By on October 13, 2016

2017 GMC Sierra 2500HD All Terrain X, Image: General Motors

Do you want heavy-duty work truck wrapped in black sheetmetal fit for a henchman? You’re in luck, my productive and sinister friend.

GMC has expanded its All Terrain X series to include the Sierra 2500HD. It joins the midsize Canyon and full-size Sierra 1500 in offering the X trim, but it’s squarely aimed at its offroad-ready, crosstown rival — the Ram Power Wagon.

Introduced in Austin, Texas, on Monday, the most noteworthy changes on the Sierra HD include Z71 off-road suspension, underbody shielding, a sports bar (no, not that kind of sports bar), Duratrac MT tires, and a locking rear differential. Other big changes revolve predominantly around appearance, which could be considered “tasteful” when compared to the Power Wagon. While a lot of shiny bits are now painted black, you won’t find oversized “All Terrain X” decals anywhere on this GMC.

2017 GMC Sierra 2500HD All Terrain X, Image: General Motors

That’s probably because it still considers itself a slightly more serious work truck. Its 6.0-liter V8 makes 360 horsepower and 380 pounds-feet of torque as standard. Should you choose to opt for the new 6.6-liter Duramax turbodiesel V8, to the tune of an additional $8,500, 445 hp and 910 lb-ft of torque are at the ready. That’s almost the same pulling power as a Super Duty hauling an entire stable of horses, not a fun-oriented ORV.

The pickup features a list of niceties that don’t come to mind when thinking about mud bogging or hill climbs — like GMC’s IntelliLink infotainment system with 8-inch color touchscreen, remote starting system, remote-locking tailgate, rear visibility camera, leather seats, and heated front seats and steering wheel.

While the Toyota Tundra TRD Pro and forthcoming Ford F-150 Raptor are great choices for off-road enthusiasts, someone who needs a heavy-duty work truck isn’t going to give either serious consideration. But for the Power Wagon buyer, GMC is finally offering a badass alternative.

[Images: General Motors]

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20 Comments on “GMC Introduces More Sensible ‘Xtreme’ Off-Road Truck...”


  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Great, a factory bro-truck! GM must have noticed all the dealers selling aftermarket-blinged out/cheaply lifted new stock with very impressive profits and wanted in on the action.

  • avatar
    carguy67

    Does it have a round wheel wells option?

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    I hate the word “Extreme” applied to things, and I hate “Xtreme” even more. I still remember those stupid lowered Xtreme S-10s.

    It’s a future classic? I don’t know about that:

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/why-chevrolet-10-xtreme-future-classic-120019547.html

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    It isn’t exactly a Power Wagon competitor since it doesn’t have a mild lift, locking front diff, sway bar disconnect, a 30 inch fiording depth, and a winch.

    It offers stiffer shocks, skid plates, and better tires as basically the only hat tip to offroading. The rest is bling.

    At least it is offered with a diesel.

    BTW – black is a sh!tty colour for a truck allegedly designed for off-road and dirt road use.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      It’s more like the Off-Road package RAM offers for all HDs for 2017. Like you say, a Power Wagon it sure ain’t.

      I realize the Power Wagon is sold to enough Bro-types to tarnish its reputation amongst toe cognoscenti a good bit. But underneath all the bad-ass-bro-bling, is a really, really well designed and unique vehicle for it’s (rather narrow, but still) niche.

      All that weight and all that clearance and all that articulation and all that locking and all that winch, makes it far and away the most suitable pickup for towing anything of any weight out in the boonies.

      Get the wheel on a heavy trailer stuck in a rut in the soft stuff, and no amount of electronic “mud and sand” modes will make up for a lack of old fashioned weight, over as many driven wheels in contact with the ground as possible.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Lou,
      Looking how it sits it’ll need more than skid plates off road. Now if it was a couple of yards shorter.

  • avatar
    MrIcky

    shhhh, little secret on the Power Wagon, check the box ‘power wagon badging delete’ option when ordering and the Power Wagon looks like a slightly beefier normal truck.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      MrIcky -my local dealership seems to like the vomited paint graphics. I do see the occasional PW without them. I like the 2017’s graphics much better.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      There are actually 3 different Power Wagon models–the standard Power Wagon (with or without badges, like you said), the Power Wagon Laramie (which looks exactly like you’d expect–a nice two-tone with not a graphic in sight), and the delicious base-model Power Wagon Tradesman.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I see they copied the buttresses from the old Honda Ridgeline.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    I dont get crew cab offroaders, especially with low hanging running boards that I doubt are actual rock sliders. Breakover angle is a thing offroad.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      HDs aren’t technical offroaders to begin with. Too stiff and heavy, particularly in the front. Where HDs make sense off road, is if you need to tow stuff into the boons. Forestry equipment, water tanks, a lake/river boat or float, a flatbed full of dirt bikes, or just a sturdy camper. Once you do that, the terrain you can traverse, is limited more by what you tow (and that you tow….), than by the tow vehicle itself.

      • 0 avatar
        MrIcky

        Normally I would agree with you. Then a couple years ago I saw Power Wagons (and Raptors) in action with the BLM and Forest Service fire fighters in the Sun Valley area. The articulation on a stock HD truck amazed me.

        PWs (and Raptors) are absolutely the real deal. I realize they may be a tough fit on tight roads, but they were easily going up/over/through very tough terrain to get to where they needed to go.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    When thinking of my next vehicle, the adult in me says Suburban, but the kid in me says this.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    An appearance package. A decent LSD would of been better.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      At least in the US, almost all GMs come with their somewhat unique, “spin sensing,” auto locker. Not the most predictable thing in the world for technical rock crawling with tight clearances, but a pretty darned good solution for most traction problems big truck buyers normally experience (getting stuck, getting moving with a load and getting a boat up a slick ramp). And, nowadays, it seems to be pretty much bullet proof as long as tires aren’t too big. Of course, jury’s still out on how it will hold up behind the new, torque boosted Duramax….It’s one of those designs that just look like it ought to break, as it works by allowing the big diesel and heavy driveline to build up massive momentum and then, Bang!, it locks. But GM seems to have had it under control for a long time now.

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