoplight, looking at the two-into-one lane merge a thousand feet on the other side, and know for certain that you won’t be balked or blocked by the Toyota Avalon or BMW 328i next to you. It means that if you’re stuck behind slow traffic on a country road and you see a brief section of dotted-yellow open up ahead, you will be able to take advantage of it without worrying about becoming an impromptu hood ornament on a Kenworth. You might never use that power, but it’s nice to know that you have it.

It’s been a while since we had a Chrysler 300C SRT-8. I assume that FCA discontinued the nameplate because it was a slow seller, and that makes sense. Not too many American-car fans want to combine wood trim and 470 horsepower. But I also think it is important for Chrysler to fly the flag, so to speak, with that car. There is a certain demographic that wants a combination of power and luxury in a North-American-built automobile. They shouldn’t be forced to buy a CTS-V, which is very nice and quite rapid but which unfortunately has about all the swagger of Michael Cera in Superbad.

It’s also possible that Chrysler personnel felt that the 300C SRT-8 was a little underpowered compared to the aforementioned V-car and the overseas competition. It’s true that the Hemi-powered 300C never scorched the pavement the way that, say, an E63 AMG did. But the answer to that difficulty is very much at hand, and the answer is HELLCAT.

A Hellcat-powered 300C would likely run the quarter-mile in 11.5 seconds, fast enough to see off nearly any sedan that money can buy. It would require some unique engineering to the Chrysler’s front fascia to handle the cooling needs, but I think such a thing could be done in attractive fashion. It might not quite match its Charger counterpart for top speed; the Kamm tail of the 300C probably hurts it a bit in that regard. But it would probably reach 200 mph regardless.

I’ll tell you how I would do it. I’d make a big deal of dyno-testing the Hellcat engines as they come off the line in Hermosillo — they do it anyway — and I’d make an even bigger deal of the fact that the most powerful Hellcat engines are assigned to duty in the 300C. That’s the kind of inside-baseball stuff that car junkies love, and it’s how legends are made.

I wouldn’t put a single piece of carbon fiber in the 300C Hellcat. It would be all burl wood and polished aluminum. If you want boy-racer stuff, buy a Dodge. This is American luxury, my friend. And I’d do a new Hellcat logo. Something in crystal and silver, maybe. I’d put five hundred bucks into a hand-made inlaid shift knob or some other piece of interior jewelry. The message is this: nothing’s faster, nothing’s more luxurious, and we are unashamed about this.

Price? $79,999 would be a good place to start. That’s a fourteen-grand bump over the Charger Hellcat. It should be reflected in the materials you touch inside the car. Maybe it would lose money, maybe it would sit on the showroom floors until the Sweet Meteor O’Death strikes us — but it would be a statement. And people will respond to a statement of intent, of purpose, of steadfast belief. If you don’t agree, then ask Mark Antony.

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72 Comments on “The Time Is Right for the Chrysler 300C Hellcat...”


  • avatar
    energetik9

    No I just don’t see it. The statement will be lost to the automotive buying public and it will get lost in the crowd with the other Hellcats. If the SRT-8 didn’t sell well, not sure how this would be better.

    “And I’d do a new Hellcat logo. Something in crystal and silver” Just like the K car. :)

    • 0 avatar
      Speed3

      Exactly. If the 300SRT couldn’t cut it why would a Hellcat? Who is a 300C Hellcat customer anyway? So you are saying that there is a demographic that wants this kind of performance sedan but not a Dodge? And they would choose this over a German or Japanese performance sedan?

      I’d rather have a 300C Estate.

      • 0 avatar
        baconator

        People will pay much more for something superlative than for something merely competitive. I might be one of those people. I looked at a 300C SRT last time around but ended up buying a (used) Mercedes for much less. I love the idea of owning something with a Hellcat motor, because it’s so over the top and I think it would be memorable. But I like my daily driver to have four doors, and I’m a little too old for a Charger.

        I can wrap my head around paying $65-70k for a 300C Hellcat more easily than paying $45k for an SRT, because there is *no* other way to get a 700-horsepower daily driver with a warranty.

