By on October 19, 2016

2016 Porsche 911 Carrera

Let’s get one thing clear straight away: this car doesn’t exist on any Porsche lot. Finding a no-options Porsche 911 is like finding leftover beer at a frat party or a Prius owner who isn’t smug. If you want this, you’ll have to order it.

The base Porsche 911 Carrera starts at $89,400 and is devoid of extraneous technical frippery, making it closer in spirit to mythical 911s of the past than anything else in the current catalog. And yes, I’m aware of the existence of the psychotic 911 R and GT3 RS.

Ceramic brakes, rear steering — all the performance gear appearing higher up in the 911 range serve mostly to set a faster time on the Nurburgring at the expense of a pure driving experience. Just like its grandpappy, the base 911 is more likely to swing its loaded diaper to the left when the driver throws it into a sweeping right-hander. Standard brakes mean you can’t dive into that 90-degree bend with reckless abandon and hope the carbon ceramics will save your bacon; you’ll actually have to deploy a modicum of driving talent to get through it without crashing. Tires whose sidewalls are more than black paint smeared on an alloy rim means the thing actually rides decently. These are all Very Good Things.

“But, Matt!” you scream, while hurling Vachon cakes and tins of WD-40 in my general direction, “A 911 neeeeeds to be equipped with the Sport Chrono package!” I respectfully disagree. The Sport Chrono package will add dynamic engine mounts, a timer wart on top of the dash, and transmission programming that’ll blip the throttle on downshift. To this I say: learn to deal with the weight transfer of the rear engine, buy a stopwatch, and practice your heel-and-toe technique. You do know how to heel-and-toe … right? Naturally, this necessitates leaving the $3,200 PDK on the shelf.

Porsche purists are a fanatical lot, brandishing pitchforks and generally frothing whenever the boffins from Germany make changes to their beloved sports car. Now that the base 911 sports a pair of turbos, I fully expected the Porsche faithful to self immolate on a pile of whale-tail spoilers and air-cooled engines. That hasn’t happened because, by all accounts, the new 911 goes like a torched weasel while failing to exhibit massive amounts of dreaded turbo lag or light-switch power delivery. Sure, we see pictures of the scattered 911 in a ditch, but that’s because the majority of One Percenters don’t know how to drive.

The shade of Miami Blue, while fabulous, costs over three thousand dollars. Three grand! I recommend the $0 Guards Red for purists in the audience, while my own extroverted tendencies gravitate towards the gratis Racing Yellow. Beautiful 19-inch Carrera wheel are $0. Four-way power Sport seats can be selected in three different colors without financial penalty.

The best $0 option of all? European Delivery. Porsche’s factory collection program allows buyers to receive their Porsche right in Zuffenhausen and includes transport to the plant, hotel reservations, and a factory tour. Why anyone would buy a new 911 and not select this opportunity is beyond comprehension.

It is said that old 911s are one of the few cars on the road which actually sit in the garage at night, plotting creative and high-speed ways to kill its owner. This newest 911 Carrera isn’t the Grim Reaper but it is arguably the purest distillation of the 911 line right now. Entry level? Best of the line? That’s what we call an Ace of Base around here.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

95 Comments on “Ace of Base – 2017 Porsche 911 Carrera...”


  • avatar
    Kenmore

    “a Prius owner who isn’t smug”

    Got two in my own family. Wish they were smug; they’re way too open, trusting and forgiving. They just like spending less for gas.

    BTW, please snap the lid back on your Kneejerk Cliche barrel; its smell is coming through the intertubes.

    • 0 avatar
      Car Guy

      I stand with the “smug” comment. You might not fit the narrative but I’ve meet plenty who have. Give Prius owners 5 minutes to talk about their car and they will no doubt tell you what great crusaders of the planet they are……

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        That’s interesting, I’ve never heard a Prius owner say anything about their car other than they liked it.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        “what great crusaders of the planet they are”

        Some people really are, just like there are seriously self-sacrificing Christians spending money & time on some community or other.

        If they want to believe their own brand of whack and I can see that they walk the walk, I respect their commitment and STFU.

