By on September 29, 2016

toyota-c-hr-2016-3-4-Front-Night-Static-FULL_tcm-11-746020

Toyota first showed off its funky C-HR small crossover at the Geneva Motor Show earlier this year, but it waited until Paris to reveal the model’s powertrain lineup.

Unlike its Nissan Juke competitor, don’t expect a high-performance C-HR when the model bows in 2017. At least, not just yet.

While the C-HR is poised to leap into the competitive subcompact crossover market, Toyota has stayed fairly tight-lipped about the model, which first appeared as a Scion-badged concept vehicle in North America.

Thanks to Carscoops, we now know that the C-HR will bow with three engine choices, one of them certainly not bound for North America. The big news is the C-HR will bring a hybrid option to the growing vehicle segment.

A 1.8-liter four-cylinder mated to an electric motor produces a combined 120 horsepower, and can be had with front- or all-wheel drive. The crossover’s 1.2-liter turbocharged gas engine makes 114 hp, but don’t expect to see that Euro-friendly mill offered on this continent.

Topping the range is a 2.0-liter four-cylinder serving up 142 hp, offered with a continuously variable transmission. That engine is available to select markets, though it’s a shoe-in for North America. These power numbers are European figures, so output could change somewhat when it arrives stateside. When that will be is anyone’s guess, as Toyota hasn’t announced when we’ll see the C-HR land in dealer lots.

There’s a possibility of a hotter C-HR sometime in the future. The vehicle’s chief engineer, Hiroyuki Koba, wants a performance variant to compete with the Nissan Juke Nismo. So far, Toyota executives haven’t signed off on the idea.

[Image: Toyota Motor Corporation]

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34 Comments on “Toyota C-HR Powertrain Details Revealed in Paris...”


  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Mighty Morphin’ Metal Muskrat

  • avatar
    maxxcool7421

    120 hp ? out of 1800cc ? WITH a electric motor ? …. it better get 40pmh WITH 3 passengers.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      Considering that typical Rav4 Hybrid is averaging 33mpg and the typical 2016 Prius is averaging 56mpg on fuelly, I’d guess that the Prius drivetrain in the C-HR will pretty easily net 45mpg (and not just on flat highways with the cruise set at 55mph).

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        120hp out of a 1.8?

        So … *an underpowered Corolla*?

        (Well, okay, presumably more low-end torque, but still…
        AWD is nice.

        Too bad it’s kinda ghastly, like most Toyota products this generation, with the bug-eyes.)

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Man, who pissed in that thing’s Cheerios?

  • avatar
    make_light

    Hmm Honda has the CR-V and HR-V, and now Toyota comes up with a C-HR? That is quite possibly the stupidest, most confusing name they could have given it. And Toyota styling is just a joke at this point. The “updated” Corolla looks like an insect, this is ugly and bloated looking, and the new Prius doesn’t even look like it was styled, it’s just an incoherent mess of lines. And this is coming from someone who typically appreciates “different” cars. It’s almost as if Toyota is screwing with us at this point- seeing how ugly they can make their vehicles and still get people to purchase them.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Yeah, makes no sense. The 1.8 in the Corolla makes 130-something HP without any electric motor behind it.

  • avatar
    B_C_R

    So this slots below the space where the RAV-4 used to sit? This is about the size of the first gen RAV, which pretty much invented this segment.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      RAV-4 or CR-V

      Which was first or were they about equal?

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        I have nothing to add regarding which was first, but I will say this: the first and probably second-gen RAV4 are arguably subcompact CUVs, but the CR-V has always been a compact and in fact has nearly the same dimensions now as it did 20 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      RAV4 and CRV didn’t invented this segment. Lada Niva was first CUV and went into production circa 1979

      • 0 avatar
        B_C_R

        Because Nivas were so common as urban runabouts all over the world right? If we’re going down that road, then wouldn’t the Suzuki Samurai/Jimmy count too? Those have been around since 1970! Honestly, the RAV-4 is in a very different league of crossover than a Niva or a Samurai as the RAV was based on a Corolla with some Celica All-Trac GT-4 drivetrain bits thrown in. It was a pretty clever bit of packaging that changed the automotive landscape forever.