        Chrysler already makes an upscale interior for the John Varvatos edition. The JV probably isn’t quite as Fleetwood Talisman as what Jack has in mind, but it definitely has a luxurious and uniquely American style.

    • 0 avatar

      I wouldn’t brand it an SRT. Lets call it a 300C Imperial. You get the loaded car you get the engine (slightly detuned from the charger maybe with AWD)

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    “but it would be a statement”

    So is a wheel-chaired, 400-lb Nam vet on oxygen attending a buddy’s funeral, with just as much of a future as Chrysler.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    It would probably sell, but can they make enough engines?

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Yeah, good question? I just figured the Hellcat V8 was on a niche line like the GM and Ford specialty vehicle engine line where additional hand assembly was implemented.

  • avatar
    PenguinBoy

    While I like the idea of a modern “Letter Car”, and it certainly fits in with the heritage of the Chrysler 300, I’m not sure the statement it makes fits in with Chrysler’s current position as the “mainstream” brand within FCA.

    That’s a pity though, as this could be a very cool car in a more understated way than the HELLCAT powered muscle cars. The previous generation (2011 – 2014?) 300 SRT8 is a fairly rare car, but when I see them they tend to be clean and umolested, and driven by a different demographic than most modern Chryslers. This could certainly be an image building halo car, if Chrysler still wanted that image.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Et tu Baruthte?

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I agree 100% with Jack! My current reality means that I would never purchase or consider purchasing one. But if I were to win big money such an automobile (with AWD?) would be first on my list.

    Good ol’ American luxury. Big, bold, brash and powerful. The very type of auto that Cadillac and Lincoln should be marketing.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    BTSR only has so much garage space. I know, my parents live in his neighborhood.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    Make it a modern letter car, just like what Penguin said above, not an SRT-8 or 300″C”. Only the “K” sold over 3,000 units, every other one sold in relatively small numbers.

    300
    300C
    300N—using an updated badge from the Heritage Series.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Dodge is still obtensibly a performamce brand and Jeep is gearing up to compete with Land Rover soon so Hellcatting those brands makes some sense.

    There is no statement to make for Chrysler though. Their near future is a poor-man’s Buick FWD sedan, a minivan, and some kind of anonymous 2-row CUV(s).

    If you want to argue something, GM should put the 6.2L in the CT6.

    • 0 avatar
      pmirp1

      Completely agree. CT6 exterior is beautiful. If GM spends 10k on putting better interior material, a better CUE with knobs, and the V8, that thing is worthy of big $. Chrysler 300 here in Atlanta, is ride of choice for less credit worthy customers

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        The biggest issue with the CT6 is the engines.

        The 2.0T version shouldn’t be for sale in North America, the 3.0T is fast but it’s also laggy and dull, the 3.6L is probably the best one but it’s still the same engine you can get on other $30k GM cars and doesn’t quite have the power or refinement for the price.

        I don’t know if the answer is an LT V8 or an electric drive or a hybrid V8 or a new DOHC V8, but the car has sold well enough initially that I think GM can afford to invest in something better under the hood.

        • 0 avatar
          tjh8402

          I thought a new 4.0t dohc v8 was already confirmed for the CT6

        • 0 avatar
          baconator

          The existing 6.2 is great in the $100k Escalade. Why isn’t it good enough for the CT6? Maybe back in the 1990s Cadillacs needed to have a “high feature” motor to compete with zee Germans. But, zee Germans nowadays have clattery 2.0Ts or heavy turbo-sixes in everything in order to game the fuel-efficiency regs. In the meantime, the LS/LT has proven to be one of the world’s great motor families, smooth and fuel-efficient under real-world conditions.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The Escalade’s overwhelming issue is a lack of refinement for its price range. True of the engine, true also of the suspension, steering, and interior materials. The GM pushrod motors do not have the NVH characteristics for luxury applications in today’s market. (And that’s fine; they’re still great engines.)

            The right engines for the CT6 would be:

            1) a strong hybrid using the 3.6 and a big electric motor
            2) an improved version of the 3.0T
            3) a new DOHC V8.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Your drivetrain options should be LSX or EV, all else is fail.