      • 0 avatar
        ttacgreg

        Hey, the Prius is every bit the same product of the current biosphere toxic, species extincting, ecosystem destroying, climate altering modern industrial human culture, as any Hummer, or semi truck, or airliner, or shipping vessel. It is just a smaller footprint than the others.
        With this perspective, I am of two minds. I am ashamed to be driving owning and driving a Prius. On the other hand, I don’t believe the “think globally act locally idea ” works unless large hierarchies (nations and corporations) act on remedies, so I swim in the ocean in which I dwell. I could become a monk and live in a cave, but as long as a billion others out there are indulging, what the hell. I would label myself a hypocrite Prius driver. There is an entirely easy and feasible transition process to reform our industrial culture to be harmless, or even nurturing to the biosphere, but until ignorance and greed are controlled, it ain’t happening.

        Good job Mr. Author calling up an ignorant and bigoty based sterotype raw nerve here. I hope the effects you intended it to have writing it indeed came to pass.

        Now back to the Porsche.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Tesla killed of whatever smugness ever existed among Prius owners. The empire always strikes back.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Come to Seattle, where every sixth or so car is a Prius, they’re too common to give rise to any smugness, and people buy them because they’re cheap to own and tough as nails.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Official transportation smugness list:

      1. Urban-dwellers with no car
      2. Cyclists
      3. Tesla owners
      4. Turbo’d vehicle owners with ECU tunes
      5. Classic car owners
      6. Manual transmission drivers
      7. Gray market/JDM vehicle owners
      8. NonTesla EV drivers
      9. Bikers
      10. Diesel car drivers
      11. Doug DeMuro

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        I would put “Tesla fans who don’t own a Tesla” in between 2 and 3. Mostly because they won’t stop talking about their Model 3 reservation.

      • 0 avatar
        Testacles Megalos

        Yow, ow ow ow.
        I ride a bike to work (no spandex though)
        I’ve got an old v-dub hanging around subject to my wrenching
        I don’t own or want anything with an automatic
        and I’ve got a diesel car.
        And a base-level air cooled 911 (only option was electric drivers seat).

        I’ve got my reasons for all, but none of the reasons has anything to do with anybody else. “Smug” is not the same as “I don’t care what you think.”

        I would agree that The List of Idiots (i.e. the annoyingly smug) includes some members of each group on this list. But I disagree that this list defines The List of Idiots.

        Can we agree that the LoI also includes a lot of Porsche owners. I’d venture that there is an inverse relationship between the option list length and the likelyhood that a Porsche actually leaves the garage and used in ordinary traffic, and that there is a direct correlation with ownership pride (a.k.a smugness).

        There’s only one group that is universally on the List of Idiots, and it’s Black BMW M3 owners. Never met one who wasn’t a difficult narcissist.

        Did you intentionally leave Volvo drivers off the list?

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        Oh, you just threw down. You think manual transmission drivers are more smug than bikers, DeMuro and gray market cars?

        There’s nothing more smug than DeMuro driving a gray market car (manual transmission) that’s towing a bike. Even those urban dwellers you speak of with no wheels at all.

      • 0 avatar
        ImAbeFroman

        4. Turbo’d vehicle owners with ECU tunes

        these folks are right

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Cyclists and bikers are smug for the same, and good, reasons most bipeds feel a bit smug, vis-a-vis those still stuck crawling on all four.

    • 0 avatar
      suspekt

      A few years back I had both a Hummer H2 and a Gen2 Prius.

      I dont currently own either car but I have never understood the Prius stereotypes.

      I bought the car cheap and it was for the mileage. It delivered incredible mileage.

      To this day, I stronly recommend the Prius (Gen3 for looks) to young families.

      It is a great family car with tons of room and fantastic quiteness when not on the throttle hard. It is a very good car mileage nothwithstanding.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      For goodness sake. It’s a Southpark reference. Dude, you’re breaking my balls here.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    I’m a 911 owner, so I’m biased. Mine has a few options, to include the awesome sport chromo package among others.

    But….couldn’t you argue a base Cayman over a base 911 for pure value proposition within the Porsche family?