        APaGttH, the RAV-4 hit the Japanese market just before the CR-V did. Speaking of the CR-V, I inherited a first gen CR-V last year. For a vehicle that was nearly 20 years old, it felt practically new. I quickly found a new appreciation for Honda build quality, so much so that I ended up buying a Honda Crosstour. The Crosstour being nearly as freakish as the first gen RAV-4. :P

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          Great comment, segment expertise and uncontaminated by CUV-hate.

          Please hang out here.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          I think Slavuta is refering to the fact that the Niva was a unibody compact sedan based platform (ie not BOF truck derived), with a on-road fulltime 4wd system (with locking center diff and low range), and in general rode very close to a regular comfortable car rather than a stiffly sprung solid-axle jeep.

          So there’s a bit of merit to the statement, but wholly irrelevant within the context of the US market, where I would infact give credit to the Rav4 and especially the CRV a year later (more passenger space) with kicking things off. The 4 door trackers/Vitaras before that were solidly in the “small trucklet” category with BOF construction, worse on road refinement and passenger comfort (BOF, part time t-cases, weaker motors, worse NVH).

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          B_C_R

          if lets say, we in America, in the next 10 years, will build 150mph train, it doesn’t mean we invented it.

          Whatever you said is a hogwash. Niva was a car unibody, lifted off the ground, 4wd, rides like a car – 1st CUV. Done.

          • 0 avatar
            B_C_R

            The difference in design philosophies between the Niva and the RAV-4 are the polar opposite of each other.

            The Niva is a rugged unibody ute drives and acts more like a truck.

            The RAV-4 is a car that looks like a truck, but drives like a car.

            The Niva certainly has its own place in history, that being a very rugged and budget minded ute capable of tackling rural roads and farms alike. The RAV obviously designed for inclement weather in urban landscapes where this segment of vehicle has shown tremendous growth in sales over the years.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            B_C_R

            I am strongly disagree with you. Conceptually, Niva and RAV4 are identical. With the difference of the purpose. Here is where you’re correct – RAV4 was looking like a truck but acting like a car because it never meant to be farmer’s mobile – 4Runner would do that. But Niva was purposed for dirt roads. Hence the major difference is in suspensions of these two and therefore they act differently – true. But conceptually, they are the same, Niva being first CUV

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            B-C-R, have you ever ridden in a Niva? It is definitely closer to a car (namely the Lada from which it is derived) than a truck, especially within the context of the era when a traditional 4×4 was a UAZ 469 that would shake your soul out of your body on uneven roads. Again, for the 1970s, a unibody car-derived trucklet with a full-time 4wd system that could be driven on paved roads with a smooth all-coil suspension (independent in the front) was very innovative indeed.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The Kia Niro can’t arrive soon enough.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      I unfortunately see precious little ergonomic, ride height or sightline differences between the Niro and Sportage. More than anything, the photos of the Niro resemble a 10 year-old Rio5.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I like a car like this. And for a moment I thought, “give me this 2L with manual and I take it”. But then I remembered how Toyota clutch and manual shifter feel – oh well. TBD, likely NOT. If hot version arrives by that time, I’ll look at it.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Whose tastes are the new TMC’s being styled for? Can we get them an eye exam? I am not normally over sensitive to a vehicles style or design elements, more focused on driveline, suspension and interior comfort/utility, but … NO. Please; stop buying new Toyota’s until they fire whoever is doing this.

    If it were just the stupid scoops and grill, fine, it’s a prototype. But those headlights, side creases and TAIL LIGHTS are going to be there for as long as it takes for dead sales #’s to make a difference. They’re dropping Prius hybrids to deny the restyle is killing sales, the designer must be very important to get this much cover. NOTHING that looks like this will sell well. Put those stupid design elements on a Supra, and it will gather dust in the corner of the dealership.

  • avatar
    StarAZ

    The photo reminds of that dude in gym who skips leg day lol


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