  • avatar
    FalcoDog

    I could not agree more. Properly upgraded it would be a halo car for sure and Chrysler needs an image boost badly. Chrysler should throw everything at it and make just enough for the journalists to drive and for the top 50% of dealers to get one. Who cares if it sells.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    The problem is even if you put a Hellcat engine in a Chrysler 300 C, at the end of the day, you still are driving a car with a design that is now about 8-10 years old. Sure it has changed a little in that time, but it doesn’t look new, and it won’t grab attention. Chrysler made some noise with Hellcat for Challenger and Charger, while also smartly making small changes to their design. But honestly, when it comes time to spending big $ on a coupe, I much rather spend on a Corvette than a Challenger (which is what I did). If it is a sedan we are talking about a Caddy CT6 is much more interest grabbing than a Chrysler 300. At the end of the day, you are still in a car that can be had in cheaper versions for 30k, vs. a Corvette that we know can’t be had for less than 60k, or a CT6 which can’t be had for less than 60k. And the Chrysler is OLD. When it comes to those prices, what impression a vehicle leaves on the outside world matters.

    • 0 avatar
      zerofill

      Honestly haven’t seen a vette I liked since 1963-1967 as far as looks. But I am the minority on that I am sure. I have always been a fan of the box style bodies. So the 300c in my opinion is one of the cars that the body has lasted since 2004 on for a reason. The look is gangster… like a 62 lincoln… ;)

      The number of aftermarket parts, make it an awesome canvas to make it your own.

      I have a 2005 C… Which I am either dropping a hellcat drive train in, or gutting it and starting from scratch. Along with a lot of body modifications, etc… The actual center, where the navigation/stereo is now, will end up looking more like a Tesla. Luckily I am a car guy, and have rebuilt muscle cars from the ground up, but am also a programmer. So those will go hand in hand with what I end up doing with my 300. My daughter wrecked it awhile back, lol. Have had to change the PCM then now the TCM is bad, but will change that as well. So it is just sitting util Spring, when the overhaul starts.

      It will have a lot of body modifications, (Sold my 70 superbee awhile back, even have 70 superbee scoops to modify for it, and make functional. Buddy sent em to me, when I was talking about what I planned on doing.

      But the most amazing thing I ever saw done with the 300 was:

      http://www.streetmusclemag.com/news/from-new-to-old-chrysler-300c-srt8-converted-into-69-charger/

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Sure, why not? Chrysler can’t fornicate itself any more than it already has. But Jack’s own words explain why it won’t work:

    “I wouldn’t put a single piece of carbon fiber in the 300C Hellcat. It would be all burl wood and polished aluminum.”

    Let’s face it – in concept, the 300C was a great car, but it was never “premium” enough. A current Avalon or Genesis feels like FAR nicer goods than any 300.

    This is because Chrysler doesn’t know how to do premium cars, and hasn’t since the 1960’s.

    So, the 300 Hellcat would end up a more-expensive Charger Hellcat. I don’t see that working.

    But I’ll tell you what WOULD work: a $50,000 300C with the Hemi AND top-shelf materials and build quality.

    • 0 avatar
      MLS

      “But I’ll tell you what WOULD work: a $50,000 300C with the Hemi AND top-shelf materials and build quality.”

      Doesn’t that already exist in the 300C Platinum? It’s about $49,000 (before incentives) with the 5.7L Hemi and full-leather interior. The open-pore wood trim and leather-wrapped dash, door panels, center console, and wheel are quite nice.

      Surfaces from the armrests up are wrapped in leather, and all wood and metal trim pieces are genuine:
      http://wheelsca.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Chrysler-300C-Platinum-2015-interior.jpg

      • 0 avatar
        bryanska

        It’s gorgeous inside. I have the Luxury Edition, can’t say enough about it. The Platinum interior takes it a little further.

        Average people who sit in my car comment on how nice it is. I’ve gotten more than one “holy shit” from car guys.

        No, it ain’t no Mercedes inside. But it takes no shit from anyone. All it needs is a nice big cigar ashtray.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Didn’t even know they made that…thanks.

        So maybe I’m no genius!