  • avatar
    Car Guy

    I give Porsche serious props for still selling the 911 with a manual. That’s a sports car. And don’t tell me paddle shifters are faster. Ya, I know, blah, blah, blah track times, blah, blah, blah 0-60.

    The whole driving experience is dumbed down with paddles.

    As far as I’m concerned paddles are for canoes……..

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      A 911 is a go fast car, the PDK is the go fast transmission, what’s the problem?

      • 0 avatar
        Car Guy

        Driving a manual quickly takes more skill and gives you more connection with the car. That’s the point…

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          “Driving a manual quickly takes more skill and gives you more connection with the car. That’s the point…”

          and nobody but you is impressed.

          • 0 avatar
            Car Guy

            Never learned to drive a manual I’m guessing. You can’t simulate that too well for the Playstation generation…….

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            you guess wrong. I’ve owned four manual transmission vehicles. A turbodiesel Ram, an SRT-4, and two Mustang GTs. And I learned to drive with my dad’s (manual transmission) Spirit R/T.

            I just don’t go around acting like that makes me awesome.

          • 0 avatar
            Car Guy

            Well, I guess it sucks to be you guys living in bumper to bumper traffic. Enjoy your autos!

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          It’s a different experience for sure, but I wouldn’t describe it as dumbing down. With a manual, you have one less foot than you do pedals, so you have to develop the footwork, but if you don’t have to use the clutch when you downshift, that opens up the ability to left foot brake.

          On the street, it really doesn’t matter, but if you’re on the track, I’d rather have the PDK, with its ability to crack off lightning quick shifts. You can drive just that much harder, and are much less likely to miss a shift, which may mean lunching an expensive engine or taking a trip into the barriers.

          • 0 avatar
            duffman13

            Yeah, but at the end of the day the manual is still more fun, which is why I’m really out on track.

          • 0 avatar
            Car Guy

            I don’t disagree with your points. You will be faster on the track with PDK. But the vast majority of time is spent on the streets and some of the soul and fun factor is lost with those….

          • 0 avatar
            FormerFF

            If your preference is a manual, absolutely go for it, but it’s not fair to those who prefer an autobox to look down on them as inferior.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “I don’t disagree with your points. You will be faster on the track with PDK. But the vast majority of time is spent on the streets and some of the soul and fun factor is lost with those….”

            on the street, when I’m stuck on a congested, barely moving interstate, a manual is no fun. just constant “clutch in, clutch out, clutch in, clutch out” as traffic moves slower than I can idle in first gear. That, sir, is about 90% of my driving and a manual does not make that more “fun.”

          • 0 avatar
            duffman13

            > on the street, when I’m stuck on a congested, barely moving interstate, a manual is no fun. just constant “clutch in, clutch out, clutch in, clutch out” as traffic moves slower than I can idle in first gear. That, sir, is about 90% of my driving and a manual does not make that more “fun.”

            I drive my S2k to work once a week so I don’t have to sit in DC beltway traffic in it on a regular basis. On the days I do though, I make sure I take the scenic route home so I have fun with around half of my drive that day.

            If you can afford a $90k new Porsche, you can probably afford something else with an automatic to commute in. If you don’t want to that’s your prerogative as a buyer though.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            When it’s too much trouble, when did you give up sex?? Without serious hip/knee/joint issues, clutch in-n-out isn’t anything you ever think about, even in heavy stop-n-go congestion. It’s more of a delight if you don’t mind or love manuals

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            “but it’s not fair to those who prefer an autobox to look down on them as inferior.”

            Not categorically. But statistically, I’m not so sure…..

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            @DenverMike

            I’m very much with you there. I find manuals much more pleasant in stop and go than autos. Especially the spastic robot clutch autos sports cars tend to come with. Massively powerful cars like the Viper (or trucks like the Cummins Ram) possibly excepted, as the clutch is a bit stiff. And turbos does make the ordeal more annoying than it has to be. But a beautiful drivetrain like Honda’s vtecs, with 1st stretching from 800 to 8-9000 rpm, is a delight in traffic. Precise, no pogoing back and forth as torque converters try to hang on to lockup or roboboxes go schitzo…

            On a track in a fast car, especially if driving with a fast group, the autos make more sense to me. New cars, even the base 911, have gotten so powerful that shifts come up too fast and frequently, compared to in more “feel” oriented cars like the Miata or 86. Ditto for the grip of new tires hitting you with enough G forces to render letting go of the wheel more of a chore than in cars from earlier eras, as well as the above two.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        I think at least part of the gist of article is, and I can’t say I disagree, that the RWD base 911 is not really a Go-Fast-Car. I can certainly go faster than most cars, but it’s mission isn’t really to Just!Go!Fast! in the way the similarly priced latest GTRs’ are.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    A review of a car you didn’t drive? What’s the point?

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    When I was a kid, my father had a 911, a 1972 911T to be specific. Back then 911s were simple sports/GT cars, his had cloth seats, air conditioning installed at the port (that didn’t work well), crank up windows, and a crappy AM-FM radio. It was a lot of fun to drive, if a bit treacherous. If you drove it fast and didn’t know about trailing throttle oversteer, you’d find out in a hurry. I took it through a left/right combination that was posted at 35 mph at 70 mph, and got a little wiggle at the exit. I thought it was quite manageable but it scared the fecal matter out of my passenger, who was quire a wildman himself. Good times.

  • avatar
    Edsel Maserati

    The 911 goes like a “torched weasel”? Funny, I just read that line last night in the new Car & Driver.

    • 0 avatar
      zamoti

      I’ve never understood the desire to coin such strange phrases. Scalded cat, raped ape, and now torched weasel? Please stop raping the apes, scalding the cats or torching the weasels.

  • avatar
    jmo

    “If you want this, you’ll have to order it.”

    I wish that was the case for every car. A long list of options and the ability to order it exactly the way you want.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    I can get behind this. You have all the basics covered, and unlike the Boxsters and Caymans, you get a mechanical LSD on the base trim. It literally has everything you need. The track day bro in me would want the Sport Seats Plus ($800) for the deeper bolsters, but that’s basically it. The brakes are fine, and consumables are much cheaper without the carbon ceramics anyway.

    The Sport exhaust would be awesome but isn’t worth it for $3k, and you can have the exhaust modified for under $300 to achieve the same sound full time.

    If I had my druthers and $106k, it would be a 911S with Sport Plus Seats and PASM, aluminum interior trim, and pay the $300 to have the exhaust modified for the noise, since if I had the sport exhaust I’d probably have the button pushed ON all the time anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      philipwitak

      “If I had my druthers and $106k, it would be a 911S with Sport Plus Seats and PASM, aluminum interior trim, and pay the $300 to have the exhaust modified”

      and if i had mine, i would have preferred one of last year’s new completely stock cayman gt4s – plus an extra $20k in the bank. check this ‘cayman gt4 / lamborghini aventador’ clip to see why… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYXllBrqJXw

  • avatar
    nsk

    First, I really like this Ace of Base series. I think you should do Ferrari next. The options on those cars add truly zero performance value.

    Next, I’ve seen near-zero option 991s at larger Porsche dealers. Hennessy in Atlanta usually has a couple cars with only PDK and/or heated seats.

    What’s interesting is that Porsche leases residualize only a certain amount above base MSRP. So if you add, like, $40k worth of options to a base 991, the residual isn’t necessarily 52% or whatever of the whole MSRP.

    I have a 991 with all the performance options except PCCB, and I think its appeal is limited to track guys and message board kids. Regular car guys can’t understand why a $118k car would include manual seats without heat.

  • avatar
    Nostrathomas

    There are only two things that would be a must-have option for me if I bought a new 911.

    1. Paint to Sample color.
    2. Euro Delivery.

    If I’m spending that much $, it better be a little special, and I better pick it up in Germany!

    Although I do quite like Miami Blue as-is.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    Best part of passing on sport chrono is not getting that stupid wart on the steering wheel.

    I love red brakes so much, so is be hard pressed to skip the S.