  • avatar
    April S

    I don’t know about putting such a motor like that into an aging car as the 300. BTW, my Dentist drove a friends Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat. He said it was too dangerous to drive and he owns a Viper.

  • avatar
    nguyenvuminh

    Yeah baby, let’s make this sucker. Personally, I think FCA should stop making all other variants and should make all Chrysler product Hellcat. The only option is color. The symbolism and imagery are so perfect, a company going to hell making Hellcats taking their customers to the same place where all of them will be able to hug each other in deep love.

  • avatar
    NoID

    Keep in mind, The 300 SRT is still being produced for overseas markets. Stuffing a Hellcat into it and selling it state-side wouldn’t be a cake-walk, but it isn’t like FCA would have to rebuild the bakery first.

    I’d welcome it.

  • avatar
    dont.fit.in.cars

    The same idea could be launched across all US brands. I drive 2014 Impala. The motor is good but not great. The idea it could be outfitted with a GM’s twin turbo V6 (Cadillac) mated to AWD (Buick Lacrosse), a few SS badges, mag shocks and a launch switch. 100 more HP would make the old fat white guys with coin giggly.

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    The time is always right for a Chrysler 300 Hellcat. The time is always right for GM to put the NA 6.2L V8 in Cadillac sedans. The time is always right for Ford to build a MarkIX/X based on the Mustang.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Cadillac needs a Reuss-esque leader if it is to survive, the current administration will do everything but the most logical thing as you suggest.

      With some of the success Lincoln has been having, I do wonder if something brash, such as a Continental Mark X, is in the future.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        If Lincoln’s current plans come to fruition, good things will be happening. That doesn’t necessarily mean “Mark X”, but things are going more in that direction than a Lincoln Focus or Fiesta.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Lincoln, next five to ten years, is in a stable position and could possibly grow overseas. I think Cadillac is in serious trouble.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Cadillac’s problem is not with the product, it’s that they’re trying to charge Mercedes/Lexus prices without having built up enough credibility yet. Lincoln seems to be going in the direction of bringing back the cushy luxobarge which nobody save maybe Lexus is really making anymore. Everybody else seems to want to be BMW or Audi.

  • avatar
    LXbuilder

    Was stupid to drop the SRT version of the 300 to begin with, it was the best Q ship going for the price. No way a Hellcat version is getting done when they no longer do SRT.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Everyone who thinks the Chevy SS is great and not buying it, will think this an even better idea, but still not buy it.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    Who in their right mind is going to pay the thick end of 80 grand for a Chrysler 300? It doesn’t matter what’s under the hood, they’d be fire saling them at 25 grand off in no time.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Sure, why not? A big badass sedan, available only in black. Maybe change the bodywork, too, but not too much. To my eyes the 300 still has a road presence that the big cars from Ford and GM lack.

    BTW, the Ford Flathead V-8 was prone to overheating as well, a problem that couldn’t be totally cured with a bigger radiator and more airflow. It was an internal problem.

    Jack, you sure you haven’t been taken over by the zombie of BTSR? ;-) Actually, I miss him.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    If only .

    Not like I’d ever buy one even used but the thoughts inspired by Jack’s writing were great .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    yamahog

    Eh. It’s a good idea but Chrysler won’t do it. We cling to the potential of American luxury cars but the fact is that GM/Ford/Chrysler can never make an LS / S class and never will.

    We get to play pretend in trucks slathered in chrome and leather, and turbo AWD sedans that share platforms with mainstream brands.

    And then Chrylser gives us a signal in the form of a new minivan that rocks.

    But Americans aren’t ever going to make another 1962 Cadillac DeVille or 1964 Lincoln Continental. We can blame CAFE/Share holder value/the UAW or anything else we want but really there’s a shortage of will to power/pleasure/meaning. American auto companies don’t dare to dream of a world they make, they dream of having a place in ‘the market’.

    Thank god for Tesla though, say what you will about them, but they’re working to make the world they want and that’s more than we can say about the big 2.5.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I say yes! They need the halo car, and I can’t see how this would diminish the brand. A huge (mostly) American sedan with a fire-breathing engine and traditional materials. Marketed correctly, it would do well.