    I also want the sports exhaust, and a couple other odds and ends like heated and cooled seats, and that sport steering wheel is a worthy upgrade.

    The mags were all testing a Guards base model with about $5-7k of options a month or two ago, looked like it was spec ‘d about perfectly for right about $100k.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      Your choice looks about the same as mine would be, which probably makes sense since we’re both S2k owners.

      Ideally I’d have an S with the sport suspension and sport seats. I could go for heated/cooled or sport exhaust, but if the 991 is anything like the 996/997 was, you can have a “permanent” sport exhaust for ~$300 in the same manner that the S2k UK exhaust-mod works – bypassing the second loop through the muffler. If I was doing the heating/cooling, I’d add the heated wheel too – my wife’s CUV has it and I love it in the winter for it.

      The nice thing is that Porsche lets you do this all a-la-carte. The heated/cooled seats are part of an option package that adds $8k to the base price otherwise.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    I’ve built this very car many times before. It really does deserve ace of base status. Personally, I find three options hard to turn down:

    Bose sound: $1590
    roof rack: $400

    and most expensive but most important option:
    sport exhaust: $2950.

    Gotta let that six sing its sweet song. Among the free colors, I went for white paint because I don’t want something loud and shouty and white is a classic Porsche and German race color. My total is $95,390.

    I do have to give Porsche some credit here, both for offering this car, and for actually keeping the price reasonable. I know we like to ding them for being greedy, but the 911 has actually done a good job keeping its price increases in line despite its increasing capabilities. I did some digging and the base price of a 1996 911 Carrera was $63,750. Adjusted for inflation, that is $98,231 in 2016 dollars, meaning the 1996’s base price is $3k more than my 2016 with a few options.

    • 0 avatar
      nsk

      Fully agreed on roof rack and PSE, but I can’t understand the appeal of the Bose system. I’ve had Porsches with all three radios – base, Bose, and Burmester – and I think the base sounds great. I’d spend that $1590 on a set of tires.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        For $1590 I could build and install a sound system which would crush the BOSE junk. Granted this isn’t a fair comparison but the BOSE system in my Z was literally the worst stereo I’ve had in any car. It was the first thing I removed. I honestly think the reason was that had a feature that picked up cabin noise with a mic and adjusted the stereo to compensate. Well back in ’03 that technology was a little too cutting edge, basically it made everything sound 10X worst. Most of what BOSE makes is junk… except their noise cancelling headphones, I swear by those things on airplanes.

        • 0 avatar
          Wagoon2.7TT

          Well said. Same with my ’05 Z, that Bose branded system (I believe that it was actually made by Clarion?) was butt-turrible. I’ve changed the HU and that’s made a big difference, but I can’t wait to rip the rest of the system out crappy component after crappy component.

          However, I have a Bose system in my old allraod that sounds perfectly decent although not exceptional.

          • 0 avatar
            never_follow

            Agreed, the Allroad system isn’t too bad, especially when you use the “secret equalizer” to balance out the front and back. The A8 amp is also a pretty decent upgrade, and is plug and play.

        • 0 avatar
          ImAbeFroman

          I take it you haven’t looked at the cost of stereos that are compatible with 911s?

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          You’ll lose far more than $1590 in resale on a newish Porsche if it has an aftermarket system.

          I’d take the base in a six-cylinder Porsche. Now if for some bizarre reason I bought a 718, then I’d need a louder stereo to drown out the engine.

          Bose is highly variable. The Bose system in my Acura Legend sounds better than most plain factory systems, with more power and clearer highs, but much worse than a real factory premium system like the Mark Levinson Reference unit in my Lexus LS.

        • 0 avatar
          Drew8MR

          Bose hasn’t made good gear since they were bought out (Yamaha maybe?)in the early 80’s. See also: Polk Audio, Harman Kardon, Mark Levinson, etc.etc.