    It seems to me, if you want something different in that end of the market, this would make an impact. As much as I love Caddys, there’s nothing in their stable quite like the 300+Hellcat. The Germans will charge an incredible amount of money for something similar and the Japanese don’t do this kind of car.

    Do it while you can FCA. CAFE is going to catch up to you…

  • avatar
    JimZ

    “cars would overheat in regular driving, they had trouble getting up steep hills or keeping their brakes cool on the way back down those hills, they didn’t like hot weather or long idle times.”

    not to mention the bias-ply tires which would inevitably come apart on the highway.

    Right behind EFI, modern tire technology is one of the biggest advancements.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “Right behind EFI, modern tire technology is one of the biggest advancements.”

      Marvelously sober overview of the past 35 years of automotive progress with which I, geezer, heartily agree!

      Even thinking people who despise the necessity of owning and using these expensive, dangerous fart cans would concur.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Yes, many a life was prevented by good rubber….. um….. wait. That may have come out wrong. Freudian slip. My Catholic roots are showing. LOL

  • avatar
    AlfaRomasochist

    Throw a Jag XJR / Bentley Speed style mesh grille on the front with a Hellcat logo on it and I’m in.

  • avatar
    Chris from Cali

    I’d love a Charger Hellcat, but I’ve given up on Hellcats (and GT350s, Raptors, Focus RS, etc.) because of ridiculous dealers. Want a Hellcat? Yes? Please give me an extra $20K for the privilege (if you’re lucky). For special cars like Hellcats, GT350s, etc., I’m cool with paying MSRP. But MSRP plus ADM aka “market adjustment”? As our British friends say, that’s just taking the piss, m8.

  • avatar

    I would publish the official torque spec as adequate (Bentley), then include a dyno slip in the glovebox of each car. That would drive car nerds nuts.

  • avatar
    bryanska

    YES.

    Would be a great way for the 300 to go out. “The best one was the last one”.

    At the very least, make the dynamite S exterior available with a better interior. That dark blue is hideous, and the black is like being in a coffin.

    The prior Varvatos edition almost had it right. Just needed more of that baseball-glove leather, and less of the blackness.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I’m sick of Hellcats. They’re not remotely track cars and they provide zero benefit on the street compared to the much cheaper 392 versions. Both 392 and Hellcat have enough power to break the tires loose at any street speed. All Hellcats are is an exercise in bragging about 707 horsepower.

    Assuming logical prices, I’d yawn at a $80k 300C Hellcat but be enticed by a $60k 300C 392. (But not enough to buy one.)

  • avatar
    Dingleberrypiez_Returns

    Absolutely, hands down, yes. This is a car I would purchase after ten years of depreciation. Or at least a regular SRT 300. Didn’t realize they don’t make those anymore. Kind of a bummer that the 300 finally has an adequate interior and you can’t get the most appealing engine.

  • avatar
    Domestic Hearse

    Mwah ha ha ha. I love it.

    Though, no brightwork on this car. No chrome at all.

    Murder it out. Black out everything.

    The Hellcat power plant will be most useful in the 300 package I have in mind…

    Armor plating, bullet-proof glass, Kevlar-reinforced run-flats, hermetically sealed occupant space, internal air supply, on-board firefighting equipment, in-roof sat-com, cabin gun ports (AK optimized), tear gas launchers. And some other stuff I will think of as soon as I hit Submit. (Like RPG-7’s lurking behind the headlights.)

    Seats must be stitched in miniature giraffe hide and this road-going T-14 Armata will be sold to Bratva throughout Russia and the former SovBlocs.

    Behold, the Hellcat equipped Chrysler 300VOR.

    ₽63,120,500.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    For those stating that nobody would buy it because of its ‘old’ platform, I reply with one word “Escalade”.

    And just how new are the platforms on recent Bentley, Rolls-Royce and Jaguar sedans?

    Make it big, plush, pushy and give it real ‘street cred’. The 300 already has a ‘gangster’ style to it. Adding additional ‘bling’ and making it a Hellcat with AWD would just push it so far outside existing bounds of good taste to make it enticing for those with more money than they know what to do with, more money than brains and ‘wannabe gangsters’.

    Bentley is now synonymous with rappers and English professional ‘football’ players, the epitomes of ‘bad taste’. People who buy these are all about the image, they care not about the technology or the engineering.

    Centre the ad campaign around Al Pacino and his Tony Montana character. Or Ray Liotta or Joe Pesci, or Puff they could all use the work.

    • 0 avatar
      Jagboi

      “And just how new are the platforms on recent Bentley, Rolls-Royce and Jaguar sedans?”

      Speaking of Jaguar, XE, XF and F Pace are brand new, and everything now is all aluminium. F Type is 3 years old, XJ is the oldest, dating from 2011.

      I know the next generation XJ has been completely engineered, the question within Jaguar is if there is enough of a market for big sedans to make it worthwhile paying for the tooling to build it. The Chinese economy will determine that, as right now approximately 85% of the XJ production is sold in China.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Thanks, so a new launch for Jaguar in 2015, previously a much older design. And some models based on Ford derived platforms.

        And what of Bentley and RR?

        The XE is the first built on Jaguar Land Rover’s iQ[Al] modular platform, which will be used for the second generation XF model, the Jaguar F-Pace sports utility vehicle (previewed as the Jaguar C-X17) and a new Range Rover to be positioned between the Evoque and the Sport.

        The XE is the first midsize car Jaguar has produced since the 2009 model year X-Type and is the first of several Jaguar models to be built using Jaguar’s new modular aluminium architecture, moving the company away from the Ford derived platforms that were used in the past for the X-Type and XF.

        The second-generation Jaguar XF is an evolution of the original J-Blade design pioneered in the original XF, with a largely similar silhouette.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    “And I’d do a new Hellcat logo. Something in crystal and silver, maybe.”

    A massive hood ornament.

    Make it bigger than a bulldog on a Mack.

    Jaguaresque but on roids.

    Jacked on roids and acid.

    I’m sure they could borrow a designer from their truck division to create a visible badge for it.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    For sale in 5 years on a “Buy Here, Pay Here” lot for $9999, with a set of rimzzzz and no service history.

  • avatar
    W126

    For people to fork over $80,000 this 300C would need to be a special edition and there’s not enough fake wood trim and plastic side plaques in the world to make that happen. First, the car would have to have the option of a column mounted shifter with velour bench seats. Next the car would have to come with a 3 month free subscription to Sirius XM radio EXCEPT for the Siriusly Sinatra station which would be good for the lifetime of the vehicle and would be the default station whenever the radio was turned on. Next the car would have to have a reinforced floor pan to protect the driver a la that scene from “Casino”. Finally, no internal trunk release cable, Capisce? Car salesman would have to emulate Robert DeNiro from the car salesman scene in “Analyze That”. The car would also have to have commercials featuring Joe Pesci aggressively hawking the product using plenty of expletives.

    There, now THAT is how you sell an $80,000 300C! You got a problem with that?

  • avatar
    nickoo

    But what does Bstr have to say about it? Rip in peace.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I can’t think of a reason not to. The ROI would take few units to achieve.

  • avatar
    Troggie42

    As someone who has no love lost towards Chrysler…

    I would rock the HELL out of a 300C Hellcat. I have no real desire for a Charger or Challenger, but a 300C? Absolutely. Pull some of the old John Varvatos edition trim pieces from the parts bin, I’m sure some of em are laying around.

    Sure I can’t actually AFFORD one right now, but I’m sure there are some subprime lenders out there that could help me out with that. After all, isn’t that the American Dream these days anyway? Take out unsustainable loans so you can own cool shit? ;)

    I say put the Hellcat engine in EVERYTHING. Final edition Dart? Hellcat. 200? Hellcat. Chrysler Town and Country? Hellcat. Everything badged as a Ram? OF COURSE! I mean why not? If Chrysler is as bad off as everyone seems to think, then just go out with the largest bang possible accompanied by insane burnouts.

  • avatar
    stanczyk

    They should “Hellcat” Grand Cheerokee, RAM pickup .. and Viper(750bhp “Hellcat+” would save Viper’s-ass) as well..

    BTW> Both Challanger(too old and boring..) and Charger(blunt design after rebirth..) need re-fresh and redesign..


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