      • 0 avatar
        tjh8402

        @nsk – I’m going on the assumption that the base sound system isn’t all that amazing. I like to blast my music on long boring traffic packed highway slogs (the sort of thing no sports car can make entertaining), so that’s a feature that’s important to me. If the sound from the base stereo is adequate, I’ll happily pass on the Bose.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Skip the Bose or high end system. I’ll bet the base stereo has some surprising crisp/clear/loud highs when you tune out the bass. Run a piggyback system for the mid and sub bass, with the fader as its volume, tapping into the rear speaker leads to high-level input amps with built-in low pass EQs. Then the gear can be easily pulled at trade-in or lease return.

  • avatar
    MatadorX

    I’d be leery of jumping into Euro delivery based upon my first hand experience working for a company that contracts with PCNA logistics here on the West Coast. Take time to educate yourself first.

    Euro delivery cars are often miss-handled by stevedores and port staff alike, but because they are considered “used cars” among fleets of new, no one cares and no one takes responsibility. New, Porsche protective wraps all vehicles with vinyl guard or full body covers, in addition to door edge guards, ensuring ship contaminants don’t ruin the body, and stevedores don’t panel chip door edges. Euro delivery units receive no protection whatsoever, many we handle have door chips as a result when they arrive, and vessel ventilation contaminants often land on paint, ruining the finish.

    Finally, carriers/dealers are in no particular rush to remove Euro delivery units from the port, from which PCNA pays to lease several lots whether they are full or not. Thus they sit, outside baking in the sun, getting plenty of dew, salt air corroding the components, for 2-3 months on the high end. Nights in southern California on the coast are 9 time out of 10 comparable to rain; year round cars are covered in water each morning.

    It takes no more than 5 weeks for a vessel to travel from Emden to the west coast, if you haven’t received your car stateside shortly after that time-frame, time to start asking questions. It is not possible that it is still in transit beyond that time. It is likely sitting at a port. The worse case I saw was a Euro delivery unit bound for Hawaii. The unit sat at the port for over 6 months, covered in dirt, baking in the sun. Finally the selling dealer forced the hand of the carrier to ship it from the mainland.

    Thus, the most important part of well executed Euro delivery is ordering from an excellent dealership. They are the only party (not the vessel line, PCNA, importer, etc) responsible for advocating on your behalf towards achieving quick discharge from the port, transfer via the first available truck (not allowing your car to languish at the port for 2-3 months), and most importantly, repair of any damage sustained during transport. I’d personally request information to the effect of the name of the vessel the vehicle is to be transported on, (this can be tracked on several sites for free) and a copy of the pre-load and post discharge damage forms, these will provide irrefutable evidence of body damage the dealer will be responsible for repair of. They try to avoid fixing this damage usually, because PCNA takes significant time to reimburse them, but it is their duty to do so.

    • 0 avatar
      Nostrathomas

      This is a very informative, if somewhat disheartening to read, post.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      And you’re making payments while you wait for the car to show up.

    • 0 avatar
      sightline

      I didn’t have any of the storage problems outlined above – shipping took ~6 weeks IIRC and it sat at the port for two days before getting loeaded up to the dealershup. However…

      When my Q5 was delivered to the Bay Area after Euro delivery, it had two huge down-to-the-metal scratches on the hood. I took one look at it and refused delivery. Made the dealership remove the hood and repaint it before I would come pick it up.

      The dealership was genuinely puzzled that I wouldn’t take the car, but later they told me that was one of the first Euro deliveries they had done in years. I would definitely recommend going with a dealer that does this regularly in case anything goes wrong.

  • avatar
    Fred

    The problem with Porsche is they have sold stripped down cars to lighten them up as a more of a club racer, but they charge you more for it. Not that they could delete enough from this car to allow me to afford it.

    • 0 avatar
      tjh8402

      FWIW, part of the advantage of this ace of base 911 is that low options means a low curb weight. C/D just tested almost this exact car (MSRP on theirs was $96,650) and its listed at 3229 lbs. That’s only about 200 lbs more than the lightest recent 911, the R (3020 lbs) and less than 100 lbs more than the boy racer 911 GT3 RS which is 3155 lbs).

  • avatar
    ajla

    If I went for a 911, it would have to be the Targa. Unfortunately that requires AWD.

    A brown one with a rear wiper, sport exhaust, and brushed aluminum interior is $117K.

    Trouble is that is close to the Panamera GTS, which is RWD and comes with a naturally-aspirated V8.

    • 0 avatar
      tjh8402

      @ajla – your Panamera options are out of date. There will likely be a RWD base model Panamera coming with a lower power version of the turbo six at some point, but right now, your choices for the new model are both 4wd and are either the $100k 4S with the 440 hp turbo V-6 or the $147k Turbo with a 550 hp turbo V-8. No more naturally aspirated, so for the price you’re looking at (around $120k), you are looking at a decently optioned 4S with awd and the turbo six.

      I went ahead and built one. There is no true brown color on the pallet right now so I went with beige which is $3300. I added the following options:

      Leather Interior in Marsala/Cream (because I think everything less expensive looked weird with the beige)
      $4,320

      Sport Package $6,930
      includes:
      -Adaptive Air Suspension incl. Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM)
      -Rear Axle Steering i.c.w. Power Steering Plus
      -Sport Chrono Package
      -Sport Exhaust System incl. Tailpipes in Silver Exclusive

      LED-Headlights incl. Porsche Dynamic Light System (PDLS) $1,020
      Comfort Access $1,090
      ParkAssist (Front and Rear) incl. Surround View $1,190
      Rear wiper $360
      Roof Transport System $430

      Total Price:
      $119,590

    • 0 avatar
      ImAbeFroman

      A Macadamia Metallic Brown Targa would be my choice too. Although I do prefer the 997.2 Targa over the 991 it would be something to kick out of bed.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I love the Targa, but not enough to sign up for AWD. Why would I want heavy AWD on a sports car which I wouldn’t own unless I could also afford a different car to drive in the rain? My choice of 911 would be the base or S coupe depending on budget, RWD, with a manual, a generous complement of functional options, and absolutely none of the cosmetic junk (leather air vent slats?) for which Porsche owners love to pay five-figure sums.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      @ajla

      If you’d choose a Panamera over a 911 and you didn’t need the rear seat room, I’d say you really don’t want a 911.

      Whether you want to call it a sports car or a grand touring car, it’s a totally different experience than the Panamera.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I only have like $50K to spend on my next car and I’ve never driven either one anyway so I’m just internet daydreaming.

        In all honestly I can’t really say I seriously *want* any Porsche, but the 911 Targa and the (old) Panamera GTS are the two things they’ve got that speaks to me.

  • avatar
    ImAbeFroman

    Gotta ask:
    For $90K would one rather have this or
    – VERY low mileage 997 Carrera GTS 4
    – VERY low mileage 991 Carerra S/C4S
    – 997.2 Turbo

    The Base 911’s biggest issue is sibling rivalry.

    • 0 avatar
      Nostrathomas

      I’d still rather have a 993!

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      You’re on to something here.

      I test drove a 991 Carerra S back to back with a 981 Boxster S. I liked the Boxster more.

      My 90k would go towards:
      – a lightly used 981 Boxster S
      – a lightly used Aprilia Tuono
      – a sport pilot certificate
      – put the rest in an investment

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The question is whether you’d rather have a Carrera S configured with some other guy’s choice of colors and options or a plain Carrera configured your way. Either answer is valid.

      • 0 avatar
        ImAbeFroman

        I can assure you that choosing paint and interior color would be less interesting than purchasing a well-specced used example. GTS models have all the desirable options as standard unless the original buyer was dumb enough to select “no-cost” options (ex: full Alcantara delete).
        When I buy a new 911 it’s not going to be a base car. People can sit and nitpick but the Porsche configurator has some very neat stuff in it (for a price).
        Ask yourself “how fun would it be dropping $90K and seeing dozens of blank buttons across the cockpit on the daily?”.
        That said it seems the base 991.2 is a powerhouse and the loaded S/4S models possess more legally unusable performance than I’d want.
        AWD adds something to a 911 unlike other cars: all weather all year high performance. On a 997.2 I prefer the AWD body and it doesn’t take anything away from the car.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          “AWD adds something to a 911 unlike other cars: all weather all year high performance.”

          Are you really going to drive your new 911 in the snow and rain? That’s beater weather.

          And AWD does take something away: 1) lightness and 2) entertaining RWD dynamics. Imperturbable computer-assisted grip no matter the throttle level is the right thing for a luxury sedan, and it may be necessary for very high-power sports cars. It’s not the right thing at all for a sports car with manageable power.

          • 0 avatar
            ImAbeFroman

            Rain? Heck yeah. Snow? Here in TN we get 10-12″ over approx 5-10 random days of snow annually. But we do have plenty of 50-75 degree days and summers in the upper 90s.
            911s are made to be used everyday. The new AWD system is 0-100% FWD but it’s mostly 95% rear. Not like slapping xDrive on a 3-series.
            There is also a trick to disable the front axle. Still haven’t addressed the wide body. That’s my biggest draw.
            Either way (2S/4S/6M/PDK) it’s hard to go wrong or sacrifice anything on the 997.2/991/991.2. There were some lame duck models pre-2005 IMO.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            I’ve seen a couple 911s with winter tires ripping around the city on snowy days. At least one was a RWD though. That guy looked like he was having fun.

            My father’s doctor drives an AWD 911 year-round as well. I’m sure he uses winter tires on that.

            If you’ve got the money, why not? You can drive something else on days where ground clearance would be an issue, and during spring rust-and-pothole season.

          • 0 avatar
            Zarf

            997.2 C2S owner (bought used). I was just this morning trying to decide when I want to put on my snow tires. If there is less that 3 inches of snow I love taking it out. We drive it all year round and put 14K miles on it this year.

          • 0 avatar
            Nostrathomas

            I drove my 964 C2 for an entire winter season (I live in Canada, so it’s real winter too). With winter tires, and the engine sitting right over the rear wheels, it was actually quite capable and stable…much more so than a RWD truck or something like a Mustang.

            The thing that stopped me from driving it in winter, and would prevent me from driving a new 911 in the winter, is not the car itself. It’s other drivers on the road. It’s just too easy for someone to slide into you at an intersection. That and the rock/salt on the roads just beat up the car.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I’m sure the cars (even RWD) are very capable in the winter with the right tires. I just couldn’t convince myself to expose the car to weather damage. If I were to buy something as expensive and finicky as a 911 for myself, it would be with the intent of keeping it much longer than the 5 or 6 years I usually keep cars. Enjoying it only in dry weather, and keeping it secure in the garage the rest of the time, would help keep it in the condition I’d want. And in that use case AWD is a negative. The wider body does nothing for me and everything else is a minus.

            Now, on the other hand, my wife also loves 911s and would love to have one as a daily driver later in life, when 1) the kids are gone and 2) we’re magically rich enough for that to make financial sense. If I bought one for her, it would definitely be a PDK Carrera 4. She doesn’t like open-top driving so no need for the Targa.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      It’s kind of like the Miata – the biggest problem with buying a new one is that there are so many lightly used ones for half the price out there.

  • avatar
    Chan

    The 911’s options list is basically lease fodder.

    $120k for a Carrera S is a much more difficult pill to swallow than a $1300 lease payment.

    Non-exotic sports and luxury cars depreciate like rocks–the best 911 is a base model with one or two sporty options like the Sport Chrono package and some wheels.

    Oh wait, that’s like $6000 right there.

  • avatar
    TybeeJim

    Don’t you find it interesting that Prius “operators” are reading about a a base Porsche? Wonder why that would be The case.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • cimarron typeR: Interesting that the prndl gear display for auto is the exact as our 81 Corolla wagon growing up....
  • 28-Cars-Later: Should I review the MY14 Cadillac SRX I drove a drunk girl home in last night? :D
  • EBFlex: “ You lost it, and most of us, when you tried to convince us that the “F Series” wasn’t a ford pick-up.” I...
  • mopar4wd: I don’t think the dealers want these. Local Acura dealer got a new bright red A-spec TLX in and...
  • slavuta: We had FWD like this, no turbo. So much plastic in the cabin…. And rust, rust, rust…

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber